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Encyclopedia > Lorraine (region)
Région Lorraine
(Région flag) (Region logo)
Location
Administration
Capital Metz
Regional President Jean-Pierre Masseret
(PS) (since 2004)
Departments Meurthe-et-Moselle
Meuse
Moselle
Vosges
Arrondissements 19
Cantons 157
Communes 2,337
Statistics
Land area1 23,547 km²
Population (Ranked 11th)
 - January 1, 2006 est. 2,339,000
 - March 8, 1999 census 2,310,376
 - Density (2006) 99/km²
1 French Land Register data, which exclude lakes, ponds, and glaciers larger than 1 km² (0.386 sq. mi. or 247 acres) as well as the estuaries of rivers
Nancy - Place Stanislas - Arc de triomphe

Lorraine (German: Lothringen) is one of the 26 régions of France. Its two main cities are Metz (administrative capital) and Nancy (historical capital). The region's name is derived from the medieval Lotharingia. Image File history File links Description: Flag of Lorraine Source: modified by me, originally uploaded to EN by author, self-made by author Date: 2005 Author: User:Neutrality Permission: Public domain Other versions of this file: - File links The following pages link to this file: Lorraine ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... -1... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Si paix dedans, paix dehors (French: If peace inside, peace outside) Cathedral St. ... In France, the president of the regional council (French: Président du conseil régional) is the elected official who heads the conseil régional of a région, a state-level territory. ... The Socialist Party (Parti Socialiste, PS) is one of the largest political parties in France. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Departments (French: IPA: ) are administrative units of France and many former French colonies, roughly analogous to English counties. ... Meurthe-et-Moselle is a département in the northeast of France named after the Meurthe and Moselle rivers. ... Meuse is a département in northeast France, named after the Meuse River. ... Moselle is a département in the northeast of France named after the Moselle River. ... Vosges is a French department, named after the Vosges mountain range. ... The 100 French departments are divided into 342 arrondissements, which may be translated into English as districts. ... The cantons of France are administrative divisions subdividing arrondissements and départements. ... Map of the 36,568 communes of metropolitan France. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here areas between 10,000 km² and 100,000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ... // The following are ranked lists of French régions. ... Rio de la Plata estuary Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Estuaries An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Place Stanislas Nancy/France Selbst fotografiert von user:Enslin Am 1. ... Image File history File links Place Stanislas Nancy/France Selbst fotografiert von user:Enslin Am 1. ... Nancy (IPA pronounciation ; archaic German: ; Luxembourgish: Nanzeg) is a city and commune in the Lorraine région of northeastern France. ... France is divided into 26 régions: 21 of these are in the continental part of metropolitan France, one is Corse on the island of Corsica (although strictly speaking Corse is in fact a territorial collectivity, not a région, but is referred to as a région in common... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Si paix dedans, paix dehors (French: If peace inside, peace outside) Cathedral St. ... Nancy (IPA pronounciation ; archaic German: ; Luxembourgish: Nanzeg) is a city and commune in the Lorraine région of northeastern France. ... Lotharingia (yellow), as established by the Treaty of Verdun, 843, and reduced by the Treaty of Mersen, 870 Lotharingia was a short-lived kingdom in western Europe, the aggregate of territories belonging to Lothair, King of Lotharingia (reigned 855–869), who received it in 855 from his father, Lothair I...

Contents

Administrative history

It is important to note that the current région of Lorraine is larger than the historical duchy of Lorraine which gradually came under French sovereignty between 1737 and 1766. The modern région includes provinces and areas that were historically separate from the duchy of Lorraine proper. These are: It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Lorraine (province). ... Events 12 February — The San Carlo, the oldest working opera house in Europe, is inaugurated. ... 1766 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Kingdom of France was organized into provinces until March 4, 1790, when the establishment of the département system superseded provinces. ...

Some people consider that the traditional province of Lorraine is limited to the duchy of Lorraine proper, while other people consider that it includes Barrois and the Three Bishoprics. This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... The Three Bishoprics (French: Trois-Évêchés) were a province of pre-Revolutionary France. ... The extent of the Holy Roman Empire in c. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... Lorraine coat of arms location of the Lorraine province Lorraine (French: Lorraine; German: Lothringen) is a historical area in present-day northeast France. ...


The Three Bishoprics were non-contiguous territories around Metz, Verdun, and Toul which were detached from the Holy Roman Empire in the 16th century and came under French sovereignty. City flag City coat of arms Motto: Si paix dedans, paix dehors (French: If peace inside, peace outside) Cathedral St. ... Verdun (German: Wirten, official name before 1970 Verdun-sur-Meuse) is a city and commune in the Lorraine région, northeast France, in the Meuse département, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... Cathédrale Saint-Étienne de Toul Toul is a historic fortified town of France, a sous-préfecture of the Meurthe-et-Moselle département. ... The extent of the Holy Roman Empire in c. ...


The case of Barrois is the most complicated: the western part of Barrois (west of the Meuse River), known as Barrois mouvant, was detached from the rest of Barrois in the early 14th century and passed under French sovereignty. On the other hand, the largest part of Barrois (east of the Meuse River) was a duchy (Duchy of Bar) part of the Holy Roman Empire and united with the duchy of Lorraine in the 15th century by the marriage of the Duke of Bar, René I of Naples, with the daughter of the Duke of Lorraine, Isabella. Thus the duchies of Bar and Lorraine were united under the same duke, although formally they kept separate existence until their incorporation into France in 1766. The Meuse (Maas) at Maastricht Meuse near Grave The Meuse (Dutch & German Maas) is a major European river, rising in France and flowing through Belgium and the Netherlands before draining into the North Sea. ... In the middle of the 10th century, the territory of Bar (Barrois) formed a dependency of the Holy Roman Empire. ... The extent of the Holy Roman Empire in c. ... René dAnjou, René I of Naples (René I the Good, French Le bon roi René) (January 16, 1409 – July 10, 1480), was Duke of Anjou, Count of Provence (1434–1480), Count of Piedmont, Duke of Bar (1430–1480), Duke of Lorraine (1431–1453), King of Naples (1438–1442; titular... Isabella (1400 - February 28, 1453) was Duchess of Lorraine from 1431 to her death. ... 1766 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


When the French régions were created in the middle of the 20th century, it was decided to gather Barrois, Three Bishoprics, and Lorraine proper into a single region. Barrois was too small to become a région in its own right, while the Three Bishoprics were a territory without any real unity. It was decided to call the région "Lorraine" only, with no mention of Barrois, the Three Bishoprics, or any of the small principalities formerly part of the Holy Roman Empire. The extent of the Holy Roman Empire in c. ...


Lothringia experienced great prosperity during the 12th and 13th centuries under the Hohenstaufen Emperors, but this prosperity was terminated in the 14th century by a series of harsh winters, bad harvests, and the Black Death. During the Renaissance, prosperity returned to Lothringia under Habsburg administration, until the Thirty Years' War devastated large parts of southern Germany. Most of Elsaß was ceded to France at the Peace of Westphalia in 1648, which marked its start, along with Alsace, as a contested territory between France and Germany (French-German enmity).In which from 1871 until 1918 a large part of the region was part of the German Empire as the Imperial Province Elsaß-Lothringen. Arms of the Hohenstaufen Dynasty The Hohenstaufen (or the Staufer(s)) were a dynasty of Kings of Germany, many of whom were also crowned Holy Roman Emperor and Dukes of Swabia. ... It has been suggested that Plague doctor be merged into this article or section. ... The Renaissance (French for rebirth, or Rinascimento in Italian), was a cultural movement in Italy (and in Europe in general) that began in the late Middle Ages, and spanned roughly the 14th through the 17th century. ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Ratification of the Treaty of Münster The Peace of Westphalia refers to the pair of treaties (the Treaty of Münster and the Treaty of Osnabrück) signed in October and May 1648 which ended both the Thirty Years War and the Eighty Years War. ... (New région flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Bas-Rhin Haut-Rhin Arrondissements 13 Cantons 75 Communes 903 Statistics Land area1 8,280 km² Population (Ranked 14th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Motto Gott mit Uns (German: God with us”) Anthem Heil dir im Siegerkranz (unofficial) Territory of the German Empire in 1914, prior to World War I Capital Berlin Language(s) Official: German Unofficial minority languages: Danish, French, Frisian, Polish, Sorbian Government Constitutional monarchy Emperor  - 1871–1888 William I  - 1888 Frederick... Imperial Province of Elsaß-Lothringen Alsace-Lorraine (German: ) was a territorial entity created by the German Empire in 1871 after the annexation of most of Alsace and parts of Lorraine in the Franco-Prussian War. ...


Geography

Chajoux Valley

Lorraine is the only French region to have borders with three other countries: Belgium (Wallonia), Luxembourg, and Germany (Saar, Rhineland-Palatinate). It also borders the French regions of Franche-Comté, Alsace, and Champagne-Ardenne. The location of Lorraine led to it being seen as a strategic asset and as the crossroads of four nations, it had a very important role in European affairs. Many rivers run through Lorraine, including the Rhine, Moselle, Meurthe, and Meuse. Download high resolution version (951x569, 118 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (951x569, 118 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wallonia (French: Wallonie, German: Wallonien, Walloon: Walonreye, Dutch: Wallonië) or the Walloon Region (French: Région Wallonne, Dutch: Waals Gewest) is the predominantly French-speaking region that constitutes one of the three federal regions of Belgium, with its capital at Namur. ... With an area of 2570 km² and 1. ... The Rhenish Palatinate (Rheinpfalz, sometimes Lower Palatinate or Niederpfalz) occupies rather more than a quarter of the German Bundesland (federal state) of Rhineland-Palatinate (Rheinland-Pfalz) and contains the towns of Ludwigshafen, Kaiserslautern, Neustadt an der Weinstrasse, Pirmasens, Landau and Speyer. ... (Region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Besançon Regional President Raymond Forni (PS) (since 2004) Departments Doubs Haute-Saône Jura Territoire de Belfort Arrondissements 8 Cantons 116 Communes 1,786 Statistics Land area1 16,202 km² Population (Ranked 20th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... Capital Châlons-en-Champagne Land area¹ 25,606 km² Regional President Jean-Paul Bachy (PS) (since 2004) Population  - Jan. ... It has been suggested that River Rhine Pollution: November 1986 be merged into this article or section. ... Moselle is a département in the northeast of France named after the Moselle River. ... Meurthe is a former département of France. ... Meuse is a département in northeast France, named after the Meuse River. ...


Culture

Nancy - Place Stanislas - Fountain of Neptune

Most of Lorraine has a clear French identity. For this reason, Bismarck only annexed about a third of today's Lorraine to the German Empire following the Franco-Prussian War. The disputed third, known as Moselle, had a culture not easily classifiable as either French or German, possessing both Romance and Germanic dialects. Like many border regions, Lorraine was a patchwork of ethnicities and dialects, sometimes not even mutually intelligible with either French or German.[citation needed] Image File history File links From German Wikipedia File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links From German Wikipedia File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Nancy (IPA pronounciation ; archaic German: ; Luxembourgish: Nanzeg) is a city and commune in the Lorraine région of northeastern France. ... Combatants Second French Empire North German Confederation allied with south German states (later German Empire) Commanders Napoleon III Otto Von Bismarck, Helmuth von Moltke the Elder Strength 400,000 at the beginning of the war 1,200,000 Casualties 150,000 dead or wounded 284,000 captured 350,000 civilian... Moselle is a département in the northeast of France named after the Moselle River. ... The Romance languages (sometimes referred to as Romanic languages) are a branch of the Indo-European language family, comprising all the languages that descend from Latin, the language of the Roman Empire. ...


Despite the French government's 'single language' policy, the local Germanic dialect still survives in the northern part of the region. It is known as Lorraine Franconian in English, francique or platt (lorrain) in French (not to be confused with lorrain, the Romance dialect spoken in the region). This is distinct from the neighbouring Alsatian language, although the two are often confused. Neither has any form of official recognition. Lorraine Franconian is a Germanic dialect spoken in parts of the French region of Lorraine. ... Lorrain is a language spoken by a minority of people in Lorraine in France and in Gaume in Belgium. ... This inscription in Alsatian on a window in Eguisheim, Alsace, reads: Dis Hausz sted in Godes Hand - God bewar es vor Feyru (This house stands in Gods hand - God beware it for fire) Alsatian (French Alsacien, German Elsässisch) is a Low Alemannic German dialect spoken in Alsace, a...


Like most of France's regional languages (such as Breton, Provençal and Alsatian) Lorraine Franconian is being largely replaced by French since the advent of mandatory public schooling in the 19th and 20th centuries. There are a number of languages of France. ... Breton (Brezhoneg) is a Celtic language spoken by some of the inhabitants of Brittany (Breizh) in France. ... Provençal (Provençau) is one of several dialects of Occitan spoken by a minority of people in southern France and other areas of France and Italy. ... This inscription in Alsatian on a window in Eguisheim, Alsace, reads: Dis Hausz sted in Godes Hand - God bewar es vor Feyru (This house stands in Gods hand - God beware it for fire) Alsatian (French Alsacien, German Elsässisch) is a Low Alemannic German dialect spoken in Alsace, a...


Cross of Lorraine

Cross of Lorraine

During World War II, the cross was adopted as the official symbol of the Free French Forces (French: Forces Françaises Libres, or FFL) under Charles de Gaulle. Image File history File links Croix_de_Lorraine. ... Image File history File links Croix_de_Lorraine. ... Free French Forces under review during the Battle of Normandy. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The capitaine de corvette Thierry d'Argenlieu suggested the adoption of the Cross of Lorraine as the symbol of the Free French, both to recall the perseverance of Joan of Arc (whose symbol it had been), and as an answer to the Hakenkreuz. Cross of Lorraine The Cross of Lorraine, ‡, is a heraldic cross. ... Joan of Arc, also known as Jeanne dArc,[1] (1412 - May 30, 1431)[2] is a 15th century national heroine of France. ... The swastika is a cross with its arms 90° to either right or left. ...


In his General Order n° 2 of 3 July 1940, vice-admiral Émile Muselier, then chief of the naval and air forces of the Free French for only two days, created the bow flag displaying the French colours with a red Cross of Lorraine, and a cocarde also featuring the Cross of Lorraine.


Appropriately, de Gaulle is memorialised by a gigantic 43-meter high Cross of Lorraine at his home village of Colombey-les-Deux-Églises.


The cross was also carried on the fuselages of aircraft flying on behalf of the Forces Aériennes Françaises Libres (FAFL) from 1940 to 1943 to distinguish them from the aircraft of the Vichy French air force, which continued to sport the traditional roundels of the French Air Force (Armée de l'Air), dating from World War I. The French Air Force is the air force branch of the French Armed Forces. ...


The Cross of Lorraine was later adopted by Gaullist movements such as the Rally for the Republic (RPR). The Rally for the Republic, also known by its French acronym RPR (Rassemblement pour la République), was a French political party. ...


Cuisine

The use of the potato in Lorraine can be traced back to 1665 and it is used in various traditional dishes of the region such as the potée lorraine. The Breux potato, which takes its name from the village of Breux in the north of the Meuse, is considered to be excellent by experts due to the perfect conditions of the area. Smoked bacon is also a traditional ingredient of the cuisine of Lorraine. It is used in various traditional dishes of the region, including the famous Quiche Lorraine. The mirabelle plum of Lorraine is the emblematic fruit of Lorraine. It is used in pies and other desserts, as well as in alcoholic beverages. Image File history File links Quiche_Lorraine. ... Image File history File links Quiche_Lorraine. ... This page is about the food; for the Native American people, see Quiché. Mediterranean quiche In cooking, a quiche is a pie made primarily of eggs and cream in a pastry crust. ... Binomial name Solanum tuberosum L. The potato (Solanum tuberosum) is a perennial plant of the Solanaceae, or nightshade, family, commonly grown for its starchy tuber. ... There are communes that have the name Breux in France: Breux (Meuse), in the Meuse département Related Breux-Jouy, in the Essonne département Breux-sur-Avre, in the Eure département This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share... This page is about the food; for the Native American people, see Quiché. Mediterranean quiche In cooking, a quiche is a pie made primarily of eggs and cream in a pastry crust. ... The Mirabelle Plum, also known as the Mirabelle Prune, is the edible drupaceous fruit of the Mirabelle Prune Tree, a cultivar of the Prune Tree. ... Functional group of an alcohol molecule. ...


Traditional dishes in the region include:

  • Quiche Lorraine
  • Pâté lorrain (chopped pork and veal flavoured with white wine and baked in puff pastry)
  • Potée lorraine (a stew of smoked meats and sausages, with cabbage and root vegetables)
  • Andouille (tripe sausage)

This page is about the food; for the Native American people, see Quiché. Mediterranean quiche In cooking, a quiche is a pie made primarily of eggs and cream in a pastry crust. ...

Beverages

  • Wine The most well-known wine of the region is the pinot noir of Toul. There are vineyards in the valley of the Moselle, the valley of Seille, the valley of Metz, and the valley of Sierck.
  • Beer Historically, Lorraine was the location of many breweries, including the Champigneulles, Vézelise, Tantonville, Ligny-In-Barrois, Uckange, and Metz.

Today, these breweries have closed down, but there are still breweries operating in the region, including Les Brasseurs de Lorraine in Pont-à-Mousson. Pinot noir is a red wine grape variety of the species Vitis vinifera. ... Cathédrale Saint-Étienne de Toul Toul is a historic fortified town of France, a sous-préfecture of the Meurthe-et-Moselle département. ... The Seille (pronunciation: ) is a river in the French région of Lorraine, originating near Azoudange, in the département of Moselle. ...


Economy

With 44 billion euros, Lorraine generates 3.4% of France's GDP, and ranks 8th out of the 22 regions of France.[citation needed] The logistics and service sectors have experienced the strongest growth in recent years while the traditional industries (textiles, mining, metallurgy) have experienced a decline and consequently the region has experienced a major difficulty with a rising unemployment rate that is near the national average. “EUR” redirects here. ... Look up Logistics in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the type of fabric. ... Chuquicamata, the largest open pit copper mine in the world, Chile. ... Metallurgy is a domain of materials science and of materials engineering that studies the physical and chemical behavior of metallic elements, their intermetallic compounds, and their mixtures, which are called alloys. ...

Lorraine France
GDP 2000 44.3 Billion Euros 1.816 Trillion Euros
Agriculture 2.5% 2.8%
Industry 30.7% 25.6%
Service 66.8% 71.6%
Unemployment June 2002 8.4% 9%

Major communities

Épinal is a commune of northeastern France, préfecture (capital) of the Vosges département. ... Centre Centre Forbach is a town and commune, in the Moselle département, in France. ... Lunéville is a commune in the French région of Lorraine. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Si paix dedans, paix dehors (French: If peace inside, peace outside) Cathedral St. ... Montigny-lès-Metz is a commune in the département of Moselle and the Lorraine region of France. ... Nancy (IPA pronounciation ; archaic German: ; Luxembourgish: Nanzeg) is a city and commune in the Lorraine région of northeastern France. ... Saint-Dié-des-Vosges, commonly referred to as Saint-Dié, is a commune of northeastern France. ... Sarreguemines (German Saargemünd) is a town and commune in the Moselle département, in Lorraine, northeastern France. ... Thionville (German: , Luxembourgish: Diedennuewen), is a town and commune in the Moselle département, in the Lorraine région, France. ... Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy is a French commune, situated in the Meurthe-et-Moselle département in the Lorraine. ... Verdun (German: Wirten, official name before 1970 Verdun-sur-Meuse) is a city and commune in the Lorraine région, northeast France, in the Meuse département, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ...

Fauna and regional Flora

Fauna

Type species Felis lynx Linnaeus, 1758 The overall range of Lynx species. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Binomial name Sus scrofa Linnaeus, 1758 The Wild Boar (Sus scrofa) is the wild ancestor of the domesticated pig. ...

Flora

This article is about the box tree. ... Look up charm in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Milk thistle flowerhead Thistledown a method of seed dispersal by wind. ... Species About 35; see text. ... Distribution Species See List of Acer species Maples are trees or shrubs in the genus Acer. ... Classes Psilotopsida Equisetopsida Marattiopsida Pteridopsida (Polypodiopsida) this dnt make sense A fern is any one of a group of about 20,000 species of plants classified in the phylum or division Pteridophyta, also known as Filicophyta. ... Species See text European Ash in flower Narrow-leafed Ash (Fraxinus angustifolia) shoot with leaves Closeup of European Ash seeds 19th century illustration of Manna Ash (Fraxinus ornus) An ash can be any of four different tree genera from four very distinct families (see end of page for disambiguation), but... // Species See list. ... Species Fagus crenata - Japanese Beech Fagus engleriana - Chinese Beech Fagus grandifolia - American Beech Fagus hayatae - Taiwan Beech Fagus japonica - Japanese Blue Beech Fagus longipetiolata - South Chinese Beech Fagus lucida - Shining Beech Fagus mexicana - Mexican Beech or Haya Fagus orientalis - Oriental Beech Fagus sylvatica - European Beech Beech (Fagus) is a genus... Categories: Stub | Fruit ... Binomial name Convallaria majalis Lily of the valley is a flowering plant of the Convallaria genus. ... Binomial name L. Bilberry is a name given to several species of low-growing shrubs in the genus Vaccinium (family Ericaceae) that bear tasty fruits. ...

Notable Inhabitants of Lorraine

Art and Literature

from Polish wiki from web site declaration of GNU Free Documentation License source::http://www. ... from Polish wiki from web site declaration of GNU Free Documentation License source::http://www. ... Les misères de la guerre Jacques Callot (c. ... Year 1592 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Events February 10 - The Académie française in Paris is expanded to become a national academy for the artistic elite. ... 1600 was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Events March 11 – Chelsea hospital for soldiers is founded in England May 6 - Louis XIV of France moves his court to Versailles. ... Émile Erckmann (20 May 1822 — 14 March 1899) was a French writer, strongly associated with the region of Alsace-Lorraine. ... 1822 (MDCCCXXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Alexandre Chatrian (18 December 1826 — 3 September 1890) was a French writer, strongly associated with the region of Alsace-Lorraine. ... The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar). ... Paul Verlaine illustrated in the frontispiece of , 1902 Paul Marie Verlaine (March 30, 1844 – January 8, 1896) is considered one of the greatest and most popular of French poets. ... Jan. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... Émile Gallé in 1889 Émile Gallé (Nancy, 8 May 1846 – Nancy, September 23, 1904) was a French artist who worked in glass, and is considered to be one of the major forces in the French Art Nouveau movement. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... Jules Bastien-Lepage (November 1, 1848 - November 10, 1884), French painter, was born in the village of Damvillers, Meuse and spent his childhood there. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Eugène Vallin (Herbéviller, 1856 - Nancy, 1922) was a French furniture designer and manufacturer, as well as an architect. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... David Émile Durkheim (April 15, 1858 - November 15, 1917) is known as the founder of modern sociology. ... 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... no ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lucien Weissenburger (Nancy, 2 May 1860 – Nancy, 24 February 1929), was a French architect. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Émile Friant (Dieuze, 1863 - Nancy 1932) was a French painter. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... François-Émile André (Nancy, 1871 - Nancy, 1933), was a French architect, artist, and furniture designer. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Jean-Marie Straub was born in France in 1933. ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... Bernard-Marie Koltès (born 9 April 1948 in Metz, died 1989 in Paris) was a French playwright and director. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ...

Economy and Industry

Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

Military

Download high resolution version (596x800, 129 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (596x800, 129 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Joan of Arc, also known as Jeanne dArc,[1] (1412 - May 30, 1431)[2] is a 15th century national heroine of France. ... Events End of the reign of Emperor Go-Komatsu of Japan. ... Events February 21 - The trial of Joan of Arc March 3 - Eugenius IV becomes Pope May 30 - In Rouen, France, 19-year old Joan of Arc is burned at the stake. ... Georges Mouton, count of Lobau (February 21, 1770 - November 21, 1838) was a Marshal of France born in Pfalzburg, Lorraine who enlisted in the French army in 1792. ... Battle of Chesma, by Ivan Aivazovsky. ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... Year 1828 (MDCCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Louis Hubert Gonzalve Lyautey (1854 - 1934), made Marshal of France in 1921, was the first French Resident-General in Morocco from 1912 to 1925. ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Musicians, actors and comedians

Florent Schmitt (September 28, 1870, Blamont, Meurthe et Moselle – August 17, 1958 Neuilly-sur-Seine) was a French composer. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Darry Cowl, born André Darricau in Vittel, (27 August 1925 - 14 February 2006) was a French musician and actor. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Patricia Kaas Patricia Kaas (born December 5, 1966 in Forbach, France) is a French singer and actress. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ...

Politicians

Public domain image from http://www. ... Public domain image from http://www. ... Comte Pierre Louis Roederer (February 15, 1754 - December 17, 1835) was a French politician and economist, politically active in the era of the French Revolution and First French Republic. ... 1754 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Jules Ferry, French statesman Jules François Camille Ferry (April 5, 1832 – March 17, 1893) was a French statesman. ... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Raymond Poincaré, President of the French Republic during the Great War. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Maurice Barrès (September 22, 1862 - December 4, 1923), French novelist, politician, radical conservative and anti-semite was born at Charmes-sur-Moselle (Vosges). ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Albert Lebrun (August 29, 1871 - March 6, 1950) was a French politician, President of France from 1932 to 1940, and as such was the last president of the Third Republic. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jack Lang in Belém (Brazil) Jack Mathieu Emile Lang (born 2 September 1939) is a French politician and a member of the French Socialist Party. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Religion

Leo IX, born Bruno of Eguisheim-Dagsburg (June 21, 1002 – April 19, 1054) was Pope from February 12, 1049 to his death. ... Events November 13 - English king Ethelred gives order to kill all Danes in England, leading to the St. ... Events Cardinal Humbertus, a representative of Pope Leo IX, and Michael Cerularius, Patriarch of Constantinople, decree each others excommunication. ... Henri Grégoire Henri Grégoire (December 4, 1750-May 20, 1831), generally known in French as abbé Grégoire, was a French Roman Catholic priest and revolutionary leader and constitutional bishop of Blois. ... Events March 2 - Small earthquake in London, England April 4 - Small earthquake in Warrington, England August 23 - Small earthquake in Spalding, England September 30 - Small earthquake in Northampton, England November 16 – Westminster Bridge officially opened Jonas Hanway is the first Englishman to use an umbrella James Gray reveals her sex... Leopold I 1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...

Sciences

Charles Messier Charles Messier (June 26, 1730 – April 12, 1817) was a French astronomer who in 1774 published a catalogue of 45 deep sky objects such as nebulae and star clusters. ... Events Pope Clement XII elected September 17 - Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Ahmed III (1703-1730) to Mahmud I (1730-1754) Anna Ivanova (Anna I of Russia) became czarina Births April 16 - Henry Clinton, British general (d. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Jean-François Pilâtre de Rozier (baptised 30 March 1754 in Metz, died 15 June 1785 in Wimereux/Pas-de-Calais) was a French chemistry and physics teacher, and one of the first pioneers of aviation. ... 1757 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Jean-Victor Poncelet (July 1, 1788 - December 22, 1867) was a mathematician and engineer who did much to revive projective geometry. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Charles Hermite (pronounced in IPA, , or phonetically air-meet) (December 24, 1822 - January 14, 1901) was a French mathematician who did research on number theory, quadratic forms, invariant theory, orthogonal polynomials, elliptic functions, and algebra. ... 1822 (MDCCCXXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Edmond Nicolas Laguerre (April 9, 1834 - August 14, 1886) was French mathematician who was born in Bar-le-Duc France and died in Bar-le-Duc France. ... Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Jules TuPac Henri Poincaré (April 29, 1854 – July 17, 1912) (IPA: [][1]) was one of Frances greatest mathematicians and theoretical physicists, and a philosopher of science. ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Marie Marvingt (February 20, 1875 – December 14, 1963) was a world-class athlete who won numerous awards in swimming, fencing, shooting, ski jumping, ice skating, and bobsledding. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Louis Camille Maillard (February 4, 1878 - May 12, 1936) was a French physician and chemist. ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Hubert Curien (1924-February 6, 2005) was a French physicist and a key figure in European science politics, as both the President of CERN (1994-1996) and the first chairman of the European Space Agency (ESA) (1981-1984). ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Sport

Michel François Platini (born June 21, 1955) is a French former football manager and midfielder, and now president of UEFA, the Union of European Football Associations. ...

Divers

  • Antoine de Ville
  • Raymond Schwartz (1894-1973)

1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1973 Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

  • Côtes de Toul

Côtes de Toul is a French wine produced in the département of Meurthe-et-Moselle in the Lorraine région. ...

External links

  • Lorraine regional council website
  • Pictures of Lorraine region and Vosges


Coordinates: 49°00′N, 6°00′E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
French region of Lorraine 13,Lorraine France,Reference&maps, (525 words)
The Leuci and Mediomatrici tribes settled in Lorraine long before it came under Roman rule in the 1st century B.C. For the next several centuries Lorraine was a part of the Belgium Province of the Roman Empire.
In 1871, France lost the departement of Moselle, and the region of Alsace, to the Prussians.
Today, the region of Lorraine is poised as a major European crossroads, replete with a wonderful blend of French and German cultures, friendly people, and a beautiful countryside.
Lorraine, France (554 words)
The present-day region of Lorraine, with its capital Nancy, lies in eastern France in the valleys of the upper Meuse and the Moselle, bounded on the west by Champagne and on the east by the Vosges and extending northward to the Ardennes and southward to the Langres plateau.
In 959 the duchies of Upper and Lower Lorraine (Lotharingia) were created, the latter, with its capital at Nancy, becoming known as Lorraine tout court.
After the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-1871 a large part of Lorraine, mainly German-speaking, including in particular Metz and the surrounding area, was incorporated in the newly established German Empire, becoming part of the province of Alsace- Lorraine.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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