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Encyclopedia > Loki
Loke depicted in an 18th century Icelandic manuscript.

Loki or Loke is a god or giant in Norse mythology. The 13th century Icelandic Poetic Edda and Prose Edda, two of the very few sources of information regarding the figure, inconsistently place him among the Æsir, as his blood-brotherhood makes him a member of Odin's family. Although frequently mentioned in 13th century Icelandic sources, it is generally believed by scholars that it is unlikely that Loki was ever worshipped.[1] Loki may refer to: Loki, the god of mischief in Norse mythology Loki Software, a software firm that ported several Windows computer games to Linux LOKI, a family of cryptographic block ciphers Loki (computer), a home computer developed by Sinclair Research, but never launched Loki is a location-based Internet... Download high resolution version (960x1162, 860 KB)This is from one of the mss (SÁM 66) at http://www. ... Download high resolution version (960x1162, 860 KB)This is from one of the mss (SÁM 66) at http://www. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... A manuscript (Latin manu scriptus, written by hand), strictly speaking, is any written document that is put down by hand, in contrast to being printed or reproduced some other way. ... Norse, Viking or Scandinavian mythology comprises the indigenous pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian peoples, including those who settled on Iceland, where most of the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... The Poetic Edda is a collection of Old Norse poems primarily preserved in the Icelandic mediaeval manuscript Codex Regius. ... The Younger Edda, known also as the Prose Edda or Snorris Edda is an Icelandic manual of poetics which also contains many mythological stories. ... This is the article about the chief god in North Germanic tradition; for other uses see Odin (disambiguation). ...


In the Eddas, Loki is described as a son of Fárbauti and in the Prose Edda as also a son of Laufey.[2] Loki also had two brothers (Helbindi & Byleist) of whom nothing is known. Loki is introduced in the Prose Edda as the "contriver of all fraud". Tales regarding Loki in these sources often feature Loki mixing freely with the gods for a long time, even becoming Odin's blood brother before arranging the accidental murder of Baldr by Höðr in the Prose Edda book Gylfaginning. After Baldr's death, the Æsir restrain Loki with the entrails of his son Narfi. He is eventually freed and fights alongside the Jotun against the forces of the Æsir at Ragnarök. In Norse mythology, Fárbauti (cruel-striker) was the father of Loki, Byleifstr/Byleist and Helblindi/Helbindi with his wife Laufey or Nal. ... In Norse mythology, Laufey was, with Farbauti, the mother of Loki. ... In Norse Mythology, Helblindi (Hel-blinder) was a Jotun (giant), brother of Loki and Byleist and son of Fárbauti (cruel-striker) and his wife Laufey. ... Byleist is a character described in Norse Mythology. ... This is the article about the chief god in North Germanic tradition; for other uses see Odin (disambiguation). ... The Norwegian warrior Orvar-Odd bids a last farewell to his blood brother, the Swedish warrior Hjalmar, by MÃ¥rten Eskil Winge (1866). ... Balder redirects here. ... Loki tricks Höðr into shooting Baldr. ... External links Original text English text Categories: Mythology stubs | Medieval literature | Sagas of Iceland | Norse mythology | Nordic folklore ... In Old Norse, áss (or ǫ́ss, ás, plural æsir, feminine ásynja, feminine plural ásynjur) is the term denoting one of the principal gods of the pantheon of Norse paganism. ... Disembowelment is evisceration, or the removing of vital organs, usually from the abdomen. ... In Norse mythology, Narfi was the father of Nótt. ... For other uses, see Ragnarök (disambiguation). ...


Loki is not to be confused with the similarly named Útgarða-Loki, a king of the giants in Jötunheimr. For the Marvel Comics character, see Utgard-Loki (Marvel Comics). ... In the late 19th century, this Norwegian mountain district was named Jotunheimen after Jötunheimr of Norse mythology. ...

Contents

Eddic depictions

Most information regarding Loki that we have today has been extracted from two Icelandic sources dating from after their Christianization: the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson and the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13 century from earlier sources. St Francis Xavier converting the Paravas: a 19th-century image of the docile heathen The historical phenomenon of Christianization, the conversion of individuals to Christianity or the conversion of entire peoples at once, also includes the practice of converting pagan practices, pagan religious imagery, pagan sites and the pagan calendar... The Younger Edda, known also as the Prose Edda or Snorris Edda is an Icelandic manual of poetics which also contains many mythological stories. ... A statue of Snorri Sturluson by Norwegian sculptor Gustav Vigeland was erected at Reykholt in 1947. ... The Poetic Edda is a collection of Old Norse poems primarily preserved in the Icelandic mediaeval manuscript Codex Regius. ...


Names

Like other deities in the Eddas, Loki is described with many names: Lie-Smith, Sly-God, Shape-Changer, Sly-One, Foxy-One, Lopt, Sky Traveler, Sky Walker and Wizard Of Lies among others.


Nature

Iðunn and Loki, by John Bauer
Iðunn and Loki, by John Bauer
Loki tricks Höðr into killing Baldr
Loki tricks Höðr into killing Baldr

Loki is an adept shape-shifter, with the ability to change both form (examples include transmogrification to a salmon, horse etc.) and sex (he turned into a woman to trick Frigg to learn Baldr's weakness). But he had to borrow Freyja's cloak whenever he wanted to change into bird form. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (736x848, 428 KB) en: Loki and Idun illustrated by John Bauer in 1911 for Our Fathers Godsaga by Viktor Rydberg sv: Loke och Idun illustrerad av John Bauer 1911 för Viktor Rydbergs Fädernas gudasaga Source: http://runeberg. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (736x848, 428 KB) en: Loki and Idun illustrated by John Bauer in 1911 for Our Fathers Godsaga by Viktor Rydberg sv: Loke och Idun illustrerad av John Bauer 1911 för Viktor Rydbergs Fädernas gudasaga Source: http://runeberg. ... Idun and the Apples (1890) by J. Doyle Penrose. ... Tyr and Fenrir, by John Bauer (1911) The Changeling, by John Bauer (1913) Trolls with an abducted princess, by John Bauer (1915) John Bauer (1882–1918) was a Swedish illustrator best known for Bland Tomtar och Troll (Among Elves and Trolls), an annual Christmas book for children published in Sweden. ... PD image, from Swedish Wikipedia This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... PD image, from Swedish Wikipedia This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Loki tricks Höðr into shooting Baldr. ... Balder redirects here. ... For other uses, see Shapeshifting (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Salmon (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... Gender in common usage refers to the sexual distinction between male and female. ... For other uses, see Frigg (disambiguation). ... -1...


In the Eddic depictions Loki mainly plays the role of a villain: a coward (when he was captured by a giant, he begged for his life and promised to give him the goddess Idun), liar (in Lokasenna, all gods called him a liar), cheater (he tricked Idun into being captured by the giant and only went to save her when threatened by the gods), thief (he stole Sif's hair and stole various things from the giants; he also stole Freyja's necklace and got beaten by Heimdall who was sent by Freyja to get the necklace back[3]), and as a murderer (he killed the god Baldur by tricking his blind brother Höðr into using a projectile made of mistletoe). Idun (Illustration by Arthur Rackham, 1910) In Norse mythology, Idun (also Iduna, Idunn, Ithun, Ithunn, or Idunnor, Old Norse Iðunn) was the goddess of youth, fertility, and death. ... Lokasenna (Lokis flyting, Lokis wrangling, Lokis quarrel) is one of the mythological poems of the Poetic Edda. ... For other uses, see SIF (disambiguation). ... -1... In Norse Mythology, Baldur (also Balder, ON Baldr), the god of innocence, beauty, joy, purity, and peace, is Odins second son. ...


In Lokasenna, Odin relates what seems to be a lost story about how Loki spent eight years milking a cow like a maid. Lokasenna (Lokis flyting, Lokis wrangling, Lokis quarrel) is one of the mythological poems of the Poetic Edda. ...

  • Loki:
"Be silent, Odin! Not justly thou settest
The fate of the fight among men;
Oft gavst thou to him who deserved not the gift,
To the baser, the battle's prize."
  • Odin:
"Though I gave to him who deserved not the gift,
To the baser, the battle's prize;
Winters eight wast thou under the earth,
Milking the cows as a maid,
Ay, and babes didst thou bear;
Unmanly thy soul must seem."

Children

Loki was the father (and in more than one instance the mother) of many beasts, humans and monsters. This article is about the legendary creature. ...


Having sex with giantesses was nothing unusual for gods in Norse mythology; Odin, Thor, Njord, Freyr are good examples; and since Loki was actually a giant himself, there is nothing unusual about this activity. Together with Angrboda, he had three children: For other uses, see Thor (disambiguation). ... In Norse mythology, Njord or Njordr (Old Norse Njörðr) is one of the Vanir and the god of wind, fertile land along the seacoast, as well as seamanship, sailing and fishing. ... This 19th century representation of Freyr shows him with his boar Gullinbursti and his sword. ... Angrboda (Old Norse Angrboða Harm-foreboding) appears in Norse Mythology as a giantess. ...

Loki also married a goddess named Sigyn who bore him two sons: Narfi and Vali. (This Vali is not to be confused with Odin's son with the giantess Rind and sometimes his name is Nari). To punish Loki for his part in Baldr's death, Odin turned Vali into a rabid wolf who proceeded to tear Narfi's throat out. Narfi's entrails were used to chain Loki to a large rock until Ragnarok. Fenrir may refer to: Fenrisulfr, a Norse mythological wolf. ... Wolf Wolf Man Mount Wolf Wolf Prizes Wolf Spider Wolf 424 Wolf 359 Wolf Point Wolf-herring Frank Wolf Friedrich Wolf Friedrich August Wolf Hugo Wolf Johannes Wolf Julius Wolf Max Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf Maximilian Wolf Rudolf Wolf Thomas Wolf As Name Wolf Breidenbach Wolf Hirshorn Other The call... For other uses, see Ragnarök (disambiguation). ... Thor goes fishing for the Midgard Serpent in this picture from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... This article is about sea serpents in mythology and cryptozoology. ... In Norse mythology, Hel (sometimes Anglicized or Latinized as Hela) is the queen of Hel, the Norse underworld. ... Sigyn was, in Norse mythology, the wife of Loki, who bore him two sons, Narvi and Váli. ... In Norse mythology, Narfi was the father of Nótt. ... In Norse mythology, Váli was a son of Loki. ...


While he was in the form of a mare Loki mated with the stallion Svadilfari and gave birth to Sleipnir, the eight-legged steed of Odin. 13 year old Peruvian Paso mare A broodmare and foal In English, a mare (an old Germanic word) is a female horse; the word is also an etymological root of marshal (originally marescalcus horse servant). Mares are considered easier to handle than males, which are called stallions or after castration... In Norse mythology, Svadilfari was a magical stallion, owned by a hrimthurs (rime giant) disguised as a human stonemason, who built the walls of Asgard and whose name is uncertain. ... The Tängvide image stone is thought to show Odin entering Valhalla riding on Sleipnir Sleipnir is also a Japanese web browser. ... This is the article about the chief god in North Germanic tradition; for other uses see Odin (disambiguation). ...


One story in the Hyndluljóð states that Loki ate the heart of a woman and proceeded to give birth to a monster whose name is not given. Hyndluljóð or Lay of Hyndla is an Old Norse poem often considered a part of the Poetic Edda. ...


Cooperation with the gods

Loki occasionally works with the other gods and goddesses. For example, he tricked the unnamed giant who built the walls around Asgard out of being paid for his work by distracting his horse while disguised as a mare—thereby he became the mother of Odin's eight-legged horse Sleipnir (although Loki is the one who gave ill advice to the gods in the first place). This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Tängvide image stone is thought to show Odin entering Valhalla riding on Sleipnir Sleipnir is also a Japanese web browser. ...


In another myth, after Thor threatened to crush all his bones for cutting off Sif's hair, Loki pits the dwarves against each other in a gifting contest. The dwarves make Odin's spear, Freyr's ship and Sif's new hair. He even rescues Iðunn after he gave her to a giant, but only after being cornered and threatened with death by the gods. Finally, in Þrymskviða, Loki manages, with Thor at his side, to retrieve Mjolnir after the giant Þrymr secretly steals it, in order to ask for Freyja as a bride in exchange. In Norse mythology, Gungnir (also Gungni, Gungner, or Gungrir) was the name of Odins javelin. ... In Norse mythology, Skíðblaðnir (the name can be anglicized as Skídbladnir, Skídhbladhnir, Skíthblathnir, Skidbladnir, Skithblathnir or Skidhbladhnir) is the ship of Freyr. ... For other uses, see SIF (disambiguation). ... Idun and the Apples (1890) by J. Doyle Penrose. ... Thor dresses up as a bride and Loki as a bridesmaid. ... For other uses, see Thor (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Mjolnir (disambiguation). ... In Norse mythology, King Thrym (uproar) (Þrymr) of the Jotuns (frost giants) stole Mjollnir, Thors hammer, to extort the gods into giving him Freyja as his wife. ... -1...


Even though Loki may have been a liability to gods (leading to the death of Baldr, the birth of Fenrir and other monsters that would eventually engulf the world), his pranks ultimately provided the gods with all their most precious items, from Thor's hammer to the flying ships. Fenrir may refer to: Fenrisulfr, a Norse mythological wolf. ...

Loke och Sigyn depicted by Mårten Eskil Winge 1863.
Loke och Sigyn depicted by Mårten Eskil Winge 1863.

Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... MÃ¥rten Eskil Winge (1825-1896) was a Swedish artist especially known for his Norse mythology paintings. ...

Slayer of Baldr

Disguised as a giantess, Loki arranged the murder of Baldr. He used mistletoe, the only plant which had not sworn never to harm Baldr (in some versions it was deemed unimportant and harmless, and in others it was deemed too young to make an oath), and made a dart of it, which he tricked Baldr's blind brother Höðr into throwing at Baldr, thereby killing him. Another version of the myth, preserved in Gesta Danorum, does not mention Loki. Balder redirects here. ... Families Santalaceae (Viscaceae) Loranthaceae Misodendraceae Mistletoe is the common name for a group of hemi-parasitic plants in the order Santalales that grow attached to and within the branches of a tree or shrub. ... Loki tricks Höðr into shooting Baldr. ... Bishop Asgar, etching by the Danish-Norwegian illustrator Louis Moe (1857—1945) Gesta Danorum (Deeds of the Danes) is a work of Danish history, by 12th century author Saxo Grammaticus (Saxo the Grammarian). It is the most ambitious literary undertaking of medieval Denmark. ...


Loki, in the shape of a witch with stained black teeth Þökk, was the only being that refused to weep for Baldr, preventing the defunct god's return from Hel. After refusing to weep for Baldr, Loki (in the form of Þökk) stepped into a cave, and immediately after changed shape into a raven. Þökk (Thanks) is a giantess in Norse mythology, presumed to be Loki in disguise, who refuses to weep for the slain Baldr, thus forcing him to stay in Hel. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Niflheim. ... For other uses, see Raven (disambiguation). ...


Binding and Ragnarök

The murder of Baldr was not left unpunished, and eventually the gods tracked down Loki, who was hiding in a pool at the base of Franang's Falls in the shape of a salmon. There they caught Loki with a fishing net. They also hunted down Loki's two children with Sigyn, Narfi and Váli (not to be confused with Váli, the son of Odin and Rind). They changed Váli into a wolf, and he then turned against his brother and killed him. They used Narfi's entrails to bind Loki to three slabs of stone, and Skaði placed a snake above his head so that its venom would pour onto him. Sigyn sits beside him and collects the venom in a wooden bowl, but she has to empty the bowl when it fills up, during which time the searing venom drips onto Loki's face. The pain is then so terrible that he writhes, making the earth shake. Balder redirects here. ... Sigyn was, in Norse mythology, the wife of Loki, who bore him two sons, Narvi and Váli. ... In Norse mythology, Narfi was the father of Nótt. ... In Norse mythology, Váli was a son of Loki. ... In Norse mythology, Váli is a son of the god Odin and the giantess Rindr. ... This is the article about the chief god in North Germanic tradition; for other uses see Odin (disambiguation). ... Rind (giantess) - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... In Norse mythology, Váli was a son of Loki. ... Numbers are significant in Norse mythology although not to the extent which they are in some traditions e. ... In Norse mythology, Skaði ‡ is a mountain giantess, wife of the Van god Njord and thus a Van goddess herself. ...


Baldr's murder was also one of the events that precipitated Ragnarök. Loki would stay bound until then. When Ragnarök finally comes and Loki is freed by the trembling earth, he will sail to Vigrid from the north on a ship that also bears Hel and all those from her realm. Once on the battlefield, he will meet Heimdall. They will fight and though Heimdall is ultimately victorious, Heimdall later dies of his wounds. For other uses, see Ragnarök (disambiguation). ... In Norse mythology, Vigrond (battle shaker) is the battlefield, on a plain, where Ragnarok will be fought. ... In Norse mythology, Hel (sometimes Anglicized or Latinized as Hela) is the queen of Hel, the Norse underworld. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Niflheim. ... Heimdall returns Brisingamen to Freya Heimdall (Old Norse Heimdallr, the prefix Heim- means world, the affix -dallr is of uncertain origin, perhaps it means pole, bright, or valley) is one of the Æsir in Norse mythology. ...


Snaptun stone

The "Snaptun stone" features a depiction of Loki with a curled mustache and scarred lips.
The "Snaptun stone" features a depiction of Loki with a curled mustache and scarred lips.

On a spring day in 1950, a semi-circular flat hearth stone bearing a depiction of Loki was discovered on a beach near Snaptun, Denmark.[4] Made of soap stone, the depiction was carved around the year 1,000 AD. The depiction features a curled mustache. The figure is identified as Loki due to the seemingly scarred lips, a reference to a story recorded in Skáldskaparmál.[4] The stone is on display at the Moesgaard Museum near Aarhus, Denmark. In common historic and modern usage, a hearth (Har-th) is a brick- or stone-lined fireplace or oven used for cooking and/or heating. ... The lid of a soapstone box to show the characteristic look of the stone. ... The second part of the Younger Edda of Snorri Sturluson the Skáldskaparmál or language of poetry is effectively a dialogue between the Norse god of the sea, Ægir and Bragi, the god of poetry, in which both Norse mythology and discourse on the nature of poetry are intertwined. ... For the Aarhus convention on public participation, see Aarhus Convention. ...


Norwegian rune poem

In the 13th century Norwegian rune poem, Loki is mentioned in a paragraph in relation to the Younger Futhark rune Bjarkan: The rune poems list the letters of a runic alphabet with a short verse characterizing each one. ... Technical note: Due to technical limitations, some web browsers may not display some special characters in this article. ... Rune redirects here. ... Berkanan is the reconstructed Proto-Germanic name of the b-rune ᛒ, meaning birch. In the Younger Futhark it is called bjarken in Icelandic and bjarkan in Norse. ...

Bjarkan’s laufgrœnstr lima;
Loki far flærðar tima.
Birch is with leafy, greenest limbs;
Loki bore deceit’s luck.[5]

Loka Táttur

Not all lore depicts Loki as a malevolent being. An 18th century ballad (that may have drawn from a much earlier source) from the Faroe Islands, entitled Loka Táttur (The Loki's Tale ballad),[6] depicts Loki as a friend to man: when a thurs (troll or giant) comes to take a farmer's son away, the farmer and his wife pray to Odin to protect him. Odin hides the son in a field of wheat, but the thurs finds him. Odin rescues the son and takes him back to the farmer and his wife, saying that he is done hiding the son. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... For other uses, see Troll (disambiguation). ... Jack the Giant-Killer by Arthur Rackham. ...


The couple then pray to Hœnir, who hides the son in the neck-feathers of a swan, but again the thurs finds him. On the third day, they pray to Loki, who hides the son amidst the eggs of a flounder. The thurs finds the flounder, but Loki instructs the boy to run into a boathouse. The giant gets his head caught and Loki kills him by chopping off his leg and inserting a stick and a stone in the leg stump to prevent the thurs from regenerating. He takes the boy home, and the farmer and his wife embrace both of them. HÅ“nir was an indecisive god and a member of the Æsir in Norse mythology. ...


Other spellings

  • Common Danish, Swedish and Norwegian form: Loke
  • German form: Lohho, Loge (Wagner)

Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ...

Modern age

The composer Richard Wagner presented Loki under an invented Germanized name Loge in his opera Das Rheingold. Loge is also mentioned, but does not appear as a character, in Die Walküre and Götterdämmerung. The name comes from the common mistranslation and confusion with Logi, a fire-giant. Since Wagner's time, Loki has appeared, either as himself or as the namesake of characters, in comic books, on television, in literature and in song lyrics. Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... For the famous train, see Rheingold Express. ... Die Walküre (The Valkyrie) is the second of the four operas that comprise Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung), by Richard Wagner. ...   (Twilight of the Gods – see Notes) is the last of the four operas that comprise Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung), by Richard Wagner. ... Fornjót (Old Norse Fornjótr) is an ancient giant in Norse mythology, the father of Kári (a personification of wind), of Logi (a personification of fire), and of Hlér or Ægir (the ruler of the sea) and a king of Finland. ...


References

  1. ^ From page XXI of Jesse Byock's Introduction to his 2005 translation of The Prose Edda.
  2. ^ Crossley-Holland, Kevin (1980). The Norse Myths. Pantheon Books. ISBN 0394500482. 
  3. ^ The Prose Edda, Skáldskaparmál (8&16); Húsdrápa.
  4. ^ a b Margrethe, Queen, Poul Kjrum, Rikke Agnete Olsen. Oldtidens Ansigt: Faces of the Past (1990), ISBN 9788774682745
  5. ^ Dan Bray translation. Available online through the Northvegr Foundation website: [1]
  6. ^ An online version of the tale can be found via the Northvegr Foundation here: [2]

The Younger Edda, known also as the Prose Edda or Snorris Edda is an Icelandic manual of poetics which also contains many mythological stories. ... The second part of the Younger Edda of Snorri Sturluson the Skáldskaparmál or language of poetry is effectively a dialogue between the Norse god of the sea, Ægir and Bragi, the god of poetry, in which both Norse mythology and discourse on the nature of poetry are intertwined. ... Thor goes fishing for Jörmungandr in this picture from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... The Northvegr Foundation is a nonprofit educational foundation. ... The Northvegr Foundation is a nonprofit educational foundation. ... Norse paganism is a term used to describe the religious traditions which were common amongst the Germanic tribes living in Nordic countries prior to and during the process of the Christianization in Northern Europe. ... Norse, Viking or Scandinavian mythology comprises the indigenous pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian peoples, including those who settled on Iceland, where most of the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... In Old Norse, áss (or ǫ́ss, ás, plural æsir, feminine ásynja, feminine plural ásynjur) is the term denoting one of the principal gods of the pantheon of Norse paganism. ... Balder redirects here. ... For other uses, see Frigg (disambiguation). ... Heimdall returns Brisingamen to Freya Heimdall (Old Norse Heimdallr, the prefix Heim- means world, the affix -dallr is of uncertain origin, perhaps it means pole, bright, or valley) is one of the Æsir in Norse mythology. ... In Norse mythology, Hel (sometimes Anglicized or Latinized as Hela) is the queen of Hel, the Norse underworld. ... Hermóðr the Brave (Old Norse Hermóðr Courage-Battle) appears, in Norse mythology, clearly among the gods only in Snorri Sturlusons Gylfaginning where Hermóðr is the messenger sent by Odin to find out what ransom Hel would accept to return Baldr to Ásgarðr. ... Loki tricks Höðr into shooting Baldr. ... HÅ“nir was an indecisive god and a member of the Æsir in Norse mythology. ... Mimir was a primal god of Norse mythology whose head was severed and sent to Odin during the war between the Aesir and the Vanir deities. ... Njord or Njordr (Old Norse Njörðr) is one of the Vanir and the god of the fertile land along the seacoast, as well as seamanship and sailing in Norse mythology. ... This is the article about the chief god in North Germanic tradition; for other uses see Odin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Thor (disambiguation). ... Týr, depicted here with both hands intact, is identified with Mars in this illustration from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... This picture, from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript in the care of the Árni Magnússon Institute, shows Ullr on his skis and with his bow. ... In Norse mythology, Vali (ON: Váli) was a son of the god Odin (Old Norse: Óðinn) and the giantess Rindr. ... In Norse mythology, Ve was one of the Æsir and a son of Bestla and Borr. ... In Norse mythology, Vidar (Víðar, Viðarr, Widar) is the Son of Odin and the giantess Grid (Jotun). ... Vili was one of the Æsir and a son of Bestla and Borr in Norse mythology. ... Image File history File links Mjollnir_icon. ... Vanir is the name of one of the two groups of gods in Norse mythology, the other and more well known being the Æsir. ... This 19th century representation of Freyr shows him with his boar Gullinbursti and his sword. ... -1... In Norse mythology, Njord or Njordr (Old Norse Njörðr) is one of the Vanir and the god of wind, fertile land along the seacoast, as well as seamanship, sailing and fishing. ... The dying Viking hero Ragnar Lodbrok exclaimed in Krákumál: the dísir invite me home (to Valhalla). This is an illustration of a lady welcoming Odin back to Valhalla on the Tängvide image stone, Gotland. ... The Norns spin the threads of fate at the foot of Yggdrasil, the tree of the world. ... In Norse mythology, the dwarves (Old Norse: dvergar, sing. ... In Norse religion the einherjar or einheriar were spirits of warriors who had died bravely in battle. ... In Norse mythology, the Álfar, or Elves, are usually considered to be the height of humans or just above. ... In Norse mythology, the Light Elves (Old Norse: Liósálfar) live in Álfheim. ... ... For other uses, see Troll (disambiguation). ... The Valkyries Vigil, by the Pre-Raphaelite painter Edward Robert Hughes. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... In Norse Mythology, Bifröst is the bridge leading from the realm of the mortals Midgard to the realm of the gods Asgard, which the gods travel daily to hold their councils under the shade of the tree Yggdrasill. ... In Norse mythology, Ginnungagap (seeming emptiness or gaping gap) was a vast chasm that existed before the ordering of the world. ... For other uses, see Midgard (disambiguation). ... Muspelheim (Flameland), also called Muspel (Old Norse Múspellsheimr and Múspell, respectively), is the realm of fire in Norse Mythology. ... Niflheim (Land of Mists) is the realm of ice and cold in Norse mythology. ... For other uses, see Yggdrasil (disambiguation). ... The Poetic Edda is a collection of Old Norse poems primarily preserved in the Icelandic mediaeval manuscript Codex Regius. ... The Younger Edda, known also as the Prose Edda or Snorris Edda is an Icelandic manual of poetics which also contains many mythological stories. ... Excerpt NjÃ¥ls saga in the Möðruvallabók (AM 132 folio 13r) circia 1350. ... The Volsung Cycle is the name of a series of Germanic legends based on the same matter as Niebelungenlied, and which were recorded in medieval Iceland. ... The Tyrfing Cycle is a collection of legends united by the magic sword Tyrfing. ... A rune stone in Lund Rune stones are stones with runic inscriptions dating from the early Middle Ages but are found to have been used most prominently during the Viking Age. ... Old Norse is the Germanic language spoken by the inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements during the Viking Age, until about 1300. ... The orthography of the Old Norse language since the introduction of the Latin alphabet in Iceland is a thorny subject. ... Norse mythology provides a rich and diverse source which many later writers have borrowed from or built upon. ... Viking Age is the term denoting the years from about 800 to 1066 in Scandinavian History[1][2][3]. // The Vikings have been much maligned in European history, due in large part to their violent attacks on Christians in the first centuries of their excursions out of Scandinavia. ... The skald was a member of a group of courtly poets, whose poetry is associated with the courts of Scandinavian and Icelandic leaders during the Viking age, who composed and performed renditions of aspects of what we now characterise as Old Norse poetry. ... In literature, a kenning is a poetic phrase, a figure of speech, substituted for the usual name of a person or thing. ... The Blót was the pagan Germanic sacrifice to Norse gods and Elves. ... Seid or seiðr is an Old Norse term for a type of sorcery or witchcraft which was practiced by the pre-Christian Norse. ... Numbers are significant in Norse mythology although not to the extent which they are in some traditions e. ... Divided between the Æsir and the Vanir, and sometimes including the jötnar (giants), the dividing line between these groups is less than clear. ... // Places Asgard Bifröst Bilskirnir Breidablik Elivagar Fyris Wolds Gandvik Ginnungagap Helgardh Hlidskjalf Hvergelmir Jötunheimr Leipter River Kormet Midgard Muspelheim Nastrond Nidavellir Niflheim Ormet Reidgotaland Slidr River Svartalfheim Utgard Valhalla Vanaheim Vimur Yggdrasil Events Fimbulwinter Ragnarök Artifacts Balmung Brisingamen Draupnir Dromi Eitr Mjolnir Skíðblaðnir Gram Gungnir... For other uses, see Ragnarök (disambiguation). ...


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Loki | Home | The Games that Linux People Play (369 words)
Loki is active in supporting and initiating open source development projects.
The Loki webstore will remain open until 12:00 PM PST January 31s placed on the webstore will be filled.
The Loki domains will be redirected to point to the new host, so you won't need to make any changes to continue to use these services.
Loki (279 words)
Loki is one of the major deities in the Norse pantheon.
Loki's mistress is the giantess Angrboda, and with her he is the father of three monsters.
Loki is often called the Sly One, the Trickster, the Shape Changer, and the Sky Traveler.
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