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Encyclopedia > Lord Voldemort
Harry Potter character
Lord Voldemort
Lord Voldemort
Ralph Fiennes as Voldemort
in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
House Slytherin
Actor Ralph Fiennes
Christian Coulson, as a 16-year-old in HP2
Hero Fiennes Tiffin, as an 11-year-old in HP6
Frank Dillane, as a 16-year-old in HP6
Ian Hart voice in HP1
Richard Bremmer, non-faced in HP1
First appearance Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone

Lord Voldemort (pronounced /ˈvoʊldəmɔr/)[1][2] is a fictional character and the primary antagonist in the Harry Potter novel series written by British author J. K. Rowling. Voldemort first appeared in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, which was released in 1997. Voldemort appeared either in person or in flashbacks in each book in the series, except the third, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. Voldemort has also appeared in all the corresponding film adaptations as of present date, except the third. This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Ralph Nathaniel Fiennes, (IPA: ), born 22 December 1962) is a Tony Award-winning, Academy Award-nominated and Genie Award-nominated British actor. ... Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is a 2007 fantasy adventure film, based on the novel of the same name, by J. K. Rowling. ... In the Harry Potter series, Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is divided into four houses, each bearing the last name of its founder: Godric Gryffindor, Salazar Slytherin, Rowena Ravenclaw and Helga Hufflepuff. ... In the Harry Potter series, the Hogwarts school of witchcraft and wizardry is divided into four houses, each bearing the last name of its founder - Godric Gryffindor, Salazar Slytherin, Rowena Ravenclaw and Helga Hufflepuff. ... Ralph Nathaniel Fiennes, (IPA: ), born 22 December 1962) is a Tony Award-winning, Academy Award-nominated and Genie Award-nominated British actor. ... Christian Coulson (born 3 October 1978) is a British actor most famous for his film appearance as Tom Marvolo Riddle, the teenage Lord Voldemort, in the second installment of the Harry Potter film franchise, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. ... Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets is the second fantasy adventure film in the popular Harry Potter films series, based on the novel by J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. ... Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince is a 2008 fantasy adventure film, based on the novel of the same name by J. K. Rowling. ... Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince is a 2008 fantasy adventure film, based on the novel of the same name by J. K. Rowling. ... Ian Hart (born 8 October 1964) is an English actor. ... Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone, released in the United States as Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone, is a 2001 fantasy/adventure film based on the novel of the same name by J.K. Rowling. ... Richard Bremmer (born 1953 in Warwickshire, England) is a British actor. ... Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone, released in the United States as Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone, is a 2001 fantasy/adventure film based on the novel of the same name by J.K. Rowling. ... HPPS redirects here. ... A fictional character is any person, persona, identity, or entity that is created from ones imagination or from an adaption of an existing entity. ... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... Joanne Jo Murray, née Rowling OBE[1] (born 31 July 1965),[2] who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling,[3] is a British writer and author of the Harry Potter fantasy series. ... HPPS redirects here. ... HP3 redirects here. ...


In the series, Voldemort is the main enemy of Harry Potter, who according to a prophecy has the power to defeat him. He is described as "the most powerful Dark wizard who has ever lived", and aims to conquer the wizarding world, which fears him so much that they refuse to refer to him by his name, instead saying "You-Know-Who" or "He-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named." Even his followers only refer to him as "The Dark Lord". He was born as Tom Marvolo Riddle, and is the last descendant of wizard Salazar Slytherin, one of the founders of Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Harry James Potter is the title character and the main protagonist of J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter fantasy series. ... For other uses, see Prophecy (disambiguation). ... Hogwarts, a wizarding school. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Magic (Harry Potter). ... Lordship redirects here. ... In the Harry Potter series, the Hogwarts school of witchcraft and wizardry is divided into four houses, each bearing the last name of its founder - Godric Gryffindor, Salazar Slytherin, Rowena Ravenclaw and Helga Hufflepuff. ... In J. K. Rowlings best-selling Harry Potter series of novels, Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is a school of magic for witches and wizards between the ages of eleven and seventeen. ...


Several people have portrayed Voldemort in the films, but the most referenced actor is British actor Ralph Fiennes, who has portrayed him in the film adaptations of the fourth and fifth novels. In a 2006 BigBadRead poll, British school children voted Lord Voldemort their favourite literary villain of all time.[3] Ralph Nathaniel Fiennes, (IPA: ), born 22 December 1962) is a Tony Award-winning, Academy Award-nominated and Genie Award-nominated British actor. ... Bad guy redirects here. ...

Contents

Character development

According to a 1999 interview with Rowling, Voldemort was invented as a literary foil for Harry Potter, the main protagonist of the series, and that she intentionally did not flesh out Voldemort's backstory at first. "The basic idea [was that Harry] didn't know he was a wizard [...] And so then I kind of worked backwards from that position to find out how that could be, that he wouldn't know what he was. [...] When he was one year old, the most evil wizard for hundreds and hundreds of years attempted to kill him. He killed Harry's parents, and then he tried to kill Harry — he tried to curse him. [...] Harry has to find out, before we find out. And - so - but for some mysterious reason the curse didn't work on Harry. So he's left with this lightning bolt shaped scar on his forehead and the curse rebounded upon the evil wizard, who has been in hiding ever since."[4] She also added that his name is invented and has no real life basis.[5] A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ... In narratology, a back-story (also back story or backstory) is the history behind the situation extant at the start of the main story. ... For other uses, see Evil (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with lighting. ...


In the course of the second book, Rowling established the paradox that Voldemort was a blood purist who hated non-pure blood wizards, despite being a half-blood himself. In a 2000 interview with the British Broadcasting Corporation, Rowling fleshed Voldemort out as a self-hating bully: "Well I think it is often the case that the biggest bullies take what they know to be their own defects, as they see it, and they put them right on someone else and then they try and destroy the other and that's what Voldemort does."[6] Look up paradox in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Workplace bullying be merged into this article or section. ...


In the same year, Rowling became more precise about Voldemort. She began to link him to charismatic real-life tyrants, describing him as "a raging psychopath, devoid of the normal human responses to other people's suffering".[7] However, according to statements in 2004, Rowling says that Voldemort is not directly based on any historical character.[8] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... See Also: Antisocial Personality Disorder Theoretically, psychopathy is a three-faceted disorder involving interpersonal, affective and behavioral characteristics. ...


In 2006 Rowling established that Voldemort at his core has a very human fear: the fear of death. She said: "Voldemort's fear is death, ignominious death. I mean, he regards death itself as ignominious. He thinks that it's a shameful human weakness, as you know. His worst fear is death."[9] For other uses, see Death (disambiguation). ...


Throughout the series, Rowling established that the name "Voldemort" is so feared in the Wizarding World that it is considered dangerous even to speak his name. Most characters in the novels refer to him as "You-Know-Who" or "He-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named" rather than saying his name aloud. In Deathly Hallows, a Taboo is placed upon the name, such that anyone who utters it may be traced by Voldemort or his followers. According to an interview with Rowling, "Voldemort" is pronounced with a silent 't' at the end, as is common in French.[10] This was the pronunciation used by Jim Dale in the first four U.S. audiobooks; however, after the release of the film version of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, in which the characters who dared refer to him by name pronounced it with the "t", Dale altered his pronunciation to that in the films. The pronunciation has since been used in the other films as well. Hogwarts, a wizarding school. ... Jim Dale and Glenn Close in 2006 performing Busker Alley. ... Cassette recording of Patrick OBrians The Mauritius Command done by Patrick Tull An audiobook is a recording that is primarily of the spoken word as opposed to music. ... Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone, released in the United States as Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone, is a 2001 fantasy/adventure film based on the novel of the same name by J.K. Rowling. ...


Appearances

See also: Chronology of the Harry Potter stories

The chronology is a general timeline of events derived from information provided in the series of Harry Potter novels written by J.K. Rowling, along with additional materials posted on her web site and published in various interviews. ...

First three books

Lord Voldemort on the back of Professor Quirrell's head in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
Lord Voldemort on the back of Professor Quirrell's head in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone

Lord Voldemort makes his debut in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone. In this story, Rowling introduces him as the Dark Lord who has murdered Harry Potter's parents, and later unsuccessfully tries to regain his dissolved body by stealing the eponymous Philosopher's Stone. While writing the book, Rowling established that Harry Potter's parents have been killed by the powerful Dark Wizard Lord Voldemort; but for some reason, baby Harry survives when Voldemort tries to murder him with a Killing Curse. Voldemort is disembodied, and Harry carries a mysterious scar on his forehead as a result. According to a 1999 interview with The Diane Rehm Show, fleshing out Voldemort's backstory was a case of backwards planning: she decided that Harry Potter's parents had been killed by an evil, supremely powerful wizard, and that wizard became Voldemort.[11] Image File history File links Voldemort_in_Movie_1. ... Image File history File links Voldemort_in_Movie_1. ... Professor Quirinus Quirrell is a fictional character in Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone, the first novel in the Harry Potter series written by J.K. Rowling. ... Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone, released in the United States as Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone, is a 2001 fantasy/adventure film based on the novel of the same name by J.K. Rowling. ... HPPS redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In the fictional Harry Potter series, many magical objects exist for the use of the characters. ... Diane Rehm (born 1936 in Washington, D.C.) is an American public radio talk show host. ...


In the second instalment, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, Rowling introduces the character of Tom Marvolo Riddle, a manifestation of a teenage Voldemort that resides inside a magical diary found by Ginny Weasley. In this book, Ginny is written as a shy girl with a crush on Harry Potter.[12] Feeling anxious and lonely, she begins to write into the diary and shares her deepest fears with the sympathetic Tom.[13] However, at the climax of the story, when Tom Marvolo Riddle rearranges the letters in his name to create the anagram of "I am Lord Voldemort", the nature of Tom as a magical manifestation of the boy who would later grow up to become the Dark Lord is revealed. Riddle states he has grown strong on her fears and eventually possesses Ginny. He then uses her as a pawn to unlock the Chamber of Secrets, whence a basilisk is set free and petrifies several Hogwarts students. Harry defeats both the Riddle from the diary and the basilisk.[13] In Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, Dumbledore reveals to Harry that the diary was one of Voldemort's Horcruxes (an external vessel which contains a part of his torn soul). HP2 redirects here. ... Ginevra Molly Ginny Weasley is a fictional character in J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... The climax (or turning point) of a narrative work is its point of highest tension or drama in which the solution is given. ... For the game, see Anagrams. ... Spiritual possession is a concept of supernatural and/or superstitious belief systems whereby gods, daemons, demons, animas, or other disincarnate entities may temporarily take control of a human body, resulting in noticeable changes in behaviour. ... Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is the main setting of the Harry Potter series of fictional novels by J. K. Rowling. ... Harry Potter series. ... A Horcrux is a class of magical objects introduced in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. ...


In the third book, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, Voldemort does not appear, either in person or in the form of a magical manifestation. He is, however, heard when Harry passes out from the effects of a Dementor. Towards the end of the story Sybill Trelawney, the Divination professor, makes a rare genuine prophecy: "The Dark Lord lies alone and friendless, abandoned by his followers. His servant has been chained these 12 years. Tonight, before midnight, the servant will break free and set out to rejoin his master. The Dark Lord will rise again with his servant's aid, greater and more terrible than ever before. Tonight... before midnight... the servant... will set out... to rejoin... his master..."[14] Though it is initially implied that the prophecy refers to Sirius Black, the book's ostensible antagonist, the servant is eventually revealed to be Peter Pettigrew, who, since the fall of Lord Voldemort, has been disguised as Ron Weasley's pet rat, Scabbers. HP3 redirects here. ... A dementor is an utterly foul fictional being, the worst creature J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter book series has to offer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sirius Black is a fictional character in J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... Peter Pettigrew, often referred to by his nickname Wormtail, is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... This article is about rats. ...


Fourth to sixth books

A corporeal Lord Voldemort returns to power.
A corporeal Lord Voldemort returns to power.

In the fourth instalment of the series, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Voldemort appears at the start and the climax of the book. Rowling lets many seemingly unrelated plot elements fall into order. It is revealed that Voldemort's minion Barty Crouch Jr, disguised as Hogwarts professor Mad-Eye Moody, has manipulated the events of the Triwizard Tournament. Voldemort's goal is to teleport reluctant participant Harry Potter to the Little Hangleton graveyard, where the Riddle family are buried.[15] Harry is captured and, after Pettigrew uses Harry's blood (which would prove to be a major flaw) to fulfil a gruesome magical ritual, Voldemort regains his body and is restored to his full power.[16] For the first time in the series, Rowling describes his appearance: "tall and skeletally thin", with a face "whiter than a skull, with wide, livid scarlet eyes and a nose that was as flat as a snake’s with slits for nostrils".[15] Rowling writes that his "hands were like large, pale spiders; his long white fingers caressed his own chest, his arms, his face; the red eyes, whose pupils were slits, like a cat's, gleamed still more brightly through the darkness".[15] It was revealed that, while in Albania, Pettigrew had captured the Ministry of Magic official Bertha Jorkins, who was tortured for information about the Ministry.[17] After they learned that Barty Crouch Jr, a faithful Death Eater, had been smuggled out of Azkaban and was privately confined at his father's house, they killed her. With Pettigrew's help, Voldemort created a small, rudimentary body, corporeal enough to travel and perform magic, and formulated a plan to restore his own body by capturing Harry. A portion of the plan had been overheard by Frank Bryce, a gardener, whom Voldemort then killed.[17] Voldemort then completes his plan and returns to life in his full body as a result of the ritual with Harry's blood. He then summons his Death Eaters to the graveyard to witness the death of Harry Potter as he challenges Harry to a duel. However, when Voldemort duels Harry, their wands become magically locked together due to the twin Phoenix feather cores of the wands. Because of a phenomenon later revealed as Priori Incantatem, ghost-like manifestations of Voldemort's most recent victims (including Harry's parents) then appear and distract Voldemort, allowing Harry just enough time to escape via portkey with the body of fellow-student, Cedric Diggory, who was murdered by Peter Pettigrew on Voldemort's orders.[18] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 478 pixelsFull resolution (2233 × 1333 pixel, file size: 671 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Screenshot of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 478 pixelsFull resolution (2233 × 1333 pixel, file size: 671 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Screenshot of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... HP4 redirects here. ... Look up Minion in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Bartemius Barty Crouch Junior is a fictional character from the Harry Potter series of books. ... Alastor Mad-Eye Moody is a fictional character in the Harry Potter series of books, an ex-Auror working for the Order of the Phoenix. ... The Champions of the 1994-1995 Triwizard Tournament: shown characters are portrayed by the actors that play them in the movies The Triwizard Tournament is a fictional tournament featured in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... This article is about the satellite communications facility. ... Little Hangleton, England, is a fictitious town described in the Harry Potter series of novels. ... In the fictional universe of the Harry Potter series as written by J. K. Rowling, the Ministry of Magic is the governing body of the magical community of Britain and succeeded the earlier Wizards Council. ... It has been suggested that Rufus Scrimgeour be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Torture (disambiguation). ... In the fictional Harry Potter series, a Death Eater is a follower of Lord Voldemort. ... Azkaban is the fictional wizard prison in the Harry Potter series of books by J. K. Rowling. ... Bartemius Barty Crouch Senior (d. ... Frank Bryce (1917–1994) is a fictional character in the Harry Potter universe. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into List of spells in Harry Potter. ... In the fictional Harry Potter universe, many magical objects exist for the use of the characters. ... Cedric Diggory is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ...


In the fifth book, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Voldemort appears at the climax, having again carefully plotted against Harry.[19] In this book, Harry Potter goes through extreme emotional stress, and according to Rowling, it was necessary to prove that Harry is emotionally vulnerable and thus human, in contrast to his nemesis Voldemort, who is emotionally invulnerable and thus inhuman: "[Harry is] a very human hero, and this is, obviously, there’s a contrast, between him, as a very human hero, and Voldemort, who has deliberately dehumanised himself. […]and Harry, therefore, did have to reach a point where he did almost break down."[20] In this book, Voldemort makes liberal use of the Ministry of Magic's refusal to believe that he has returned.[21] Voldemort engineers a plot to free the Death Eaters from Azkaban and then embarks on a scheme to retrieve the full record of a prophecy regarding Harry and himself which is stored in the Department of Mysteries. He sends a group of Death Eaters to retrieve the prophecy, where they are met by the Order of the Phoenix. All but one, Bellatrix Lestrange, are captured, and Voldemort engages in a ferocious duel with Dumbledore. Voldemort attempts to possess Harry Potter but finds that he cannot; Harry is too full of that which Voldemort finds detestable: love. Sensing that Dumbledore could win, Voldemort disapparates, but not before the Minister of Magic sees him in person, making his return to life public knowledge. OotP redirects here. ... In J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series of novels, the Ministry of Magic is the governing body of the magical community of Britain, succeeding the earlier Wizards Council. ... Bellatrix Lestrange (née Black) is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ...

The boy Tom Riddle, as illustrated by Mary GrandPre.

In the sixth book, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, Voldemort once again declares war, and begins to rise to power once more. He murders Amelia Bones of the Department of Magical Law Enforcement, and begins to target members of the Order of the Phoenix, including Emmeline Vance. Rowling uses several chapters as exposition to establish Voldemort's backstory. In a series of flashbacks, using the pensieve as a plot device, she reveals that Voldemort is the son of the witch Merope Gaunt and muggle Tom Riddle, Sr. However, Riddle abandons Merope before their child's birth, soon after which Merope dies. Tom Riddle, Sr. never comes to find his son.[22] After living in an orphanage, young Tom is picked up by Albus Dumbledore, who takes him to Hogwarts.[23] Riddle is outwardly a model pupil, but is in reality a sadist who enjoys using his powers to harm and control people. He eventually murders his father and grandparents as revenge for abandoning him.[24] The book also discusses Riddle's hatred of "Muggles" (non-magical humans), his obsession with Horcruxes, and his desire to split his soul in order to achieve immortality.[25] J.K. Rowling stated that the fact that Voldemort was conceived under a love potion is related to his inability to understand love.[26] Image File history File links Hbp13. ... Image File history File links Hbp13. ... Mary GrandPré is an American illustrator, best known for her work on the American version of the Harry Potter books. ... Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, released on July 16, 2005, is the sixth of seven novels in J.K. Rowlings popular Harry Potter series. ... Amelia Susan Bones is a fictional character in the Harry Potter series of books. ... This article is about members of the Order of the Phoenix from the Harry Potter books. ... Exposition is a literary technique by which information is conveyed about events that have occurred prior to the beginning of a novel, play, movie or other work of fiction. ... In the Harry Potter series, many magical objects exist for the use of the characters. ... Merope Riddle (née Gaunt) (c. ... Sadism and masochism, in the original sense, describe psychiatric disorders characterized by feelings of sexual pleasure or gratification when inflicting suffering or having it inflicted upon the self, respectively. ... Muggle is the only word used in the Harry Potter series of books by J. K. Rowling to refer to a normal person who lacks any sort of magical ability. ... Tom Riddles diary, the first Horcrux that Harry Potter encountered, as seen in the film Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. ... For other uses, see Soul (disambiguation). ... This article is about human pregnancy. ... In the fictional Harry Potter series created by J. K. Rowling, magic is depicted as a natural force that can be used to override the usual laws of nature while still being approached entirely scientifically. ... For other uses, see Love (disambiguation). ...


In the main plot of the book, Voldemort's next step is to engineer an assault on Hogwarts, and to attack Dumbledore himself. This is accomplished by Draco Malfoy, who arranges transportation into Hogwarts by means of a pair of Vanishing Cabinets, which bypass the extensive protective enchantments placed around the school.[27] The cabinets allow Voldemort's Death Eaters to enter Hogwarts, where a battle commences and Dumbledore is cornered. Hogwarts professor (and triple agent) Severus Snape uses the Killing Curse against Dumbledore when Malfoy is unable to do so himself.[27] Draco Malfoy is a fictional character in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... Severus Snape is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Cruciatus redirects here. ...


Final book

Further information: Deathly Hallows (objects)

In Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, the final book of the Harry Potter series, Voldemort furthers his quest for ultimate power. He disposes of the Minister for Magic and replaces him with Pius Thickenesse, who is under the Imperius Curse.[28] Establishing a totalitarian police state, he has Muggle-borns persecuted and arrested for "stealing magic" from the "pure blood" wizards.[29] After failing to kill Harry with Lucius Malfoy's borrowed wand (to avoid the effect of Priori Incantatem),[30] he goes on a murderous search for the Elder Wand, the most powerful wand ever created, seeing it as the weapon he needs to overcome Harry's and make him truly invincible. He goes on a quest that takes him out of the country to Gregorovitch's wand shop, where he kills the old wandmaker.[31] His journey also takes him to Nurmengard, the prison where Gellert Grindelwald is kept. He ends up killing Grindelwald as well. After finally locating the Elder Wand and stealing it from Dumbledore's tomb, he finds out that Harry and his friends are stealing and destroying his Horcruxes. After offering the occupants of the castle mercy if they give up Harry, he assembles a large army and launches an invasion of Hogwarts, where Harry is searching for Ravenclaw's Lost Diadem, one of the Horcruxes.[32] Voldemort murders Snape believing it would make him the true master of the Elder Wand, since Snape killed Dumbledore.[33] He then calls an hour's armistice, in exchange for Harry Potter.[34] When Harry willingly walks into Voldemort's camp in the forest, Voldemort strikes him down with the Elder Wand.[34] However, the use of Harry's blood to resurrect Voldemort's body proves to be a major setback: while Harry's blood runs in Voldemort's veins, Harry cannot be killed as his mother's protection lives on now in Voldemort too. Instead, the part of Voldemort's soul that resides in Harry's body is destroyed by Voldemort himself and whilst his soul lives in Harry the two are bonded. Voldemort forces Hagrid to carry the apparently lifeless body of Harry back to the castle as a trophy, sparking another battle. In the battle, Voldemort overpowers Minerva McGonagall, Kingsley Shacklebolt and Horace Slughorn. Harry then reveals himself and explains to Voldemort that Draco Malfoy became the true master of the Elder Wand when he disarmed Dumbledore; Harry, in turn, won the wand's allegiance when he took Draco's wand. Refusing to believe this, Voldemort casts the Killing Curse with the Elder Wand while Harry uses a Disarming Charm with Draco's, but the Elder Wand refuses to kill its master and the spell rebounds on Voldemort, who, in the absence of his remaining Horcruxes, is totally annihilated.[35] The Sign of the Deathly Hallows represents all three objects symbolically: the Wand, the Stone, and the Cloak. ... HP7 redirects here. ... A police state is a political condition where the government maintains strict control over society, particularly through suspension of civil rights and often with the use of a force of secret police. ... Lucius Malfoy is a fictional character and antagonist in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Note: The Elder Wand is an extremely powerful magical object from the final book in the Harry Potter series, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. ... Gregorovitch is a wand maker in the Harry Potter series. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Gellert Grindelwald (ca. ... A Horcrux is a class of magical objects introduced in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. ... In the Harry Potter series, the Hogwarts school of witchcraft and wizardry is divided into four houses, each bearing the last name of its founder - Godric Gryffindor, Salazar Slytherin, Rowena Ravenclaw and Helga Hufflepuff. ... Professor Minerva McGonagall is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Kingsley Shacklebolt is a fictional character in the Harry Potter series of books written by J. K. Rowling. ... Horace E. F. Slughorn (born between 1898 and 1902) is a fat, pompous fictional character in the Harry Potter series of novels written by J.K. Rowling. ... Draco Malfoy is a fictional character in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ...


Rowling stated that after his death, Voldemort is forced to exist in the stunted form that Harry sees in the King's Cross-like Limbo after his confrontation with Voldemort in the Forbidden Forest. Rowling also mentioned that, despite his extreme fear of death, he is unable to become a ghost.[36][37] Kings Cross station (often spelt Kings Cross on platform signs) is a railway station in the district of the same name in northeast central London. ...


Portrayals within films

As of 2007, Voldemort appears in four Harry Potter films, namely Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, and Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. He has been portrayed, in his varying incarnations and ages, by a total of six different actors. Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone, released in the United States as Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone, is a 2001 fantasy/adventure film based on the novel of the same name by J.K. Rowling. ... Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets is the second fantasy adventure film in the popular Harry Potter films series, based on the novel by J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. ... Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is a 2005 fantasy adventure film, based on J. K. Rowlings novel of the same name, and is the fourth film in the popular Harry Potter film series. ... Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is a 2007 fantasy adventure film, based on the novel of the same name, by J. K. Rowling. ...


In Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, he is merely a face on the back of Quirrell's head. This was achieved by computer generated imagery. Ian Hart, the actor who played Professor Quirrell in the same film, provided both the voice and the facial source for this character. Voldemort also appears in a scene in the Forbidden Forest where he is seen sucking the blood of a unicorn. As Voldemort's face was altered enough by CG work, and Hart's voice was affected enough, there was no confusion by Hart's playing of the two roles. In that film, he was also shown in a flashback sequence when he arrived at the home of James and Lily Potter to kill them. In this scene Voldemort is played by Richard Bremmer.[38] His next appearance would be in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets as Tom Marvolo Riddle (portrayed by Christian Coulson). Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone, released in the United States as Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone, is a 2001 fantasy/adventure film based on the novel of the same name by J.K. Rowling. ... The seawater creature in The Abyss marked CGIs acceptance in the visual effects industry. ... Ian Hart (born 8 October 1964) is an English actor. ... Professor Quirinus Quirrell is a fictional character in Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone, the first novel in the Harry Potter series written by J.K. Rowling. ... A voice actor (also a voice artist) is a person who provides voices for animated characters (including those in feature films, television series, animated shorts), voice-overs in radio and television commercials, audio dramas, dubbed foreign language films, video games, puppet shows, and amusement rides. ... Richard Bremmer (born 1953 in Warwickshire, England) is a British actor. ... HP2 redirects here. ... Christian Coulson (born 3 October 1978) is a British actor most famous for his film appearance as Tom Marvolo Riddle, the teenage Lord Voldemort, in the second installment of the Harry Potter film franchise, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. ...

Young Tom in his fifth year at Hogwarts as played by Christian Coulson
Young Tom in his fifth year at Hogwarts as played by Christian Coulson

In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Voldemort is initially only heard, possessing the scratchy, weak voice heard in the first film. By the film's climax, however, he appears in his actual physical form for the first time, played by Ralph Fiennes. Voldemort is shown clad in dark black robes, being tall and emaciated, with no hair and yellowish teeth; his wand has a white tone and the handle appears to be made of bone; his finger nails are long and pale blue while his toe nails appear to be infected. Unlike in the book, his pupils are not snake-like and his eyes are green, because producer David Heyman felt that his evil would not be able to be seen and would not fill the audience with fear (his eyes do briefly take on a snake-like appearance when he opens them after turning human, but quickly turn normal). As in the book, the film version of Voldemort has no nose and has snake-like slit nostrils. Ralph Fienne's nose was not covered in makeup on the set, and was digitally removed in post-production. The film version of Voldemort also has a forked tongue. Image File history File linksMetadata Riddleinhogwarts. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Riddleinhogwarts. ... Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is a setting in J. K. Rowlings best-selling Harry Potter series. ... Christian Coulson (born 3 October 1978) is a British actor most famous for his film appearance as Tom Marvolo Riddle, the teenage Lord Voldemort, in the second installment of the Harry Potter film franchise, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. ... Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is a 2005 fantasy adventure film, based on J. K. Rowlings novel of the same name, and is the fourth film in the popular Harry Potter film series. ... Ralph Nathaniel Fiennes, (IPA: ), born 22 December 1962) is a Tony Award-winning, Academy Award-nominated and Genie Award-nominated British actor. ... This article is about the skeletal organs. ... This article is about a medical condition. ... David Heyman is a British film producer born in London, England in 1961. ...


Fiennes himself stated that he had two weeks to shoot the climatic showdown scene where he is gloating at a terrified Harry Potter, played by Daniel Radcliffe. Fiennes said with a chuckle: "I have no doubt children will be afraid of me now if they weren't before." In preparation, he read the novel Goblet of Fire, but jokingly conceded: "I was only interested in my scene, and I had to go through thousands and thousands of other scenes which I did, dutifully, until I got to my scene and I read it many, many, many, many, many times and that was my research."[39] Fiennes reprised his role as Voldemort in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix.[40] Daniel Jacob Radcliffe[1][2] (born 23 July 1989)[3] is an English film, television and stage actor. ... Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is a 2007 fantasy adventure film, based on the novel of the same name, by J. K. Rowling. ...


Fiennes' nephew, Hero Fiennes Tiffin, portrayed Tom Riddle as a child in Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince. Newcomer Frank Dillane, son of actor Stephen Dillane, will replace Christian Coulson as the adolescent Riddle. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince is the yet-to-be released sixth installment in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Stephen Dillane (born 30 November 1956) is a Tony Award-winning British actor. ... Christian Coulson (born 3 October 1978) is a British actor most famous for his film appearance as Tom Marvolo Riddle, the teenage Lord Voldemort, in the second installment of the Harry Potter film franchise, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. ...


Attributes

Personality

Rowling described Voldemort as "the most evil wizard for hundreds and hundreds of years"[41] She elaborated that he is a "raging psychopath, devoid of the normal human responses to other people's suffering"[42] He feels no desire or need for human companionship or friendship, and is completely unable to comprehend the idea of love or affection for another. He believes he is superior to everyone around him, to the point that he frequently refers to himself in the third-person as "Lord Voldemort." Rowling alluded to this saying that Voldemort is "incredibly power hungry. Racist, really".[43] Rowling has also stated that if Voldemort looked into the Mirror of Erised, he would see "Himself, all-powerful and eternal. That's what he wants."[43] This article is about psychological theories of psychopathy. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial quota... This article describes magic in the fictional Harry Potter universe. ...


Rowling also stated that the fact that Voldemort is conceived under the love potion Amortentia — administered by the witch Merope Gaunt to the Muggle Tom Riddle — is related to his inability to understand love; it is "a symbolic way of showing that he came from a loveless union – but of course, everything would have changed if Merope had survived and raised him herself and loved him. The enchantment under which Tom Riddle fathered Voldemort is important because it shows coercion, and there can’t be many more prejudicial ways to enter the world than as the result of such a union".[26] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Witchcraft. ... Merope Riddle (née Gaunt) (c. ... Muggle is the only word used in the Harry Potter series of books by J. K. Rowling to refer to a normal person who lacks any sort of magical ability. ... Tom Riddele, a character in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter serires, was a resident of the village of Little Hangleton and the son of the squire and his wife. ... For other uses, see Love (disambiguation). ... Union generally refers to two or more things joined into one, such as an organization of multiple people or organizations, multiple objects combined into one, and so on. ... For other uses, see Coercion (disambiguation). ... For with(out) prejudice in law, see Prejudice (law). ...


Like most archetypical villains (particularly the evil genius archetype), Voldemort's arrogance inevitably leads to his downfall. He also suffers from a pathological fear of death, which he regards as a shameful and ignominious human weakness. According to Rowling, his Boggart would be his own corpse.[44] Rowling also said that the difference between Harry and Voldemort is that Harry accepts mortality, and thus Harry is in the end stronger than his nemesis [26] Bad guy redirects here. ... A true medical diagnosis, this fear is characterized by an abnormal or irrational fear of death. ... A Boggart in the Harry Potter fictional books is a shape-shifter that takes on the form of its intended victims worst fear. ...


Despite his inner darkness, Voldemort is highly intelligent and charismatic, inspiring many influential wizards and witches such as Lucius Malfoy and the Lestranges to follow him as his loyal "Death Eaters". He also possesses a dry cynical sense of humour, usually laughing at the expense of others but also capable of laughing at himself despite his usually narcissistic demeanour. For other uses, see Charisma (disambiguation). ... Lucius Malfoy is a fictional character and antagonist in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... In the fictional Harry Potter series, a Death Eater is a follower of Lord Voldemort. ... Narcissistic personality disorder (NPD), is a personality disorder defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM IV-R), the diagnostic classification system used in the United States, as a pervasive pattern of grandiosity, need for admiration, and a lack of empathy. ...


Magical abilities and skills

Replica of Voldemorts wand

Throughout the series, Rowling establishes Voldemort as an extremely powerful, intelligent, and ruthless Dark Wizard. He is also known as one of the greatest Legilimens in the world and a highly accomplished Occlumens, and is thus able to read minds as well as shield his own from penetration. However, in the seventh book, he loses control, allowing Harry to see occasionally through his eyes and hear his thoughts.[45] Voldemort can fly without support, defying the law of magic that states only objects can fly through use of a flying charm. Voldemort first exhibits the ability to fly while in pursuit of Harry Potter over Little Whinging.[30] In addition, Voldemort is a Parselmouth, a trait he inherited from his ancestor, Salazar Slytherin. It seems that most of his Gaunt ancestors inherited this highly unusual trait: such traits are commonly passed down through families through inbreeding, a practice employed by the Gaunt Family. When Voldemort attempts to kill Harry, turning him into a Horcrux, his ability to speak Parseltongue is passed to Harry through the small bit of the former's soul. After that bit of soul is destroyed, Harry loses this ability.[45] Voldemort claims he has experimented and pushed the boundaries of magic farther than they had ever been pushed. Albus Dumbledore states that Voldemort's knowledge of magic is more extensive than any wizard alive[46] and that even Dumbledore's most powerful protective spells and charms would not likely be sufficient if Voldemort returned to full power. Dumbledore also said that Voldemort was probably the most brilliant student Hogwarts has ever seen. [47] In the Harry Potter series created by J.K. Rowling, magic is depicted as a natural force that can be used to override the usual laws of nature while still being approached entirely scientifically. ... In the Harry Potter series created by J.K. Rowling, magic is depicted as a natural force that can be used to override the usual laws of nature while still being approached entirely scientifically. ... Little Whinging, Surrey, England, is a fictitious town to the south of London, described in the Harry Potter series of novels. ... This article describes magic in the fictional Harry Potter universe. ... Inbreeding is breeding between close relatives, whether plant or animal. ...


On her homepage, Rowling wrote that Voldemort's wand is made of yew, whose sap is poisonous and which symbolises death.[48] It forms a deliberate contrast to the wand of his nemesis Harry Potter, whose wand is made of holly, which she chose because holly is alleged to repel evil.[48] Species Taxus baccata - European Yew Taxus brevifolia - Pacific Yew Taxus canadensis - Canadian Yew Taxus chinensis - Chinese Yew Taxus cuspidata - Japanese Yew Taxus floridana - Florida Yew Taxus globosa - Mexican Yew Taxus sumatrana - Sumatran Yew Taxus wallichiana - Himalayan Yew Yews are small coniferous trees or shrubs in the genus Taxus in the... This article is about the plant. ...


Rowling establishes in the books that Voldemort is magically connected to Harry Potter via Harry's forehead scar. He disembodies himself when his Killing Curse targeting Harry Potter rebounds on him, leaving the scar on Harry's forehead. In the books, Harry's scar serves as an indicator of Voldemort's presence: it burns when the Dark Lord is near or whenever Voldemort is feeling particularly murderous or exultant. According to Rowling, by attacking Harry when he was a baby Voldemort gave him "tools [that] no other wizard possessed – the scar and the ability it conferred, a magical window into Voldemort's mind."[49] Cruciatus redirects here. ...


Outward appearance

After he regained his body in the fourth book, Rowling described Voldemort as having very pale skin, a chalk-white, skull-like face, snake-like slits for nostrils, red eyes and cat-like slits for pupils, a skeletally thin body and long, thin hands with unnaturally long fingers.[15] As mentioned in the first chapter of the seventh book, he also has no lips. Earlier in life, as seen through flashbacks contained in the second and sixth books, Tom Marvolo Riddle is described as very handsome which is seemingly an inherited trait from his father, for his mother "...was no beauty".[23] The transformation into his monstrous state is believed to have been the result of creating his horcruxes, becoming less human as he continued to divide his soul.[25] However, in the movies, (with the exception of the first), Voldemort's eyes are blue with round pupils. The human eye The pupil is the central transparent area (showing as black). ...


Family

Family tree

Note: the names 'Thomas' and 'Mary' Riddle are taken from the films.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Salazar Slytherin
 
The Peverell Family
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Thomas Riddle
 
Mary Riddle
 
Marvolo Gaunt
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tom Riddle Sr
 
Merope Gaunt
 
Morfin Gaunt
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tom Marvolo Riddle
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Harry Potter

This article refers to the founders of Hogwarts, the school in J.K. Rowlings fictional Harry Potter series. ... The House of Gaunt is a fictional family of wizards and witches in the Harry Potter series of books by J. K. Rowling. ... Tom Riddele, a character in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter serires, was a resident of the village of Little Hangleton and the son of the squire and his wife. ... The House of Gaunt is a fictional family of wizards and witches in the Harry Potter series of books by J. K. Rowling. ... The House of Gaunt is a fictional family of wizards and witches in the Harry Potter series of books by J. K. Rowling. ... Tom Marvolo Riddle (born 31 December 1926) is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series. ... Harry James Potter is the title character and the main protagonist of J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter fantasy series. ...

Riddle family

The Riddle family consisted of old Mr and Mrs Riddle (named Thomas and Mary Riddle in the film adaptation of the fourth novel) and their son, Tom Riddle (Senior). They owned over half of the valley in which the town of Little Hangleton lay, and Thomas was the most prominent inhabitant of that town. They lived in The Riddle House, a large house with fine gardens, and were very unpopular locally, due to their snobbish attitudes. Tom, apparently the only child of Thomas and Mary, certainly indulged in the typical pursuits of the upper class in the first half of the twentieth century, socialising with attractive women of his class, riding horses, and enjoying his status in the town. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is a 2005 fantasy adventure film, based on J. K. Rowlings novel of the same name, and is the fourth film in the popular Harry Potter film series. ... The riddle house The Riddle house is where Tom Riddle senior(Voldemorts father)and his parents lived. ... For the 1960s British Rock band, see The Snobs. ...


Rowling revealed in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince that young Merope Gaunt made efforts to get as close to Tom as she could, peering at him through the windows and bushes at every opportunity. Morfin noticed his sister's affection for Tom Riddle, and hexed Tom as he rode by, covering him in hives. As surmised by Dumbledore, once Merope was alone she was able to make her move for Tom Riddle. She offered Tom a drink laced with a love potion as he rode by one day without his attractive companion, Cecilia. He became infatuated with Merope and they eloped. Within three months of the marriage, Merope became pregnant. Merope decided to stop giving Tom the love potion; she either believed that he had fallen in love with her on his own or he would at least stay for their unborn child. She was wrong, and Tom quickly left his pregnant wife and went home to his parents, claiming to have been "hoodwinked" and tricked into marrying Merope.[22] Tom Marvolo Riddle, their son, was born on the 31st of December[50] and was left to grow up in an orphanage. In Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, Riddle states that the Chamber of Secrets was opened in his fifth year. Additionally, the book states that the diary is 50 years old. As the chamber of secrets is set in 1992, it would be reasonable to estimate that Riddle is in his mid sixties. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, released on July 16, 2005, is the sixth of seven novels in J.K. Rowlings popular Harry Potter series. ... Lord Voldemort (pronounced )[1][2] is a fictional character and the primary antagonist in the Harry Potter novel series written by British author J. K. Rowling. ... Hives redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Readers first learn about the doom of the Riddles in the beginning of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. Tom Riddle Sr and his parents were murdered by Tom Marvolo Riddle himself; however it was the Riddles' gardener Frank Bryce who was blamed for the murders in the Muggle world,[17] while in the Wizarding world Morfin Gaunt was framed for them.[24] HP4 redirects here. ... Frank Bryce (1917–1994) is a fictional character in the Harry Potter universe. ... Muggle is the only word used in the Harry Potter series of books by J. K. Rowling to refer to a normal person who lacks any sort of magical ability. ... Lord Voldemort (pronounced )[1][2] is a fictional character and the primary antagonist in the Harry Potter novel series written by British author J. K. Rowling. ...


Gaunt family

Most of the House of Gaunt background is exposed in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince through Dumbledore's Pensieve. The Gaunts were once a very powerful and influential family, the last known descendants of Salazar Slytherin, but were reduced to poverty, as shown in the Pensieve's memory that Harry Potter and Dumbledore witnessed. Like Salazar Slytherin, the Gaunts were parselmouths.[22] Exposition is a literary technique by which information is conveyed about events that have occurred prior to the beginning of a novel, play, movie or other work of fiction. ... Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, released on July 16, 2005, is the sixth of seven novels in J.K. Rowlings popular Harry Potter series. ... In the fictional Harry Potter series, many magical objects exist for the use of the characters. ... In the Harry Potter series, the Hogwarts school of witchcraft and wizardry is divided into four houses, each bearing the last name of its founder - Godric Gryffindor, Salazar Slytherin, Rowena Ravenclaw and Helga Hufflepuff. ... This article describes magic in the fictional Harry Potter universe. ...


Marvolo Gaunt was the last Gaunt family patriarch. He was sentenced to a short term in Azkaban for his and his son's assault upon a Ministry of Magic official. His stint in Azkaban had serious implications on Marvolo's health and he died soon after returning home. His signet ring passed to his son, Morfin Gaunt, who was convicted on the grounds of assaulting a Muggle, and later died in Azkaban after being convicted again, this time for the murder of Tom Riddle Sr and Riddle's parents, a crime actually committed by his nephew.[24] The truth was discovered much later by Dumbledore, who visited Morfin at Azkaban to gather information about Voldemort. After Dumbledore successfully extracted Morfin's memory of his encounter with his nephew, he tried to use the evidence to have Morfin released, but Morfin died before the decision could be made. As he was the last male Gaunt, the House of Gaunt ended with Morfin's death. For other senses, see Patriarch (disambiguation). ... Azkaban is the fictional wizard prison in the Harry Potter series of books by J. K. Rowling. ... In the fictional universe of the Harry Potter series as written by J. K. Rowling, the Ministry of Magic is the governing body of the magical community of Britain and succeeded the earlier Wizards Council. ... This article is about the authentication means. ... Azkaban is the fictional wizard prison in the Harry Potter series of books by J. K. Rowling. ...


Merope Gaunt was the daughter of Marvolo, sister of Morfin. Harry's first impression of her was that she looked "like the most defeated person he had ever seen", probably due to the fact that she lived in raggedness, squalor and abuse. She married Tom Riddle Sr. and became pregnant within three months of the wedding.[22] It is suggested that she tricked her husband by using a love potion, but when she became pregnant, she decided to stop administering the potion. It is implied that Merope had grown tired of living a lie and thought that her husband might have grown to love her, or that he might have stayed for the sake of their unborn child; however, he left her. Desperate, Merope wandered through the streets of London. The only thing she had left was the heavy gold locket that had once belonged to Salazar Slytherin, one of her family's most treasured items, which she sold for a very small amount. By the time she was due to give birth, she stumbled into a Muggle orphanage; within the hour, she gave birth to her only son, Tom Marvolo Riddle, and died within the next hour. In the fictional Harry Potter series created by J. K. Rowling, magic is depicted as a natural force that can be used to override the usual laws of nature while still being approached entirely scientifically. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Muggle is the only word used in the Harry Potter series of books by J. K. Rowling to refer to a normal person who lacks any sort of magical ability. ...


The Gaunts are distantly related to Harry Potter because all of them are descendants of the Peverell brothers.[51]


References

  1. ^ Harry Potter: Pronunciation Guide. Scholastic. Retrieved on 2007-08-22.
  2. ^ Enchanted with Potter Literature: Fans line up for hours to get their books signed. The Orange County Register, Santa Ana, CA (1999-10-26). Retrieved on 2006-12-28.
  3. ^ Lord Voldemort Is Favourite Literary Villain. LifeStyleExtra. Retrieved on 2008-01-21.
  4. ^ "J.K. Rowling on The Diane Rehm Show, WAMU Radio Washington, D.C., October 20, 1999".
  5. ^ "Lydon, Christopher. J.K. Rowling interview transcript, The Connection (WBUR Radio), 12 October 1999".
  6. ^ " "JK Rowling talks about Book Four," cBBC Newsround, 8 July 2000".
  7. ^ " Jensen, Jeff. "'Fire' Storm," Entertainment Weekly, 7 September 2000".
  8. ^ "JK Rowling's World Book Day Chat, 4 March 2004".
  9. ^ "Anelli, Melissa and Emerson Spartz. "The Leaky Cauldron and MuggleNet interview Joanne Kathleen Rowling: Part Two," The Leaky Cauldron, 16 July 2005".
  10. ^ Enchanted with Potter Literature: Fans line up for hours to get their books signed. The Orange County Register, Santa Ana, CA (1999-10-26). Retrieved on 2006-12-28.
  11. ^ "J.K. Rowling on The Diane Rehm Show, WAMU Radio Washington, D.C., October 20, 1999". Retrieved on 2007-08-15.
  12. ^ [HP2], chapter 4
  13. ^ a b [HP2], chapter 17
  14. ^ [HP3], chapter 16
  15. ^ a b c d [HP4], chapters 32 to 35
  16. ^ [HP4], chapter 32
  17. ^ a b c [HP4], chapter1
  18. ^ [HP4], chapter 34
  19. ^ [HP5], chapters 35-37
  20. ^ "Living With Harry Potter". Retrieved on 2007-08-15.
  21. ^ [HP4], chapter 36
  22. ^ a b c d [HP6], chapter 10
  23. ^ a b [HP6], chapter 13
  24. ^ a b c [HP6], chapter 17
  25. ^ a b [HP6], chapter 23
  26. ^ a b c "'J.K. Rowling Web Chat Transcript". Retrieved on 2007-08-15.
  27. ^ a b [HP6], chapters 36-38
  28. ^ [HP7], chapter 8
  29. ^ [HP7], chapters 12, 13, and 15
  30. ^ a b [HP7], chapter 4
  31. ^ [HP7], chapter 14
  32. ^ [HP7], chapter 31
  33. ^ [HP7], chapter 32
  34. ^ a b [HP7], chapter 34
  35. ^ [HP7], chapter 36
  36. ^ Webchat with J.K. Rowling, 30 July 2007 (HTML). Retrieved on 2007-10-06.
  37. ^ [HP7], chapter 35
  38. ^ Credit Confusion. MuggleNet. Retrieved on 2007-01-07.
  39. ^ Fischer, Paul. Ralph Fiennes for "White Countess" and "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire". Retrieved on 2007-01-07.
  40. ^ Helena Bonham Carter Joins the All-Star Cast and Nicholas Hooper Signs on to Compose the Score of Warner Bros. Pictures' Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. Warner Bros. (2006-08-02). Retrieved on 2006-12-23.
  41. ^ "J.K. Rowling on The Diane Rehm Show, WAMU Radio Washington, D.C., October 20, 1999". Retrieved on 2007-08-15.
  42. ^ Jeff Jensen (2000-09-07). "Fire Storm". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved on 2008-04-20.
  43. ^ a b "Grossman, Lev. "J.K. Rowling Hogwarts And All," Time Magazine, 17 July, 2005". Retrieved on 2007-08-15.
  44. ^ "Anelli, Melissa and Emerson Spartz. "The Leaky Cauldron and MuggleNet interview Joanne Kathleen Rowling: Part Two," The Leaky Cauldron, 16 July 2005".
  45. ^ a b "J.K. Rowling Web Chat Transcript", The Leaky Cauldron, 2007-07-30. Retrieved on 2007-07-30. 
  46. ^ [HP5], chapter 37
  47. ^ [HP2], chapter 18
  48. ^ a b Section: Extra Stuff WANDS. Retrieved on 2007-08-15..
  49. ^ jkrowling.com F.A.Q.
  50. ^ F.A.Q
  51. ^ "TIME Person of The Year Runner-up: J.K. Rowling", Time Magazine, 2007-12-23. Retrieved on 2007-12-23. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article is about the day of the year. ... HP2 redirects here. ... HP2 redirects here. ... HP3 redirects here. ... HP4 redirects here. ... HP4 redirects here. ... HP4 redirects here. ... HP4 redirects here. ... OotP redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article is about the day of the year. ... HP4 redirects here. ... Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, released on July 16, 2005, is the sixth of seven novels in J.K. Rowlings popular Harry Potter series. ... Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, released on July 16, 2005, is the sixth of seven novels in J.K. Rowlings popular Harry Potter series. ... Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, released on July 16, 2005, is the sixth of seven novels in J.K. Rowlings popular Harry Potter series. ... Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, released on July 16, 2005, is the sixth of seven novels in J.K. Rowlings popular Harry Potter series. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article is about the day of the year. ... Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, released on July 16, 2005, is the sixth of seven novels in J.K. Rowlings popular Harry Potter series. ... HP7 redirects here. ... HP7 redirects here. ... HP7 redirects here. ... HP7 redirects here. ... HP7 redirects here. ... HP7 redirects here. ... HP7 redirects here. ... HP7 redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... HP7 redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... “WB” redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article is about the day of the year. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article is about the day of the year. ... -1... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... OotP redirects here. ... HP2 redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article is about the day of the year. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Bibliography

This article is about the concept of time. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

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The Harry Potter Wiki has information related to: Lord Voldemort

Harry James Potter is the title character and the main protagonist of J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter fantasy series. ... Ronald Bilius Ron Weasley is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Hermione Jean Granger (first name pronounced ) is a fictional character in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... Albus Percival Wulfric Brian Dumbledore is a fictional character within the Harry Potter series written by British author J. K. Rowling. ... Severus Snape is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Rubeus Hagrid is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Sirius Black is a fictional character in J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... Draco Malfoy is a fictional character in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... Ginevra Molly Ginny Weasley is a fictional character in J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... Neville Longbottom is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Luna Lovegood is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... James and Lily Potter are fictional characters in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... The Weasley family are a fictional family of wizards who figure prominently in the plot of J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter series of novels. ... The following are teachers and staff at Hogwarts in the Harry Potter book series by J. K. Rowling. ... In the Harry Potter novels, by J. K. Rowling, the Order of the Phoenix is a fictional organisation founded by Albus Dumbledore to fight Lord Voldemort and his followers, the Death Eaters. ... In the fictional Harry Potter series, a Death Eater is a follower of Lord Voldemort. ... -1... Dobby House-elves are fictional magical creatures in the Harry Potter series of books written by J. K. Rowling. ... Hogwarts, a wizarding school. ... In the fictional Harry Potter series created by J. K. Rowling, magic is depicted as a natural force that can be used to override the usual laws of nature while still being approached entirely scientifically. ... The chronology is a general timeline of events derived from information provided in the series of Harry Potter novels written by J.K. Rowling, along with additional materials posted on her web site and published in various interviews. ... The Harry Potter book and film series are set in a number of fictional locations. ... Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is a setting in J. K. Rowlings best-selling Harry Potter series. ... In the fictional universe of the Harry Potter series as written by J. K. Rowling, the Ministry of Magic is the governing body of the magical community of Britain and succeeded the earlier Wizards Council. ... Quidditch is a fictional sport developed by J. K. Rowling, found in the internationally bestselling Harry Potter novels and films. ... Magical creatures comprise a colourful and integral aspect of the wizarding world in the Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling. ... Spells in Harry Potter occur in the wizarding world of the series of books by author J. K. Rowling. ... In the fictional Harry Potter series, many magical objects exist for the use of the characters. ... Tom Riddles diary, the first Horcrux that Harry Potter encountered, as seen in the film Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. ... Because students in the novels board the train to Hogwarts at Platform 9¾ at Kings Cross railway station in London, the real Kings Cross has erected a sign at a wall between tracks 9 and 10 to commemorate this. ... // Writer J. K. Rowling cites several writers as influences in her creation of her bestselling Harry Potter series. ... Different composers have been involved in writing the music for the Harry Potter films. ... The immense popularity and wide recognition of JK Rowlings Harry Potter fantasy series has led to it being extensively parodied, in works spanning nearly every medium. ... There have been many published theories about politics in the Harry Potter books and from academic circles. ... The cover of Harry Potter en de Steen der Wijzen (Harry Potter and the Stone of the Wise Men) – the Dutch language translation of the first book, jointly published by De Harmonie and Standaard. ... Fantastic Beasts & Where to Find Them is a 2001 book written by English author J. K. Rowling to benefit the British charity Comic Relief. ... Quidditch Through the Ages is both a fictional book described in the Harry Potter series of novels by the English author J. K. Rowling, and a real book by that author, although her name is only stated in the book as the copyright holder of the Harry Potter-name. ... The Tales of Beedle the Bard is the title of a book of fairy tales Albus Dumbledore left Hermione Granger in his will. ... Lego Harry Potter is a Lego theme based on the books and films of the Harry Potter series. ... This is the back side of each card in the game. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Lord Voldemort - Uncyclopedia, the content-free encyclopedia (1423 words)
Lord Voldemort is an agent of The Dark Side of the Repo.
Lord Voldemort's parents fashioned a tiny rocket that (using fl hole theory and a large engine) was supposed to propel the young Lord to Earth and allow him to gain control like Mummy and Daddy had always dreamed.
Lord Voldemort now has robot legs, and 5 blue Reposwords that he is planning to use in his next attack on the NRA headquarters, which he will wage with the help of his newly found allies, the people from the iPod commercials.
Lord Voldemort (128 words)
Lord Voldemort led a "Dark Arts" campaign in which he was personally responsible for the murder of hundreds of muggles and wizards.
Lord Voldemort killed Harry's parents when he was about 1 year old and attempted to kill Harry.
Nearly everyone in the wizarding world is extremely afraid of Lord Voldemort, and will not even utter his name for fear that that may give him strength to return.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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