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Encyclopedia > Lord Randolph Churchill
Lord Randolph Henry Spencer Churchill
Lord Randolph Henry Spencer Churchill

Lord Randolph Henry Spencer-Churchill (13 February 184924 January 1895) was a British statesman. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1057x1420, 414 KB) Summary Lord Randolph Churchill Licensing This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1057x1420, 414 KB) Summary Lord Randolph Churchill Licensing This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... January 24 is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Statesman is a respectful term used to refer to politicians, and other notable figures of state. ...


Lord Randolph was the third son of the 7th Duke of Marlborough and Frances (1822–1899), daughter of the 3rd Marquess of Londonderry and his wife Frances Anne Vane. He was the father of the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom Sir Winston Churchill. His Grace The Duke of Marlborough John Winston Spencer-Churchill, 7th Duke of Marlborough (2 June 1822 - 4 July 1883); English statesman. ... Charles William Vane, 3rd Marquess of Londonderry, KG, GCB, GCH (May 18, 1778) - (March 6, 1854) was a British soldier, politician and nobleman, the son (by his second wife) of Robert Stewart, 1st Marquess of Londonderry, and half-brother to Robert Stewart, Viscount Castlereagh. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of a cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, FRS, PC (Can) (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was a British politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. ...

Contents

Early life

He was born at 3 Wilton Terrace, Belgravia, London. His early education was conducted at home, and at Tabor's Preparatory School at Cheam. In January 1863 he went to Eton College, where he remained until July 1865. He did not stand out either at academic work or sport while at Eton; his contemporaries describe him as a vivacious and rather unruly boy. In October 1867 he matriculated at Merton College, Oxford. He had a liking for sport, but was also an avid reader, and obtained a second-class degree in jurisprudence and modern history in 1870. In 1874 he was elected to Parliament as Conservative member for Woodstock, defeating George Brodrick, a fellow, and afterwards warden, of Merton College. His maiden speech, delivered in his first session, made no impression on the House. Belgravia is a district in the City of Westminster in London, to the south-west of Buckingham Palace. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Cheam is a large suburban village close to Sutton in the London Borough of Sutton, England. ... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (privately funded and independent) for boys, founded in 1440 by King Henry VI. It is located in Eton, Berkshire, near Windsor in England, situated north of Windsor... College name The House of Scholars of Merton Named after Walter de Merton Established 1264 Sister College Peterhouse Warden Prof. ... Type Lower House Speaker of the House of Commons Leader of the House of Commons Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Harriet Harman, QC, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader of the House of Commons Theresa May, PC, (Conservative) since December 6, 2005 Members 646 Political groups... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... Woodstock was a parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom. ... A maiden speech is the first speech given by a newly elected representative in such bodies as the House of Commons or the United States House of Representatives. ...


Influential marriage

Lord Randolph Churchill married on 15 April 1874 Jennie Jerome, daughter of Leonard Jerome, of New York in the United States, by whom he had two sons, Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill (1874–1965) and John Strange Churchill (1880–1947). Jennie Jerome's social contacts greatly helped advance Lord Randolph's early career. is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Jennie Jerome in 1874 Jeanette (Jennie) Jerome [1] CI DStJ, known also as Lady Randolph Churchill (January 9, 1854 – June 9, 1921) was an American society beauty, best known to history as the mother of British prime minister Winston Churchill. ... Leonard Walter Jerome, born November 3, 1817 in Pompey, New York, United States – died March 3, 1891 at Brighton, England , was a Brooklyn, New York entrepreneur and grandfather of Sir Winston Churchill. ... NY redirects here. ... Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, FRS, PC (Can) (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was a British politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. ... Major John Strange Spencer-Churchill, DSO (4 February 1880 - 23 February 1947) was the son of Lord Randolph Henry Spencer-Churchill and Jennie Jerome, and brother of Winston Churchill. ...


It has been long rumored that their second son, John, was not fathered by Lord Randolph, but instead was possibly the son of an Irish nobleman, Col. John Strange Jocelyn, 5th Earl of Roden (1823–1897), with whom she had been involved in a secret affair. That does not seem likely, given the similarity of names, which would seem a bit obvious in the circumstances. However affairs among the social elite at the time were common, and the Churchills' marriage was no different. Her influential lovers during their marriage included Count Charles Andreas Kinsky, King Edward VII of the United Kingdom (after the child's birth), and Milan Obrenović IV of Serbia. Lord Randolph did quarrel for a time with Edward VII, during the latter's affair with Jennie Jerome. However, they later mended their friendship, which would remain close until Lord Randolph's death.[1] Karel Andreas Kinsky 1858-1919 Count Karel Kinsky was the son of Count Octavian Kinsky (1813-1879)the head of the Kinsky dynasty and Agnes Schaffgotsch genannt Semperfrei von und zu Kynast und Greiffenstein (1810-1888) Karel born into the familys great equine tradition, inherited a love of horses. ... Edward VII King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Emperor of India His Majesty King Edward VII (9 November 1841–6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth realms, and the Emperor of India. ... Milan I, born Milan Obrenovich IV, (August 22, 1854 – February 11, 1901), was the king of Serbia from 1882 to 1889. ... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 9th century   -  First unified state c. ...


The "Fourth Party"

It was not until 1878 that he came to public notice as the exponent of a species of independent Conservatism. He made a series of furious attacks on Sir Stafford Northcote, R. A. Cross, and other prominent members of the "old gang". George Sclater-Booth (afterwards 1st Baron Basing), President of the Local Government Board, was a specific target, and the minister's County Government Bill was fiercely denounced as the "crowning dishonour to Tory principles", and the "supreme violation of political honesty". Lord Randolph's attitude, and the vituperative fluency of his invective, made him a parliamentary figure of some importance before the dissolution of the 1874 parliament, though he was not yet taken quite seriously. The Rt Hon. ... The Rt Hon. ... George Sclater-Booth, 1st Baron Basing (19 May 1826–22 October 1894), known as George Sclater-Booth before 7 July 1887, was a British Conservative politician. ...

1881 caricature from Punch

In the new parliament of 1880 he speedily began to play a more notable role. Along with Sir Henry Drummond-Wolff, Sir John Gorst and occasionally Arthur Balfour, he made himself known as the audacious opponent of the Liberal administration and the unsparing critic of the Conservative front bench. The "fourth party", as it was nicknamed, at first did little damage to the government, but awakened the opposition from its apathy; Churchill roused the Conservatives by leading resistance to Charles Bradlaugh, the member for Northampton, who, though an avowed atheist or agnostic, was prepared to take the parliamentary oath. Sir Stafford Northcote, the Conservative leader in the Lower House, was forced to take a strong line on this difficult question by the energy of the fourth party. The long controversy over Bradlaugh's seat, showed that Lord Randolph Churchill was a parliamentary champion who added to his audacity much tactical skill and shrewdness. He continued to play a conspicuous part throughout the parliament of 1880 to 1885, targeting William Ewart Gladstone as well as the Conservative front bench, some of whose members, particularly Sir Richard Cross and William Henry Smith, he singled out for attack. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (560x836, 38 KB)1881 caricature of Lord Randolph Churchill. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (560x836, 38 KB)1881 caricature of Lord Randolph Churchill. ... Caricature from Punch, 1882 Sir Henry Drummond-Wolff (1830 - October 11, 1908), son of Joseph Wolff, was a well-known English diplomat and Conservative politician, who started as a clerk in the foreign office and was created KCMG in 1862 for various services abroad. ... Sir John Eldon Gorst, (1835-1916), was a British lawyer and politician. ... Arthur James Balfour, 1st Earl of Balfour (25 July 1848 - March 19, 1930) was a British statesman and the thirty-third Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... Charles Bradlaugh (26 September 1833 _ 30 January 1891) was a political activist and one of the most famous English atheists of the 19th century. ... Northampton was a parliamentary constituency centred on the town of Northampton which existed until 1974. ... The Rt Hon. ... William Ewart Gladstone (29 December 1809 – 19 May 1898) was a British Liberal Party statesman and Prime Minister (1868–1874, 1880–1885, 1886 and 1892–1894). ... The Rt Hon. ... The Rt Hon. ...


From the beginning of the Egyptian imbroglio Lord Randolph was emphatically opposed to almost every step taken by the government. He declared that the suppression of Arabi Pasha's rebellion was an error, and the restoration of the khedive's authority a crime. He called Gladstone the "Moloch of Midlothian", for whom torrents of blood had been shed in Africa. He was equally severe on the domestic policy of the administration, and was particularly bitter in his criticism of the Kilmainham treaty and the rapprochement between the Gladstonians and the Parnellites. Colonel Ahmad Urabi (April 1, 1841 - September 21, 1911), (Arabic: أحمد عرابي) also known as Urabi Pasha or Orabi Pasha, was an Egyptian army general who revolted against the khedive and European domination of Egypt in 1879 in what has become known as the Urabi Revolt. ... For the HMS Khedive, see USS Cordova. ... Charles Stewart Parnell, the uncrowned King of Ireland Charles Stewart Parnell[1] (27 June 1846 – 6 October 1891) was an Irish political leader and one of the most important figures in 19th century Ireland and the United Kingdom; William Ewart Gladstone described him as the most remarkable person he had...


Tory democracy

By 1885 he had formulated the policy of progressive Conservatism which was known as "Tory democracy". He declared that the Conservatives ought to adopt, rather than oppose, popular reforms, and to challenge the claims of the Liberals to pose as champions of the masses. His views were largely accepted by the official Conservative leaders in the treatment of the Gladstonian Franchise Bill of 1884. Lord Randolph insisted that the principle of the bill should be accepted by the opposition, and that resistance should be focused on the refusal of the government to combine with it a scheme of redistribution. The prominent, and on the whole judicious and successful, part he played in the debates on these questions, still further increased his influence with the rank and file of the Conservatives in the constituencies.


At the same time he was actively spreading the gospel of democratic Toryism in a series of platform campaigns. In 1883 and 1884 he invaded the Radical stronghold of Birmingham, and in the latter year took part in a Conservative garden party at Aston Manor, at which his opponents paid him the compliment of raising a serious riot. He gave constant attention to the party organization, which had fallen into considerable disorder after 1880, and was an active promoter of the Primrose League. Birmingham (pron. ... Primrose League badges The Primrose League was an organization for spreading Conservative principles amongst the British democracy, founded in 1883 and active until the mid 1990s, being finally wound up about 2003. ...


Office

In 1884 progressive Toryism won out. At the conference of the Central Union of Conservative Associations, Lord Randolph was nominated chairman, despite the opposition of the parliamentary leaders. A split was averted by Lord Randolph's voluntary resignation; but the episode had confirmed his title to a leading place in the Tory ranks. It was strengthened by the prominent part he played in the events immediately preceding the fall of the Liberal government in 1885; and when Hugh Childers's budget resolutions were defeated by the Conservatives, aided by about half the Parnellites, Lord Randolph Churchill's admirers were justified in proclaiming him to have been the "organizer of victory". His services were, at any rate, far too important to be refused recognition; and in Lord Salisbury's cabinet of 1885 he was made Secretary of State for India. As the price of entry he demanded that Sir Stafford Northcote be removed from the Commons, despite being the Conservative leader there. Salisbury was more than willing to concede this and Northcote went to the Lords as the Earl of Iddlesleigh. During his tenure at the India Office during the short-lived minority Conservative administration, Churchill reversed policy over Burma. He sided with commercial interests and directed the Viceroy, Lord Dufferin, to invade Upper Burma in November 1885. With little discussion, Churchill then decided to annex the final remnant of the once great Burmese kingdom, adding it as a new province of the Indian Raj as a "New Year present" for Queen Victoria on 1 January 1886. Caricature from Punch, 1882 Hugh Culling Eardley Childers (June 25, 1827 - January 29, 1896) was a British and Australian Liberal statesman of the nineteenth century. ... Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury, KG, GCVO, PC (3 February 1830 – 22 August 1903), known as Lord Robert Cecil before 1865 and as Viscount Cranborne from 1865 until 1868, was a British statesman and Prime Minister on three occasions, for a total of over 13 years. ... The office of Secretary of State for India or India Secretary was created in 1858 when India was brought under direct British rule (British Raj). ... Categories: Stub | Ontario counties and regions ... Upper Burma was a term used by the British to refer to the central and northern area of what is now the country of Myanmar. ... In many Indian languages, Raj literally means Prince or Royalty though is often used to mean something more like the English term of empire and as such is often used in reference to the Mughal Raj and the British Raj: the period of direct colonial rule of India by the...


In the autumn election of 1885 he contested Birmingham Central against John Bright, and though defeated here, was at the same time returned by a very large majority for South Paddington. In the contest which arose over Gladstone's Home Rule bill, Lord Randolph again bore a conspicuous part, and in the electioneering campaign his activity was only second to that of some of the Liberal Unionists, Lord Hartington, George Goschen and Joseph Chamberlain. He was now the recognized Conservative champion in the Lower Chamber, and when the second Salisbury administration was formed after the general election of 1886 he became Chancellor of the Exchequer and Leader of the House of Commons. Birmingham Central is a former parliamentary constituency in the city of Birmingham, England. ... John Bright John Bright (November 16, 1811–March 27, 1889), was a British Radical and Liberal statesman, associated with Richard Cobden in the formation of the Anti-Corn Law League. ... Paddington South was a Parliamentary constituency in London which returned one Member of Parliament. ... Devolution or Home rule is the pooling of powers from central government to government at regional or local level. ... For the Canadian party see Liberal-Unionist The Liberal Unionists were a British political party that split away from the Liberals in 1886, and had effectively merged with the Conservatives by the turn of the century. ... Spencer Compton Cavendish, 8th Duke of Devonshire (23 July 1833 - 24 March 1908) was a British Liberal statesman, previously known (1858-1891) as Marquess of Hartington (a courtesy title). ... George Joachim Goschen, 1st Viscount Goschen (10 August 1831 - 7 February 1907) was a British statesman and businessman ironically best remembered for being forgotten by Lord Randolph Churchill. ... The Rt. ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British Cabinet minister responsible for all economic and financial matters. ... The Leader of the House of Commons is a member of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom who is responsible for arranging government business in the House of Commons. ...


Eclipse

His management of the House was on the whole successful, and was marked by tact, discretion and temper. But he had never really reconciled himself with some of his colleagues, and there was a good deal of friction in his relations with them, which ended with his sudden resignation on 20 December 1886. Various motives influenced him in taking this surprising step; but the only ostensible cause was that put forward in his letter to Lord Salisbury, which was read in the House of Commons on 27 January. In this document he stated that his resignation was due to his inability, as Chancellor of the Exchequer, to concur in the demands made on the Treasury by the ministers at the head of the naval and military establishments. It was commonly supposed that he expected his resignation to be followed by the unconditional surrender of the cabinet, and his restoration to office on his own terms. The sequel, however, was entirely different. The cabinet was reconstructed with Goschen as Chancellor of the Exchequer (Lord Randolph had "forgotten Goschen", as he is said to have remarked). For the next few years there was some speculation about a return to frontline politics, as often happens when a Cabinet minister resigns, but Churchill's own career as a Conservative chief was over. is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury, KG, GCVO, PC (3 February 1830 – 22 August 1903), known as Lord Robert Cecil before 1865 and as Viscount Cranborne from 1865 until 1868, was a British statesman and Prime Minister on three occasions, for a total of over 13 years. ... Type Lower House Speaker of the House of Commons Leader of the House of Commons Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Harriet Harman, QC, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader of the House of Commons Theresa May, PC, (Conservative) since December 6, 2005 Members 646 Political groups... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British Cabinet minister responsible for all economic and financial matters. ... Alternate meanings in cabinet (disambiguation) A Cabinet is a body of high-ranking members of government, typically representing the executive branch. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ...


Although he continued to sit in Parliament, his health was in serious decline throughout the 1890s. He bestowed much attention on society, travel and sport. He was an ardent supporter of the turf, and, in 1889, he won the Epsom Oaks with a mare named the Abbesse de Jouarre. In 1891 he went to South Africa, in search both of health and relaxation. He travelled for some months through Cape Colony.[2], the Transvaal and Rhodesia, making notes on the politics and economics of the countries, shooting lions, and recording his impressions in letters to a London newspaper, which were afterwards republished under the title of Men, Mines and Animals in South Africa. He attacked Gladstone's Second Home Rule Bill with energy, and gave fiery pro-Union speeches in Ireland. This does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Oaks Stakes is a Group 1 United Kingdom flat racing horse race for three year old fillies run over a distance of 1 mile 4 furlongs at Epsom Downs during June. ... 13 year old Peruvian Paso mare A broodmare and foal In English, a mare (an old Germanic word) is a female horse; the word is also an etymological root of marshal (originally marescalcus horse servant). Mares are considered easier to handle than males, which are called stallions or after castration... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Anthem: God Save the Queen Cape Colony Capital Cape Town Language(s) English and Dutch1 Religion Dutch Reformed Church, Anglican Government Constitutional monarchy Last Monarch King George VI Last Prime Minister  - 1908 – 1910 John X. Merriman Last Governor  - 1901 - 1910 Walter Hely-Hutchinson Historical era 19th century  - Dutch East India... Flag of Transvaal For the Russian theme park, see Transvaal Park. ... Southern Rhodesia, todays Zimbabwe. ... William Ewart Gladstone (29 December 1809 – 19 May 1898) was a British Liberal Party statesman and Prime Minister (1868–1874, 1880–1885, 1886 and 1892–1894). ... Devolution or Home rule is the pooling of powers from central government to government at regional or local level. ...


During this time he coined the phrase "Ulster will fight, and Ulster will be right". But it was soon apparent that his powers were undermined by the illness (reputedly tertiary syphilis, but possibly multiple sclerosis or a brain tumour) which took his life at the age of 45. As the session of 1893 wore on, his speeches lost their old effectiveness, and in 1894 he was listened to not so much with interest as with pity. His last speech in the House was delivered in the debate on Uganda in June 1894, and was a painful failure. He was, in fact, dying of syphilis. A journey round the world failed to cure him. Lord Randolph started in the autumn of 1894, accompanied by his wife, but his illness made so much progress that he was brought back hurriedly from Cairo. He reached England shortly before Christmas and died in London. He is buried near his wife and sons at St Martin's Church, Bladon, near Woodstock, Oxfordshire. Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by Treponema pallidum. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: Egypt: Site of Cairo (top center) Coordinates: , Government  - Governor Dr. Abdul Azim Wazir Area  - City 214 km²  (82. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The parish church of St Martin in Bladon The grave of Sir Winston Churchill St Martins Church in Bladon near Woodstock, Oxfordshire is the Anglican parish church of Bladon-with-Woodstock. ... Map sources for Woodstock at grid reference SP4416 Woodstock is a small town in Oxfordshire in the United Kingdom. ...


His widow, Lady Randolph Churchill, married George Cornwallis-West in 1900, yet retained her noble prerogative earned through her marriage to Lord Randolph. George Frederick Myddleton Cornwallis-West (1874-1951) was a British officer of the Scots Guards notable for his marriage to the mother of Winston Churchill, Jennie Jerome. ...


Fictional appearances

The character Randolph Churchill has appeared in numerous movies and television productions about his son Winston. He is generally portrayed as a cold and distant man, although perhaps was no worse than many other fathers of his time and class.


He was featured in the film "Edward the King" as a more natural character, sociably similar to Albert Edward, Prince of Wales and his other friends. His downfall is represented when he confronted Alexandra, Princess of Wales and demanded her to use her influence with the Prince to stop Lord Aylesford proceeding with a divorce from his wife, Lady Aylesford, after she had planned to elope with Lord Randolph's elder brother, the Marquess of Blandford. He threatens to expose letters from the Prince to Lady Aylesford, so scandalous, so he says, that if they were to be exposed, "the Prince of Wales would never sit on the throne of England." Outraged, the Princess goes to see the Queen, who is equally indignified. The Prime Minister, Benjamin Disraeli, informs the Prince, who is so angry that he challenges Lord Randolph to a duel in the South of France. Eventually, Lord Aylesford does not attempt to seek a divorce from his wife, and Lord Blandford does not elope with Lady Aylesford. Lord Randolph sends a note of apology to the Prince, which is merely acknowledged. Disgraced, Lord Randolph and his wife leave for America. Edward the Seventh was a TV drama series, made by Granada in 13 one-hour episodes. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth Realms, and the Emperor of India. ... Princess Alexandra of Denmark (later Queen Alexandra of the United Kingdom; 1 December 1844 – 20 November 1925), was Queen Consort to Edward VII of the United Kingdom and thus Empress of India during her husbands reign. ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 May 1876, until her death on 22 January 1901. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield, KG, PC, FRS (December 21, 1804 – April 19, 1881), born Benjamin DIsraeli was a British Conservative statesman and literary figure. ... A duel is a formalized type of combat. ...


He is the target of an assassination attempt in the J.M. Barrie novella about a secret society of killers, Better Dead. Sir James Matthew Barrie, Baronet, Scottish author Sir James Matthew Barrie, Baronet (May 9, 1860 - June 19, 1937), more commonly known as J. M. Barrie, was a Scottish novelist and dramatist. ...


References

  1. ^ http://www.geocities.com/jesusib/EdwardVII.html
  2. ^ http://www.matjiesfontein.com/About/index.htm Visit to Matjiesfontein.
  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.
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Lord Randolph Churchill
Parliament of the United Kingdom (1801–present)
Preceded by
Henry Barnett
Member of Parliament for Woodstock
18741885
Succeeded by
Francis William Maclean
Preceded by
(new constituency)
Member of Parliament for Paddington South
1885–1894
Succeeded by
Sir Thomas George Fardell
Political offices
Preceded by
The Earl of Kimberley
Secretary of State for India
1885–1886
Succeeded by
The Earl of Kimberley
Preceded by
Sir William Harcourt
Chancellor of the Exchequer
1886–1887
Succeeded by
George Goschen
Preceded by
Sir Michael Hicks-Beach, Bt
Conservative Leader of the Commons
1886–1887
Succeeded by
William Henry Smith
Preceded by
William Gladstone
Leader of the House of Commons
1886–1887

  Results from FactBites:
 
Lord Randolph Churchill - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1788 words)
Lord Randolph was the third son of the 7th Duke of Marlborough and Frances, daughter of the 3rd Marquess of Londonderry.
Lord Randolph's attitude, and the vituperative fluency of his invective, made him a parliamentary figure of some importance before the dissolution of the 1874 parliament, though he was not as yet taken quite seriously.
Lord Randolph insisted that the principle of the bill should be accepted by the opposition, and that resistance should be focused on the refusal of the government to combine with it a scheme of redistribution.
Winston Churchill - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (9818 words)
Churchill managed to escape from his prison camp, resulting in a long-running criticism and controversy as it was claimed that he did not wait for Haldane and another man who had planned the escape, but who were unable, or unwilling, to risk slipping over the fence when Churchill did.
Churchill advocated the pre-emptive occupation of the neutral Norwegian iron-ore port of Narvik and the iron mines in Kiruna, Sweden, early in the War.
Churchill was the last (and one of the most influential) exponents of "Whig history" — the belief of the 18th- and 19th-century Whigs that the British people had a unique greatness and an imperial destiny, and that all British history should be seen as progress towards fulfilling that destiny.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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