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Encyclopedia > Lord of the Flies
Lord of the Flies

The original UK Lord of the Flies book cover Lord of the Flies may refer to: Beelzebub Lord of the Flies, the novel by William Golding Lord of the Flies (song), a song by Iron Maiden Lord of the Flies (1963 film), a film based on the novel directed by Peter Brook. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (822x1215, 240 KB) This image is of a book cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by the publisher of the book. ...

Author William Golding
Cover artist Pentagram
Country United Kingdom
Language English
Genre(s) Allegorical novel
Publisher Faber & Faber
Publication date 1954 in the UK, 1955 in the USA
Media type Print (Paperback & Hardback)
Pages 248 pp (first edition, paperback)
ISBN ISBN 0-571-05686-5 (first edition, paperback)
Followed by The Inheritors

Lord of the Flies is a novel by Nobel Prize-winning author William Golding. It discusses how culture created by man fails, using as an example a group of British school-boys stuck on a deserted island who try to govern themselves with disastrous results. Its stances on the already controversial subjects of human nature and individual welfare versus the common good earned it position 70 on the American Library Association's list of the 100 most frequently challenged Books of 1990–2000.[1] The novel was chosen by TIME magazine as one of the 100 best English-language novels from 1923 to the present.[2] Sir William Gerald Golding (19 September 1911 – 19 June 1993) was a British novelist, poet and Nobel Prize for Literature laureate best known for his novel Lord of the Flies. ... For other uses, see Country (disambiguation). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... An allegory (from Greek αλλος, allos, other, and αγορευειν, agoreuein, to speak in public) is a figurative representation conveying a meaning other than and in addition to the literal. ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... Faber and Faber is a celebrated publishing house in the UK, notable in particular for publishing the poetry of T. S. Eliot. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Hardcover books A hardcover (or hardback or hardbound) is a book bound with rigid protective covers (typically of cardboard covered with cloth, heavy paper, or sometimes leather). ... ISBN redirects here. ... The Inheritors is a 1955 novel by the British author William Golding, better known for Lord of the Flies. ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... The Nobel Prize in literature is awarded annually to an author from any country who has produced the most outstanding work of an idealistic tendency. The work in this case generally refers to an authors work as a whole, not to any individual work, though individual works are sometimes... Sir William Gerald Golding (19 September 1911 – 19 June 1993) was a British novelist, poet and Nobel Prize for Literature laureate best known for his novel Lord of the Flies. ... The article on Mount Desert Island, an island off the coast of Maine, redirects here. ... ALA Logo The American Library Association (ALA) is a group based in the United States that promotes libraries and library education internationally. ... This article is about the concept of time. ...


Published in 1954, Lord of the Flies was Golding's first novel, and although it was not a great success at the time — selling fewer than three thousand copies in the United States during 1955 before going out of print — it soon went on to become a bestseller, and by the early 1960s was required reading in many schools and colleges. It was adapted to film in 1963 by Peter Brook, and again in 1990 by Harry Hook (see "Film adaptations"). For the British politician, see Peter Brooke. ...


The title is said to be a reference to the Hebrew name Beelzebub (בעל זבוב, Ba'al-zvuv, "god of the fly", "host of the fly" or literally "Lord of Flies"), a name sometimes used as a synonym for Satan.[3] Hebrew redirects here. ... “Belzebub” redirects here. ... This article is about the concept of Satan. ...

Contents

Plot

The novel begins when two boys, Ralph and Piggy find themselves next to a plane crash site, they are unaware of their surroundings. The boys soon find a conch shell and Piggy suggests that Ralph blows on the conch to call for any others who might be nearby. The situation soon becomes apparent; there are many British school boys and no adults. The boys are divided into the 'big'uns' (several older children) and the 'littluns'. Ralph, one of the 'big'uns' holds an impromptu election and becomes the chief beating another elder boy, Jack, who was vying for the position. Ralph quickly calls everyone together to work toward two common goals, the first being to have fun and the second to be rescued by creating a constant fire signal, to be lit using Piggy's glasses. Some of the boys then go exploring and it is discovered they are on a small island. Capt. ... Species Strombus gigas Strombus luhuanus Strombus pugilis Strombus tricornis Strombus canarium Strombus dolomena Strombus gibberulus Strombus conomurex Strombus lentigo Strombus doxander Strombus urceus Strombus fragilis Strombus gallus Strombus dentatus Strombus marginatus Strombus raninus Strombus buvonius A conch (pronounced in the U.S.A. as konk or conch, IPA: or ) [1... A smoke signal is a form of visual communication used over a long distance, developed both in the Americas and in China. ...


For a time things on the island are civil, all the boys work toward building shelters, gathering food and water, and generally surviving. The one goal which constantly gets sidelined is keeping the signal fire going as some of the boys, the 'hunters', led by Jack focus their energy on hunting the wild pigs on the island. The children's belief in a Beast on the island also creates a problem. The children begin to split into two groups, based on the existence of the beast. Ralph attempts to disprove the existence of the beast while Jack exploits the belief in the beast to encourage his group of 'hunters'. Hunters was a commissioned soundtrack for the Discovery Channel series Hunters: The World of Predators and Prey. ...


Jack soon forms a separate tribe from Ralph's. Jack gains defectors from Ralph's tribe by promising them meat from hunting, fun, and most importantly protection from the beast. Jack's tribe gradually becomes more savage and they adopt face paint. Jack and his tribe of 'hunters' eventually murder one of the other boys, Simon. They then raid Ralph's camp, attacking the non-hunters in order to steal Piggy's glasses in order to make a cooking fire. For other uses, see Meat (disambiguation). ... Link titleBold textMedia:Example. ... A pair of modern glasses Glasses, also called eyeglasses or spectacles are frames, bearing lenses worn in front of the eyes normally for vision correction, eye protection, or for protection from UV rays. ...


By this time Ralph's tribe consists of just himself, Piggy, and two twins named Sam and Eric. They all go to rock fort of Jack's tribe, to try and get back Piggy's glasses so he can see. In the ensuing confrontation Piggy is killed by Roger. Sam and Eric are captured and both become part of Jack's tribe, leaving Ralph by himself.


In the final sequence of the book Jack and his friend Roger lead the tribe of 'hunters' on a hunt for Ralph, intending to kill him. In order to do this Jack sets the entire island on fire. The fire is so large that it attracts the attention of a nearby warship which comes to the island and rescues the boys. A navy officer lands on the island and his sudden appearance brings the children's fighting to an abrupt halt. When learning of the boys activities the officer remarks, "I expected better from British boys".....


Film adaptations

There have been two film adaptations:

Lord of the Flies is a 1963 film adaptation of William Goldings novel of the same name. ... For the British politician, see Peter Brooke. ... Lord of the Flies is a 1990 film adaptation of the classic novel Lord of the Flies written by William Golding. ...

Allusions/references to other works

Lord of the Flies borrows key elements from R.M. Ballantyne's The Coral Island (1857). Ballantyne's book, a simple adventure without any deep social themes, portrays three boys, Ralph, Peterkin and Jack, who land on an island. Golding used two of the names in his book, and replaced Peterkin with Simon. Lord of the Flies has been regarded as Golding's response showing what he believed would happen if children (or generally, people) were left to form a society in isolation.[4] RM Ballantyne (April 24, 1825 – February 8, 1894), Scottish juvenile fiction writer, Born Robert Michael Ballantyne in Edinburgh, Scotland he was part of a famous family of printers and publishers. ... The Coral Island is a novel written by Scottish juvenile fiction R.M. Ballantyne. ...


Golding read 'The Coral Island' as he was growing up, and thought of Ballantyne as racist, since the book teaches that evil is associated with black skin and is external.[citation needed] In Chapter 11 of the original Lord of the Flies, Piggy calls Jack's tribe "a pack of painted niggers."[5] The term was not viewed as offensive in 1960s British society as it is today as there was slightly more racism, being seen as a descriptive (rather than abusive) term for people of dark skin.[citation needed] In any case, the word was changed to "savages" in some editions and "Indians" in the mass media publication. // Nigger is a racial slur used to refer to dark-skinned people, especially those of African ancestry. ...


Influence

Many writers have borrowed plot elements from Lord of the Flies.


Printed works

Robert A. Heinlein's Tunnel in the Sky, published in 1955, can be seen as a rebuttal to Lord of the Flies as it concerns a group of teenagers stranded on a uninhabited planet who manage to create a functional tribal society.[6] Robert Anson Heinlein (July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was one of the most popular, influential, and controversial authors of hard science fiction. ... Tunnel in the Sky is a science fiction book written by Robert Heinlein and published in 1955. ...


Stephen King has stated that the Castle Rock in Lord of the Flies was the inspiration for the town of the same name that has appeared in a number of his novels. The book itself also appears prominently in his novels Hearts in Atlantis and Cujo.[7] King's fictional town in turn inspired the name of Rob Reiner's production company, Castle Rock Entertainment. For other persons named Stephen King, see Stephen King (disambiguation). ... Castle Rock, Maine is part of Stephen King’s fictional Maine topography, and as such serves as the setting for a number of his novels, novellas, and short stories. ... Hearts in Atlantis (1999), is a fictional work by Stephen King. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Robert Rob Reiner (born March 6, 1945) is an American actor, director, producer, writer, childrens advocate and political activist. ... The current Castle Rock Entertainment logo. ...


The DC Comics series Salvation Run is an adaptation of the "Lord of the flies" concept with all the major DC Supervillains being marooned on an Alien planet DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Salvation Run is an upcoming seven-part DC Comics Mini-Series which will tie in to Final Crisis. ...


Television

Lord of the Flies inspired Sunrise Animation's classic anime series Infinite Ryvius, which follows the lives of nearly 500 teenagers stranded aboard a space battleship. Animé redirects here. ... Infinite RYVIUS ) is a 26-episode drama/sci-fi series produced by Sunrise Animation, the studio also responsible for other landmark shows in the space genre, in 1999. ...


Also the "Das Bus" episode of the Simpsons is based on this book Das Bus is the 14th episode of the ninth season of The Simpsons, and a parody of the book and film Lord of the Flies. ... Simpsons redirects here. ...


The Club Spongebob episode of Spongebob Squarepants, in which he, Patrick and Squidward are stranded in the woods and rely on the "magic conch" for guidance. This article is about the series. ...


Music

  • The English heavy metal band Iron Maiden composed a song about the novel, with the title "Lord of the Flies".
  • The debut studio album, Boy, by Irish rock band U2 was loosely based on the novel's theme of childhood corruption, and the final song on the album, "Shadows and Tall Trees," takes its title from the novel's chapter of the same name. Additionally, some printings of the book's cover are similar to the cover of the album.[8]
  • American Punk Rock band Bad Religion wrote a song in their 1988 album "Suffer", mentioning the novel, with the title "1000 more fools" : "I've seen the rapture in a starving baby's eyes, Inchoate beatitude, the Lord of the Flies".

Iron Maiden are an English heavy metal band from Leyton in the East End of London. ... Lord of the Flies is a single from the Iron Maiden album The X Factor, released in 1996. ... A studio album is a collection of studio-recorded tracks by a recording artist. ... Alternate cover U.S. and Canada cover Singles from Boy Released: August 1980 Released: October 1981 Boy is the debut album from Irish rock band U2, released in 1980. ... This article is about the genre. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ... Shadows and Tall Trees is the closing track from U2s debut album, Boy. ... Bad Religion is a seminal American punk rock band, formed in Southern California in 1980 by Jay Bentley (bass), Greg Graffin (vocals), Brett Gurewitz (guitars) and Jay Ziskrout (drums). ...

References

  1. ^ The 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books of 1990–2000. American Library Association (2007). Retrieved on 2007-03-27.
  2. ^ The Complete List: TIME Magazine – ALL-TIME 100 Novels. TIME (2005). Retrieved on 2007-05-12.
  3. ^ http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/02388c.htm Catholic Encyclopedia entry on Beelzebub]
  4. ^ Johnson, Arnold (1980). Of Earth and Darkness. The Novels of William Golding. Missouri: University of Missouri Press, 132. 
  5. ^ Green Paint: Mysteries of William Golding’s Lord of the Flies « Great War Fiction
  6. ^ Wagner, Thomas M. (2006). Robert A. Heinlin: Tunnel in the Sky. SF Reviews.net. Retrieved on 2007-03-27.
  7. ^ Stephen King (1947-). Authors' Calendar (2003). Retrieved on 2007-03-27.
  8. ^ Bailie, Stuart (1992-06-13). Rock and Roll Should Be This Big!. NME. Retrieved on 2007-11-28.

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External links

Wikibooks
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Lord of the Flies
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Lord of the Flies
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  Results from FactBites:
 
Lord of the Flies - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4065 words)
Lord of the Flies is an allegorical novel by Nobel Prize-winning author William Golding about a group of young boys who are stranded on a desert island and who must negotiate the social problems of cooperation and self-government, and fail disastrously.
The Lord of the Flies (which is translated from Greek "Beelzebub" and Hebrew, "Ba'alzevuv" and "Lord of the Flies" is said to be a mistranslation from a mistransliterated word whose sound sounds pungent and evil, like that of a reference to the devil.
The "Lord of the Flies" in the end reveals that evil and the terror of the "beastie" is not an external threat, but an inborn evil with the boys themselves.
Understanding "Lord of the Flies" A Novel by William Golding (1811 words)
Lord of the Flies - Barron's Booknotes from PinkMonkey.com.
Lord of the Flies - Novel Analysis from Novelguide.com.
Map of the Island in Lord of the Flies.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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