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Encyclopedia > Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports
Flag of the Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports
Flag of the Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports

The Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports is a ceremonial official in the United Kingdom. The post dates from at least the 12th century but may be older. The Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports was originally in charge of the Cinque Ports, a group of five port towns on the south coast of England. Today the role is a sinecure. The title is one of the higher honours bestowed by the British monarch. It has often been held by members of the British royal family or prime ministers, especially those who have been influential in defending Britain at times of war. Image:LWCP Flag. ... Image:LWCP Flag. ... Formally, in Kent and Sussex there are five Head Ports making up the Confederation of the Cinque Ports. ... A sinecure (from Latin sine, without, and cura, care) means an office which requires or involves little or no responsibility, labour, or active service. ... Members of the Royal Family on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after the Trooping the Colour ceremony The British Royal Family is a group of people closely related to the British monarch. ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ...


The Lord Warden was solely responsible for the return of all writs to the Crown, along with the collection of taxes and the arrest of criminals. His court was held in St James' church, near Dover Castle, and there he exercised jurisdiction broadly equivalent to that of chancery. He also had a "lieutenant's powers of muster", and the constableship of Dover Castle, later added to the warden's office, enabled him to keep a garrison and administrative staff, including the clerk and the lieutenant of the castle. Dover Castle is situated in Kent and has been described as the Key to England due to its defensive significance throughout history. ...


The Coat of Arms of the Cinque Ports first appeared in 1305, second amongst the earliest English known heraldic emblems, predating even the coat of arms of the city of London. The Coat of Arms of the Cinque Ports displays three ships hulls and three Lions passant guardant con-joined to these hulls, all in gold. These may originally have been Gules three lions passant gardant in pale Or (for England) dimidiating Gules three ships' hulks in pale Or. The Coat of Arms of the Confederation of the Cinque Ports is set out on a red and blue background and traditionally represents the 14 'Corporate' Members. Events Wenceslas III becomes king of Bohemia The Papacy removed to France following riots in the Papal State. ...

Contents


Creation and Appointment of the Lord Warden

The creation and appointment of the Lord Warden, once the most powerful appointment of the realm, by the monarch, was instituted principally after the portsmen sided with Simon de Montfort (Earl of Leicester) against Henry III, in the Second Barons' War, and was intended to provide some central authority over the Cinque Ports, which were essentially otherwise independent of the king's sheriffs. It was combined with the office of the Constable of Dover Castle. However from 1708 Walmer Castle at Deal was to be preferred as the official residence of the Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports. The Lord Warden also holds the offices of Admiral of the Cinque Ports with a maritime jurisdiction extending to mid Channel, from Redcliffe near Seaford, in Sussex to Shoe Beacon in Essex, and of Constable of Dover Castle. Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester (1208 – August 4, 1265) was the principal leader of the baronial opposition to king Henry III of England. ... The Earl of Leicester was created in the 12th century as a title in the Peerage of England (title now extinct), and is currently a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, created in 1837. ... Henry III (October 1, 1207 – November 16, 1272) is one of the least-known British monarchs, considering the great length of his reign. ... The Second Barons War (1264–1267) was a civil war in England between the forces of a number of rebellious barons lead by Simon de Montfort, against the Royalist forces led by Prince Edward (later Edward I of England). ... A Constable is a person holding a particular office, most commonly that of law-enforcement. ... Dover Castle is situated in Kent and has been described as the Key to England due to its defensive significance throughout history. ... // Events March 23 - James Francis Edward Stuart lands at the Firth of Forth July 1 - Tewoflos becomes Emperor of Ethiopia September 28 - Peter the Great defeats the Swedes at the Battle of Lesnaya Kandahar conquered by Mir Wais In Masuria one third of the population die during the plague J... Walmer Castle was built by Henry VIII in 1539-1540 as an artillery fortress to counter the threat of invasion from Catholic France and Spain. ... Sussex as a traditional county. ... Essex is a county in the East of England. ...


The courts of Brodhull and Guestling were established to protect the privileges of the Cinque Ports by the portsmen themselves. From the 15th Century these courts had been largely replaced by the Lord Warden's Court at Dover. From the 16th Century the principal business of the courts was the installation the Lord Warden and the court is now only occasionally summoned. The office continued to be a powerful one. In 1550 the mayor and jurats of Dover refused to accept a royal writ because it was not accompanied by a letter of attendance from the Lord Warden. The member ports' parliamentary representatives were appointed by the Lord Warden at first; this influence continued until the 19th century. (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Events February 7 - Julius III becomes Pope. ...


At the installation of a new Lord Warden, the Speaker of the Confederation of the Cinque Ports instructs the Lord Warden: "to undertake the duties of the Ancient and Honorable Office and to uphold the Franchises, Liberties, Customs and Usages of the port."


The office of Speaker has traditionally rotated between the affiliate townships every year dating from at least 1550. Inaugurations are begun on May 21, and membership is ordained through a longstanding maritime tradition of a principle of the prevailing winds coming from west to east. Events February 7 - Julius III becomes Pope. ...


All Freeman of the Ports originally held the title "Baron of the Cinque Ports". The traditional title, which bears no relationship with those lords in command of castles, otherwise referred to as Barons is now reserved for Freeman elected by the Mayor, Jurats, and Common Council of the Ports to attend a Coronation, also now only in an honorary capacity.


The position of Lord Warden and Admiral of the Cinque Ports is the most ancient military honour available in England. 'Of the 158 holders of the office, only three have to date been commoners'.


List of Lords Warden of the Cinque Ports

The first authoritative list of Cinque Ports Confederation Members was produced in 1293 when Stephen of Pencester was Warden. The Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports is appointed for life, but in the earliest of records this was not the case. The office of Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports has been traced from the year 1226 from the appointment William de Averanch, although he was not the first incumbent of this office. The longest term of office was that of William Brook, Lord Cobham, who presided at the court for 40 years. Events May 20 - King Sancho IV of Castile creates the Study of General Schools of Alcala The Minoresses (Franciscan nuns) are first introduced into England Births Deaths Categories: 1293 ... Events Carmelite Order approved by Pope Honorius III Frederick II calls Imperial Diet of Cremona Births Deaths October 3 Saint Francis of Assisi founder of the Franciscan Order and patron Saint of animals and the environment Canonized by Pope Gregory IX in 1228 November 8 King Louis VIII of France...


12th Century

13th Century Henry dEssex (died c. ...

14th Century William Plantagenet, otherwise known as William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey (1166 - 1240), was the son of Hamelin de Warenne and Isabel, daughter of William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey. ... Hubert de Burgh (~1165 - May 12, 1243) was Earl of Kent, Justiciar of England and Ireland, and one of the most influential men in England during the reigns of John and Henry III. De Burgh came from a minor gentry family about which little is known. ... Robert de Auberville was appointed to the position of Keeper of the coast, then the name given to the office of Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports in the year 1228. ... Peter de Rivaux held the offices of Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports and Constable of Dover Castle from the year 1236, and intermittently up until the outbreak of the Barons War. ... Walerland Teutonicus was Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports during the 13th century. ... Bertram de Crioill was a mid-13th-century Briton who served as Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Peter II of Savoy (1203 - 1268) was Count of Savoy from 1263 until his death, and built the Savoy Palace in London. ... Reginald de Cobham, 1st Baron Cobham, KG, was born about 1295, the son of Sir Reginald de Cobham by Joan, the daughter and heir of William de Evere. ... Sir Roger de Northwode (~1230 - November 9, 1286) held the posts of Warden of the Cinque Ports and Baron of the Exchequer. ... Nicholas de Moels was born about 1195 in Cadbury Manor, Cadbury, Somerset, England. ... Richard de Grey of Codnor who died in 1271, had married Lucy, the daughter and heir of John de Humet. ... Hugh Bigod (d. ... Nicholas de Croill was Warden of the Cinque Ports during the 13th century. ... Walter de Burgsted was Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports during the 13th century. ... Hamo de Crevequer (died 1263) was a Norman nobleman who held the office of Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports. ... Humphrey de Bohun, 7th Baron de Bohun and 3rd Earl of Hereford (1249 - December 31, 1297) was one of several noblemen of the same name to have held the earldom of Hereford, and a key figure in the Norman conquest of Wales. ... Edmund Crouchback (January 16, 1245 - June 5, 1296) was the second surviving son of Eleanor of Provence and King Henry III of England. ... Sir Henry de Sandwich was Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports during the 13th century. ... Roger de Leybourne or Roger Leyburn was a Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports and Sheriff of Kent, and was known as a general administrator. ... Henry de Montfort (1238 - 1265) was the son of Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, and with his father played an important role in the struggle of the barons against King Henry III. Henrys mother was Eleanor Plantagenet (daughter of King John), whose marriage to Simon further increased... King Edward I of England (June 17, 1239 – July 7, 1307), popularly known as Longshanks because of his 6 foot 2 inch frame and the Hammer of the Scots (his tombstone, in Latin, read, Hic est Edwardvs Primus Scottorum Malleus, Here lies Edward I, Hammer of the Scots), achieved fame... Stephen de Pencester was Warden of the Cinque Ports when the first authoritative list of Cinque Ports Confederation Members was produced in 1293. ... Sir Robert de Burghersh, Lord Burghersh, was born between 1252-6, at Burghersh, in Sussex, England, and died in 1306. ...

15th Century Henry Cobham 1st lord Cobham, (1260-1339) was Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports in 1307, and also held the titles of Sheriff of Kent, Constable of Canterbury, Tonbridge, Dover and Rochester Castles. ... Henry Cobham 1st lord Cobham, (1260-1339) was Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports in 1307, and also held the titles of Sheriff of Kent, Constable of Canterbury, Tonbridge, Dover and Rochester Castles. ... Hugh (1262-1326), son of Hugh le Despenser II, sometimes referred to as the elder Despenser, was for a time the chief adviser to King Edward II of England. ... Edmund Plantagenet, or Edmund of Woodstock (August 5, 1301 – March 19, 1330) was Earl of Kent from July 28, 1321 (1st creation). ... John Peche Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports from 1323 to 1325. ... Sir Bartholomew de Burghersh (died August 3, 1355) was the son of Sir Robert de Burghersh (Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports 1299-1306) by Maud (nee de Badlesmere). ... Sir Bartholomew de Burghersh (died August 3, 1355) was the son of Sir Robert de Burghersh (Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports 1299-1306) by Maud (nee de Badlesmere). ... Patrick Randolph, 9th Earl of Dunbar (1285-1369) was a Scottish noble prominent during the reigns of the Bruce kings, Robert I and David II, and was also 2nd Earl of March. ... John Beauchamp of Hache, Baron Beauchamp de Somerset (died ?1361) was Warden of the Cinque Ports from 1359 to about 1361. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Andrew de Guldeford was Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports at some time between 1364 to 1376. ... Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York, (June 5, 1341 - August 1, 1402) was a younger son of King Edward III of England, the fourth of the five sons of the King who lived to adulthood. ... Simon de Burley was holder of the offices of Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports and Constable of Dover Castle between 1384-88. ... John Devereux, 2nd Baron Devereux, KG, was a politician of the reign of King Richard II of England. ... John Beaumont, 4th Baron Beaumont (1361-1396) served in the French wars against the partisans of Pope Clement VII. He was Knighted by Edward III, and was Warden of the West Marches, Admiral of the North (sea), Constable of Dover Castle, and Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports. ... Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York, (June 5, 1341 - August 1, 1402) was a younger son of King Edward III of England, the fourth of the five sons of the King who lived to adulthood. ... John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset (c. ... Sir Thomas Erpingham was a English knight, immortalised as a character in the play Henry V by William Shakespeare, as an officer in the kings army. ...

16th Century Henry V Henry V, (August 9 or September 16, 1387 – August 31, 1422), King of England, son of Henry IV by Mary de Bohun, was born at Monmouth, Wales, in September 1387. ... Thomas Fitzalan, 12th Earl of Arundel (October 13, 1381 - October 13, 1415) was an English nobleman, one of the principals of the deposition of Richard II, and a major figure during the reign of Henry IV. He was the only surviving son of Richard Fitzalan, 11th Earl of Arundel and... Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester (1390 - February 23, 1447) was the fifth son of King Henry IV of England by his first wife, Mary de Bohun. ... The title Baron Saye and Sele was created in the Peerage of England in 1447, when letters patent granted the title to James Fiennes (c. ... Humphrey Stafford, 1st Duke of Buckingham (1402-1460) was best-known as a military commander in the Hundred Years War and in the Wars of the Roses. ... Richard Woodville, 1st Earl Rivers (d. ... Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick (1428—April 14, 1471), was also known as Warwick the Kingmaker. ... Sir John Scott (died October 17, 1485) was Warden of the Cinque Ports. ... Sir William Scott of Scotts Hall, Brabourne (died August 24, 1524) was Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports. ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ...

17th century Edward Poyning (1459 - 1521) was Lord Deputy to King Henry VII of England. ... George Nevill, 5th Baron Bergavenny (c. ... Sir Edward Guilford (alternative spelling Guildford) (born about 1474 Offington, Sussex, England; d. ... George Boleyn, Viscount Rochford (c. ... Henry Fitzroy, 1st Duke of Richmond and Somerset (June 15, 1519 – June 18, 1536) was the son of Henry VIII and his teenaged mistress, Elizabeth Blount, the only bastard that Henry acknowledged. ... Sir Thomas Cheney (c 1485 - December 15, 1558) was Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports from 1536 until his death. ... Arthur Plantagenet, 1st Viscount Lisle, KG (died March 3, 1542) was an illegitimate son of King Edward IV of England. ... Thomas Seymour, 1st Baron Seymour of Sudeley Thomas Seymour, Baron Seymour of Sudeley (c. ... William Brooke (later Lord Cobbam) was Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports, and was returned as MP for Hythe. ... Henry Brooke, 11th Baron Cobham succeeded his father as Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports under Queen Elizabeth I of England. ...

18th Century Henry Howard, 1st Earl of Northampton (1540 - June 15, 1614), was the second son of Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, the poet, and of his wife, the former Lady Frances de Vere, daughter of the 15th Earl of Oxford, and was the younger brother of the 4th Duke of Norfolk. ... Robert Carr, Earl of Somerset (sometimes spelt Ker) (c. ... Edward la Zouche, (6 June 1556 - 18 August 1625) 11th Baron Zouche of Haryngworth, was the son of George la Zouche, 10th Baron Zouche and his wife Margaret, née Welby. ... George Villiers (August 28, 1592 - August 23, 1628) was the 1st Duke of Buckingham of the second creation (1623) of that title and a favourite of King James I of England and then of Charles I. He was born in Brooksby, Leicestershire, the son of the minor noble Sir George... Theophilus Howard, KG (August 13, 1584, Walden, Essex - June 3, 1640) was an English nobleman and politician. ... James Stewart, 4th Duke of Lennox, 1st Duke of Richmond (1612-1655) was a Scottish nobleman The Scottish connection to the earldom of Richmond began in 1613 when Ludovic Stewart, 2nd Duke of Lennox, was created Earl of Richmond. ... John Boys was born in 1607 at Bonnington, in Kent, and died on the 8th of October, in 1664 at Bonnington. ... Algernon Sydney (or Sidney) (~1622-1683) was an English politician, an opponent of King Charles II of England. ... Thomas Kelsey rose from obscurity as a London tradesman to become an important figure in the government of Oliver Cromwell. ... Robert Blake, General at Sea, 1599–1657 by Henry Perronet Briggs, painted 1829. ... Sir Heneage Finch (1628-1689) of Eastwell, Kent, was the 3rd Earl of Winchilsea. ... James VII and II (14 October 1633–16 September 1701) became King of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 6 February 1685. ... Sir John Beaumont (1583 - April 19, 1627), English poet, second son of the judge, Sir Francis Beaumont, was born at Grace-Dieu in Leicestershire. ... Henry Sydney (or Sidney), 1st Earl of Romney (8 April 1641 - 8 April 1704) was born in Paris, a son of Robert Sidney, 2nd Earl of Leicester, of Penshurst Place in Kent, England, by Lady Dorothy Percy, a daughter of Henry Percy, 9th Earl of Northumberland, a descendant of Edward...

19th Century Prince George of Denmark Prince George of Denmark (April 2, 1653 - October 28, 1708) was the Prince consort of Queen Anne of Great Britain. ... Lionel Cranfield Sackville, 1st Duke Of Dorset (January 18, 1688 - October 10, 1765) was an English political leader and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. ... James Butler, 2nd Duke of Ormonde (April 29, 1665 - November 16, 1745), Irish statesman and soldier, son of Thomas, earl of Ossory, and grandson of James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde, was born in Dublin and was educated in France and afterwards at Christ Church, Oxford. ... John Sidney, 6th Earl of Leicester (February 14, 1680 - September 27, 1737), was a Privy Councillor during the Georgian era. ... Lionel Cranfield Sackville, 1st Duke Of Dorset (January 18, 1688 - October 10, 1765) was an English political leader and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. ... Robert Darcy, 4th Earl of Holderness (1718-1778), was a British diplomatist and politician. ... Frederick North, 2nd Earl of Guilford (April 13, 1732–August 5, 1792), more often known by his earlier title, Lord North, was Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1770 to 1782, and a major actor in the American Revolution. ... William Pitt the Younger (28 May 1759–23 January 1806) was a British politician during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. ...

  • Robert Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool 1806-1827
  • Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington 1829-1852
  • James Broun-Ramsay, 1st Marquess of Dalhousie 1853-1860
  • Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston 1861-1865
  • Granville Leveson-Gower, 2nd Earl Granville 1865-1891 (not installed?)
  • William Henry Smith 1891 (not installed?)
  • Frederick Hamilton-Temple-Blackwood, 1st Marquess of Dufferin and Ava 1892-1895
  • Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury 1895-1903

20th Century Robert Banks Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool (June 7, 1770 - December 4, 1828) was a British statesman, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1812 to 1827. ... Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington (1 May 1769–14 September 1852) was an Anglo-Irish soldier and statesman, widely considered one of the leading military and political figures of the 19th century. ... James Andrew Broun-Ramsay, 1st Marquess and 10th Earl of Dalhousie (April 22, 1812–December 19, 1860) was a British statesman, and a colonial administrator in India. ... Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston (October 20, 1784 - October 18, 1865) was a British Liberal statesman who served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in the mid-19th century. ... Granville George Leveson-Gower, 2nd Earl Granville (May 11, 1815 - March 31, 1891) was a British Liberal statesman. ... The Rt Hon. ... Lord Dufferin as a young man Frederick Temple Hamilton-Temple-Blackwood, 1st Marquess of Dufferin and Ava, PC (June 21, 1826 – February 12, 1902) was a British public servant and prominent member of Victorian society. ... The Right Honourable Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury, KG, PC (February 3, 1830–August 22, 1903). ...

21st Century George Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston (January 11, 1859 – March 20, 1925), was a conservative British statesman who served as Viceroy of India. ... King George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert Windsor ),3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the last British monarch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, changing the name to the House of Windsor in 1917. ... Thomas Brassey (1836-1918) was a British politician. ... Lord Beauchamp as Governor of New South Wales in 1899 William Lygon, 7th Earl Beauchamp, (February 20, 1872 - November 15, 1938), British politician, succeeded his father as Earl Beauchamp in 1891, and was mayor of Worcester at age 23. ... Rufus Daniel Isaacs, 1st Marquess of Reading (10 October 1860 - 30 December 1935) was a British politician and jurist. ... The Right Honourable George Freeman Thomas, PC later Freeman-Thomas, 1st Marquess of Willingdon of Ratton (September 12, 1866 - August 12, 1941) was a British Liberal politician who served as Governor General of Canada and Viceroy of India. ... The Right Honourable Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG , OM , CH , FRS , PC (November 30, 1874 – January 24, 1965) was a British statesman, best known as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom during the Second World War. ... Rt Hon Robert Menzies The Right Honourable Sir Robert Gordon Menzies, KT, CH, QC (20 December 1894 – 14 May 1978), Australian politician, was the twelfth and longest-serving Prime Minister of Australia serving eighteen and a half years. ... Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon in her later years as Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother The Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon (Elizabeth Angela Marguerite Windsor, L.G. , L.T. , C.I. , G.C.V.O. , G.B.E. , C.C. , née Bowes-Lyon) (4 August 1900 – 30 March 2002) was the Queen...

Admiral Michael Cecil Boyce, Baron Boyce, GCB, OBE (born 2 April 1943) is a cross bench member of the British House of Lords. ...

Further reading

  • Brentnall, Margaret The Cinque ports and Romney Marsh London, 1972.
  • Body, Edward The Cinque Ports and Lords Warden: a history in verse and prose. Kent Messenger, 1992

External links

  • Official Confederation of the Cinque Ports
  • Cinque Ports 1155-1500
  • Kent Resources Cinque Ports page
  • flagspot.net Flags of the World Website
  • Additional listing from www.eastkent
  • A Background to Heraldry.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Cinque Ports@Everything2.com (1068 words)
The Confederation of the Cinque Ports is an ancient feudal union of towns providing naval defence of the south-east coast of England, facing the Continent.
The Cinque Ports were granted extensive powers of self-government, administration of justice, and freedom from tax and toll by a charter in the 1200s.
The Barons of the Cinque Ports have the right to hold a canopy over the Sovereign at the Coronation, though the last time this happened was that of George IV in 1821.
Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports - definition of Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports in Encyclopedia (1070 words)
The Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports was originally in charge of the Cinque Ports, a group of five port towns on the south coast of England.
The Lord Warden is also referred to as Admiral of the Cinque Ports with a maritime jurisdiction extending to mid Channel, from Redcliffe near Seaford, in Sussex to Shoe Beacon in Essex.
The office of Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports has be traced from the year 1226 from the appointment William de Averanch, although he was not the first incumbant of this office.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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