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Encyclopedia > Look Around You
Look Around You
Format Parody
Created by Robert Popper
Peter Serafinowicz
Directed by Tim Kirkby
Starring Robert Popper
Peter Serafinowicz, amongst others
No. of episodes 14
Production
Running time 10/30 minutes
Broadcast
Original channel BBC2 (UK)
Original run October 10, 2002 – March 07, 2005

Look Around You is a BBC television comedy series devised and written by Robert Popper and Peter Serafinowicz, and, in the first series only, narrated by Nigel Lambert. The first series of eight 10-minute shorts was shown in 2002, and the second series of six 30-minute episodes in 2005, both on BBC2. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... Robert Popper is a comedy writer and actor, best known as co-creator of the mock BBC documentary Look Around You, in which he also plays the part of Jack Morgan. ... Peter Serafinowicz (born 10 July 1972) is an English comic actor, voice artist and composer of Polish descent. ... Tim Kirkby (born 13 Novemeber1970, Kent) is an English film and television director. ... Robert Popper is a comedy writer and actor, best known as co-creator of the mock BBC documentary Look Around You, in which he also plays the part of Jack Morgan. ... Peter Serafinowicz (born 10 July 1972) is an English comic actor, voice artist and composer of Polish descent. ... BBC Two (or BBC2 as it was formerly styled) was the second UK television station to be aired by the BBC. History The channel was scheduled to begin at 7:20pm on April 20, 1964 and show an evening of light entertainment, starting with the comedy show The Alberts and... BBC Television is a service of the British Broadcasting Corporation which began in 1932. ... The word comedy has a classical meaning (comical theatre) and a popular one (the use of humor with an intent to provoke laughter in general). ... Robert Popper is a comedy writer and actor, best known as co-creator of the mock BBC documentary Look Around You, in which he also plays the part of Jack Morgan. ... Peter Serafinowicz (born 10 July 1972) is an English comic actor, voice artist and composer of Polish descent. ... Nigel Lambert (born 1944) was a narrator in the first series of the BBC programme Look Around You in 2002. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC Two (or BBC2 as it was formerly styled) was the second UK television station to be aired by the BBC. History The channel was scheduled to begin at 7:20pm on April 20, 1964 and show an evening of light entertainment, starting with the comedy show The Alberts and...


The first series was broadcast on BBC America in early 2005, with a slightly edited version of the second series airing in March 2006. The first series of Look Around You was nominated for a BAFTA award in 2003. BBC America is an American television network, owned and operated by BBC Worldwide, which was launched on March 29, 1998, available on both cable and satellite. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organization that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ...

Contents

Series 1

Series 1 DVD
Series 1 DVD

In the first series, the episodes both satirised and paid homage to 1970s and early 1980s educational films and schools programmes, with a different scientific subject being discussed in each episode, or "modules" as they are referred to in the series. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... 1867 edition of the satirical magazine Punch, a British satirical magazine, ground-breaking on popular literature satire. ... For a description of the medieval homage ceremony see commendation ceremony Homage is generally used in modern English to mean any public show of respect to someone to whom you feel indebted. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... This article is about motion pictures. ...


The modules were, in order of transmission:

  1. Maths
  2. Water
  3. Germs
  4. Ghosts
  5. Sulphur
  6. Music
  7. Iron
  8. Brain

The humour is derived from a mixture of patent nonsense and faithful references and homages. For instance, fictional items that have a passing resemblance to everyday objects were created; such items include the Boîte Diabolique, and a performance-enhancing chewing gum called "Garry Gum" (which unfortunately induces diarrhoea - necessitating the consumption of "Anti-Garry Gum") and each episode began with an authentic "countdown clock", similar to the one used on ITV Schools programmes from 1979 to 1987. The original accompanying music to the countdown was replaced with a solo guitar which is heard tuning at the beginning of "The Brain" episode. Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, as imagined by by Raphael in this detail from The School of Athens. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... Germ can mean: Microorganism, especially a pathogenic one; see Germ theory of disease. ... For other uses, see Ghost (disambiguation). ... For the chemical element see: sulfur. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Iron (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Brain (disambiguation). ... Diarrhoea is the correct way to spell the word Diarrhoea. ... ITV Schools (full name, Independent Television for Schools And Colleges) was an example of public service broadcasting on a commercial television network. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ...


The subjects were distorted beyond recognition, for instance, germs were described as coming from Germany. The general format of an episode would be an introduction to the subject, followed by a series of silly experiments performed by the hapless (and normally mute) scientists, played by Popper, Serafinowicz and Edgar Wright, among others. At the end of each module, the narrator would explain what the programme would be about next week such as reggae, romance or Italians, although none of these subjects were ever covered. Germ can mean: Microorganism, especially a pathogenic one; see Germ theory of disease. ... This article is about the profession. ... Edgar Wright at Comic Con in San Diego Edgar Wright (born 18 April 1974 in Poole, Dorset) is an English film and television director. ... Reggae is a music genre developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... This article primarily discusses philosophical ideologies in relation to the subject of romantic love. ...


The series has been praised for its attention to detail. For example, the colour and overall look of the film is altered, and passably authentic incidental music was overdubbed to complete the parody of the original programmes. Incidental music is music in a play, television program, radio program or some other form not primarily musical. ... Les Paul, a pioneer of multi-track recording. ...


A running gag throughout the series is the fastidious labelling of all items, such as hairdryers, magnets, or a jar of nuts (which contained both types of nut: the foodstuff and fastener). Another recurring joke is the naming of the different materials used in the experiments, such as a Besselheim plate, poking fun at real lab equipment, which is often named after people (e.g. Petri dish, Erlenmeyer flask). The series was commissioned off the back of a 20-minute pilot episode (twice the length of an episode in the first series but otherwise identical) about calcium; this is included on the DVD release of series 1 as an "advanced double-length module". A 1900 blow dryer (France) A blow dryer is a electromechanical device designed to blow cool or hot air over wet or damp hair, in order to accelerate the evaporation of water particles and dry the hair. ... For other uses, see Magnet (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Nut (disambiguation). ... A nut is a type of hardware fastener with a threaded hole. ... Man looking at fungus inside of petri dishes A Petri dish is a shallow glass or plastic cylindrical dish that biologists use to culture microbes. ... Conical flask For the episode of The X-Files, see The Erlenmeyer Flask. ... For other uses, see Calcium (disambiguation). ... Size comparison: A 12 cm Sony DVD+RW and a 19 cm Dixon Ticonderoga pencil. ...


The DVD extras also include a music video for the song "Little Mouse" (as featured in the module on music), a selection of mock-Ceefax pages, and a creator's commentary. The joke is taken even further by presenting the DVD subtitles in exactly the same format as those broadcast via teletext. A BBC Ceefax page from 10 September 1999 Ceefax (phonetic for See Facts) is the BBCs teletext information service. ... In printed material In printed material, a subtitle is an explanatory or alternate title. ... A BBC Ceefax page from January 9, 2007. ...


Unseen episodes

At the end of each episode, reference is made to the "next module" -- although these episodes were never actually made. The episodes that were promised, but never seen:

It has been suggested that Blanc de noirs be merged into this article or section. ... “Make-up” redirects here. ... Dynamite is an explosive based on the explosive potential of nitroglycerin, initially using diatomaceous earth (kieselguhr) as an adsorbent. ... For other uses, see Flour (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Flower (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hitch hike. ... Reggae is a music genre developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... This article primarily discusses philosophical ideologies in relation to the subject of romantic love. ...

Series 2

Series 2 DVD
Series 2 DVD

The second series was composed of six 30-minute episodes and was presented in the pop-science vein of programmes such as How? and Tomorrow's World. The series was directed by Tim Kirkby, and Ash Atalla (producer of The Office) worked as executive producer. Running from 31 January to 7 March 2005 on BBC Two at 10pm, Series 2 comprised the following episodes: Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is not about the magazine, Popular Science Popular science is interpretation of science intended for a general audience, rather than for other scientists or students. ... How 2 is an informative childrens programme produced by TVS between 1990 and 1992, and SMG Productions (stv) from 1993. ... Tomorrows World was a long-running BBC television series, showcasing new (and often wacky) developments in the world of science and technology. ... Tim Kirkby (born 13 Novemeber1970, Kent) is an English film and television director. ... Ash Atalla is an Egyptian TV producer responsible for producing several British TV series such as The IT Crowd, The Office, and Man Stroke Woman. ... The Office is a British television comedy series, created, written and directed by Ricky Gervais and Stephen Merchant, and first aired in the UK on BBC Two on July 9, 2001. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

  1. Music 2000
  2. Health
  3. Sport
  4. Food
  5. Computers
  6. "Live" Inventor of the Year Final

According to the audio commentary, the programme is set around 1980-81. To reinforce the show's retro look, each episode's opening continuity announcement (typically narrated by Serafinowicz) played over the 2-dimensional BBC2 ident from 1979-1986 and the programme was broadcast in the 4:3 "Academy" aspect ratio. This was clearly a deliberate stylistic choice as most BBC programmes since the late 1990s are now broadcast in 16:9 widescreen. Additionally, location footage was shot on 16mm film, of the type used for location filming at the time. The TOTP introduction to Episode 1 used the real countdown background music, Yellow Pearl by Phil Lynott. For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... This article is about the machine. ... For other uses, see Inventor (disambiguation). ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A television ident visually identifies the network or station presenting a television programme. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... 4:3 is a ratio. ... The 16:9 aspect ratio (also known as widescreen) is an aspect ratio that is 16/9 or 1. ... The inner box (green) is the format used in most pre-1952 films and pre-widescreen television. ... (Redirected from 16mm film) 16mm film was initially created in the 1920s as an inexpensive amateur alternative to the conventional 35 mm film format. ... Top of the Pops is a long-running British music chart television programme shown each week on BBC Two and now licensed for local versions around the world. ... Philip Parris Lynott (August 20, 1949–January 4, 1986) was an Irish singer, instrumentalist and songwriter, who first came to prominence as a member of Thin Lizzy. ...


The second series differed from the first series in that there was dialogue between the four presenters and their guests, leaving behind both the narrated style of the first series and the anonymity given to the scientists. Popper and Serafinowicz starred as presenters Jack Morgan (the artist responsible for the song 'Little Mouse' as featured in the first series) and Peter Packard respectively, alongside the two new female presenters, Pam Bachelor and Pealy Maghti, played by Olivia Colman and Josie D'Arby respectively. Olivia Colman (born 30 January 1974) is an English actress best known for her comedic performances, such as Sophie Chapman in Peep Show, and Harriet Schulenburg in Green Wing. ... Josie DArby (born October 3, 1976) is a British actress and television presenter from Newport, South Wales. ...

In a marriage of footage separated by over two decades, "HRH Sir Prince Charles" presents an award to the makers of the sex-change machine

Several running gags from the first series are also reprised, such as mentions of Imhotep and phrases such as "Thanks, ants. Thants." There was also a measure of continuity throughout this series, as each week inventors (played by a number of UK comic actors) showcased their new products, culminating in the live final programme where a winning invention was chosen, supposedly by "HRH, Sir Prince Charles". Archive footage of Prince Charles was blended with Look Around You footage, Peter Serafinowicz replacing the prince’s real voice with his own perfectly lip-synched impression of it. Other running jokes in this series were "people who liked (topic) so much, they changed their name to it", such as Synthesiser Patel in the "Music" episode and Computer Jones in the "Computers" episode. Image File history File links L_a_y_2. ... Image File history File links L_a_y_2. ... The running gag is a popular hallmark of comic and serious forms of entertainment. ... This article is about the ancient Egyptian official. ... “Prince Charles” redirects here. ... The term synthesiser is also used to mean frequency synthesiser, an electronic system found in communications. ... This article is about the machine. ...


The "Music 2000" episode featured a futuristic song contest, showcasing songs we would be hearing in the year 2000. Toni Baxter's 'Sexual Interface' won the contest. The runners-up were "Machadaynu" by Tony Rudd (played by Kevin Eldon) and Anthony Carmichael's 'Rapping Song'. Eldon as evil hypnotist in Big Train Kevin Eldon ( b. ...


DVD extras include a quiz, Pages from Ceefax, an alternative Birds of Britain feature, the Scary Picture and the Test Card (A music video). There is also an Easter egg. A BBC Ceefax page from 10 September 1999 Ceefax (phonetic for See Facts) is the BBCs teletext information service. ... A virtual Easter egg is a hidden message or feature in an object such as a movie, book, CD, DVD, computer program, or video game. ...


Special Guests

Each episode featured several additional characters, many of whom were played by well known British comedians.


Episode 1

  • Kevin Eldon - "Tony Rudd", school teacher and "Music 2000" contestant who performed the song "Machadaynu".
  • Kate Drew - "Toni Baxter", "Music 2000" contestant who performed the song "Sexual Interface" (the vocals were actually performed by Sarah Alexander).
  • Chris Obi - "Antony Carmichael", profiteroles chef and "Music 2000" contestant who performed the song "The Rapping Song".
  • Harry Enfield - "The Ghost of Tchaikovsky", judge of "Music 2000".
  • Sanjeev Kohli - "Synthesiser Patel", synth enthusiast and programmer of the "Easitone 'Play-In-A-Day' 50".
  • Michael Fenton Stevens - "Sir Alan Rees", the chairman of ROPRA (The "Royal Pop and Rock Association").
  • Mark Heap - "Leonard Hatred", inventor of "Psilence" liquid-skin ear spray.
  • Simon Pegg - Sleeping Medieval guard.

Eldon as evil hypnotist in Big Train Kevin Eldon ( b. ... Sarah Alexander (born 3 January 1971) is an English actress, best known for her roles in various British comedy series. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... “Tchaikovsky” redirects here. ... Kohli as Navid in Still Game Sanjeev Kohli (born 1971) is a Scottish comedian, writer and actor. ... Michael Fenton Stevens is a UK actor and comedian, member of the Hee Bee Gee Bees and the voice behind the Spitting Image number 1 hit in 1986, The Chicken Song. ... Mark Heap (born 4 October 1962) is an English actor best known for a variety of television comedy roles including struggling artist Brian Topp in Spaced, the pompous Dr. Alan Statham in Green Wing, and various roles in the sketch shows Big Train and Jam. ... Simon John Pegg (born 14 February 1970 in Gloucester) is an English comedian, writer and film and television actor. ...

Episode 2

  • Benedict Wong - "Dr Franklin Fu", plastic surgeon and co-worker of the medical robot Medibot. Wong also performed the voice of Medibot.
  • Matt Lucas - the voice of "Dr Phillip Lavender", sufferer of "Geodermic Granititis" (also known as "Cobbles") and inventor of its cure, the "Anti-Cobbling Cream".
  • Simon Pegg - man with bad teeth in the advertisement for "Jenny" toothpaste. In the list of invented toothpastes that followed the ad, one was called "Pegg".
  • Paul Humpoletz - "Prof. Keith Craven", Professor at the "National Sleep Research Centre" at "St. St. Johns" (pronounced "St Singens").
  • Geoffrey McGivern - teacher in Prof. Keith Craven's recorded dream.
  • Peter Baynham - volunteer at the National Sleep Research Centre who answered phones whilst sleeping (uncredited).

Benedict Wong is a British actor. ... Matthew Richard Lucas (born March 5, 1974) is an English comedy actor. ... Simon John Pegg (born 14 February 1970 in Gloucester) is an English comedian, writer and film and television actor. ... Geoffrey McGivern ( b. ... Peter Baynham is a British comedy writer and perfomer born in Cardiff, Wales. ...

Episode 3

  • Sarah Alexander - "Ros Lamb, the Southport Sparrow", World 400,000m champion and world record Shepherds Bush to Aberdeen sprinter, thanks to the ingestion of the rocket fuel for humans called "Di-tutetamine Brohohibe" allowing her to run at 3,500mph. (Alexander is Serafinowicz' partner).
  • Graham Linehan - coach of Ros Lamb (uncredited). (Linehan is Serafinowicz' brother-in-law).
  • Lewis McLeod - "Mario Abdullah-Levy", BBC Scotland reporter.
  • Edgar Wright - "Eddie Yorque", Look Around You's Chief Technician (uncredited).
  • Alex Woodhall - "Paul Alan", owner of the horse "Championess". The horse was the inventor of the "Horse Race Predicting Computer".
  • Andrew Burt - "Sebastian Jackson" and two of his clones, "Provastian Jackson" and "Ninastian Jackson", designers of special footballs including "Invisiball", "Footcube", "Meat-Ball", "Piggy Ball" and the world's roundest ball.
  • Paul Birchard - "Scot Nolan", American inventor of the golf and tennis combination game, "Gonnis".
  • Adam Buxton - Bunny Gnowles, Gonnis umpire.

Sarah Alexander (born 3 January 1971) is an English actress, best known for her roles in various British comedy series. ... Graham Linehan (born 1968) is an Irish television writer and director who, often in partnership with Arthur Mathews, has written or co-written a number of popular television comedies. ... BBC Scotland (BBC Alba in Gaelic) is a constituent part of the British Broadcasting Corporation, the publicly-funded broadcaster of the United Kingdom. ... Edgar Wright at Comic Con in San Diego Edgar Wright (born 18 April 1974 in Poole, Dorset) is an English film and television director. ... Andrew Burt (born 23 May 1945 in Wakefield, West Yorkshire) is an English actor. ... A football is a ball that is round. ... Paul Birchard is an English actor. ... This article is about the sport. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Adam Offord Buxton (born 7 June 1969 in London [1]) is an English comedian, who together with his comedy partner Joe Cornish wrote and presented the Channel 4 comedy series The Adam and Joe Show. ...

Episode 4

  • Paul Elliot - "Tony Parker, the Human Dustbin".
  • Ross Lee - "Andy Gough", Slimmer of the Year and the face of "Slimby" diet milkshake.
  • Paul Putner - "Clive Pounds", manager of "Big 'C' - The Casserole People" automated fast food outlet. Clive Pounds is the brother of Len Pounds from the Series 1 episode, Sulphur (also played by Putner).
  • Richard Leaf - astronaut in the black and white film "Scenes From the World of Tomorrow". (Leaf is the husband of Black Books and Green Wing actress, Tamsin Greig).
  • Nicola Cunningham - wife of the astronaut in "Scenes From the World of Tomorrow". (Cunningham played the zombie "Mary" in Shaun of the Dead).
  • John Owens - "Teddy Clarke", inventor of the "Vegetable Orchestra System".

Paul Putner is an English comedian and actor. ... Richard Leaf is a young British actor who has been recently confirmed as playing Dawlish, the auror - in the upcoming Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix He has had small parts in television and stage productions before. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Green Wing is an award winning British television comedy, set in a hospital. ... Tamsin Greig (IPA pronunciation ), born 12 July 1966)[1] is an English actress best known for her comedy performances. ... Shaun of the Dead is a zombie-themed romantic comedy (or rom zom com as it dubs itself) or zombie comedy released in 2004. ... John Owens (1790–1846), English merchant, was born in Manchester, England in 1790, the son of a prosperous merchant. ...

Episode 5

  • David Walliams - the voice of "Bournemouth", Britain's most technologically advanced computer.
  • Paul Jerricho - "Computer Jones", inventor of Bournemouth.
  • Alex Lowe - "Lee Grithiffths", owner of "Grithiffths Game Megamart".
  • Belinda Stewart-Wilson - "Patricia                    ", (surname is silent) inventor of the first computer for women, "Petticoat 5".
  • This episode also saw the return of Edgar Wright as "Eddie Yorque", Look Around You's Chief Technician.

David Walliams (born David Williams, August 20, 1971) is an English comedy actor, best known for his partnership with Matt Lucas in the sketch show Little Britain. ... Paul Jerricho (born 18 November 1948) is a British actor. ... Alex Lowe is an English actor and comedian, who also plays the character known as Barry from Watford. // He was born in London in 1968 and grew up in Pinner, Middlesex. ... Edgar Wright at Comic Con in San Diego Edgar Wright (born 18 April 1974 in Poole, Dorset) is an English film and television director. ...

Episode 6

As this episode revolved around the Invention of the Year award, the inventors from previous episodes returned - "Leonard Hatred" (Mark Heap), "Dr Phillip Lavender" (Matt Lucas), "Teddy Clarke" (John Owens), "Paul Alan" (Alex Woodhall) with "Championess". The episode also saw the return of "Synthesiser Patel" (Sanjeev Kohli), "Computer Jones" (Paul Jerrico) and "Eddie Yorque" (Edgar Wright). It also included several further characters: Mark Heap (born 4 October 1962) is an English actor best known for a variety of television comedy roles including struggling artist Brian Topp in Spaced, the pompous Dr. Alan Statham in Green Wing, and various roles in the sketch shows Big Train and Jam. ... Matthew Richard Lucas (born March 5, 1974) is an English comedy actor. ... John Owens (1790–1846), English merchant, was born in Manchester, England in 1790, the son of a prosperous merchant. ... Kohli as Navid in Still Game Sanjeev Kohli (born 1971) is a Scottish comedian, writer and actor. ... Edgar Wright at Comic Con in San Diego Edgar Wright (born 18 April 1974 in Poole, Dorset) is an English film and television director. ...

  • David Mitchell - "Pat Taylor", inventor of the Sex-Change Machine, "Sexmachange".
  • Ryan Cartwright - "Sam Macnamara", associate of Pat Taylor and veteran 'volunteer' of 50-60 sex-changes.
  • Cavan Clerkin - "Adam Sandwich", the British Counting Backwards Champion.
  • Nick Frost - carrier of "HOT JON" placard.
  • James Serafinowicz - "Cobalt", the blue man. (James is Peter Serafinowicz's brother).

David Mitchell (born 14 July 1974 in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England[1]) is an English comedian, actor and writer. ... Ryan Cartwright (born 14 March 1981) is a British actor. ... Nicholas John Frost (born March 28, 1972 in Romford, London) is an English actor and comedian famous for his work with Simon Pegg. ...

Trivia

The 'Hot Jon' sign
The 'Hot Jon' sign
  • In the live final episode, a man (played by Nick Frost) holds up a sign saying "HOT JON". When a presenter asks what it means, the sound is intentionally cut out for comedy purposes. Apparently, "HOT JON" is a phonetic oriental greeting meant to be seen by HRH Prince Charles on an official trip to the Far East, during which the man had met the prince. Allegedly, when the scene was filmed, the meaning of "HOT JON" changed during each take.[1]
  • A running joke is that all guests, when introduced, enter through a series of large blast doors (similar to those from Get Smart! or Dexter's Laboratory). However, these were filmed against a bluescreen, which gave an inferior effect and the creators stated, on the DVD commentary, that they did not like the joke but felt they were "stuck with it".
  • The "Computers" episode featured clips of fake 1980s computer games created by members of b3ta. Games included "Diarrhea Dan".
The "scary picture"
  • In one episode, a picture that was designed to be terrifying was shown, after many concerned warnings from the presenters for those of a nervous disposition to look away now. The joke was that the actual picture (a bear and a skeleton)[2] was actually comically tame, poking fun at the more squeamish nature of decades past. In later episodes, the image appears spliced into the film several times, apparently by accident, often when jumping between scenes. It also appears as a shock flash parody on the Series 2 DVD.
  • Matt Groening is a big fan of the show[3], as are Megan Mullally,[4] Emo Philips, Bob Harris[5], and cartoonists Chris Onstad[6], MC Steinberg, Michael Cera and Ryan North.
  • Leonard Hatred's funny walk was not scripted – it was improvised by Mark Heap. His encounter with Championess in the 2nd series finale was also improvised.[7]
  • When aired on BBC America in 2006, episodes were edited to fit within a 30 minute time slot, including commercials. This triggered a continuity error with the series; "Leonard Hatred"'s initial segment was cut from the first episode, causing him to appear without explanation in the season finale.
  • A remixed version of the song 'Machadaynu' (from the Music 2000 episode) has become a cult song in its own right. There is even an internet petition to have it released as a UK single. The remixed version was created by The Freelance Hairdresser, an alter ego of bastard pop pioneer Soundhog.
  • Peter Packard's line thanking the security guards Hank Sullivan and Hank Fletcher during the series final of Series Two is a callback to a running joke from Look Around You Series One. The line "Thanks, Hanks. Thanks." is taken from Series One's "Water" episode, in which the narrator exclaims "Thanks, ants. Thants." as well as "Bless you, ants. Blants." It is one of the few jokes that appears in both series.

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links Hot_jon. ... Nicholas John Frost (born March 28, 1972 in Romford, London) is an English actor and comedian famous for his work with Simon Pegg. ... The running gag is a popular hallmark of comedy television shows and movies. ... A blast shelter is a place where people can go to protect themselves from bomb blasts. ... Get Smart was an American comedy television series that ran from September 18, 1965 to May 1970, and from January to February 1995. ... Dexters Laboratory (Dexters Lab for short) is an American animated television series created by Genndy Tartakovsky. ... The bluescreen setup. ... B3ta is a humorous British website, described as a puerile digital arts community by The Guardian [1]. It was founded by Rob Manuel, Denise Wilton and Cal Henderson. ... Image File history File links Slimmingpicture. ... Image File history File links Slimmingpicture. ... Matthew Abram Groening (born February 15, 1954[2] in Portland, Oregon;[1] his family name is pronounced , rhymes with raining) is an Emmy Award-winning American cartoonist and the creator of The Simpsons, Futurama and the weekly comic strip Life in Hell. ... Megan Mullally (born November 12, 1958 in Los Angeles, California, USA) is a three-time SAG and two-time Emmy Award-winning Irish-American actress, talk show host, singer and comedian, best known for her role as Karen Walker on Will & Grace. ... Emo Philips is an American entertainer and comedian. ... Bob Harris could refer to: Bob Harris, a BBC radio presenter. ... Christopher Onstad is a writer, cartoonist, and artist known best for his creation Achewood, a regularly-updated webcomic. ... Michael Austin Cera (pronounced ) (born June 7, 1988) is a Canadian television and film actor, best known for playing George Michael Bluth in Arrested Development and Evan in Superbad. ... Ryan North is the creator and author of Dinosaur Comics, and co-creator of Whispered Apologies. ... Mark Heap (born 4 October 1962) is an English actor best known for a variety of television comedy roles including struggling artist Brian Topp in Spaced, the pompous Dr. Alan Statham in Green Wing, and various roles in the sketch shows Big Train and Jam. ... BBC America is an American television network, owned and operated by BBC Worldwide, which was launched on March 29, 1998, available on both cable and satellite. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Freelance Hairdresser is part of the novelty side of bootlegging. ... Bastard pop is a musical genre which, in its purest form, consists of the combination (usually by digital means) of the music from one song with the a cappella from another. ... Soundhog (Ben Hayes) is a DJ, producer and composer of a number of acclaimed Bastard Pop songs. ...

References

  1. ^ Registration required. IMDB.com.
  2. ^ Slimby Slimming Picture. Look Around You. BBC. Retrieved on 2006-06-11.
  3. ^ Matt Groening Interview. The A.V. Club. Retrieved on 2006-06-11.
  4. ^ Megan's Favourites. The Megan Mullally Show Official Website. Retrieved on 2006-12-03.
  5. ^ Bob Harris blog entry. Bob Harris. Retrieved on 2007-04-16.
  6. ^ Chris Onstad interview. Brian M. Palmer. Retrieved on 2007-05-15.
  7. ^ Robert Popper and Peter Serafinowicz. Look Around You 2, commentary track [DVD]. Talkback Thames/BBC.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Look Around You
  • Look Around You at bbc.co.uk
  • Look Around You at the Internet Movie Database
  • Tony Rudd (from series 2) fansite
  • Tarvu (from Dvd Extras and Diarrhea Dan) fansite
  • Look Around You Series 1, on Google video.
  • Look Around You Series 2 clips, on YouTube video
  • Look Around You at Comedy Central

  Results from FactBites:
 
Look Around You - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2135 words)
Look Around You is a BBC television comedy series devised and written by Robert Popper and Peter Serafinowicz, and, in the first series only, narrated by Nigel Lambert.
The first series of Look Around You was nominated for a BAFTA award in 2003.
For example, the colour and overall look of the film is altered, and passably authentic background music was overdubbed to complete the parody of the original programmes.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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