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Encyclopedia > London Fire Brigade
London Fire Brigade
London Fire Brigade
London Fire Brigade area
Coverage
Area Greater London
Size 609 square miles
Population 7,517,700.
Operations
Formed 1865 (originally called the Metropolitan Fire Brigade, it was renamed the London Fire Brigade in 1904)
HQ Lambeth
Staff 7000
Stations 112
Chief Fire Officer Sir Ken Knight
LFB Logo
Website London Fire Brigade
Fire Authority London Fire and Emergency Planning Authority


The London Fire Brigade (LFB) is the statutory fire and rescue service for London, England. It is run by the London Fire and Emergency Planning Authority and is the third-largest fire service in the world with nearly 7000 staff of which 5800 are operational firefighters and officers.[1] better map File links The following pages link to this file: Greater London London Categories: GFDL images ... Greater London is the top level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... The Metropolitan Fire Brigade is the operational arm of the Metropolitan Fire and Emergency Services Board which operates in the metropolitan area of Melbourne, the capital of the State of Victoria, Australia. ... Year 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... Lambeth is a place in the London Borough of Lambeth. ... A fire station is a building or other area set aside for storage of firefighting apparatus i. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... In the United Kingdom a Fire Authority or Fire and Rescue Authority is a body or committee which oversees the operation, policy and service delivery of a county or metropolitan fire and rescue service. ... Sapient 22:36, 19 February 2006 (UTC) Category: ... The Statute of Grand Duchy of Lithuania A statute is a formal, written law of a country or state, written and enacted by its legislative authority, perhaps to then be ratified by the highest executive in the government, and finally published. ... ... Greater London is the top level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... Sapient 22:36, 19 February 2006 (UTC) Category: ...


In 2004 it answered nearly 300,000 emergency calls, responded to 60,000 fires and over 5000 traffic accidents, making it one of the busiest fire brigades in the world. In 2005, it received over 9000 hoax calls, the highest number of all the fire brigades in the United Kingdom [2] 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A car accident in Yate, near Bristol, England, in July 2004. ... Fire brigades in the United Kingdom are organised on a territorial basis. ...


As well as fire fighting, the LFB responds to hazardous material incidents, conducts emergency planning and performs fire safety inspections and education. A repair locker hose team aboard USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67) combats a controlled fire on the mobile aircraft firefighting training device May 2, 2006. ... A hazardous material (HAZMAT) is any solid, liquid, or gas that can cause harm to humans, other living organisms, or the environment due to being radioactive, flammable, explosive, toxic, corrosive, a biohazard, an oxidizer, an asphyxiant, or capable of causing severe allergic reactions. ... Emergency operations or Emergency preparedness is a set of doctrines to prepare civil society to cope with natural or man-made disasters. ... Fire safety is a component of Building Safety. ...


It does not provide an ambulance service, this function is performed by the London Ambulance Service as an independent NHS Trust, however all firefighters are trained in first aid and fire engines - or appliances as they are known - carry first-aid equipment including basic resuscitators. An ambulance in San Jose Del Cabo, Mexico A Helicopter used as an Ambulance. ... The London Ambulance Service (LAS) is the largest ambulance service in the world that does not directly charge its patients for its services. ... National Health Service Trusts (NHS Trusts) provide many services of the United Kingdom National Health Service in England and Wales. ... First aid is a series of simple, life-saving medical techniques that a non-doctor or layman can be trained to perform. ... Star of Life symbol First Aid symbol First Aid is the immediate and temporary proper aid provided to a sick or injured person or animal until medical treatment can be provided. ...

Contents

Organisation

The LFEPA consists of three directorates that all report to the commissioner - currently Sir Ken Knight [3] - they are: Fire and Community Safety Directorate, Resources Directorate and Corporate Services Directorate.


The LFB's headquarters is at Lambeth, on the Albert Embankment, next to the River Thames, and close to Lambeth Bridge, but it was confirmed in November 2005, that the brigade's headquarters will be moving to a new building adjacent to the existing Southwark training centre in 2007 [4]. Lambeth is a place in the London Borough of Lambeth. ... The Albert Embankment is a stretch of the river bank on the south side of the River Thames in central London. ... The Thames (pronounced //) is a river flowing through southern England, in its lower reaches flowing through London into the sea. ... Lambeth Bridge, seen from Millbank, looking north and downstream Lambeth Bridge from Millbank, facing east towards Lambeth Image:Lambeth. ... The Borough or Southwark is an area of the London Borough of Southwark situated 1. ...


Historical organisation

In 1938, the LFB was organised into two Divisions: Northern and Southern, divided in most places by the River Thames. Each was commanded by a Divisional Officer. Each division was divided into three Districts, each under a Superintendent, with his headquarters at a "superintendent station". The superintendent stations themselves were commanded by District Officers, with the other stations under Station Officers.[5] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Thames (pronounced //) is a river flowing through southern England, in its lower reaches flowing through London into the sea. ...


Legislative powers

LFB Headquarters
LFB Headquarters

Fire and rescue authorities in England come under the government department that used to be known as the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister (ODPM). This department was responsible for legislation covering fire authorities. However, in 2006, a structural change to central government led to the creation of the Department for Communities and Local Government. It is now responsible for fire and resilience in England and therefore London [6]. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 602 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The London Fire Brigades headquarters is at Lambeth, on the Albert Embankment, next to the River Thames, and close to Lambeth Bridge. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 602 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The London Fire Brigades headquarters is at Lambeth, on the Albert Embankment, next to the River Thames, and close to Lambeth Bridge. ... ... The Office of the Deputy Prime Minister is a department of the British government. ... The Department for Communities and Local Government is a United Kingdom government department. ... For the band see Resilience (band) Resilience generally means the ability to recover from (or to resist being affected by) some shock, insult, or disturbance. ...


The Fire and Rescue Services Act 2004 changed many working practises [7], it was brought in to replace the Fire Services Act 1947(amended 1959). This page is a candidate to be copied to Wikisource. ... The Fire Services Act 1947 (amended 1959) was the primary legislation relating to firefighting operations in the UK from just after the war, until it was repealed and replaced by the Fire and Rescue Services Act 2004 which came about after the Independent Review of the Fire Service in the...


The new act was drafted in response to the Independent Review of the Fire Service [8], often referred to as the Bain Report, after its author Professor Sir George Bain. It recommended radical changes to many fire brigade working procedures and led to a national fire strike in 2002. Professor Sir George Sayers Bain, a Canadian by birth, was President and Vice-Chancellor of Queens University, Belfast, Northern Ireland from 1998[1] to 2004[2]. While not without success, for example in pushing Queens further up the research league table, Bains tenure was dogged by a... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ...


Further changes to the legislative, organisational and structural fabric of the brigade, which could include varying the attendance time, the location of front line pumps (fire engines) and number of personnel, plus mandatory performance targets, priorities and objectives are set by the DCLG in the form of a document called the Fire and Rescue Service National Framework. The framework is set annually by the government and applies to all brigades in England. Responsibility for the rest of the UK fire service is devolved to the various parliaments and assemblies. On UK wide issues, the Chief Fire Officers Association provides the collective voice on fire, rescue and resilience issues.[9] Membership is made up from senior officers above the rank of assistant chief officer, to chief officer or the new title of brigade manager. The Chief Fire Officers Association or CFOA is the professional body representing senior fire officers in the UK. The organisation used to be known as the Chief and Assistant Chief Fire Officers Association, it was formed in 1974 following local government re-structuring. ...

  • The Fire and Rescue Act 2004 repealed several acts, many going back fifty years. The full list of acts repealed can be found at:[1]

...

History

Following a multitude of ad-hoc firefighting arrangements and the 1666 Great Fire of London, various insurance companies established fire fighting units to fight fires that occurred in buildings that their respective companies had insured. As the demands grew on the primitive fire brigades they began to co-operate with each other until, on January 1, 1833, the London Fire Engine Establishment was formed under the leadership of James Braidwood [10]. With eighty firefighters and thirteen fire stations, the unit was still a private enterprise, funded by the insurance companies and as such was responsible mainly for saving material goods from fire. 1666 is often called Annus Mirabilis. ... Detail of painting from 1666 of the Great Fire of London by an unknown artist, depicting the fire as it would have appeared on the evening of Tuesday, 4 September from a boat in the vicinity of Tower Wharf. ... Insurance, in law and economics, is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of a contingent loss. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Flame. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 1833 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... James Braidwood (1800 - 1861) was the first director of the London fire brigade and is credited with the development of the modern fire service. ... It has been suggested that Firefighter Assist and Search Team be merged into this article or section. ... A fire station is a building or other area set aside for storage of firefighting apparatus i. ...


Several large fires, most notably at the Palace of Westminster in 1834 [10] and warehouses by the River Thames in 1861 [10], spurred the insurance companies to lobby the government to provide the Brigade at public expense and management. After due consideration, in 1865 the Metropolitan Fire Brigade Act was passed[10], creating the Metropolitan Fire Brigade under the leadership of Captain (later Sir) Eyre Massey Shaw. In 1904 the Brigade was officially renamed as the London Fire Brigade[10]. The Palace of Westminster, also known as the Houses of Parliament or Westminster Palace, in London, England is where the two Houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (the House of Lords and the House of Commons) meet to conduct their business. ... 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Thames (pronounced //) is a river flowing through southern England, in its lower reaches flowing through London into the sea. ... 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar) // January 1 - Benito Juárez captures Mexico City January 2 - Friedrich Wilhelm IV of Prussia dies and is succeeded by... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... The Metropolitan Fire Brigade is the operational arm of the Metropolitan Fire and Emergency Services Board which operates in the metropolitan area of Melbourne, the capital of the State of Victoria, Australia. ... Colorized photograph of Captain Shaw Captain Sir Eyre Massey Shaw (1830-1908) was the Superintendent of the Metropolitan Fire Brigade (now renamed the London Fire Brigade), and its predecessor, the London Fire Engine Establishment, from 1861 to 1891. ... Year 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ...


During the Second World War, fire brigades were amalgamated into a single National Fire Service. The separate London Fire Brigade for the county of London was re-established in 1948[10]. With the formation of Greater London in 1965, this absorbed most of the Middlesex Fire Brigade, the borough brigades for West Ham, East Ham and Croydon and parts of the Essex, Hertfordshire, Surrey and Kent brigades[10]. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... The National Fire Service (NFS) was the single united countrywide fire service created in the United Kingdom during the Second World War. ... The County of London (in red), super imposed upon todays Greater London area, to show the difference in size with post-1965 Borough boundaries The County of London was an administrative county of England from 1888 to 1965. ... Greater London is the top level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... West Ham is a place in the London Borough of Newham in east London. ... East Ham is a place in the London Borough of Newham. ... Croydon was a local government district in north east Surrey from 1849 to 1965. ... Essex is a county in the East of England. ... Hertfordshire (pronounced Hartfordshire and abbreviated as Herts) is an inland county in the United Kingdom and part of the East of England Government Office region. ... Not to be confused with Surry. ... This article is about the county in England. ...


In 1986 the Greater London Council - or GLC - was disbanded and replaced by a new statutory authority, called the London Fire and Civil Defence Authority or more simply, the LFCDA[10]. On July 3, 2000, the London Fire and Emergency Planning Authority, took over statutory responsibility from the LFCDA. 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Arms of the Greater London Council The Greater London Council (GLC) was the top-tier local government administrative body for Greater London from 1965 to 1986. ... July 3 is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 181 days remaining. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... Sapient 22:36, 19 February 2006 (UTC) Category: ...


At the same time, the Greater London Authority was established to administer the LFEPA and in turn the LFB, and coordinate emergency planning for London. Consisting of the Mayor of London and other elected members; the GLA also takes responsibility for the Metropolitan Police Authority, Transport for London and other functions. The Greater London Authority (GLA) administers the 1579 km² (610 sq. ... Ken Livingstone, the current Mayor of London The Mayor of London is an elected politician in London, United Kingdom. ... The Metropolitan Police Authority is the police authority responsible for supervising the Metropolitan Police Service, the police force for Greater London. ... Transport for London (TfL) is a local government body responsible for the transport system throughout the City of London and Greater London in England. ...


Former Chief Officers

  • 1991 to 2003 Brian Robinson
  • 1987 to 1991 Gerald Clarkson
  • 1980 to 1987 Ronald Bullers
  • 1976 to 1980 Peter Darby
  • 1970 to 1976 Joseph Milner
  • 1938 to 1941 Aylmer Firebrace

Staffing

Role structure

Station Ranks


The traditional ranks - to the left of the column below have been replaced in the LFB, by new titles more descriptive to the job function. [11]


The old titles are still in use in many of the UK's other brigades and fire authorities. [12]

  • Firefighter

Senior Officers Leading Firefighter is a rank in the British fire services, between Firefighter and Sub-Officer. ... Sub-Officer (usually addressed as Sub) is a rank in the British fire services, between Leading Firefighter and Station Officer. ... A rank in the New Zealand Fire Service and also in fire departments in the United Kingdom, a Station Officer is a fire fighter officer with responsibility for a number of junior fire fighters. ...

  • Assistant Divisional Officer = Station Manager
  • Divisional Officer = Group Manager
  • Senior Divisional Officer = Area Manager
  • Assistant Chief Officer = Assistant Commissioner
  • Deputy Chief Officer = Deputy Commissioner
  • Chief Officer = Commissioner

Historical ranks

The rank structure used by the London Fire Brigade in 1938 was:[5]

  • Fireman
  • Senior Fireman
  • Sub-Officer
  • Station Officer
  • District Officer
  • Superintendent
  • Senior Superintendent
  • Divisional Officer (4)
  • Senior Divisional Officer (1)
  • Deputy Chief Officer (1)
  • Chief Officer (1)

Recruitment and training

Professional firefighter training lasts about four months and takes places at the LFB's specialist training centre in Southwark. On successful completion, the newly-qualified firefighter is posted to one of the fire stations within the London area to work on a shift pattern - currently two day shifts (nine hours), followed by two night shifts (15 hours), followed by four days off. Working patterns were the subject of scrutiny in Professor Bain's Independent Review of the Fire Service.[13]


After training school, firefighters serve a one year period when they are on probation, and many choose to take formal promotion exams. Qualification and full pay are not reached until four years service has been completed. Ongoing training - both theoretical and practical continues throughout the firefighter's career.[14]


Promotion

Firefighters gain promotion by taking examinations. Until July 2006, these were administered by the Fire Services Examinations Board who set national written exams for promotion to the rank of Leading firefighter, Sub-officer and Station officer (see above). [15] Early elections in November are announced in the Netherlands. ...


Some promotion exams can be substituted by qualifications from the Institution of Fire Engineers. Firefighters and civilians - for example building inspectors, scientists, surveyors and other practising professionals take these qualifications either by written test or research. The Institution of Fire Engineers is a worldwide body that provides research, training, conferences and professional qualifications for firefighters and civilians who work in fields related to fire fighting, the science of fire fighting and prevention, and related technology. ...


Future promotion exams will be set using the Integrated Personal Development System or IPDS. [16]


Firefighting, special services and fire prevention

Firefighters respond to fires[17], and special services.[18],[19] A special service is defined as every other non-fire related emergency and includes: road traffic accidents (known by all the emergency services as RTAs), chemical incidents, persons shut in lifts, persons under trains, train crashes, waterborne rescues (most notably the Marchioness sinking in 1989) and other emergencies requiring specialist rescue personnel and equipment. The full scope of a brigade's duties and powers are enshrined in The Fire and Rescue Act 2004 [20] [21] The result of excessive speed, this cement truck rolls over into the front garden of a house. ...


Firefighters and in some cases specialist teams from the brigade's Fire Investigation unit also investigate arson incidents, work alongside the police and provide evidence in court. The Skyline Parkway Motel in Afton, Virginia after an arson fire on July 9, 2004. ...


The other core duty of the brigade is to 'prevent damage', and day-to-day fire prevention duties.


Firefighting cover

The London Fire Brigade provides fire cover according to a system of four risk categories, these have traditionally been used across the UK, where every building is rated from "A" risk to "D" risk [22]. The risk category determines the minimum number of appliances to be sent to an incident:


"A" risk


Areas with high density of large buildings and/or population, for example office blocks or factories.


Three fire engines to be sent within eight minutes, the first two to arrive within five minutes.


"B" risk


Areas with medium density of large buildings and/or population, for example multi-storey residential blocks.


Two engines deployed, one within five minutes, the second within eight minutes.


"C" risk


Low density suburban areas and detached properties.


One fire engine to be sent within ten minutes.


"D" risk


More rural areas not covered by bands A-C.


One fire engine to be sent within twenty minutes.


"Mutual assistance"


The Fire and Rescue Act 2004, gives brigades the power to assist other brigades or fire authorities in what is known as mutual assistance.[23] The LFB played a comprehensive role in assisting Hertfordshire Fire and Rescue Service with the Buncefield oil fire in 2005.


The brigades that adjoin the LFB are as follows:

Essex County Fire and Rescue Service are the statutory fire fighting service for the county of Essex in the south-east of England. ... Kent Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service for the county of Kent covering a geographical area south of London, to the coast and including major shipping routes via the Thames and Medway rivers. ... The Surrey Fire and Rescue Service is the statuory fire & rescue service for the County of Surrey, England, with 24 fire stations. ... The Royal Berkshire Fire and Rescue Service is a statutory fire and rescue service covering the area of the ceremonial county of Berkshire in England. ... BAA plc is the owner and operator of seven major United Kingdom airports and operator of several airports worldwide, making the company one of the largest transport companies in the world. ... London Heathrow Airport (IATA airport code: LHR, ICAO airport code: EGLL, and often simply Heathrow) is the United Kingdoms busiest and best-connected airport. ... London City Airport (IATA: LCY, ICAO: EGLC) is a single-runway airport, intended for use by STOL (Short Take Off and Landing) airliners, and principally serving the financial districts of London. ...

Special services

Core services are paid for by London's council tax payers and through central government funding - known as a grant settlement; and each council tax payer's bill will include what is known as a precept - a specific part of their bill that contributes to the funding of the FRS. Those in need of the LFB's services in an emergency do not pay. But the brigade can provide additional special services for which it may charge where there is no immediate threat to life or imminent risk of injury. The Council Tax is the main form of local taxation in England, Scotland and Wales. ...


Examples of these special services which may be charged for are:

  • clearing of flooded commercial premises
  • use of Brigade equipment for supplying or removing water
  • making structures safe in cases where there is no risk of personal injury to the public

Safety and fire prevention

LFB firefighters and 'watch officers' visit residential and commercial premises to advise on hazard risk assessment and fire prevention. They also provide safety education to schools and youth groups. Each of the London boroughs has a central fire safety office that collates and coordinates fire prevention work in accordance with legislation, and they are supported by a dedicated team of specialist officers.


Fire stations

The LFB has 112 fire stations across the 33 London boroughs.[24] They are staffed 24 hours per day by full-time members of the brigade, and are linked to a command and control centre located in Docklands [25]. This centre was opened in 2004, calls to it are fed from 999 operators at BT. The administrative area of Greater London contains 32 London Boroughs, of which twelve (plus the City of London) make up Inner London and twenty Outer London. ... The Millennium Dome and Canary Wharf from the Royal Victoria Dock. ... BT Group plc (formerly British Telecommunications plc) which trades as BT (also previously as British Telecom and is still commonly known as such amongst the general public) is the privatised UK state telecommunications operator. ...


Some UK fire authorities use part time, or retained firefighters who live and work near their local station and are on-call, but the LFB is one of only two UK fire services where all operational staff are full-time employees. Each Station has four shifts, known as watches: red, white, blue and green; with a watch commander (Station Officer or Sub Officer) in charge. The overall management of the station is carried out by the Station Commander (Assistant Divisional Officer), who will also attend serious incidents, as well as spending time on call.


A group of three to six stations within a borough are managed by a Borough Commander (Divisional Officer) who interacts strategically on a local level with the Borough Commander for the police and the chief executive of the local authority.


More than half of the LFB's fire stations have two fire engines or appliances, also known as pumps. These are generally the busier stations receiving over 2000 calls (known colloquially by firefighters as "shouts") per year. They may also be stations of strategic importance, or those located in areas considered high risk. The remaining stations have a single pump (actually known as a pump ladder or DPL) and generally attend fewer than 2000 calls per year. Many stations also have other specialist vehicles attached to them such as aerial ladders, fire rescue units, hose layers, urban search and rescue trucks, high volume pumps, incident support units, and scientific support units that assist with Hazmat incidents. HAZMAT is an abbreviation of “Hazardous Material”. Hazardous materials are any substances (solids, liquids, or gases) that are dangerous to the well-being of humans, animals, or the environment. ...


Central London stations can attend up to 8000 calls in a year, inner city stations about 3000 to 4000 calls per year (these tend to be the stations that are busy serving the poorer densely-populated areas), and outlying or suburban fire stations may attend around 1500 calls which include road traffic accidents, grass fires and house fires.[26] Central London is a much-used but unofficial and vaguely defined term for the most inner part of London, the capital of England. ...


Architecturally, fire stations vary in age and design from Edwardian red-brick fire houses to modern spacious blocks complete with additional specialist facilities [27]. Early fire stations were originally built with horse-drawn appliances in mind and with traditional features such as the firemen's pole, used by firefighters to gain rapid access from their upstairs accommodation quarters to the fire engine garages below when summoned. The oldest working station in London is at Clerkenwell between the City and the West End. The Edwardian period or Edwardian era in the United Kingdom is the period 1901 to 1910, the reign of King Edward VII. It is sometimes extended to include the period to the start of World War I in 1914 or even the end of the war in 1918. ... A firemens pole or sliding pole is a wooden pole or a metal tube or pipe installed between floors in fire stations, which was invented by Chicago, Illinois resident David Kenyon, although it is often incorrectly credited to the Boston Fire Department. ... Clerkenwell (pronounced clarkenwell) is a locality in the southermost part of the London Borough of Islington. ... The City of London is a geographically-small City within Greater London, England. ... The interior of Covent Garden Market in the West End The West End of London is an area of central London, containing many of the citys major tourist attractions, businesses, and administrative headquarters. ...


More modern fire stations, though constructed without such features, often have more spacious accommodation and facilities for staff of both sexes, public visitor areas such as community safety offices and other amenities. An example of these is the new fire station in Hammersmith which opened in 2003 [28], just a few hundred yards along the Shepherd's Bush Road from the previous local fire station which had been constructed in 1913 [29]. Hammersmith is an urban centre in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham in West London, England, approximately 5 miles (8km) west of Charing Cross on the north bank of the River Thames. ... Shepherds Bush is a district of West London in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham, situated 4. ...


Notable incidents

The geographical area covered by the LFB along with the major transport infrastructure; and the political, business and administrative bases typical of a capital city has seen the brigade involved in several major incidents. A major incident, which used to be known as a major accident requires the implementation of an inter-agency response to a pre-determined contingency plan.


Any of the emergency services can initiate Major Incident Procedure usually from an officer on the ground. In legislative terms, in the UK the most senior fire officer is in charge of any incident involving fire, any other is the responsibility of the police, however as in the case of the 2005 London bombings multiple major incidents were declared by by the fire service for the Aldgate and Edgware Road bombs, and by the London Ambulance Service for the Tavistock Square bus bomb. When a major incident is declared the services along with civilian agencies use a structural system known as gold command that allows them to follow a set procedure for incident management. Put simply gold command relates to strategic control of an incident, silver command tactical and bronze operational. The term gold command can also relate to an emergency service building, mobile control unit or other base that becomes the focal point (often remotely) for the incident's management. The July 2005 London bombings were synchronised terrorist attacks. ... The London Ambulance Service (LAS) is the largest ambulance service in the world that does not directly charge its patients for its services. ... It has been suggested that Gold Command be merged into this article or section. ...


Additionally, a major incident can lead to the government activating its coordination facility, known as COBR. COBR (for Cabinet Office Briefing Rooms) is a UK government coordination facility which is activated in cases of national or regional emergency or crisis, or during events abroad with major implications for the UK. It is often referred to as COBRA (or Cobra; see initialism), in apparent confusion with the...


Some notable major incidents where the LFB has played a significant role:

... December 11 is the 345th day (346th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Hertfordshire Oil Storage Terminal, known locally as the Buncefield oil depot, is an oil depot located on the edge of Hemel Hempstead (Grid reference TL087084) to the north of London in the United Kingdom. ... The 7 July 2005 London bombings were a series of coordinated terrorist bomb blasts that hit Londons public transport system during the morning rush hour. ... Wikinews has news related to: Four small explosions strike Londons transport system On 21 July 2005, four attempted bomb attacks disrupted part of Londons public transport system two weeks after the 7 July 2005 London bombings. ... The Ladbroke Grove rail crash (also known as the Paddington train crash) was an English rail accident which occurred on 5 October 1999 in which thirty-one people died. ... October 5 is the 278th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (279th in Leap years). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... The Cannon Street station rail crash was an accident on the British railway system which occurred on 8 January 1991 at Cannon Street station. ... January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Marchioness disaster occurred on the River Thames on August 20, 1989, when the pleasure boat Marchioness sank after being run down by the dredger Bowbelle. ... August 20 is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cover of the Hidden Inquiry report into the Clapham Junction rail accident The Clapham Junction rail crash was a serious railway accident involving two collisions between three commuter trains at 0810 on the morning of December 12, 1988. ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Kings Cross fire was a devastating underground fire in London which broke out at approximately 19:30 on November 18, 1987, and which killed 31 people. ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Escalators at Canary Wharf, London. ... Soho is an area of central Londons West End, in the borough of the City of Westminster. ... The Moorgate tube crash was a railway accident on the London Underground which occurred at 8. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... The London Underground is an all-electric railway system that covers much of Greater London and some neighbouring areas. ... A Buffer stop is a device to prevent railway vehicles from going past the end of a section of track. ... From 1969 until 1997, the Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA) conducted an armed campaign (or guerrilla war) in Northern Ireland aimed at overthrowing British rule there and creating a united Ireland. ... The Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA) is a paramilitary group which aimed, through the use of violence, to achieve three goals: (i) British withdrawal from Ireland, (ii) the political unification of Ireland through the merger of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland , and (iii) the creation of an all... London bombings can refer to a number of bomb attacks on London: The July 2005 London bombings carried out by British Islamic extremists: 7 July 2005 London bombings 21 July 2005 London bombings David Copelands nail bomb attacks against ethnic minorities and gays in London kill three people and...

The LFB and popular culture

  • Fire Wars: In 2003, the BBC followed the arson investigators of the LFB's Fire Investigation Unit (FIU). The two-part series, broadcast in July 2003, looked at how the LFB investigated '4000 fires where the cause was unknown'. The second programme Fire Wars: Murder Most Foul centred on one investigation.[38]
  • London's Burning: The television series London's Burning, shown on ITV was based on the fictional LFB 'Blackwall' fire station. The series centred on characters on the Blue Watch. It was originally a 1986 television film, written by Jack Rosenthal. The fire station used as the principal location in the drama was the LFB's Dockhead near London Bridge.[39]. The television series that followed the film ran from 1988 to 2002. [40]
  • Fire!: The LFB's Kingsland Road fire station in Hackney, east London was the focus of a documentary series by Thames Television for ITV, broadcast in the spring of 1991. Fire! [41] The documentary caused an internal inquiry by the LFB after scenes were shown of firefighters having a food fight at a Christmas party in one of the programmes. Several watch members from Kingsland Road were suspended after the programme was broadcast on 27 June 1991.[42]
  • Fireman! A Personal Account: Former London firefighter Neil Wallington wrote an account of his experience in the LFB called "Fireman! A Personal Account", it was published in 1979. [43] He chronicled his transition from a firefighter in the Croydon Fire Brigade through to his reaching the rank of Station Officer in the LFB. He went on to become the Chief Fire Officer of Devon Fire and Rescue Service and has written several books about the fire service all over the world. Fireman!... outlined the change in working conditions in the LFB in the 1970s, a time that saw the working hours of firefighters drastically reduced, and conditions improved.
  • Red Watch: The former ITN newsreader Gordon Honeycombe became friendly with Wallington while he was a Station Officer at Paddington fire station. In 1976, Honeycombe published an account of a serious fatal fire at a hostel in Maida Vale, in 1974 that claimed the lives of seven people including one firefighter. The resulting book was called "Red Watch", [44] it provided a graphic account of a single incident, and outlined some of the changes to working practises that resulted from it.

Londons Burning was a television drama programme produced by London Weekend Television. ... It has been suggested that Channel 3 (UK) be merged into this article or section. ... A watch is a period of work duty, traditionally on a ship but also in some other areas of employment which have been influenced by naval language. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jack Rosenthal, CBE (8 September 1931 - 29 May 2004) , was a playwright, who wrote several early episodes of the ITV soap opera Coronation Street and a number of successful plays and films. ... For other uses, see London Bridge (disambiguation). ... Hackney Town Hall was built in the 1930s for the old Metropolitan Borough. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... June 27 is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 187 days remaining. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A rank in the New Zealand Fire Service and also in fire departments in the United Kingdom, a Station Officer is a fire fighter officer with responsibility for a number of junior fire fighters. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ... ITN may refer to: Independent Television News In the news, a section on the Main Page of English Wikipedia This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... Ronald Gordon Honeycombe (born September 27, 1936) is an author, playwright and stage actor, well known in the United Kingdom as a national television newscaster. ... Paddington is an area in the west of London in the City of Westminster. ... Maida Vale is a road in north-west London, and a district surrounding it. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ...

References

  1. ^ London Fire Brigade: Our staff
  2. ^ BT: Hoax calls cost fire service £230,000 every day
  3. ^ London Fire Brigade: Commissioner
  4. ^ London Fire Brigade: News
  5. ^ a b London Fire Brigade, The London Fire Brigade: Information for Intending Candidates, December 1938.
  6. ^ Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) website
  7. ^ Fire and Rescue Services Act 2004
  8. ^ Independent Review of the Fire Service
  9. ^ Chief Fire Officers Association
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h London Fire Brigade: Key dates
  11. ^ London Fire Brigade: Rank structure
  12. ^ FireNet: UK fire service ranks
  13. ^ Independent Review of the Fire Service, Prof Sir George Bain Pub: 16 Dec 2002
  14. ^ London Fire Brigade: Training
  15. ^ Fire Services Examinations Board
  16. ^ Integrated Personal Development System Booklet, (PDF download)
  17. ^ Fire and Rescue Act 2004
  18. ^ Fire and Rescue Act 2004
  19. ^ Fire and Rescue Act 2004
  20. ^ Fire and Rescue Services Act 2004, Crown Copyright 2004, Pub: The Stationery Office
  21. ^ The Fire and Rescue Act 2004 online publication
  22. ^ London Fire Brigade: Fire cover
  23. ^ Fire and Rescue Act 2004
  24. ^ London Fire Brigade: Our Organisation (accessed 16 Jan 07)
  25. ^ PR Newswire: London Fire Authority's New Command and Control System Goes Live
  26. ^ London Fire Brigade: A-Z of fire stations
  27. ^ Firefleet.co.uk gallery of London fire stations
  28. ^ New £7.7m fire station at Hammersmith, 2003
  29. ^ Hammersmith Today: Old fire station set to be a pub
  30. ^ BBC News website: Beds, Herts and Bucks
  31. ^ BBC News wesbsite: on this day 7 July 2005
  32. ^ BBC News website: on this day 5 October 1990
  33. ^ BBC News website: on this day 8 January 1991
  34. ^ BBC news website on this day 20 August 1989
  35. ^ BBC News website: on this day 12 December 1988
  36. ^ BBC News website: on this day 18 November 1987
  37. ^ BBC News website: on this day 28 February 1975
  38. ^ Fire Wars, Produced by Folio/Mentorn for BBC Television transmitted on 1 July 2003 & 8 July 2003
  39. ^ London's Burning: The Movie, (IMDB)
  40. ^ "London's Burning" TV series, (IMDB)
  41. ^ Fire! Produced & directed by Chris Oxley/Laurel Productions for Thames Television/ITV transmitted in 1991
  42. ^ Ban on Party Firemen, Another TV Row, Pub Daily Mail, 28 June 1991
  43. ^ Fireman! A Personal Account, by Neil Wallington, Pub David & Charles, 22 Feb 1979, ISBN 0-7153-7723-X
  44. ^ Red Watch: The best seller about a fire and the men who fought it, by Gordon Honeycombe, Pub Arrow, 17 May 1976, ISBN 0-09-126310-7

July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 8 is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 176 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 28 is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 186 days remaining. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 17 is the 137th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (138th in leap years). ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ...

See also

Fire related

A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... The Chief Fire Officers Association or CFOA is the professional body representing senior fire officers in the UK. The organisation used to be known as the Chief and Assistant Chief Fire Officers Association, it was formed in 1974 following local government re-structuring. ... Cyril Thomas Demarne, O.B.E. (February 7, 1905 - January 28, 2007) was a British wartime firefighter. ... The United Kingdoms Fire Service College is at Moreton-in-Marsh in Gloucestershire, England. ... FiReControl is a UK based project to reduce the number of control rooms used to handle emergency calls for fire brigades and authorities. ... The Institution of Fire Engineers is a worldwide body that provides research, training, conferences and professional qualifications for firefighters and civilians who work in fields related to fire fighting, the science of fire fighting and prevention, and related technology. ... The London Fire Brigade Museum covers the history of firefighting since 1666 (the date of the Great Fire of London). ... Colorized photograph of Captain Shaw Captain Sir Eyre Massey Shaw (1830-1908) was the Superintendent of the Metropolitan Fire Brigade (now renamed the London Fire Brigade), and its predecessor, the London Fire Engine Establishment, from 1861 to 1891. ...

Other emergency services

The London Ambulance Service (LAS) is the largest ambulance service in the world that does not directly charge its patients for its services. ... HEMS seen in Ruskin Park, next to Kings College Hospital, during a routine stop to change personnel in 2005. ... The Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) is the Home Office police force responsible for Greater London, with the exception of the square mile of the City of London. ... RNLI Lifeboat at Calshot Spit The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) is a charity dedicated to saving lives at sea around the coasts of the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
London Fire: The London Fire Brigade (755 words)
Fire appliances were considerably improved and the first fully enclosed appliances made their appearance.
London now enjoys a highly professional fire fighting force, highly trained to work in all situations - fire, rescue, accident etc. The first woman fire fighter joined the brigade in 1982 and the number has now risen to over 50.
London now has the advantage of a force of some 6250 operational fire fighters trained to meet all eventualities - from fire to car accidents, from floods to chemical spillages.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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