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Encyclopedia > London Magazine

The London Magazine is a historied publication of arts, literature, and miscellaneous interests. Its history ranges nearly three centuries and five reincarnations of the journal, publishing the likes of William Wordsworth, William Burroughs, and John Keats. It is currently in its sixth incarnation, reinvigorated by owner Christopher Arkell and the editor and English poet Sebastian Barker. It runs under the full title The London Magazine: A Review of Literature & the Arts and aims to continue the the magazine's tradition of international interest and appealing to the common reader's affinity for quality art. William Wordsworth (April 7, 1770 – April 23, 1850) was a major English romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped launch the Romantic Age in English literature with their 1798 joint publication, Lyrical Ballads. ... William S. Burroughs. ... Keats grave in Rome (left). ... Sebastian Barker, born in 1945, is a British poet, son of George Barker and Elizabeth Smart. ...


History

The London Magazine was founded in 1732 in political oppossition to the Tory-based [[Gentleman's Magazine ]] and ran successfully for 53 years until its closure in 1785.


In 1820, it was reborn under the editorship of John Scott who formatted the magazine along the lines of the Ediburgh publication [[Blackwood's Magazine]]. It was during this time the magazine enjoyed its greatest literary prosperity publishing poetic luminaries such as William Wordsworth, Percy Bysshe Shelley, John Clare and John Keats. In September, 1821, the first installment of Thomas De Quincey's Confessions of an English Opium-Eater appeared in the journal; these were later published as a book. Scott quickly began a literary row with members of the Blackwood's, in particular with Dr. John Gibson Lackhart in regards to many subjects including the Blackwood's virule criticism of the Cockney School under which Leigh Hunt and John Keats were grouped. The rivalry ended in a fatal duel between Scott and Lockhart's close friend and workmate J.H. Christie. Scott lost the duel and his life in 1821. The magazine continued under the editorship of John Taylor and included a working staff of Thomas Hood, William Hazlitt, and Charles Lamb. During this time Lamb published his earliest series of Essays of Elia in 1823. The magazine dwindled in success towards the end of the decade due to Taylor's insistent tampering of the poets' works and was abandoned by many of its staff, including Lamb and Hazlitt. The magazine again ceased publication in 1829. William Wordsworth (April 7, 1770 – April 23, 1850) was a major English romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped launch the Romantic Age in English literature with their 1798 joint publication, Lyrical Ballads. ... Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 – July 8, 1822; pronounced ) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets of the English language. ... John Clare (13 July 1793 – 20 May 1864) was an English poet, in his time commonly known as the Northamptonshire Peasant Poet, the son of a farm labourer, born at Helpston near Peterborough. ... Keats grave in Rome (left). ... Thomas de Quincey from the frontispiece of Revolt of the Tartars, Thomas de Quincey (August 15, 1785 – December 8, 1859) was an English author and intellectual. ... Confessions of an English Opium Eater (1821). ... An artists rendering of James Henry Leigh Hunt James Henry Leigh Hunt (October 19, 1784 - August 28, 1859) was an English essayist and writer. ... Keats grave in Rome (left). ... Essays of Elia is a collection of essays written by Charles Lamb in 1823. ...


In 1900 Harmsworth's Monthly Pictorial Magazine was renamed the London Magazine by Cecil Harmsworth, the propietor of the Daily Mail at the time. The publication continued until 1930 when it was renamed The New London Magazine. The Australian scholar Sue Thomas referred to it as "an important informer...of popular literary tastes in the late Victorian and Edwardian periods". Despite its acclaim it closed in 1933. The Daily Mail is a British newspaper and the oldest tabloid, first published in 1896. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ...


In 1954, a new periodical was given the name of the London Magazine, under the editorship of Joh Lehmman, largely continuing the tradtion of the acclaimed 1940s periodical New Writing. It was endorsed by T.S. Eliot as a non-university based periodical that would "boldly assume the existence of a public interested in serious literature." In 1961 the magazine changed hands and was undertaken by Lehmann's fellow poet and criticb Alan Ross until Ross's death in 2001 prompted the Magazine's closure again. However it was quickly relaunched by Arkell and poet and critic Sebastian Barker and continues to run today. Alan John Ross, (May 6, 1922 – February 14, 2001), was a British poet and editor. ... Sebastian Barker, born in 1945, is a British poet, son of George Barker and Elizabeth Smart. ...



Notable Contributors: W.H. Auden, Frank Auerbach, Louis de Bernières, Bill Brandt, William Burroughs, Thomas Carlyle, Henry Cary, Charles Causley, John Clare, Hartley Coleridge, Allan Cunningham, Odysseus Elytis, Gavin Ewart, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Roy Fuller, W. S. Graham, Nadine Gordimer, Bishop of Oxford Richard Harries, Tony Harrison, William Hazlitt, Thomas Hood, Ted Hughes, Leigh Hunt, Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, John Keats, Charles Lamb, Laurie Lee, Louis MacNeice, Mary Russell Mitford, Paul Muldoon, Les Murray, Ben Okri, Harold Pinter, Thomas de Quincey, Alan Ross, Richard Savage, John Scott, Iain Sinclair, Derek Walcott, Evelyn Waugh, William Wordsworth Christopher Isherwood and W.H. Auden, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1939 Wystan Hugh Auden (February 21, 1907–September 29, 1973) was an English poet. ... Frank Helmut Auerbach (born April 29, 1931) is a jewish painter. ... Louis de Bernières (born London, UK on December 8, 1954) is a British novelist. ... Bill Brandt, Icons Bill Brandt (May 3, 1904 – December 20, 1983) was an influential British photographer and photojournalist known for his high-contrast images of British society and his distorted nudes and landscapes. ... William S. Burroughs. ... The most familiar view of Carlyle is as the bearded sage with a penetrating gaze. ... Henry Francis Cary (December 6, 1772 - August 14, 1844) was an English author and translator. ... Charles Causley, CBE (August 24, 1917 – November 4, 2003) was a Cornish poet and writer. ... John Clare (13 July 1793 – 20 May 1864) was an English poet, in his time commonly known as the Northamptonshire Peasant Poet, the son of a farm labourer, born at Helpston near Peterborough. ... Hartley Coleridge (September 19, 1796 - January 6, 1849) was an English writer. ... Allan Cunningham (December 7, 1784 _ October 30, 1842) was a Scottish poet and author. ... Odysseus Elytis Odysseas Elytis was the pseudonym of Odysseas Alepoudelis (November 2, 1911–March 18, 1996), a Greek poet. ... Gavin Buchanan Ewart (1916 - 1995) was a British poet who is best known for contributing to Geoffrey Grigsons New Verse at the age of seventeen. ... Lawrence Ferlinghetti Lawrence Ferlinghetti (born Lawrence Ferling[1] on March 24, 1919) is an American poet who is known as the co-owner of the City Lights Bookstore and publishing house, which published early literary works of the Beats, including Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg. ... Roy Broadbent Fuller (11 February 1912 – 27 September 1991) was an English writer, known mostly as a poet. ... William Sydney Graham (November 19, 1918 - January 9, 1986) was a Scottish poet who is often associated with Dylan Thomas and the neo-romantic group of poets. ... Nadine Gordimer (born 20 November 1923) is a South African novelist and writer, winner of the 1991 Nobel Prize in literature and 1974 Booker Prize. ... The Bishop of Oxford is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Oxford in the Province of Canterbury. ... The Rt Revd Richard Harries, Bishop of Oxford, giving a speech in 2004. ... Tony Harrison (born April 30, 1937) is an English poet. ... // William Hazlitt (10 April 1778 – 18 September 1830) was an English writer remembered for his humanistic essays and literary criticism, often esteemed the greatest English literary critic after Samuel Johnson. ... Thomas Hood Thomas Hood (May 23, 1799 - May 3, 1845) was a British humorist and poet. ... 1 Aspinall Street, Mytholmroyd, West Yorkshire, where Ted Hughes was born. ... An artists rendering of James Henry Leigh Hunt James Henry Leigh Hunt (October 19, 1784 - August 28, 1859) was an English essayist and writer. ... Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, CBE (born May 7, 1927) is a Booker prize-winning novelist, short story writer, and two-time Academy Award-winning screenwriter. ... Keats grave in Rome (left). ... Charles Lamb (1775-1834) Charles Lamb (10 February 1775 –- 27 December 1834) was an English essayist, best known for his Essays of Elia and for the childrens book Tales from Shakespeare, which he produced along with his sister, Mary Lamb (1764–1847). ... Laurence Edward Alan Laurie Lee, MBE (June 26, 1914 – May 13, 1997) was an English poet, novelist, and screenwriter, raised in the village of Slad, Gloucestershire. ... Frederick Louis MacNeice (September 12, 1907 – September 3, 1963) was a British and Irish poet and playwright. ... Mary Russell Mitford Mary Russell Mitford (December 16, 1787 - January 10, 1855), was an English novelist and dramatist. ... Paul Muldoon (b. ... Leslie Allan Murray (b. ... Ben Okri (born on March 15, 1959) is a Nigerian poet and novelist. ... Harold Pinter, CH, CBE (born 10 October 1930) is an English playwright, screenwriter, poet, actor, director, author, and political activist. ... Thomas de Quincey from the frontispiece of Revolt of the Tartars, Thomas de Quincey (August 15, 1785 – December 8, 1859) was an English author and intellectual. ... Alan John Ross, (May 6, 1922 – February 14, 2001), was a British poet and editor. ... This article needs cleanup. ... // John Scott may be: John Scott (Australian politician), Member of the Australian House of Representatives John Scott (Canadian politician) (1822–1857), first mayor of Bytown, later Ottawa John Scott (Missouri politician), Missouris first U.S. Representative (1821-1827) John Scott (Pennsylvania) (1824–1896), lawyer, U.S. Senator for Pennsylvania... For the Australian politician, see Ian Sinclair Iain Sinclair is a British writer and film maker. ... Derek Walcott, courtesy of the Nobel Foundation Derek Alton Walcott (born January 23, 1930) is a West-Indian poet, playwright, writer and visual artist who writes mainly in English. ... Evelyn Waugh, as photographed in 1940 by Carl Van Vechten Arthur Evelyn St. ... William Wordsworth (April 7, 1770 – April 23, 1850) was a major English romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped launch the Romantic Age in English literature with their 1798 joint publication, Lyrical Ballads. ...


External links

  • Official website of the current incarnation
  • Back issues from the 18th and 19th centuries, via The Online Books Page.

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