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Encyclopedia > Los Angeles Rams
St. Louis Rams

The St. Louis Rams are a National Football League team based in St. Louis, Missouri.

Founded: 1937
Formerly known as: Cleveland Rams (1937-1945), Los Angeles Rams (1946-1994; in Los Angeles 1946-1978.
Home stadium: Edward Jones Dome
Uniform colors: Navy Blue and Gold
Helmet design: Golden ram horns on a navy blue background
League championships won: 1945, 1951, 1999: once in three of the four cities in which they have played
Super Bowl appearances: XIV (lost), XXXIV (won), XXXVI (lost)
Head Coach: Mike Martz

In 1999 and 2001, the Rams reached the Super Bowl with an explosive offense (nicknamed "The Greatest Show on Turf") led by league MVP Kurt Warner and Offensive Player of the Year Marshall Faulk. In the latter year, the explosive Rams offense was complemented by an equally high-ranked defense. During this period, the Rams were also noted for a colorful celebration conducted by their offensive players in the end zone after scoring a touchdown; the celebration, known as the "Bob and Weave," was eventually banned by the commissioner's office, along with all other "prolonged and premeditated" displays of this sort.


Franchise history

On January 30, 2000, the St. Louis Rams defeated the Tennessee Titans in the Super Bowl, on the heels of a 1999 regular season which saw them win 13 out of 16 games. Injured starting quarterback Trent Green was replaced by former Iowa Barnstormers Arena Football League star Kurt Warner, who led the team to its first winning season since moving from L.A. (and, indeed, the franchise's first such campaign since 1990).


In the 2000 regular season, the Rams finished 10-6, losing the National Football Conference's Western Division title on tie-breakers to the New Orleans Saints (who had also won ten games); the Rams went on to lose to the Saints in the first round of the playoffs, for which they did qualify as a wild card. In 2001, the Rams went 14-2 (including a spectacular 8-0 on the road) and again reached the Super Bowl, this time losing to the New England Patriots on Adam Vinatieri's last-second field goal.


In 2002, the Rams disappointed with a 7-9 final record (after starting out 0-5), but uncovered a future superstar in the person of Marc Bulger, who filled in for injured quarterback Kurt Warner and won every game in which he both started and finished. The 2003 Rams had a regular-season record of 12-4 and won their division once again, but lost to the Carolina Panthers in the second round of the playoffs after having earned a bye in the first round.


In June 2004, Warner was released by the Rams and signed a free agent contract with the New York Giants, leaving the starting quarterback job to Bulger.


In January 2005, the Rams became the first team in NFL history without a winning record in the regular season to win a playoff game.


Players of note

Pro Football Hall of Famers:

Current stars:


Retired numbers:

Not to be forgotten:

St. Louis Rams official web site (http://www.stlouisrams.com/)

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  Results from FactBites:
 
St. Louis Rams - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3693 words)
The Rams entered the NFL in 1937 and were placed in the Western division to replace the recently failed St.
To accommodate the Rams' move, the ballpark was reconfigured and enclosed to accommodate crowds of 65,000 for football.
In the 1982, the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum was occupied by the erstwhile Oakland Raiders.
Los Angeles Rams (1946-1994) (4243 words)
The Rams were still hobbling, and facing one of the greatest teams in NFL history, but they would have at least one advantage, and that would be the crowd, with game being played at the Rose Bowl in the Los Angels suburb of Pasadena.
After a loss dropped the Rams to 1-5, they returned to the Coliseum for the first time in 3 years to face the Raiders who were playing their first season in Los Angeles.
Shortly after the Rams got the ok to move to St. Louis, the city of Los Angeles would be rocked again when the Raiders moved back to Oakland leaving the 2nd largest television market without an NFL team.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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