FACTOID # 1: Idaho produces more milk than Iowa, Indiana and Illinois combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Lois Lowry
Lois Lowry
Born: March 20, 1937
Hawaii, United States
Occupation: Writer
Website: http://www.loislowry.com

Lois Lowry (born March 20, 1937) is an author of children's literature who has been awarded the Newbery Medal twice: first for Number the Stars in 1990, and again in 1994 for The Giver, her most famous and controversial work. March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (80th in leap years). ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For the album by the Kaiser Chiefs see Employment (album) Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (80th in leap years). ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Cosette Dwyer is an amazing author. ... Jane Frank: illustration from Thomas Yoseloffs The Further Adventures of Till Eulenspiegel (1957). ... The John Newbery Medal is a literary award given by the Association for Library Service to Children of the American Library Association (ALA) to the author of the outstanding American book for children. ... Number the Stars is a novel about the Holocaust of the Second World War by Lois Lowry. ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... This article is about the novel by Lois Lowry. ...

Contents

Biography

Lois Lowry was born March 20, 1937 in Hawaii to parents Robert and Katherine Hammersberg. Initially, Lois' parents named her "Sena" for her Norwegian grandmother but upon hearing this, her grandmother telegraphed and instructed her parents that the child should have an American name.[1] Lois and Ann were the names of her father's sisters, so her parents decided to name her Lois in honor of her. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Telegraphy (from the Greek words tele = far away and grapho = write) is the long distance transmission of written messages without physical transport of letters, originally over wire. ...


Lowry was born the middle of three children. She had an older sister, Helen, and a younger brother Jon. Helen, three years older than Lois, died in 1962 at the age of 28. This experience informed Lowry's first book A Summer to Die which is about a young girl who tragically loses her older sister (which is also a subplot of Number the Stars). Lowry's brother Jon is six years younger than she and grew up to be a doctor. He and Lois continue to enjoy a close relationship. [2] Number the Stars is a novel about the Holocaust of the Second World War by Lois Lowry. ...


Lowry's father was a career military officer - an army dentist- whose work moved the family all over the United States and to many parts of the world. Lowry and her family moved from Hawaii to Brooklyn, New York in 1939 when Lowry was 2 years old and later relocated to her mother's hometown Carlisle, PA in 1942 when Lowry's father was deployed to the Pacific during World War II. Lowry's father served on a hospital ship called HOPE and on the island of Tinian during the war. [3]


Following World War II, Lowry and her family moved to Tokyo, Japan where her father was stationed from 1948-1950. Lowry went through Junior High School in Tokyo at a special school for military families and then returned to the United States to attend High school. Lowry and her family briefly lived in Carlisle, PA during 1950 before moving to Governor's Island, New York, where Lois attended Curtis High School on Staten Island. In 1952, Lois entered Packer Collegiate Institute in Brooklyn Heights, New York, where she finished high school. After Highschool, Lowry entered Brown University in 1954 which she attended for two years until her marriage at 19 to Donald Lowry, a Naval officer, in 1956. Together they had four children: daughters Alix and Kristin, and sons Grey and Benjamin. [4] Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ...


The Lowrys moved quite frequently in their early years of marriage due to Donald's military career. They lived in California, Connecticut (where Alix was born), Florida (where Grey was born), South Carolina, and finally Cambridge, Massachusetts (where Kristin and Benjamin were born) where they settled after Donald left the service to attend Harvard Law School. After Donald Lowry finished law school the family moved to Portland, ME. [5] Waterfront of Portland along the Fore River Portland is the largest city in Maine with a population of 64,249 citizens as of 2000. ...


As her children became older Lowry found time to complete her degree in English literature from the University of Southern Maine in Portland in 1972. After earning her B.A., she pursued graduate studies at her alma mater. It was during this coursework that she was introduced to photography, which became a life-long passion as well as a profession. Her specialty was child photography, but she also took pictures to accompany the articles she submitted as a freelance journalist. It was while working on a freelance journalism piece for Redbook Magazine that Lowry got her first book opportunity when the article she wrote caught the attention of an editor at Houghton Mifflin. The story Lowry had written for the magazine was meant for adults but was written through the eyes of a child. The editor at Houghton Mifflin recognized an upcoming talent and suggested that Lowry write a children's book. She agreed and wrote A Summer to Die which was published in 1977. As Lowry nurtured her budding careers, she became a person who was no longer compatible with Donald Lowry; they divorced in 1977 when Lowry was 40 years old. Lowry said the following of these transitional years of her life, "My children grew up in Maine. So did I. I returned to college at the University of Southern Maine, got my degree, went to graduate school, and finally began to write professionally, the thing I had dreamed of doing since those childhood years when I had endlessly scribbled stories and poems in notebooks."[6] The University of Southern Maine (USM) is a multi-campus public university and part of the University of Maine System. ...


In 1979, she began her "Anastasia" series of books with Anastasia Krupnik, the story of a precocious and quirky ten-year-old girl (based, in part, upon Lowry's own daughters) who wants to be a writer. Lowry would go on to write seven sequels to this book including Anastasia Has the Answers in 1986 and Anastasia at This Address in 1991. [7]


In 1980, Lowry published her most autobiographical work, Autumn Street. The main character is a girl named Elizabeth, whose father is away at war. Elizabeth befriends her grandmother's African American cook Tatie and her grandson Charles. In the course of the story, Elizabeth encounters racism, her beloved grandfather's debilitating stroke, and the murder of Charles. In the end, with the love of her family, Elizabeth comes to terms with the fear and grief of the adult world. Elizabeth's story closely parallels Lowry's actual childhood in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. "Charles" was actually a girl named Gloria who was murdered during Lois's childhood. Gloria was the granddaughter of Fleta Jordan, who was a cook for Lois's grandfather, and Fleta was the real "Tatie." The real "Autumn Street" was (and is) called College Street in Carlisle. [8]


Lowry would go on to write several more books in the next three decades, two of which would win the prestigious Newbery Medal, Number the Stars in 1989 and The Giver in 1993. Many of Lowry's works deal with somber topics, but Lowry manages to mix the comic and the tragic skillfully in her stories in a way that makes them enticing to readers both young and old. Following her characters as they cope with hard times, often with humor, helps her readers face the same issues. Lowry said the following of her own writing, "My books have varied in content and style. Yet it seems that all of them deal, essentially, with the same general theme: the importance of human connections... I try, through writing, to convey my passionate awareness that we live intertwined on this planet and that our future depends upon our caring more, and doing more, for one another." [9]


Some of Lowry's works have been controversial because she has chosen to tackle difficult subject matter. In particular her 1993 book, The Giver, has concerned some parent groups. This novel for young readers presents a dystopian view of a future society where history is hidden, where people are conditioned not to see colors, and where those who do not fit within the society's narrow definition of acceptability are "released." The protagonist discovers being "released" is synonymous with being put to death. Many have deemed this material to be inappropriate for children, and as a result The Giver has been banned in some schools. Nevertheless, Lowry won a Newbery Medal for this book in 1994. She continues the controversial themes of The Giver in her books Gathering Blue and Messenger. [10]


Writing about both funny things and serious issues has sustained Lois Lowry through her own hard times. Her son Grey was killed in the crash of his fighter plane in 1995. Lowry has acknowledged that this was the most difficult day of her life, but through her steady work as an author, she has persevered. Lowry said, "His death in the cockpit of a warplane tore away a piece of my world. But it left me, too, with a wish to honor him by joining the many others trying to find a way to end conflict on this very fragile earth." [11]


Today, Lois Lowry remains active by not only continuing to write and make speaking appearances, but also enjoying time with her long-time companion Martin Small at her homes in Massachusetts and Maine. Lois takes pleasure in reading, knitting, gardening and entertaining her four grandchildren. [12]


Family

Step sister was an actor on broadway in 1986


Bibliography

This article is about the novel by Lois Lowry. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... The John Newbery Medal is a literary award given by the Association for Library Service to Children of the American Library Association (ALA) to the author of the outstanding American book for children. ... Gathering Blue is a 2000 novel by noted childrens author Lois Lowry. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Messenger by Lois Lowry Messenger is a 2004 novel by Childrens author Lois Lowry. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

The Anastasia Series

nigger This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Anatasia Again is a novel by Lois Lowry. ... Anastasia At Your Service is a fictional novel by Lois Lowry. ... Anastasia, Ask Your Analyst is a fictional novel Lois Lowry. ... Anastasia on her Own is a fictional novel Lois Lowry. ... Anastasia has the answers, is a fictional novel Lois Lowry. ... Anastasias Chosen Career is a fictional novel Lois Lowry. ... Anastasia at this Address, is a fictional novel Lois Lowry. ... Anastasia Absolutely, is a fictional novel Lois Lowry. ...

Books about Sam

All about Sam, is a fictional novel Lois Lowry. ... Attaboy Sam!, is a fictional novel Lois Lowry. ... See You Around, Sam, is a fictional novel Lois Lowry. ... Zooman Sam, is a fictional novel Lois Lowry. ... Sam-I-Am is a character by Dr. Seuss. ...

Books about the Tates

The One Hundredth Thing about Caroline is a childrens novel by Lois Lowry, published in [date]. Synopsis Spoiler warning: Caroline Tate discovers a note written to the mysterious man living on the apartment above her, telling him to Get rid of the kids. Caroline jumps to the conclusion that... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Switcharound is a novel by Lois Lowry, it the published in ____. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Your Move, J.P.! is a novel by Lois Lowry. ...

Books about Gooney Bird

This article or section reads like an advertisement. ... This article or section reads like an advertisement. ...

Standalone books

The silent boy was written by Lois Lowry and was published in 2003. ... Number the Stars is a novel about the Holocaust of the Second World War by Lois Lowry. ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ... The John Newbery Medal is a literary award given by the Association for Library Service to Children of the American Library Association (ALA) to the author of the outstanding American book for children. ... Autumn Street is a fictional novel by two time Newberry Award winning author Lois Lowry. ... Rabble Starkey is a 1987 fictional novel by two time award-winning author Lois Lowry. ... Gossamer is fantasy/sci-fy book for young adults by Lois Lowry. ...

Autobiographical

An autobiography written by the American Author Lois Lowry, in which she uses photographs and accompanying text to construct a picture of her life. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.loislowry.com/pdf/Richmond_Speech.pdf
  2. ^ http://www.loislowry.com/bio.html
  3. ^ http://www.loislowry.com/bio.html
  4. ^ http://www.pabook.libraries.psu.edu/LitMap/bios/Lowry_Lois.html
  5. ^ http://www.pabook.libraries.psu.edu/LitMap/bios/Lowry_Lois.html
  6. ^ http://www.loislowry.com/bio.html
  7. ^ http://www.pabook.libraries.psu.edu/LitMap/bios/Lowry_Lois.html
  8. ^ http://www.pabook.libraries.psu.edu/LitMap/bios/Lowry_Lois.html
  9. ^ http://www.loislowry.com/bio.html
  10. ^ http://www.pabook.libraries.psu.edu/LitMap/bios/Lowry_Lois.html
  11. ^ http://www.loislowry.com/bio.html
  12. ^ http://www.pabook.libraries.psu.edu/LitMap/bios/Lowry_Lois.html

External links

  • Lowry's website
  • Complete list of books by Lowry
  • Interview with Writer Unboxed, April 20, 2007
Persondata
NAME Lowry, Lois
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION American children's novelist
DATE OF BIRTH March 20, 1937
PLACE OF BIRTH Hawaii, United States
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
Borders - Feature - Vintage Inspiration: Lois Lowry Looks to the Past (792 words)
Lois Lowry, a two-time Newbery medalist, is not only one of our most celebrated children's authors, she's also a photographer.
Lowry starts each chapter with an image—an old car, a soldier headed off to World War I—but the cover photograph is the one that gave her her story.
Lowry is at work on the final book of a trilogy that includes the loosely connected The Giver and Gathering Blue.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m