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Encyclopedia > Longwave radio mast Hellissandur

The Longwave radio mast Hellissandur is a 412 metre high guyed radio mast for longwave transmissions at Gufuskálar in the vicinity of Hellissandur on the peninsula Snæfellsnes of Iceland. This mast, which is the tallest structure in Western Europe, is insulated against ground and guyed in 5 levels by steel ropes, which are subdivided by insulators. It was built in 1963 as replacement for a 190.5 metre (625ft) tall LORAN-C tower, which was built in 1959, for the North Atlantic LORAN-C chain (GRD 7970). After the LORAN-C scheme was shut down on December 31st, 1994 the longwave radio mast Hellissandur was converted to an aerial mast for a longwave broadcasting transmitter of the Broadcasting Service of Iceland, for a transmission frequency of 189 kHz and a power of 300 kilowatts. ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... KVLY-TV mast, which is guy-wire supported. ... Masts of the Rugby VLF transmitter in England Radio masts and towers are, typically, tall structures designed to support antennas (also known as aerials in the UK) for telecommunications and broadcasting, including television. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In telecommunications, transmission is the act of transmitting electrical messages (and the associated phenomena of radiant energy that passes through media). ... Hellissandur is a part of Ólafsvík at Snæfellsnes on West-Iceland. ... A peninsula in Croatia A peninsula is a piece of land that is bordered on three or more sides by water. ... The Snæfellsnes peninsula is situated to the west of the Borgarfjörður in the west of Iceland. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The borders of Western Europe were largely defined by the Cold War. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Atlantic (disambiguation) The Atlantic Ocean is Earths second-largest ocean, covering approximately one-fifth of its surface. ... LORAN (LOng RAnge Navigation) is a terrestrial navigation system using low frequency radio transmitters. ... RUV or the Ríkísútvarpið (Pronounced Rikissootvarpith) is the main state broadcaster for Iceland. ... A kilohertz (kHz) is a unit of frequency equal to 1,000 hertz (1,000 cycles per second). ... The kilowatt (symbol: kW) is a unit for measuring power, equal to one thousand watts. ...


Coordinates: 64°54′25″N, 23°55′19″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


See also

It has been suggested that List of tallest buildings and structures in the world#Radio masts taller than 600 metres be merged into this article or section. ... An incomplete list of the tallest structures in Iceland. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
longwave - Article and Reference from OnPedia.com (874 words)
Unlike shortwave radio, longwave signals do not reflect or refract using the ionosphere, so there are fewer phase-caused fadeouts.
In Europe, North Africa and Asia, longwave radio frequencies between 153 and 279 kHz are used for domestic and international broadcasting.
As aerials are usually used: mast antennas which are fed at the bottom and which are insulated against ground, mast antennas fed by the guy ropes (such masts are usually grounded), T-aerials, L-aerials and long wire aerials.
Wikipedia: Longwave radio mast Hellissandur - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (154 words)
The Longwave radio mast Hellissandur (also called Gufuskálar) is a 412 metre high guyed radio mast for longwave transmissions in the vicinity of Hellissandur on the peninsula Snæfellsnes of Iceland at 64°54'24″N, 23°55'18″W,(64°54′24″N, 23°55′18″W).
This mast, which is the tallest structure in Western Europe, is insulated against ground and guyed in 5 levels by steel ropes, which are subdivided by insulators.
After the LORAN-C scheme was shut down on December 31st, 1994 the longwave radio mast Hellissandur was converted to an aerial mast for a longwave broadcasting transmitter of the Broadcasting Service of Iceland, for a transmission frequency of 189 kHz and a power of 300 kilowatts.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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