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Encyclopedia > Long sword

The term long-sword is ahistoric in the sense that it refers to a different kind of sword depending on historical context. It shares this complication with the related terms war-sword, and great sword. A sword (from Old English sweord; akin to Old High German swerd lit. ... The term war-sword was historically used specifically for the post-Roman steel swords of medieval Europe. ... Great sword - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


In an early medieval context, a long-sword refers to a Spatha type "viking sword", which is 'long' compared to the Seax. The Spatha is a straight, slashing sword, usually worn by cavalry officers and auxiliaries in later Roman armies. ... Categories: Weapon stubs ...


In a late medieval context, a long-sword is a "hand-and-a half" or bastard-sword, which was 'long' mainly because of the lengthened hilt which allowed it to be wielded with both hands. This type of sword was actually called "long sword" (German langes schwert) in the 14th and 15th centuries. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... (13th century - 14th century - 15th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 14th century was that century which lasted from 1301 to 1400. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ...


In a post-medieval context, the zweihänder of the 16th century Landsknechts, without doubt the longest sword of them all, are sometimes included in the term. The Zweihänder (German for two hander) is a massive two-handed sword, designed to capitalize on brute force and shock effect, at the expense of some finesse. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Landsknechts (German, Land land, country + Knecht servant: i. ...

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Timeline

The Germanic tribes of the late Roman Iron Age were able to forge double edged blades used for hacking that were longer that the gladius and spatha of Rome. Surviving examples of these Germanic swords had blades measuring between 28 and 32 in (710 and 810 mm) in length and 1.7 to 2.4 in (45 to 60 mm) in width. These single handed weapons of war sported a tang only some 4 to 5 in (100 to 130 mm) long, and had very little taper in their blades ending in usually rounded tip. Ancient Rome was a civilization that existed in Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East between 753 BC and its downfall in AD 476. ... Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ... From left to right: Mainz, Fulham, Pompeii, and Pompeii Gladii. ... The Spatha is a straight, slashing sword, usually worn by cavalry officers and auxiliaries in later Roman armies. ... Rome - Wikipedia /**/ @import /w/skins-1. ...


This pattern continued through the Viking age where the swords grew slightly in length to 37 in (930 mm) and took on a slightly more acute distal taper and point. These blades had deep fullers running their length, yet still had single handed hilts which often sported a 'brazil nut' shaped pommel. While the pattern of hilt and blade design of this time might readily be called 'The Viking sword' to do so would be to neglect the wide spread popularity it enjoyed. All over continental Europe between 700-1000 AD this design and its small variations could be found. This article needs cleanup. ... For people named Fuller, see Fuller (disambiguation). ... See also: Hilt (band) and Peter Hilt Hilt of Szczerbiec The hilt of a sword is its handle, consisting of a guard, grip and pommel. ... See also: Hilt (band) and Peter Hilt The hilt of a sword is its handle, consisting of a guard, grip and pommel. ... A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ...


During "Norman" times the blades increased some 4 in (100 mm) in over all length, and the hilt changed significantly. Instead of the brazil-nut pommel, a thick disc shaped pommel was attached 'on-edge' to the bottom of the iron hilt. In addition the upper guard grew substantially from the near-absent design predating it. Also the blades tended to taper slightly less than those found during the times of the Vikings.


In the high middle ages a great variety of different types of swords were developed; the shape of these blades developed as the answer to increasing armour protection coming into use in Europe, after the mid 13th century. These included the bastard-sword and great-sword variations. While the cutting and slashing blade designs persisted, the plate armour in use required almost every type of sword to become pointed for thrusting at the tip. In addition the blades became diamond or hexagonal in cross section to keep the strength for thrusting. This lead to the off-shoot in the estoc. The average blade length of a long-sword during this time as around 1.1 m (3 ft 7 in), and the weight was usually between 1.2 and 1.8 kg (2.6 to 4.0 lb). The actual size and weight of a long-sword would depend on personal preference or build of the wielder and varied tremendously when compared to previous ages. In addition to this large sword, often a smaller sword called an arming sword was worn as a back up. A hoplite wearing a helmet, a breastplate and greaves (and nothing else). ... A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... An estoc is a type of sword common in the 16th century. ... Depending on the time period, a knight could have more than one sword. ...


Late medieval long-sword combat

While a living tradition of long-sword fighting has not survived to our day, manuscripts written by the masters of the art still exist. Among the most famous of these treatises are Fiore dei Liberi's "Flos Duellatorum" (1410) and Filippo Vadi's "De Arte Gladiatoria Dimicandi" (1485), of the Italian school, and Hans Talhoffer's "Alte Armatur und Ringkunst" (1459) and Ms. 3227a (ca. 1389, containing the system of Johannes Liechtenauer), of the German school. In recent decades, efforts to revive the art by translating and analyzing these treatises have been made throughout Europe and North America, leading to a much deeper knowledge base about the nature of European swordsmanship. Fiore dei Liberi (ca. ... Portrait of Talhoffer (pictured left), and his coat of arms, from the 1459 Fechtbuch plate 25 of Talhoffers Fechtbuch of 1467, showing two longsword fencers standing in the ward (Stand beid in der Hut) plate 170 of Talhoffers Fechtbuch of 1467, showing rondel dagger combat Hans Talhoffer (also spelled Talhofer... The Codex ms. ... sitting fencing master, probably representing Liechtenauer, fol. ... page of Mscr. ...


There seems to have been some confusion as to the difference between what was considered a long-sword (modern & historical term) and what was considered a bastard-sword (historical term). After hand and a half swords appeared on the scene in the high middle ages, they were of a comparable size, and were used in a similar fashion to what were called "war swords". As time wore on, bastard-swords came to replace what might be called long-swords (war-swords), as their (generally) more sharply tapered blades and distinctly rhomboid cross sections were better suited for defeating the increasing armour protection worn on the battlefield. In practice, however, the words are at times used as synonyms. As a result of the popularity of the bastard sword, the single-handed war-swords of the centuries before may even have been referred to as short swords. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The term war-sword was historically used specifically for the post-Roman steel swords of medieval Europe. ... This article is about mathematics. ... See also the town of Battle, East Sussex, England Generally, a battle is an instance of combat between two or more parties wherein each group will seek to defeat the others. ...


Note that this kind of sword is not the medieval great sword, or even less so the two-handed sword of the renaissance. That kind of sword has another purpose and method of use than the long-sword or the bastard-sword. Great sword - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... A two-handed sword, used as a general term, is any large sword that requires two hands to use. ... By Region: Italian Renaissance Northern Renaissance -French Renaissance -German Renaissance -English Renaissance The Renaissance was an influential cultural movement which brought about a period of scientific revolution and artistic transformation, at the dawn of modern European history. ...


See also

  • Historical fencing
  • Historical European Martial Arts
  • Knight's sword
  • Side-sword
  • Short sword

Historical martial arts reconstructions are attempts at reviving martial arts with no living tradition. ... the first page of the Codex Wallerstein shows the typical arms of 15th century fencing Historical European Martial Arts (HEMA) are reconstructed fighting techniques of the european Middle Ages and Renaissance. ... Depending on the time period, a knight could have more than one sword. ... A side-sword was a type of war sword used by infantry during the Renaissance of Europe. ...

External links

  • AES, an Edmonton based school featuring instruction in Western Martial Arts
  • AEMMA, Academy of European Medieval Martial Arts, an organization of teachers and students of European Swordsmanship located in Toronto, Canada
  • The Chicago Swordplay Guild, a modern school for the study of historical European martial arts
  • Sword Academy The Sword Academy, a Calgary based school of historical European Medieval Martial Arts
  • ARMA The Association for Renaissance Martial Art.

 
 

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