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Encyclopedia > London Zoo

Coordinates: 51°32′08.39″N, 00°09′21.51″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

ZSL London Zoo

Date opened 1828
Location Regent's Park, London, England
Land area 36 acres [1] (0.108 km²)
Coordinates 51°32′08.39″N, 00°09′21.51″W
# of Animals 16802 (2006)[2]
# of Species 704 (2006)
Major exhibits Gorilla Kingdom, Clore Rainforest Lookout, Into Africa
Website
The giant ZSL London Zoo aviary
The giant ZSL London Zoo aviary

ZSL London Zoo is the world's oldest scientific zoo. It was opened in London on April 27, 1828, and was originally intended to be used as a collection for scientific study. It was eventually made open to the public in 1847. Today it houses a collection of more than 651 species of animals. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Year 1828 (MDCCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about Regents Park in London. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... For other uses, see Species (disambiguation). ... Download high resolution version (2000x1500, 203 KB)London Zoo avery. ... Download high resolution version (2000x1500, 203 KB)London Zoo avery. ... Giraffes in Sydneys Taronga Zoo A zoological garden, zoological park, or zoo is a facility in which animals are confined within enclosures and displayed to the public, and in which they may also be bred. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... Year 1828 (MDCCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Species (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ...


It is managed under the auspices of the Zoological Society of London (established in 1826), and is situated at the northern edge of Regent's Park (the Regent's Canal runs through it). The Society also has a more spacious site at ZSL Whipsnade Zoo in Bedfordshire to which the larger animals such as elephants and rhinos have been moved. The Zoological Society of London (sometimes known by the abbreviation ZSL) is a learned society founded in April 1826 by Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles, Lord Auckland, Sir Humphry Davy, Joseph Sabine, Nicholas Aylward Vigors and other eminent naturalists. ... The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about Regents Park in London. ... The Regents Canal is a canal across an area just to the north of central London. ... Whipsnade Zoo is a zoo located at Whipsnade, near Dunstable in Bedfordshire, England. ... Bedfordshire (abbreviated Beds) is a county in England that forms part of the East of England region. ...


As well as being the first scientific zoo, ZSL London Zoo also opened the first Reptile house (1849), first public Aquarium (1853), first insect house (1881) and the first children's zoo (1938). 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ...


The zoo is currently (2007) undergoing a renovation project aimed at replacing cages with enclosures which recreate animals' natural environments, giving a better lifestyle to the animals, and a more realistic experience to visitors. For example, in 2005 the African Bird Safari and Meet The Monkeys walkthroughs opened and then in 2006 the new "Into Africa" and "Butterfly Paradise" exhibits opened, while at Easter 2007 the Duke of Edinburgh officially opened the new "Gorilla Kingdom" and "Clore Rainforest Lookout" a walkthrough rainforest replacing the small mammals building. [3] In Easter 2008 the Bird House will reopen as a tropical rainforest, home to a variety of birds[citation needed]. Gorilla Kingdom is a flagship 6000m2 exhibit for the Zoological Society of Londons ZSL London Zoo. ... For other meanings of bird, see bird (disambiguation). ...


The closest London Underground stations are Camden Town and Chalk Farm. The London Underground is an underground railway system - also known as a rapid transit system - that serves a large part of Greater London, United Kingdom and some neighbouring areas. ... Camden Town tube station is a major crossover point for the two branches of the Northern Line and the busiest station on the entire London Underground. ... Chalk Farm tube station is a London Underground station near Camden Town in London. ...

Bird's eye view of the Gardens of the Zoological Society, circa 1828
Bird's eye view of the Gardens of the Zoological Society, circa 1828

Contents

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 483 pixel Image in higher resolution (2246 × 1356 pixel, file size: 256 KB, MIME type: image/png) Gardens of the Zoological Society Regents Park 1828 - Project Gutenberg eText 11389 From Title: The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Vol. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 483 pixel Image in higher resolution (2246 × 1356 pixel, file size: 256 KB, MIME type: image/png) Gardens of the Zoological Society Regents Park 1828 - Project Gutenberg eText 11389 From Title: The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Vol. ...

Zoo Architecture

Since its earliest days, the zoo has prided itself on appointing leading architects to design its buildings. These include: For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ...

  • The Clock Tower (1828, originally built to house llamas) and the Giraffe House (1836-1837) by Decimus Burton (both Grade II listed buildings)
  • The Mappin Terraces (1913-1914) by Sir Peter Chalmers-Mitchell (1864-1945) and John James Joass (listed Grade II). As of 1997 it is home to Sloth Bears and Hanuman Langurs.
  • The Penguin Pool (1934), the Round House (built 1932-1933 to house the zoo's gorillas) (As of May 2007 Home to Lemurs and Aye-Ayes) and the North Gate Kiosk (1936) were all designed by Berthold Lubetkin's Tecton firm, with inputs on the Penguin Pool from leading structural engineer Ove Arup. The Penguin Pool and Round House are now listed Grade I, whilst the Kiosk is listed Grade II. The Penguin Pool is no longer considered suitable for penguins, so the birds have been moved to a pool elsewhere in the zoo, near "Barcley Court". As of Spring 2007, Lubetkin's structure was filled with water but was home to no animals, at the moment the zoo is considering its long-term use.
  • The Snowdon aviary (1962-1964) (Grade II* listed).
  • The Elephant and Rhinoceros House (1962-1965) designed by Sir Hugh Casson and Neville Condor (Grade II* listed). As of Spring 2007 it is home to Bactrian Camels, Bearded Pigs and temporary housing for birds

Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) The llama (Lama glama) is a South American camelid, widely used as a pack animal by the Incas[1] and other natives of the Andes mountains. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Range map The giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) is an African even-toed ungulate mammal, the tallest of all land-living animal species. ... Decimus Burton (30 September 1800-December 1881) was a prolific English architect and garden designer, particularly associated with projects in the classical style in London parks, including buildings at Kew Gardens and London Zoo, and with the layout and architecture of the seaside towns of Fleetwood and St Leonards on... The Forth Bridge, designed by Sir Benjamin Baker and Sir John Fowler, opened in 1890, and now owned by Network Rail, is designated as a Category A listed building by Historic Scotland. ... Binomial name Melursus ursinus (Shaw, 1791) The Sloth Bear (Melursus ursinus) is a nocturnal bear, inhabiting the lowland forests of India, Nepal, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. ... Species Semnopithecus schistaceus Semnopithecus ajax Semnopithecus hector Semnopithecus entellus Semnopithecus hypoleucos Semnopithecus dussumieri Semnopithecus priam The gray langurs are a group of Old World monkeys and make up the entirety of the genus Semnopithecus. ... Modern genera Aptenodytes Eudyptes Eudyptula Megadyptes Pygoscelis Spheniscus For prehistoric genera, see Systematics Some penguins are curious. ... The Round House For other meanings, see Roundhouse (disambiguation). ... Type species Troglodytes gorilla Savage, 1847 distribution of Gorilla Species Gorilla gorilla Gorilla beringei The gorilla, the largest of the living primates, is a ground-dwelling omnivore that inhabits the forests of Africa. ... Superfamilies and Families Cheirogaleoidea Cheirogaleidae Lemuroidea Lemuridae Lepilemuridae Indriidae Lemurs make up the infraorder Lemuriformes and are members of a class of primates known as prosimians . ... Binomial name Daubentonia madagascariensis Gmelin, 1788 The Aye-aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis) is a primate native to Madagascar that combines rodent-like teeth with a long, thin middle finger to fill the ecological niche of a woodpecker. ... Berthold Lubetkin (1901-1990) was a Russian emigré architect who pioneered modernist design in Britain in the 1930s. ... structural engineer is an engineering profession who practices structural engineering. ... Sir Ove Nyquist Arup CBE, MICE, MIStructE, (born at Newcastle upon Tyne in 1895 and died in 1988) was a leading Anglo-Danish engineer, the founder of the internationally important firm of Arup and generally considered the foremost engineer of his time. ... The Snowdon Aviary is an aviary which exists at London Zoo. ... Genera and Species Loxodonta Loxodonta cyclotis Loxodonta africana Elephas Elephas maximus Elephas antiquus † Elephas beyeri † Elephas celebensis † Elephas cypriotes † Elephas ekorensis † Elephas falconeri † Elephas iolensis † Elephas planifrons † Elephas platycephalus † Elephas recki † Stegodon † Mammuthus † Elephantidae (the elephants) is a family of pachyderm, and the only remaining family in the order Proboscidea... Black Rhino from Howletts Wild Animal Park For other uses, see Rhinoceros (disambiguation). ... Sir Hugh Maxwell Casson (23 May 1910 – 15 August 1999) was a British architect, interior designer, artist, and influential writer and broadcaster on 20th century design. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Bactrian Camel range The Bactrian Camel (Camelus bactrianus) is a large even-toed ungulate native to the steppes of eastern Asia. ... Binomial name Sus barbatus Müller, 1838 Subspecies Sus barbatus oi Sus barbatus barbatus Sus barbatus ahoenobarbus The Bearded Pig (Wattrash) (Sus barbatus) is a species of pig. ... For other meanings of bird, see bird (disambiguation). ...

Stars of the Past

Adult atlas moth bred in the Zoo's Butterfly House.
  • ZSL London Zoo was home to the only living quagga ever to be photographed, along with a number of thylacines. Both species are now extinct.
  • Obaysch: When Obaysch arrived at ZSL London Zoo in 1850, it became the first hippopotamus to be seen in Europe since the Roman Empire, and the first in England since prehistory.
  • Jumbo: In 1880 the largest elephant known at the time, his name becoming an epithet for anything of large size. He unfortunately became aggressive in old age, and had to stop giving rides; he was sold to Phineas Barnum's circus, where he was hit by a train and killed.
  • Winnie: In 1914 the zoo was given an American Black Bear by a Canadian Lieutenant. The famous author A.A. Milne visited with his son Christopher Robin, and the boy was so enamoured with the bear Milne wrote the famous series of books for him entitled Winnie The Pooh.
  • Josephine: a great Indian hornbill who, for many years, was the oldest animal at the Zoo. She lived in the Bird House until her death in 1998 aged 53.
  • Guy the Gorilla: a lowland gorilla who lived at the Zoo from 1947 until his death in 1978 and in his later years became one of its best-loved residents.
  • Brumas: Brumas was the first Polar Bear to be born at the ZSL London Zoo (1949?). "He" was said to be a male, but it was later confirmed that she was in fact a female. However, the public was not informed of this "sex-change" for several months. Brumas was named after the two keepers, BRUce and SAM. Attendance at the zoo soared as a result of "his" appearance, and in his first year reached 3,000,000—a figure that has yet to be topped.
  • Eros: In 1950 Eros, a wild snowy owl, became lost in a storm and fell exhausted on the deck of HMS Eros off the Azores. During his life at the Zoo he had three mates and fathered 57 chicks. He died in 1993.
  • Chi Chi: In 1958 she became the Zoo's first Giant Panda and was one of the first Giant Pandas in a western zoo.
  • Goldie: A golden eagle who became a national celebrity when he escaped for two weeks in 1965, and flew around the roads and trees of Regents Park.
  • Human beings, Homo sapiens sapiens. An unusual four-day exhibit entitled the "Human Zoo" ran in late August 2005, with people put on display in such garments as fig leaves in the Black Bear exhibit.[4][5]

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... Binomial name Attacus atlas (Linnaeus, 1758) The Atlas moth (Attacus atlas) is a large saturniid moth found in the tropical and subtropical forests of Southeast Asia, common across the Malay archipelago to Indonesia. ... Trinomial name Equus quagga quagga Boddaert, 1785 The quagga is an extinct subspecies of the plains zebra, which was once found in great numbers in South Africas Cape Province and the southern part of the Orange Free State. ... In biology and ecology, extinction is the ceasing of existence of a species or group of species. ... Crowds look on as Obaysch rests in the London Zoo in this 1852 photograph taken by Juan, Count of Montizón. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758[2] Range map[1] The hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius), from the Greek ‘ιπποπόταμος (hippopotamos, hippos meaning horse and potamos meaning river), often shortened to hippo, is a large, mostly plant-eating African mammal, one of only two extant species in the family Hippopotamidae (the other being the Pygmy... It has been suggested that Jumbo the Circus Elephant be merged into this article or section. ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Genera and Species Loxodonta Loxodonta cyclotis Loxodonta africana Elephas Elephas maximus Elephas antiquus † Elephas beyeri † Elephas celebensis † Elephas cypriotes † Elephas ekorensis † Elephas falconeri † Elephas iolensis † Elephas planifrons † Elephas platycephalus † Elephas recki † Stegodon † Mammuthus † Elephantidae (the elephants) is a family of pachyderm, and the only remaining family in the order Proboscidea... Phineas Taylor Barnum (July 5, 1810 – April 7, 1891), American showman who is best remembered for his entertaining hoaxes and for founding the circus that eventually became Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey Circus. ... Winnipeg was the name given to the Black Bear cub that inspired the Winnie-the-Pooh stories by A. A. Milne. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... “Black Bear” redirects here. ... Alan Alexander Milne (January 18, 1882 _ January 31, 1956), also known as A. A. Milne, is an English author best known for his books about the talking stuffed bear; Winnie the Pooh and for various childrens poems, some of which also feature Winnie-the-Pooh and friends. ... “Pooh” redirects here. ... Guy the Gorilla was a large African lowland gorilla who lived in London Zoo. ... Type Species Troglodytes gorilla Savage, 1847 Species Gorilla gorilla Gorilla beringei The gorilla, the largest of the primates, is a ground-dwelling herbivore that inhabits the forests of Africa. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Look up chichi in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Panda Bear redirects here. ... Goldie was a male golden eagle who lived at London Zoo during the 1960s. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 World distribution of the golden eagle Light green = Nesting area Blue = Wintering area Dark green = All year distribution Adult in flight. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Regents Park (officially The Regents Park) is one of the Royal Parks of London. ... Human beings are defined variously in biological, spiritual, and cultural terms, or in combinations thereof. ... Human Zoo (Völkerschau) in Stuttgart (Germany) in 1928 For other uses, see Human zoo (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Ursus americanus The American Black Bear (Ursus americanus), also known as simply the black bear or cinnamon bear, is the most common bear in North America. ...

Filming at the Zoo

Black footed penguins at feeding time
Black footed penguins at feeding time

Many films and television programmes have been filmed at London Zoo. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (767x977, 222 KB) Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): London Zoo ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (767x977, 222 KB) Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): London Zoo ... This article is about motion pictures. ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ...

The Pumpkin Eater is a 1964 film which tells the story of a multiply-married woman, with many children, who finds herself with husband number three and pregnant with child number seven, unsure of where her life is taking her. ... Anne Bancroft (September 17, 1931 – June 6, 2005) was an iconic Academy, Tony, and Emmy Award-winning American actress. ... James Neville Mason (May 15, 1909 – July 27, 1984) was a three-time Academy Award nominated English actor who attained stardom in both British and American films. ... Withnail and I is a British film made in 1986 by Handmade Films. ... The phrase What a piece of work is a man! comes from Shakespeares Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, Act II, scene II, and it is often used in reference to the whole speech containing the line. ... Hamlet and Horatio in the cemetery by Eugène Delacroix For other uses, see Hamlet (disambiguation). ... An American Werewolf in London is a comedy/horror film released in 1981, written and directed by John Landis. ... About a Boy is RUBBISH !!!! :( == Headline text == Link titleLink titleLink title About a Boy is a 2002 film directed by brothers Chris Weitz and Paul Weitz, based on the book of the same name by Nick Hornby. ... Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone (also known as Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone in the United States) was a critically acclaimed and highly successful film released in 2001, based on the fantasy novel of the same name by best-selling author J.K. Rowling. ... Turtle Diary is a 1985 romantic-drama film based on a novel of the same name by Russell Hoban. ... Russell Hoban in 2005 Russell Conwell Hoban (born February 4, 1925) is an American writer of fantasy, science fiction, mainstream fiction, magic realism, poetry, and childrens books. ... Sir Ben Kingsley, CBE, (born December 31, 1943) is a British actor. ... Glenda Jackson Glenda May Jackson, CBE, (born 9 May 1936) is a two-time Academy Award-winning British actress and politician, currently Labour Member of Parliament for the constituency of Hampstead and Highgate in the London Borough of Camden. ... Talk Talk was a popular English music group that was active from 1981 to 1991. ... Its My Life is a synthpop song written by Mark Hollis and Tim Friese-Greene for Talk Talks second album Its My Life (1984). ... This article is about the year. ... Absolutely Fabulous is a British sitcom written by and starring Jennifer Saunders, and co-starring Joanna Lumley, Julia Sawalha and June Whitfield. ... Jean-Paul Gaultier (born April 24, 1952, in Arcueil, Val-de-Marne) is a French fashion designer and past television presenter. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ ZSL Corporate and Private Events
  2. ^ ZSL Animal Inventory 31/12/2006
  3. ^ BBC News story
  4. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/london/4184466.stm
  5. ^ http://www.zsl.org/london-zoo/whats-on/the-human-zoo,94,EV.html

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
London Zoo
  • London Zoo Website
  • London Zoo in the 19th C.
  • Michael Pead :: Photos of London Zoo
  • Google Maps
  • 360 Panorama outside London Zoo

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ananova - Human interest at London Zoo (197 words)
London Zoo has unveiled a new exhibition - eight humans prowling around wearing little more than fig leaves.
The 'Human Zoo' is intended to show the basic nature of human beings, over the bank holiday weekend.
Spiro, selected from dozens of hopefuls in an Internet competition, said he was excited by the prospect of monkeying around on the zoo's Bear Mountain.
London Zoo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (761 words)
It is managed under the auspices of the Zoological Society of London (established in 1826), and is situated at the northern edge of Regent's Park, London (the Regent's Canal runs through it), a short walk from Camden Underground Station.
London Zoo was home to the only living quagga ever to be photographed, along with a number of thylacine.
Obaysch: When Obaysch arrived at London Zoo in 1850, it became the first hippopotamus to be seen in Europe since the Roman Empire, and the first in England since prehistory.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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