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Encyclopedia > Lord
Look up lord in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Lord is a title for a person who has power and authority, and can have different meanings depending on the context of use. The title is primarily taken by men, while women will usually take the title 'lady'. However, this is not universal, as the Lord of Mann and the Lord Provost of Edinburgh (2003–2007), are examples of women who use 'lord'. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up lord in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 433 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1488 × 2060 pixel, file size: 745 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 433 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1488 × 2060 pixel, file size: 745 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... The Lord of Mann is the current ruler of the Isle of Man. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... Much of the recent sociological debate on power revolves around the issue of the constraining and/or enabling nature of power. ... This article is about authority as a concept. ... A lady is a woman who is the counterpart of a lord; or, the counterpart of a gentleman. ... The Lord of Mann is the current ruler of the Isle of Man. ... Lesley Hinds, born in Dundee, is the current (2006) Lord Provost of Edinburgh, Scotland. ...


According to the Oxford Dictionary of English, the etymology of the word lord goes back to the Old English word 'hlāford' which originated from 'hlāfweard' meaning 'bread keeper', reflecting the Germanic tribal custom of a superior providing food for his followers.[1] Lady, the female equivalent, originates from a similar structure, believed to have originally meant 'loaf-kneader'. The Scottish title laird is also often translated as lord, however there are differences between the two titles. A copy of the 2001 issue of the NODE The Oxford Dictionary of English (formerly The New Oxford Dictionary of English, often abbreviated to NODE) is a single-volume English language dictionary first published in 1998 by the Oxford University Press. ... Etymologies redirects here. ... Old English redirects here. ... The term Germanic tribes (or Teutonic tribes) applies to the ancient Germanic peoples of Europe. ... A lord is a male who has power and authority. ...

Contents

Title

Peerage

See also: Peerage of the United Kingdom.

It is a common misconception that the title 'Lord' is used alone. Lord is actually merely a 'placeholder' for higher titles of the peerage. Five ranks of peer exist in the United Kingdom, in descending order, these are: duke, marquess, earl (equivalent in rank to the Continental title of count), viscount, and baron. The title is used most often by barons who are rarely addressed with any other. The style of this address is 'Lord (X)', for example, Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson, is commonly known as 'Lord Tennyson'. The ranks of marquess, earl and viscounts commonly use lord as well, with viscounts using the same style as used for baron. However, marquesses and earls have a slightly different form of address were they can be called either the 'Marquess/Earl of (X)' or 'Lord (X)'. Dukes also use the style, 'Duke of (X)', but it is rarely acceptable to refer to them as 'Lord (X)'. Dukes are usually referred to as 'Your Grace'. The Peerage of the United Kingdom comprises most peerages created in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland after the Act of Union in 1801. ... For other uses, see Peerage (disambiguation). ... This article is about the nobility title. ... This article is about a title of nobility. ... For people, see Earl (given name) and Earl (surname). ... Coronet of a count This article is about the style or title of nobility. ... A viscount is a member of the European nobility whose comital title ranks usually, as in the British peerage, above a baron, below an earl (in Britain) or a count (his continental equivalent). ... For other uses, see Baron (disambiguation). ... Lord Tennyson, Poet Laureate Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson (August 6, 1809 - October 6, 1892) is generally regarded as one of the greatest English poets. ...


For certain members of the peerage, the title lord also applies by courtesy to certain of their children; for example the younger sons of dukes and marquesses can use the style 'Lord (first name) (surname)'. The titles are courtesy titles insofar that the holder does not an actual title, and are, according to British law, still commoners. In the Peerage of Scotland, the members of the lowest level of the peerage have the title 'Lord of Parliament' rather than baron, due to the differences in the pre-Union Scottish and English Peerages. A courtesy title is a form of address in systems of nobility used by children, former wives and other close relatives of a peer. ... A courtesy title is a form of address in systems of nobility used by children, former wives and other close relatives of a peer. ... The Middlesex Guildhall will be home to the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom The United Kingdom has three distinct legal systems. ... A commoner, in British law, is someone who is neither the Sovereign nor a noble. ... The Peerage of Scotland is the division of the British Peerage for those peers created in the Kingdom of Scotland before 1707. ... A Lord of Parliament is a member of the lowest rank of Scottish peerage, ranking below a viscount. ... The Acts of Union were a pair of Acts of Parliament passed in 1706 and 1707 (taking effect on 1 May 1707) by, respectively, the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland. ... The Peerage of England comprises all peerages created in the Kingdom of England before the Act of Union in 1707. ...


House of Lords

Chamber of the House of Lords

In the UK, the House of Lords (known commonly as 'the Lords') forms the upper house of Parliament. Here all peers are treated as lords but there are three different classifications: Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... For the demesne in The Keys to the Kingdom series, see The House An upper house is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature, the other chamber being the lower house. ... The House of Representatives Chamber of the Parliament of Australia in Canberra. ...

  • All lords who hold peerages created before the passage of the Life Peerages Act 1958 (and a handful who hold peerages created after then) are hereditary peers, who until 1999 constituted the most numerous category of lords sitting in the House. There are in excess of 700 lords whose titles may be inherited, however since the House of Lords Act 1999, they are no longer guaranteed a seat in the Lords and instead must take part in an election for a total of ninety-two seats. All male peers of England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom were before 1999 entitled to sit in the House of Lords by virtue of their title. Peeresses were granted the right to sit in 1963. Peers of Scotland and Ireland, however, historically had limitations on their right to sit at Westminster. Between 1707 and 1963, Scottish peers participated in elections to determine which of them would take the sixteen seats allocated to them. Elections were abolished in 1963, and from that time until 1999 all Scottish peers and peeresses were entitled to sit. Irish peers participated in similar elections between 1801 and 1922, when the Irish Free State was established. Since 1922, Irish peers have not had a right to sit at Westminster by virtue of their Irish peerages. However, many Irish peers also hold peerages of Great Britain and the United Kingdom.
  • The importance of hereditary lords has declined steadily following the increase in the appointment of life peers. These peers are entitled to sit in the House of Lords for the duration of their life, but can not transfer their titles to their heirs. They are rarely above the rank of baron and are created under the Life Peerages Act 1958. Since the Act was passed, some 1,086 life peers have been created. The only hereditary privilege associated with life peerages is that children of life peers are entitled to style themselves 'The Honourable (firstname) (surname)'.
  • These first two groups are collectively termed Lords Temporal as opposed to the third type of lord sitting in the House known as Spiritual Peers or Lords Spiritual. This group consists of twenty-six Church of England bishops who are appointed in order of superiority. Unlike Lords Temporal, who can be appointed from any of the four nations of the UK, only bishops with English Sees are eligible to sit in the Chamber. The Church of Scotland has not sent bishops to sit in the House since the Reformation. The Church of Ireland ceased to send bishops to sit after disestablishment in 1871. The Church in Wales ceased to be a part of the Church of England in 1920 and was simultaneously disestablished in Wales. Accordingly, bishops of the Church in Wales were no longer eligible to be appointed to the House as bishops of the Church of England.

The Life Peerages Act 1958 established the modern standards for the creation of Life Peers by the monarch of the United Kingdom, and granted them non-hereditary voting status in the House of Lords. ... The Peerage in the United Kingdom includes several hereditary peers, as well as life peers. ... The House of Lords Act 1999, an Act of Parliament passed by the British Parliament, was a major constitutional enactment as it reformed greatly one of the chambers of Parliament, the House of Lords (see Lords Reform). ... The Peerage of England comprises all peerages created in the Kingdom of England before the Act of Union in 1707. ... The Peerage Act 1963 (1963 c. ... The Peerage of Scotland is the division of the British Peerage for those peers created in the Kingdom of Scotland before 1707. ... The Peerage Act 1963 (1963 c. ... The Peerage of Ireland the term used for those peers created by British monarchs in their capacity as Lord or King of Ireland. ... This article is about the prior state. ... In the United Kingdom, Life Peers are appointed members of the Peerage whose titles may not be inherited (those whose titles are inheritable are known as hereditary peers). ... The Life Peerages Act 1958 established the modern standards for the creation of Life Peers by the monarch of the United Kingdom, and granted them non-hereditary voting status in the House of Lords. ... The prefix The Honourable or The Honorable ( or formerly The Honble) is a title of quality attached to the names of certain classes of persons. ... In the British system of government, Lords Temporal are those members of the House of Lords who are members of that body due to their secular status. ... The Lords Spiritual of the United Kingdom, also called Spiritual Peers, consist of the 26 clergymen of the established Church of England who serve in the House of Lords along with the Lords Temporal. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[3] in England, the Mother Church of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the oldest among the communions thirty-eight independent national churches. ... The Church of Scotland (CofS; Scottish Gaelic: ), known informally by its pre-Union Scots name, The Kirk, is the national church of Scotland. ... John Knox regarded as the leader of the Scottish Reformation The Scottish Reformation was Scotlands formal break with the papacy in 1560, and the events surrounding this. ... The Church of Ireland (Irish: ) is an autonomous province of the Anglican Communion, operating seamlessly across the border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. ... Flag of the Church in Wales The Church in Wales (Welsh: Yr Eglwys Yng Nghymru) is a member Church of the Anglican Communion, consisting of six dioceses in Wales. ...

Judiciary

Lord is also used as a title by members of both the British and some Commonwealth legal systems when referring to judges. In this case the style used is 'The Right Honourable Lord Justice (surname)'; in the case were two or more judges have the same surname, then they will add their first name to their title. In court they are referred to as 'My Lord' or 'Your Lordship'.


Examples of courts where this is used include:

The House of Lords, in addition to having a legislative function, has a judicial function as a court of last resort within the United Kingdom. ... Her Majestys Court of Appeal is the second most senior court in the English legal system, with only the Judicial Committee of the House of Lords above it. ... The Court of Session is the supreme civil court in Scotland. ... The Supreme Court of India is the highest court of the land as established by Part V, Chapter IV of the Constitution of India. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...

Lord of the Manor

See also: Lord of the Manor.

The title of Lord of the Manor arose in the English medieval system of Manorialism following the Norman Conquest. The title Lord of the Manor is a titular feudal dignity which is still recognised today. Their holders are entitled to call themselves "[Personal name], The Lord/Lady of the Manor of [Place name]" but, for example, the United Kingdom Passport Agency does not recognise such titles. The title is not a title of the nobility. The title of Lord of the Manor arose in the English medieval system of Manorialism following the Norman Conquest. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For the 17th century system in Canada, see Seigneurial system of New France. ... Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman Conquest of England was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. ... The United Kingdom Passport Agency, run by the Home Office issues passports for those persons entitled to hold a UK passport. ... Nobility is a traditional hereditary status (see hereditary titles) that exists today in many countries (mainly present or former monarchies). ...


Laird

See also: Laird.

A Laird is a hereditary title for the owner of a landed estate in Scotland. The title of Laird may carry certain local or feudal rights, though unlike a Lordship, a Lairdship has never carried voting rights, either in the historic Parliament of Scotland or, after unification with the Kingdom of England, in the British House of Lords. A lord is a male who has power and authority. ... A title is a prefix or suffix added to a persons name to signify either veneration, an official position or a professional or academic qualification. ... This article is about the country. ... Feudalism comes from the Late Latin word feudum, itself borrowed from a Germanic root *fehu, a commonly used term in the Middle Ages which means fief, or land held under certain obligations by feodati. ... A Lord of Parliament is a member of the lowest rank of Scottish peerage, ranking below a viscount. ... The parliament of Scotland, officially the Estates of Parliament, was the legislature of the independent Kingdom of Scotland. ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... This article is about the British House of Lords. ...


Other

Various high offices of state may carry the cachet of honorary lords, seen through titles such as Lord High Chancellor or Lord Mayor. The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and in former times Chancellor of England, is one of the most senior and important functionaries in the government of the United Kingdom. ... Councillor Patrick (Pat) John Stannard, Lord Mayor of Oxford (2004). ...


Another English title, that of Lord of the Manor, does not connote peerage and does not carry parliamentary rights. The title merely marks the holder as the owner of a manor who has certain local rights, and is the equivalent of lairds in Scotland. The title of Lord of the Manor arose in the English medieval system of Manorialism following the Norman Conquest. ...


In the middle ages, bishops were influential and powerful magnates who held the feudal rank of 'lord'; thus even today the form of address 'Lord Bishop' is still sometimes heard, (particularly in Commonwealth countries) for Anglican and Roman Catholic bishops. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Diocesan College, or Bishops as it is commonly known, is a private school situated in the leafy suburb of Rondebosch in Cape Town, South Africa, at the foot of Table Mountain. ... A Lord Bishop in the United Kingdom is a bishop of the Church of England who is also a member, a Lord Spiritual of the House of Lords. ... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2008. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ...


Feudalism

In feudalism, a lord has aristocratic rank, has control over a portion of land and the produce and labour of the serfs living thereon. The serf would swear the oath of fealty to the lord, and would then become a vassal. Roland pledges his fealty to Charlemagne; from a manuscript of a chanson de geste Feudalism, a term first used in the late modern period (17th century), in its most classic sense refers to a Medieval European political system comprised of a set of reciprocal legal and military obligations among the... Aristocrat redirects here. ... Costumes of Slaves or Serfs, from the Sixth to the Twelfth Centuries, collected by H. de Vielcastel, from original Documents in the great Libraries of Europe. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Roland pledges his fealty to Charlemagne; from a manuscript of a chanson de geste. ... Look up vassal in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


As part of the heritage of feudalism, lord can generally refer to superiors of many kinds, for example landlord. In many cultures in Europe the equivalent term serves as a general title of address equivalent to the English 'Mister' (French Monsieur, Spanish Señor, Portuguese Senhor, Italian Signore, Dutch Meneer/Mijnheer/De Heer (as in: to de heer Joren Jansen), German Herr, Hungarian Úr, Greek Kyrie or to the English formal "you" (Polish Pan). See also gentleman. A landlord, is the owner of a house, apartment, condominium, or real estate which is rented or leased to an individual or business, who is called the tenant. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Look up senhor in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Kyrie is the vocative case of the Greek word κύριος (kyrios - lord) and means O Lord; it is the common name of an important prayer of Christian liturgy, also called Kyrie eleison which is Greek for Lord, have mercy. ... For other uses, see Gentleman (disambiguation). ...


Religion

People have often used the term 'lord' in religious contexts, where, The Lord refers to God in Judaism or Islam, or to God, Jesus, or the Holy Spirit in Christianity. In many Christian Bibles (such as the King James Version), the Hebrew name YHWH (the Tetragrammaton) is rendered LORD (all caps) or LORD (small caps). This usage follows the Jewish practice of substituting the spoken Hebrew word 'Adonai' (translated as 'Lord') for YHWH when read aloud.[2] This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      In mainstream... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... This page is about the version of the Bible; for the Harvey Danger album, see King James Version (album). ... The word Hebrew most likely means to cross over, referring to the Semitic people crossing over the Euphrates River. ... For other uses, see Yahweh (disambiguation). ... For the song, see ALL CAPS (song). ... In typography, small caps (short for small capitals) are uppercase (capital) characters that are printed in a smaller size than normal uppercase characters of the same font. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... At the bottom of the hands, the two letters on each hand combine to form יהוה (YHVH), the name of God. ...


Other religious uses of the word Lord include:

  • Ba'al, or Baal, is a Northwest Semitic title meaning 'lord', used for various gods and local spirit-deities. In some texts, the term refers to Hadad, the lord of the divine assembly whose name only priests were allowed to speak. References to Baal in the Hebrew Bible, such as the prophet Elijah's confrontation with Baal's priests, usually correspond to local gods rather than to Hadad.
  • The name of the god Adonis may derive from the Hebrew word for 'lord'.
  • In the Pagan religion Wicca, the male god is also referred to as 'The Lord' and the female as 'The Lady'.
  • A Dark Lord is a title is usually used in religion and mythology to refer to the Devil and other demons, or evil gods. In Christian religion, "Dark Lord" refers to "Satan".

Baal (בַּעַל / בָּעַל, Standard Hebrew Báʿal, Tiberian Hebrew Báʿal / Báʿal) is a northwest Semitic word signifying The Lord, master, owner (male), husband cognate with Akkadian Bēl of the same meanings. ... Haddad - בעל הדד - حداد (in Ugaritic Haddu) was a very important northwest Semitic storm god and rain god, cognate in name and origin with the Akkadian god Adad. ... This article is about the term Hebrew Bible. For the Jewish scriptures see Tanakh. ... Elijah, 1638, by José de Ribera This article is about the prophet in the Hebrew Bible. ... Buddhism is a variety of teachings, sometimes described as a religion[1] or way of life that attempts to identify the causes of human suffering and offer various ways that are claimed to end, or ease suffering. ... Siddhartha and Gautama redirect here. ... Jain and Jaina redirect here. ... Idol of Lord Mahavira at Shri Mahaveerji (the holy town in Rajasthan named after Mahavira. ... For other uses of the name Adonis, see Adonis (disambiguation). ... Pagan may refer to: A believer in Paganism or Neopaganism Bagan, a city in Myanmar also known as Pagan Pagan (album), the 6th album by Celtic metal band Cruachan Pagan Island, of the Northern Mariana Islands Pagan Lorn, a metal band from Luxembourg, Europe (1994-1998) Pagans Mind, is... For other uses, see Wicca (disambiguation). ... This is an overview of the Devil. ... This article is about the concept of Satan. ...

See also

It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Forms of address in the United Kingdom. ... A Lord Bishop in the United Kingdom is a bishop of the Church of England who is also a member, a Lord Spiritual of the House of Lords. ... The Lord Chamberlain or Lord Chamberlain of the Household is one of the chief officers of the Royal Household in the United Kingdom, and is to be distinguished from the Lord Great Chamberlain, one of the Great Officers of State. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and prior to the Union the Chancellor of England and the Lord Chancellor of Scotland, is a senior and important functionary in the government of the United Kingdom, and its predecessor states. ... The Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales was, historically, the second-highest judge of the Courts of England and Wales, after the Lord Chancellor. ... The High Court of Justiciary is the supreme criminal court of Scotland. ... Seal of the Court of Session © Crown Copyright The Court of Session is the supreme civil court of Scotland. ... For the international law of the sea, see Admiralty law. ... The Lord High Constable of England is the seventh of the Great Officers of State, ranking beneath the Lord Great Chamberlain and above the Earl Marshal. ... The Lord High Treasurer bears a white staff as his symbol of office. ... The Lord Justice Clerk is the second most senior Judge in Scotland. ... A Lord of Parliament is a member of the lowest rank of Scottish peerage, ranking below a viscount. ... The Office of Lord President of the Council is a British cabinet position, the holder of which acts as presiding officer of the Privy Council. ... The Lord President of the Court of Session is head of the judiciary in Scotland and presiding judge of the College of Justice and Court of Session. ... The Lord Privy Seal or Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal is one of the traditional sinecure offices in the British Cabinet. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings. ... Councillor Patrick (Pat) John Stannard, Lord Mayor of Oxford (2004). ... In feudalism, an overlord is a supreme lord; one who is the lord of other lords. ... For other uses, see Peerage (disambiguation). ... This article is about the nobility title. ... This article is about a title of nobility. ... For people, see Earl (given name) and Earl (surname). ... A viscount is a member of the European nobility whose comital title ranks usually, as in the British peerage, above a baron, below an earl (in Britain) or a count (his continental equivalent). ... For other uses, see Baron (disambiguation). ... A Lord of Parliament is a member of the lowest rank of Scottish peerage, ranking below a viscount. ... A lord is a male who has power and authority. ... The title of Lord of the Manor arose in the English medieval system of Manorialism following the Norman Conquest. ...

References

Sources consulted
Endnotes
  1. ^ Oxford English Dictionary Second Edition (Revised 2005), p.1036
  2. ^ NASB (1995). "Preface to the New American Standard Bible". New American Standard Bible (Updated Edition). Anaheim, California: Foundation Publications (for the Lockman Foundation). Archived from the original on 2006-12-07. “There is yet another name which is particularly assigned to God as His special or proper name, that is, the four letters YHWH (Exodus 3:14 and Isaiah 42:8). This name has not been pronounced by the Jews because of reverence for the great sacredness of the divine name. Therefore, it has been consistently translated LORD. The only exception to this translation of YHWH is when it occurs in immediate proximity to the word Lord, that is, Adonai. In that case it is regularly translated GOD in order to avoid confusion.”
Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... The New American Standard Bible (NASB) is an English translation of the Bible. ... Anaheim redirects here. ... The Lockman Foundation, started in 1942 by F. Dewey Lockman and his wife Minna Lockman, is a nonprofit, interdenominational Christian ministry dedicated to the translation, publication, and distribution of the New American Standard Bible, Amplified Bible, La Biblia de las Américas, Nueva Biblia de los Hispanos, and other Biblical... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A title is a prefix or suffix added to a persons name to signify either veneration, an official position or a professional or academic qualification. ... Señorita redirects here. ... Mrs (or Mrs. ... Ms or Ms. ... This article is about general usage. ... A lady is a woman who is the counterpart of a lord; or, the counterpart of a gentleman. ... A statue of an armoured knight of the Middle Ages For the chess piece, see knight (chess). ... Doctor means teacher in Latin. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: [1]) varies. ... Master is an English title. ... Mister, usually abbreviated to Mr. ... This article is about the title. ... Look up sir in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

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