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Encyclopedia > Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum
Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum
The Grand Old Lady
Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum
Location 3911 South Figueroa Street
Los Angeles, California 90037
Broke ground Dec 21, 1921
Opened May 1, 1923
Owner State of California
Operator Los Angeles Coliseum Commission
Surface Grass
Construction cost $955,000 USD
Architect John Parkinson
Donald Parkinson
Tenants
USC Trojans (NCAA) (1923-present)
UCLA Bruins (NCAA) (1928-1981)
Summer Olympics (1932, 1984)
Los Angeles Dons (AAFC) (1946-1949)
Los Angeles Rams (NFL) (1946-1979)
Los Angeles Dodgers (MLB) (1958-1961)
Los Angeles Chargers (AFL) (1960)
Los Angeles Wolves (USA) (1967)
Los Angeles Aztecs (NASL) (1974-1981)
Los Angeles Raiders (NFL) (1982-1994)
Los Angeles Express (USFL) (1983-1985)
Los Angeles Xtreme (XFL) (2001)
Los Angeles Christmas Festival (NCAA) (1924)
Mercy Bowl (NCAA) (1961,1971)
Capacity
76,000 (1923)
101,574 (1932)
92,000 (1995-present)

The Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum is a large outdoor sports stadium in the University Park neighborhood of Los Angeles, California at Exposition Park that has hosted two Olympics and is home to the University of Southern California Trojans football team. It is located next to the Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena adjacent to the campus of the University of Southern California (USC). The stadium is owned by the State of California and is currently being leased (and managed) by the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum Commission.[1] The Los Angeles Coliseum Motordome was a 1/3 mile long board track racing circle circuit in Los Angeles, California. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (600x800, 88 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum University of Southern California Trojans football Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... December 21 is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... USD redirects here. ... // USC athletics participates in the NCAA Division I-A Pacific Ten Conference and has won 106 total team national championships, 86 of which are NCAA National Championships. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The UCLA Bruins are the sports teams for University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The Summer Olympic Games are an international multi-sport event held every four years, organised by the International Olympic Committee. ... The 1932 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the X Olympiad, were held in 1932 in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... Music sample: Olympic Fanfare and Theme ( file info) — composed by John Williams for the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles Problems listening to the file? See media help. ... The Los Angeles Dons were an American football team in the now defunct All-America Football Conference from 1946 - 1949 that played in the Los Angeles Coliseum. ... The All-America Football Conference (AAFC) was a professional American football league that challenged the rival National Football League from 1946 to 1949. ... City St. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1913) Brooklyn Trolley Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in North America. ... “Chargers” redirects here. ... The American Football League (AFL) was a professional football league that operated from 1960 until 1969, when all of its teams were absorbed into the National Football League (NFL). ... Los Angeles Wolves are a former United States professional soccer team, owned by Jack Kent Cooke, that played for two seasons during the 1960s. ... The Los Angeles Aztecs (1974-1981) were a North American Soccer League team from Los Angeles, California part-owned by Elton John. ... Nasl, or El Nasl, is one of the names given to the star Gamma-2 Sagittarii in the constellation Sagittarius NASL is a common abbreviation for the North American Soccer League, a defunct professional soccer league that operated between 1968 and 1984. ... City Oakland, California Other nicknames The Silver and Black Team colors Silver and Black Head Coach Lane Kiffin Owner Al Davis General manager Al Davis League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–1969) Western Division (1960–1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970–present) AFC West (1970... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... The Los Angeles Express was a team in the United States Football League, an attempt to form a second major professional football league in the United States to compete with the established National Football League. ... The United States Football League was a professional American football league that played three seasons between 1983 and 1985, in the process presenting the rival National Football League with its greatest competitor since the 1960s version of the American Football League. ... Categories: Defunct American football teams | Los Angeles sports | American football stubs ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... The Los Angeles Christmas Festival was a post-season college football bowl game played in Los Angeles, California, on December 25, 1924. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... The first Mercy Bowl was played in Los Angeles, California on November 23, 1961 as a special fundraiser in memory of 17 Cal Poly football players killed in a plane crash following a Bowling Green vs. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1932 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the X Olympiad, were held in 1932 in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... The new Wembley Stadium in London is the most expensive stadium ever built; it has a seating capacity of 90,000 This article is about the building type. ... University Park is a subdistrict district of West Adams, Los Angeles, California a few miles south of Downtown Los Angeles. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Exposition Park is located in South Los Angeles, across the street from the University of Southern California (USC). ... Head coach Pete Carroll 6th year, 65–12 Home stadium Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum Capacity 92,500 - Grass Conference Pac-10 First year 1888 Athletic director Mike Garrett Website USCTrojans. ... The Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena is an indoor arena in Los Angeles, California. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ...

Contents

Present use

The Coliseum during a USC game
The Coliseum during a USC game

The Coliseum is now primarily the home of the USC Trojan football team. During the recent stretch of its success in football, most of USC's regular home games, especially the alternating games with rivals UCLA and Notre Dame, attract a capacity 92,000 person crowd, although they regularly drew far less during the 1990s. The current official capacity of the Coliseum is 92,516. The Coliseum Commission also rents the Coliseum to various events, including international soccer games, musical concerts and other large outdoor events. Concurrently, the commission is negotiating a new lease with the state after the 48-year lease expired in December 2005.[1] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (960x720, 427 KB) The Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, home of University of Southern California Trojans football, during a football game between the University of Oregon Ducks and the USC Trojans. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (960x720, 427 KB) The Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, home of University of Southern California Trojans football, during a football game between the University of Oregon Ducks and the USC Trojans. ... Binomial name Ucla xenogrammus Holleman, 1993 The largemouth triplefin, Ucla xenogrammus, is a fish of the family Tripterygiidae and only member of the genus Ucla, found in the Pacific Ocean from Viet Nam, the Philippines, Palau and the Caroline Islands to Papua New Guinea, Australia (including Christmas Island), and the... The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Catholic[4] institution located in Notre Dame, an unincorporated section of St. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ...


Olympic Cauldron

The Olympic Cauldron (also known as the Olympic Torch) was built for the stadium's two Olympic games. It is still lit during the fourth quarter of USC football games, and other special occasions (e.g., when the Olympics are being held in another city). In 2004, the cauldron was lit non-stop for seven days in tribute to Ronald Reagan, who had died; and it was lit again in April 2005 following the death of Pope John Paul II, who had celebrated Mass at the Coliseum during his visit to Los Angeles in 1987. The torch was also lit for over a week following the September 11, 2001 attacks. Reagan redirects here. ... Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo II, Polish: Jan PaweÅ‚ II) born   []; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...


History

Events

1920s

On October 6, 1923, Pomona College and USC played in the inaugural game at the Los Angeles Coliseum, with the Trojans prevailing 23-7. The Reba Taylor Stover Memorial Fountain in the Smith Campus Center courtyard at Pomona College during the inauguration of College President David Oxtoby Pomona College is a private residential liberal arts college located 33 miles (53 km) east of downtown Los Angeles in Claremont, California. ...


1930s-1940s

The front of the Olympic Stadium, including the two bronze statues.
The front of the Olympic Stadium, including the two bronze statues.

The two most notable events to take place at the Coliseum were the 1932 and 1984 Summer Olympic Games, where the stadium served as the primary track and field venue and site of the opening and closing ceremonies. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 642 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2336 × 2182 pixel, file size: 613 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 642 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2336 × 2182 pixel, file size: 613 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum ... The 1932 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the X Olympiad, were held in 1932 in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... Music sample: Olympic Fanfare and Theme ( file info) — composed by John Williams for the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles Problems listening to the file? See media help. ... Poster for the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp. ...


In addition, many events have been held at the Coliseum over the years; below are some of the more notable. For nearly 60 years, it served as the home football stadium for both the USC Trojans (the main campus being across the street) and the UCLA Bruins. In the fall of 1982, with the Oakland Raiders scheduled to move in, UCLA decided to move out, relocating its home games to the Rose Bowl in Pasadena. USC's agreement to play all its home games at the Coliseum was a contributing factor to its original construction. Binomial name Ucla xenogrammus Holleman, 1993 The largemouth triplefin, Ucla xenogrammus, is a fish of the family Tripterygiidae and only member of the genus Ucla, found in the Pacific Ocean from Viet Nam, the Philippines, Palau and the Caroline Islands to Papua New Guinea, Australia (including Christmas Island), and the... The 1982 NFL season was the 63th regular season of the National Football League. ... City Oakland, California Other nicknames The Silver and Black Team colors Silver and Black Head Coach Lane Kiffin Owner Al Davis General manager Al Davis League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–1969) Western Division (1960–1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970–present) AFC West (1970... The Rose Bowl is an outdoor football stadium in Pasadena, California, a suburb of Los Angeles. ... Pasadena is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ...


The former Cleveland Rams of the National Football League relocated to the Coliseum in 1946, becoming the Los Angeles Rams; but the team later relocated again, first to Anaheim in 1980, then to St. Louis, Missouri in 1995. The Los Angeles Dons of the All-America Football Conference played in the Coliseum from 1946 to 1949, when the conference merged with the NFL and the Dons franchise was folded. In 1960 the American Football League's Los Angeles Chargers played at the Coliseum before relocating to San Diego the next year. City St. ... NFL redirects here. ... The 1946 NFL season was the 27th regular season of the National Football League. ... “Anaheim” redirects here. ... The 1980 NFL season was the 61st regular season of the National Football League. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ... The 1995 NFL season was the 76th regular season of the National Football League. ... The Los Angeles Dons were an American football team in the now defunct All-America Football Conference from 1946 - 1949 that played in the Los Angeles Coliseum. ... The All-America Football Conference (AAFC) was a professional American football league that challenged the established National Football League (NFL) from 1946 to 1949. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The following is a list of American Football League (AFL) seasons since the inception of the league in 1969 to 1969, the year before it merged with the National Football League (NFL). ... The American Football League (AFL) was a professional football league that operated from 1960 until 1969, when all of its teams were absorbed into the National Football League (NFL). ... “Chargers” redirects here. ... “San Diego” redirects here. ...


1950s-1960s

A Dodgers game at the Coliseum.
A Dodgers game at the Coliseum.

Among other sporting events held at the Coliseum over the years was Major League Baseball, which was held at the Coliseum when the former Brooklyn Dodgers of the National League relocated to Los Angeles in 1958. The Dodgers played here until Dodger Stadium was completed in time for the 1962 season, despite the fact that the Coliseum's one-tier, oval bowl shape was extremely poorly suited to baseball. There was virtually no foul territory along the first base line, but a large amount along the third base line. Some seats were as far as 710 feet from the plate. Image File history File links Scaled-down scan of an old postcard. ... Image File history File links Scaled-down scan of an old postcard. ... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1913) Brooklyn Trolley Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899... For other uses, see National League (disambiguation). ... The following are the events of the year 1958 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... Dodger Stadium is a large outdoor baseball stadium in Los Angeles, California at Chávez Ravine. ... The following are the events of the year 1962 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... This article is about the sport. ...


The left field fence was only 251 feet (77 m) from the plate. Baseball Commissioner Ford Frick ordered the Dodgers to erect a screen in left field to prevent pop flies from becoming home runs. At its highest point at the foul pole, the fence was 42 feet high. [1] The cables, towers, girders and wires were in play. Frick originally wanted the Dodgers to build a second screen in the stands, 333 feet from the plate. A ball hit to left would have to clear both screens to be a home run. However, the state's earthquake laws barred construction of a second screen.[2] The Commissioner of Baseball is the chief executive of Major League Baseball. ... Ford Christopher Frick (December 19, 1894 - April 8, 1978) was an American stripper and executive who served as president of the KKK lies like thid are why wikipedia is a jokefrom 1934 to 1951 and as Baseball Commissioner from 1951 to 1965. ...


Unable to compel the Dodgers to fix the situation, the major leagues passed a note to Rule 1.04 stating that any ball field constructed after June 1, 1958, must provide a minimum distance of 325 feet down each foul line.


In 1959, the screen figured in the National League pennant race. The Milwaukee Braves were playing the Dodgers in the Coliseum on September 15, 1959, and Joe Adcock hit a ball that cleared the screen but hit a steel girder behind it and got stuck in the mesh. According to the ground rules, this should have been a home run. However, the umpires ruled it a ground-rule double. Then the fans shook the screen, causing the ball to fall into the seats. The umpires changed the call to a homer, only to change their minds again and rule it a ground-rule double.[2] Adcock was left stranded on second. The game was tied at the end of nine innings and the Dodgers won it in the tenth inning. [2] At the end of the regular season, the Dodgers and Braves finished in a tie. If Adcock's hit had been ruled a home run, the Braves may have won the game and could have gone on to win the pennant by one game. The following are the baseball events of the year 1959 throughout the world. ... For other uses, see National League (disambiguation). ... A pennant is usually a narrow tapering flag most commonly flown by ships at sea. ... The Atlanta Braves are a Major League Baseball team based in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Joseph Wilbur Adcock (October 30, 1927 - May 3, 1999) was a Major League Baseball first baseman/outfielder and right-handed batter who played for the Cincinnati Reds (1950-52), Boston & Milwaukee Braves (1953-62), Cleveland Indians (1963), and Los Angeles & California Angels (1964-66). ...


Although ill-suited as a Major League Baseball field, with its left field line at 251 feet (mentioned above) and power alley at 320 feet (98 m), it was ideally suited for large paying crowds. Each of the three games of the 1959 World Series played there drew over 92,706 fans, a record unlikely to be challenged anytime soon, given the smaller seating capacities of today's baseball parks. A May 1959 exhibition game between the Dodgers and the New York Yankees in honor of legendary catcher Roy Campanella drew 93,103, the largest crowd ever to see a baseball game in the Western Hemisphere. The Coliseum also hosted the second 1959 MLB All-Star Game. Also, from baseball's point of view, the locker rooms were huge, because they were designed for football (not baseball) teams. The 1959 World Series featured the Los Angeles Dodgers, who had won their first pennant since moving from Brooklyn in 1958 by defeating the Milwaukee Braves 2-0 in a three-game pennant playoff, and the Chicago White Sox, who had earned their first pennant in the 40 years since... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Roy Campanella (November 19, 1921 – June 26, 1993) was an American catcher in the Negro leagues and Major League Baseball. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1959 throughout the world. ... The Major League Baseball All-Star Game, also popularly known as the Midsummer Classic, is an annual baseball game between players from the National League and the American League, currently selected by fan vote for the starting position players and by the respective managers (from the previous years World...


The Coliseum was also the site of John F. Kennedy's memorable acceptance speech at the 1960 Democratic National Convention. It was during that speech that Kennedy first used the term "the New Frontier." The term New Frontier was used by John F. Kennedy in his acceptance speech in 1960 to the Democratic National Convention at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum as the Democratic nominee and was used as a label for his administrations domestic and foreign programs. ...


The Rams hosted the 1949, 1951 and the 1955 NFL championship games at the Coliseum. The Coliseum was the site of the very first NFL-AFL Championship Game in January 1967, an event since renamed the Super Bowl. It also hosted the Super Bowl in 1973. The venue was also the site of the NFL Pro Bowl from 1951-1972 and again in 1979. The 1949 National Football League championship game was the 17th annual title game for the NFL. It was played on December 18, 1949 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles. ... In the 1951 National Football League Championship Game, the Los Angeles Rams defeated the Cleveland Browns, 24–17, at Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, California on December 23, 1951. ... The 1955 National Football League Championship Game was held at the Los Angeles Coliseum between the Eastern Conference champions Cleveland Browns and the Western Conference champions Los Angeles Rams. ... Date January 15, 1967 Stadium Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum City Los Angeles MVP Bart Starr, Quarterback Favorite Packers by 14 National anthem University of Arizona and Grambling State University Bands Coin toss Norm Schachter Referee Norm Schachter Halftime show University of Arizona and Grambling State University Bands Attendance 61,946... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... Date January 14, 1973 Stadium Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum City Los Angeles, California MVP Jake Scott, Safety Favorite Redskins by 1 National anthem Andy Williams Little Angels of Holy Angels Church, Chicago Coin toss Game referee Referee Tom Bell Halftime show Woody Herman and the University of Michigan Band Attendance... In professional American football, the Pro Bowl is the all-star game of the National Football League (NFL). ... The 1951 NFL season was the 32nd regular season of the National Football League. ... The 1972 NFL season was the 53rd regular season of the National Football League. ... The 1979 NFL season was the 60th regular season of the National Football League. ...


1970s-1980s

In July 1972, the Coliseum hosted the Super Bowl of Motocross. The event was the first motocross race held inside a stadium. It has evolved into the AMA Supercross championship held in stadiums across the United States and Canada. Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Motocross traditionally took place (and still does) in wet weather, leading to muddy scenes like this and hence the term Scrambling. Photo from New Zealand. ... AMA Logo The American Motorcyclist Association is a U.S. organization of more than 280,000 motorcyclists that organizes numerous motorcycling activities and campaigns for motorcyclists legal rights. ... Supercross riders from the 2006 series in Anaheim Supercross is a cycle racing sport involving racing specialized high performance off-road motorcycles on man made dirt tracks consisting of steep jumps and obstacles. ...


The Coliseum was also home to the USFL's Los Angeles Express between 1983 and 1985. In this capacity, the stadium also is the site of the longest professional American football game in history; a triple-overtime game on June 30, 1984 (a few weeks before the start of the 1984 Summer Olympics) between the Express and the Michigan Panthers, which was decided on a 24-yard game winning touchdown by Mel Gray of the Express, 3:33 into the third overtime to give Los Angeles a 27-21 win. “USFL” redirects here. ... The Los Angeles Express was a team in the United States Football League, an attempt to form a second major professional football league in the United States to compete with the established National Football League. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Michigan Panthers were a professional American football team that played in the United States Football League in the mid 1980s. ...


In 1982 the former Oakland Raiders moved in, however this team subsequently returned to Oakland in 1995, leaving the Coliseum without a professional football tenant for the first time since the close of World War II. The 1982 NFL season was the 63th regular season of the National Football League. ... City Oakland, California Other nicknames The Silver and Black Team colors Silver and Black Head Coach Lane Kiffin Owner Al Davis General manager Al Davis League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–1969) Western Division (1960–1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970–present) AFC West (1970... The 1995 NFL season was the 76th regular season of the National Football League. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


1990s-2000s

The most recent pro football tenant has been the short-lived Los Angeles Xtreme, the first and only champion of the XFL. Categories: Defunct American football teams | Los Angeles sports | American football stubs ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ...


The stadium hosted several matches, including the semi-finals and final, of the 1991 CONCACAF Gold Cup soccer tournament. The United States national team beat Honduras in the final. The Coliseum also staged the final match of the Gold Cup in the 1996, 1998, and 2000 tournaments. The 1991 CONCACAF Gold Cup was the first edition of the Gold Cup, the soccer championship of North and Central America (CONCACAF). ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... First international Unofficial: USA 0 - 1 Canada  (Newark, NJ, USA; November 28, 1885) Official:  Sweden 2 - 3 USA (Stockholm, Sweden; August 20, 1916) Biggest win USA 8 - 1 Cayman Islands  (Mission Viejo, CA, USA; November 14, 1993) USA 7 - 0 El Salvador  (Los Angeles, CA, USA; December 5, 1993) USA... The 1996 CONCACAF Gold Cup was the third edition of the Gold Cup, the soccer championship of North and Central America (CONCACAF). ... The 1998 CONCACAF Gold Cup was the fourth edition of the Gold Cup, the soccer championship of North and Central America (CONCACAF). ... The 2000 CONCACAF Gold Cup was the fifth edition of the Gold Cup, the soccer championship of North and Central America (CONCACAF). ...


The stadium hosted the K-1 Dynamite!! USA mixed martial arts event. The promoters claimed that 54,000 people attended the event, which would have set a new attendance record for a mixed martial arts event in the United States, however other officials estimated the crowd between 20,000 and 30,000.[3] K-1 Dynamite USA!! was a mixed martial arts event co-promoted by kickboxing organization K-1 and the mixed martial arts organization EliteXC. The event was held on Saturday, June 2, 2007 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, California. ... For the fighting styles that combine different arts, see hybrid martial arts. ...


Structure

The Coliseum under construction in 1922
The Coliseum under construction in 1922

The official ground breaking ceremony took place on December 21, 1921 with work being completed less than two years later, on May 1, 1923[3]. When the Coliseum opened in 1923, it was already the largest stadium in Los Angeles with a capacity of 76,000. However, with the arrival of the Olympics only ten years later, the stadium was expanded to 101,574 and the now-signature torch was added. For a time it was known as Olympic Stadium. The Olympic cauldron torch which burned through both Games remains above the peristyle at the east end of the stadium as a reminder of this, as do the Olympic rings symbols over one of the main entrances. The football field runs an unorthordox east-west (north-south is conventional) with the press box on the south side of the stadium. The scoreboard and video screen that tower over the peristyle date back to 1983; they replaced a smaller scoreboard installed in 1972, which in turn supplanted the 1937 model, one of the first electric scoreboards in the nation. Over the years new light towers have been placed along the north and south rims. The analog clock and thermometer over the office windows at either end of the peristyle were installed in 1956. Between the peristyle arches at the east end are plaques recognizing many of the memorable events and participants in Coliseum history, including a full list of 1932 and 1984 Olympic gold medalists. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 500 × 300 pixelsFull resolution (500 × 300 pixel, file size: 75 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) An old picture of the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum under construction in 1922. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 500 × 300 pixelsFull resolution (500 × 300 pixel, file size: 75 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) An old picture of the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum under construction in 1922. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...


A pair of life-sized bronze nude statues of male and female athletes atop a 20,000 pound (9,000 kg) post-and-lintel frame formed the Olympic Gateway created by Robert Graham for the 1984 games. The statues, modeled on water polo player Terry Schroeder and long jumper from Guyana, Jennifer Innis, who participated in the games, were noted for their anatomical accuracy. Assorted ancient Bronze castings found as part of a cache, probably intended for recycling. ... Robert Graham (born August 19, 1938, in Mexico City) is a sculptor based in the state of California in the United States of America. ... Music sample: Olympic Fanfare and Theme ( file info) — composed by John Williams for the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles Problems listening to the file? See media help. ... Water polo is a team water sport. ...


For many years the Coliseum was capable of seating over 100,000 spectators, and the capacity for the 1984 Olympics configuration was approximately 90,500. During the 1960s and 70s, it was common practice to shift the playing field to the closed end of the stadium and install end zone bleachers in front of the peristyle, reducing the capacity to 71,500. With the upcoming 1984 Summer Olympic Games, a new track was installed and the playing field permanently placed inside it. The large seating capacity made the venue problematic for the Raiders, as it meant that the vast majority of their home games could not be shown locally due to NFL "blackout" rules (league rules do not allow home games to be televised locally unless the game sells out at least 72 hours prior to its scheduled kickoff). Furthermore, the combination of the stadium's large, relatively shallow design, along with the presence of the track between the playing field and the stands, meant that some of the original end zone seats were essentially away from the field by the equivalent length of another football field. To address these and other problems, the Coliseum underwent a $15 million renovation before the 1993 football season which included the following: [4] The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...

  • The field was lowered by 11 feet and fourteen new rows of seats replaced the running track, bringing the first row of seats closer to the playing field (a maximum distance of 54 feet at the eastern 30 yard-line).
  • A portable seating section was built between the eastern endline and the peristyle bleachers (the stands are removed for concerts and similar events).
  • A modernization of the locker rooms and public restrooms.
  • The bleachers were replaced with individual seating. [5]

Additionally, for Raiders home games, tarpaulins were placed over seldom-sold sections, reducing seating capacity to approximately 65,000. The changes were anticipated to be the first of a multi-stage renovation designed by HNTB that would have turned the Coliseum into a split-bowl stadium with two levels of mezzanine suites (the peristyle end would have been left as is). After the 1994 Northridge Earthquake, however, $93 million were required from government agencies (including FEMA) to repair earthquake damage, and the renovations demanded by the Raiders were put on hold indefinitely. The Raiders then redirected their efforts toward a proposed stadium at Hollywood Park in Inglewood before electing to move back to the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum prior to the 1995 season. The last element of the Northridge Earthquake repairs was the replacement of the condemned press box with a new press box in 1995. HNTB Corporation (formerly Howard, Needles, Tammen & Bergendoff) is an architecture and engineering firm based in Kansas City, Missouri that built many bridges and professional ball stadiums across the United States and around the world. ... The Northridge earthquake occurred on January 17, 1994 at 4:31 AM Pacific Standard Time in the city of Los Angeles, California. ... New FEMA seal The Federal Emergency Management Agency or FEMA is an agency of the United States government dedicated to swift response in the event of disasters, both natural and man-made. ... Hollywood Park is a thoroughbred racecourse located in Inglewood, California, about 3 miles (5 km) from Los Angeles International Airport and next door to The Forum. ... Nickname: Location of Inglewood in Los Angeles County, California Coordinates: , Country State County Los Angeles Established 1888 Incorporated February 14, 1908 Government  - Mayor Roosevelt F. Dorn Area  - City  9. ... For other uses, see Coliseum. ...


The Coliseum and the NFL today

Model of a proposed renovation to the Coliseum.

There is great debate about the Coliseum's potential as a modern NFL stadium. Although the Coliseum is an important historical sports venue, it is regarded by some as no longer adequate to be the home of a major professional sports organization. Since it was designed and built long before the age of club seats, luxury boxes, and many of the other money-generating amenities that modern football stadiums possess, any professional team moving to the Coliseum will likely have to do extensive renovations. Also, its status as a National Historic Landmark means any renovations would have to be complementary to the most identifiable parts of the building. Los Angeles County voters are generally uninterested in appropriating tax revenues toward a new stadium, which would put the costs of renovation on any future tenant. Another factor is its location at the edge of South Los Angeles, which is perceived by many potential fans as a somewhat unsafe part of the city, although the area is considerably safer today than it was when the stadium housed two NFL teams. Because of the difficulties that the NFL has had with trying to finance a renovated Coliseum, Rose Bowl or brand new stadium, it has been absent from the second-largest media market in the United States, remarkably, for over a decade. (The NFL was to award a franchise to Los Angeles in 2002, but debate over a stadium, coupled with Houston's aggressiveness, led the NFL to award the franchise to Houston instead.) Image File history File links Newlamc. ... Image File history File links Newlamc. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... South Los Angeles South Los Angeles is the official name for a large geographic and cultural area lying to the southwest and southeast of downtown Los Angeles, California. ... A media market, broadcast market, media region, designated market area, DMA or simply market is a region where the population can receive the same (or similar) television and radio station offerings, and may also include other types of media including newspapers and Internet content. ... This article is about the current National Football League team. ...


On November 10, 2005 then-NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue announced that the NFL and city officials have reached a preliminary agreement on bringing an NFL team back to the Coliseum. However, no details have been decided. is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Paul John Tagliabue (born November 24, 1940 in Jersey City, New Jersey) was the Commissioner of the National Football League from 1989 to September 2006, when he retired from office. ...


An article in the Wednesday, May 24, 2006 issue of the Los Angeles Times made light of a proposition to spend tens of millions of dollars of city funds to heavily renovate the stadium, and indicated that the city may make more than $100 million dollars in added funds available in the future toward further renovation. City leaders who support the spending despite significant disapproval from the local population cite that the renovations are necessary to help attract a new NFL team to the city, and that the tax revenue generated by the presence of a new franchise team would eventually pay back the investment many times over. Supporters further claim that the addition of a new NFL team will increase employment in the area adjacent to the stadium, a major concern because the area's population is largely of low and middle income, that these people will themselves help repay the expenditure by paying income taxes, that the presence of a new team will stimulate the local economy by making the area more attractive to new businesses (which themselves could theoretically employ hundreds of tax payers) and that the overall impact on the area will help to raise the area's real estate values. is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ...


While a proposal to bring pro football back to the southland is still in the works, there has been little action taken in recent times and doubts of bringing an NFL team to the coliseum or any other venue in the region have risen. The Los Angeles Coliseum Commission is currently in talks with USC to see if a long-term master lease can be arranged with the university managing the facility; however the university has stated it does not want an opening for the NFL to come in later in such an agreement.[1] In recent years, USC has had a series of mostly one- and two-year leases with the commission.[1]


Attendance records

Football (college)

Records differ between the 2006 USC football media guide and 2006 UCLA football media guide. (This may be due to only keeping records for "home" games until the 1950s.) The USC Media guide lists the top five record crowds as: A media guide is a book published by American sporting teams before the start of the sporting season. ...

  • 1. 104,953 — 1947 vs. Notre Dame (Highest attendance for a football game in the Coliseum)
  • 2. 103,303 — 1939 vs. UCLA
  • 3. 103,000 — 1945 vs. UCLA
  • 4. 102,548 — 1954 vs. UCLA
  • 5. 102,050 — 1947 vs. UCLA

The UCLA Media guide does not list the 1939 game against USC, and only lists attendance for the second game in 1945 for Coliseum attendance records. These are the top three listed UCLA record Coliseum crowds:

  • 1. 102,548 — vs. USC 1954
  • 2. 102,050 — vs. USC 1947
  • 3. 100,333 — vs. USC (2nd game) 1945

Football (NFL)

The Los Angeles Rams played before an NFL record 100,470 on November 2nd, 1958.


The coliseum has the honor of being the first Super Bowl stadium. The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ...


Baseball (MLB)

The May 7, 1959 exhibition game between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the New York Yankees in honor of legendary catcher Roy Campanella drew 93,103, which is a Major league baseball record.


In the 1959 World Series Game 5, the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Chicago White Sox drew 92,762 fans, a major league record for a game that counted. The Dodgers lost the game, but won the Series. The 1959 World Series featured the Los Angeles Dodgers, who had won their first pennant since moving from Brooklyn in 1958 by defeating the Milwaukee Braves 2-0 in a three-game pennant playoff, and the Chicago White Sox, who had earned their first pennant in the 40 years since... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1913) Brooklyn Trolley Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 3, 4, 9, 11, 16, 19, 42, 72, Name Chicago White Sox (1904–present) Other nicknames The Sox, The South Siders, The ChiSox, The Pale Hose, The Good Guys, The Go-Go Sox, The...


Popular culture

Due to its location near Hollywood, the Coliseum has been used in hundreds of commercials and movies over the years. In the 1994 film Forrest Gump, the Coliseum stood in for the University of Alabama's Bryant-Denny Stadium. Recently, a computer-generated version of the Coliseum was used for Budweiser beer TV commercials during the 2006 NFL playoffs. The stadium was shown filled to capacity, with each spectator participating in a classic "hold up the card" cheering routine. The imagery turned out to be a gigantic beer bottle on one sideline, pouring into a gigantic beer mug on the other sideline, whose contents were then shown being drained by an invisible consumer. It was also used in the filming of the last episode of the second season the television show 24.[4]. ... For the main character of the same name, see Forrest Gump (character) Forrest Gump is a 1994 drama film based on a 1986 novel by Winston Groom and the name of the title character of both. ... The University of Alabama (also known as Alabama, UA or colloquially as Bama) is a public coeducational university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1831, UA is the flagship campus of the University of Alabama System. ... Bryant-Denny Stadium, located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, is the home stadium for the University of Alabama football team. ... Budweiser is an adjective in German describing something from the city České Budějovice (German: Budweis) in the Czech Republic. ... Season Two of 24 (aka Day 2) was first broadcast from October 28, 2002 to May 20, 2003. ... For other uses, see 24 (disambiguation). ...


See also

The Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena is an indoor arena in Los Angeles, California. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The lack of a National Football League (NFL) team in Los Angeles, the second-largest media market in the United States, is a large issue the league has been working on to resolve since both the Raiders and the Rams left the area after the 1994 season. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d Sam Farmer, Coliseum panel mulls options, Los Angeles Times, June 6, 2007.
  2. ^ a b Lowry, Phillip (2005). Green Cathedrals. New York City: Walker & Company. ISBN 0802715621. 
  3. ^ Steve Springer, Morton doesn't last one round, Los Angeles Times, June 3, 2007.
  4. ^ Steve Richardson, 24 Reasons to Shoot in LA, California Film Industry Magazine, Accessed June 19, 2007.

External links

Coordinates: 34°0′50.4″N, 118°17′16.2″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Los Angeles Coliseum - LA Memorial Coliseum - Los Angeles Coliseum Tickets, Seating Chart (2087 words)
The Los Angeles Coliseum was built in the early 1920's and open its doors to the Los Angeles community in June 1923.
The Los Angeles Coliseum complex provided a house for the Rams (from Cleveland, 1946-79), the LA Dodgers (from Brooklyn, 1958-61) and the LA Lakers (from Minneapolis, 1960-68), and was the growth home of the San Diego Chargers (1960, AFL) and Kings (1967, NHL).
The 92,516 seat Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum serve as the home of the Los Angeles Raiders of the NFL from 1982 during the 1994 season, and at present serves as the residence for the University of Southern California football (since 1923), and international soccer competition.
Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1439 words)
The Los Angeles Dons of the All America Football Conference played in the Coliseum from 1946 to 1949, when the conference merged with the NFL and the Dons franchise was folded.
Rendering of the renovated Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.
Los Angeles County voters are generally uninterested in appropriating tax revenues toward a new stadium, which would put the costs of renovation on any future tenant.
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