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Encyclopedia > Long Mu

In Chinese mythology, Long Mu (Pinyin) (龍母;) or Mother of Dragons (Wade-Giles: Lung Mo) was a Chinese woman who was deified as a goddess after raising five infant dragons. Long Mu and her dragons developed a strong bond for each other, and have thus become an example of filial devotion and parental love, an important virtue in Chinese culture. At the moment this page contains a list of links. ... Hanyu pinyin (Simplified Chinese: 汉语拼音; Traditional Chinese: 漢語拼音; Hanyu Pinyin: , lit. ... Wade-Giles, sometimes abbreviated Wade, is a Romanization (phonetic notation and transliteration) system for the Chinese language based on Mandarin. ... In Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic theology, theosis, meaning deification or divinization, is the call to man to become holy and seek union with God, beginning in this life and later consummated in the resurrection. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Filial piety is extended into the afterlife. ... It has been suggested that True love be merged into this article or section. ...


The Legend.

The historic name of Long Mu was Wen Shi (溫氏). She was born in 290 BC (during the Qin Dynasty) in Guangdong province, near the Xi River (西江). Her her family's ancestral home was in the Teng District (藤縣) in Guangxi province. She was the second of three daughters of Wen Tianrui (溫天瑞) and Liang Shi (梁氏). Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 295 BC 294 BC 293 BC 292 BC 291 BC 290 BC 289 BC 288 BC 287... The Qin Dynasty (Chinese: 秦朝; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chin Chao) (221 BC - 207 BC) was preceded by the Zhou Dynasty and followed by the Han Dynasty in China. ... Guangdong (Simplified Chinese: 广东; Traditional Chinese: 廣東; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kuang-tung; Postal System Pinyin: Kwangtung or Canton Province, Jyutping: gwong2 dung1), is a province on the south coast of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Xi River (西江, pinyin: Xī Jiāng, Postal System Pinyin: Si Kiang, lit. ... Guangxi (Zhuang: Gvangjsih; old orthography: ; Simplified Chinese: 广西; Traditional Chinese: 廣西; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kuang-hsi; Postal System Pinyin: Kwangsi), full name Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region (Zhuang: Gvangjsih Bouxcuengh Swcigih; old orthography: ; Simplified Chinese: 广西壮族自治区; Traditional Chinese: 廣西壯族自治區; Hanyu Pinyin: ) is a Zhuang autonomous region of the Peoples Republic of China. ...


Wen Shi frequently went to the Xi River to fish and wash clothes for her family. One day, she found a large smooth white stone along the banks of the river. She took the beautiful stone home, but later discovered that the stone was actually an egg, from which hatched five baby snakes (an alternate version says one). Wen Shi's family was poor, but Wen Shi saved the best food she had for her baby snakes and fed them by hand. As the snakes grew, they helped Wen Shi catch fish at the Xi River. The snakes were natural swimmers and became very good at catching fish.


As the snakes grew even more, it became apparent that they weren't snakes at at. The snakes eventually matured into five powerful dragons. In Chinese culture, dragons are considered spirits of water, and have the power to control the weather. During a drought, Wen Shi asked her dragon children to summon the rain for her village. When rain came and ended the drought, the grateful villagers gave Wen Shi the name "Mother of Dragons" (龍母) or "Divine Human" (神人). To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Qin Shihuang, the Emperor of the Qin Dynasty, recieved word of Wen Shi and her dragons. The Emperor sent her gifts of gold and jade and requested her presence at Xianyang, the imperial capital city near the Yellow River, far to the north. By this time, Wen Shi was an elderly women in frail health. Her adult dragons feared for her safety and did not want her to travel so far from her village. Wen Shi boarded a boat to comply with the Emperor's commandment, but her dragons hid under the boat and dragged the boat backward so that the boat could never pass Guilin. Eventually, the frustrated imperial officials relented and allowed Wen Shi to remain home. Qin Shi Huang (秦始皇) (November or December 260 BC - September 10, 210 BC), personal name Zheng, was king of the Chinese State of Qin from 247 BC to 221 BC, and then the first emperor of a unified China from 221 BC to 210 BC, ruling under the name First... The Qin Dynasty (Chinese: 秦朝; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chin Chao) (221 BC - 207 BC) was preceded by the Zhou Dynasty and followed by the Han Dynasty in China. ... It has been suggested that Gold bar be merged into this article or section. ... A selection of antique, hand-crafted Chinese jadeite jade buttons Jade An ornamental stone, jade is a name applied to two different silicate minerals. ... Xianyang (Simplified Chinese: 咸阳; Traditional Chinese: 咸陽; pinyin: ) was the capital of the state of Qin during the Warring States Period in Chinese history, and remained to be capital during the short-lived Qin Dynasty. ... For other Yellow Rivers, see Yellow River (disambiguation). ... Lijiang River Guilin (Chinese: æ¡‚æž—; pinyin: ; Postal System Pinyin: Kweilin; Zhuang: Gveilinz) is one of Chinas most picturesque cities, situated in the northeast of the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region of the Peoples Republic of China on the west bank of the Lijiang River (also called the Li River). ...


After Wen Shi died, the dragons were overwhelmed with sadness and took human form, known as the five scholars (五秀才). They buried her on the northern side of Zhu Mountain (珠山).


Legacy.

Everyone who heard the story of Long Mu was touched by the filial devotion of the dragons. During the early Han Dynasty, the Xiaotong Temple (孝通廟), later known as the Longmu Ancestral Temple (龍母祖廟), was built in her honor. The temple is in Yuecheng in Deqing County (德慶縣悅城鎮) of Guangdong province. It features calligraphy dedicated to the goddess written by the Emperor Hong Wu of the Ming Dynasty. The temple remains very popular and has been renovated 13 times over the centuries, most recently in 1905-1912 and 1985. The Han Dynasty (Traditional Chinese: 漢朝; Simplified Chinese: 汉朝; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Han Chau; 206 BC–AD 220) followed the Qin Dynasty and preceded the Three Kingdoms in China. ... Guangdong (Simplified Chinese: 广东; Traditional Chinese: 廣東; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kuang-tung; Postal System Pinyin: Kwangtung or Canton Province, Jyutping: gwong2 dung1), is a province on the south coast of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Calligraphy in a Latin Bible of AD 1407 on display in Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. ... The Hongwu Emperor (September 21, 1328 – June 24, 1398), personal name Zhu Yuanzhang, was the founder of the Ming Dynasty of China, and the first emperor of this dynasty from 1368 to 1398. ... Ming Dynasty A boring thing they teach to you at school. ...


Another temple dedicated to Long Mu is the Baisha Temple in Zhaoqing, south of the Xi River in the Ruizhou District, also in Guangdong province. The temple was built in 1587, but it is not as well preserved as the Xiaotong Temple. The city declared the temple a cultural site in 1982. Zhaoqing (肇庆) is a prefecture-level city of Guangdong province in southern China. ... Xi River (西江, pinyin: Xī Jiāng, Postal System Pinyin: Si Kiang, lit. ... Guangdong (Simplified Chinese: 广东; Traditional Chinese: 廣東; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kuang-tung; Postal System Pinyin: Kwangtung or Canton Province, Jyutping: gwong2 dung1), is a province on the south coast of the Peoples Republic of China. ...


Long Mu's festival is in the first week of the fifth month of the the Chinese Lunar Calendar. She is a patron goddess of parents and children, and remains a popular deity throughout China. The Chinese calendar is a lunisolar calendar formed by combining a purely lunar calendar with a solar calendar. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Long Mu - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (661 words)
Long Mu and her dragons developed a strong bond for each other, and have thus become an example of filial devotion and parental love, an important virtue in Chinese culture.
Another temple dedicated to Long Mu is the Baisha Temple in Zhaoqing, south of the Xi River in the Ruizhou District, also in Guangdong province.
Long Mu's festival is in the first week of the fifth month of the the Chinese Lunar Calendar.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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