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Encyclopedia > Loincloth

A loincloth is a one-piece male garment, sometimes kept in place by a belt, which covers the genitals and, at least partially, the buttocks. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Belt can refer to the following objects: Look up belt in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A sex organ, or primary sexual characteristic, narrowly defined, is any of those parts of the body (which are not always bodily organs according to the strict definition) which are involved in sexual reproduction and constitute the reproductive system in an complex organism; namely: Male: penis (notably the glans penis... Bottom commonly refers to the human buttocks but also has other uses. ...


The wearer traditionally wears nothing else and is barefoot. Walking barefoot Going barefoot is the practice of not wearing shoes, socks, or other foot covering. ...

in Pharaonic Egypt, any man was worthily dressed in a loincloth (and headdress), even a god's image for worship; here Amun-Ra
in Pharaonic Egypt, any man was worthily dressed in a loincloth (and headdress), even a god's image for worship; here Amun-Ra

==History and types==♥♥ Loincloths are and have been worn: Image File history File links Size of this preview: 314 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (679 × 1297 pixel, file size: 315 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 314 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (679 × 1297 pixel, file size: 315 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Amun (also spelt Amon, Amoun, Amen, and rarely Imenand, and spelt in Greek as Ammon, and Hammon) was the name of a deity, in Egyptian mythology, who gradually rose to become one of the most important, before disappearing back into the shadows. ...

  • in societies where no other clothing is needed or wanted
  • as an undergarment or swimsuit
  • for symbolical purposes, e.g. in asceticism to express soberness[citation needed]
    • Mohandas Gandhi wore a dhoti, a Hindu loincloth, as a way of identifying with the poorest Indians, even though he knew it could be taken as a sign of primitiveness...

The loincloth is the most basic form of male (or unisex) dress. It has been nearly universal throughout the globe and all human history. The loincloth is in essence a piece of material, bark-bast, leather or cloth, passed between the legs covering the genitals. Despite this simpleness of function the loincloth takes many forms. For the types and styles of womens undergarments, see lingerie. ... A swimsuit (also swimmers), bathing suit (also bathers), aqua jammies or swimming costume (sometimes shortened to cozzie) is an item of clothing designed to be worn for swimming. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (October 2, 1869 – January 30, 1948) (Devanagari: मोहनदास करमचन्द गांधी), called Mahatma Gandhi, was the charismatic leader who brought the cause of Indias independence from British colonial rule to... Similar to sarongs, dhotis are commonly worn with western-style oxford shirts by the men of South India. ... Hinduism (known as in modern Indian languages[1]) is a religious tradition[2] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ...

Australian Aboriginal dance group wearing loincloths on stage at Namassa festival, but in modern materials
Australian Aboriginal dance group wearing loincloths on stage at Namassa festival, but in modern materials

Another style of loincloth (more typical of tropic regions) consists of a single long strip of bark-cloth or woven cloth. This was used by the inhabitants of the Austronesian speaking area of Southeast Asia and Oceania, where it was known as chawat [cawat], sirat, bah, bahag, maro or malo. The cawat/maro style loincloth is an important cultural marker of the region. Image File history File linksMetadata Nambassa_1981_Aboriginal_dance_company. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Nambassa_1981_Aboriginal_dance_company. ... The Austronesian languages are a language family widely dispersed throughout the islands of Southeast Asia and the Pacific, with a few members spoken on continental Asia. ... World map exhibiting a common interpretation of Oceania; other interpretations may vary. ...


Various cultures in tropical Africa wore or still wear loincloths, often as (nearly) the only traditional garment for every day use. The loincloth of Southern African Bushmen, called xai, is a piece of skin roughly T-shaped with long ties at the corners of the arms. The free end is pulled in back and tucked under the ties. The Bushmen, San, Basarwa, !Kung or Khwe are indigenous people of the Kalahari Desert, which spans areas of South Africa, Botswana, Namibia and Angola. ...


The ancient Egyptians, both men and women, wore loincloths as underwear, the men beneath their kilt-like schenti. These loincloths consisted of fine linen cloths in a triangular shape with ties at the two corners. The base of the triangle was placed at the small of the back and the ties tied in front, then the point or apex was drawn between the legs and tucked under the string, exactly the opposite of the Bushman fashion.

Aztec Indians wore loincloths with or without other garments
Aztec Indians wore loincloths with or without other garments

A similar style of loincloth was also characteristic of ancient Meso-America. The male inhabitants of the area of modern Mexico wore a wound loincloth of woven fabric. One end of the loincloth was held up, the remainder passed between the thighs, wound about the waist, and secured in back by tucking. (Local names: Nahuatl maxtlatl, Mayan ex.) Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1368x1482, 196 KB) Summary Page depicting use of intoxicants by elder Aztecs. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1368x1482, 196 KB) Summary Page depicting use of intoxicants by elder Aztecs. ... Mesoamerica is the region extending from central Mexico south to the northwestern border of Costa Rica that gave rise to a group of stratified, culturally related agrarian civilizations spanning an approximately 3,000-year period before the European discovery of the New World by Columbus. ...

Brazilian Xavante Indians (Xingu River region) in scanty but colorful loincloths made with separate threads

In Pre-Columbian South America, ancient Inca men wore a strip of cloth between their legs held up by strings or tape as a belt. The cloth was secured to the tapes at the back and the front portion hung in front as an apron, always well ornamented. The same garment, mostly in plain cotton but whose aprons are now, like t-shirts, sometimes decorated with logos, is known in Japan as etchu fundoshi. Image File history File links Kuarup3. ... Image File history File links Kuarup3. ... For other meanings of Inca, see Inca (disambiguation). ... Cotton ready for harvest. ...


Some of the culturally diverse Amazonian Indians still wear some ancestral type of loincloth.

Bengal boy in traditional lungi
Bengal boy in traditional lungi

In most of (sub-)tropical continental Asia, types of loincloth such as the Indian lungi, often unisex or with a close female counterpart, remain in use as traditional dress, especially among the rural peasant communities, while city dwellers tend to adopt western style costumes. Image File history File linksMetadata LungiBoy. ... Image File history File linksMetadata LungiBoy. ... A boy in a village of Narail, Bangladesh wearing a lungi with single knot. ...

Kalarippayattu sword fighting in loincloths

An elaborate, decorated form is also worn as the only garment in certain martial arts, such as Kerala's Kalarippayattu; like the aptly named boxer shorts, it must allow the fighters free, even acrobatic movement. Image File history File links Valpayattu. ... Image File history File links Valpayattu. ... Hawaiian State Grappling Championships. ... Kalarippayattu (IPA: [kaɭaɾipːajatɨ̆], Malayalam: കളരിപയറ്റ്) is an Indian martial art practised in Kerala and contiguous parts of neighboring Tamil Nadu. ... Information in this article or section has not been verified against sources and may not be reliable. ...


Japanese men traditionally wear (formerly always) a loincloth known as a fundoshi. The fundoshi is a 35 cm (14 inch) wide piece of fabric (cotton or silk) passed between the thighs and secured to cover the genitals. There are a hundred ways of tying the fundoshi, and in the modern age, men are coming to enjoy using patterned cloth for their fundoshis. The fundoshi (褌) is a traditional Japanese male loincloth, made from a strip of cotton cloth, one shaku (traditional Japanese foot, 35 cm = 14 inches) wide and about 2. ... Silk dresses Silk is a natural protein fiber, some forms of which can be woven into textiles. ...


Men of Indo-European culture, Greeks, Romans and Scandinavians, wore the loincloth more or less habitually. (Women wore a fuller version, with ties before and behind, "bikinis" called a "perizoma", as depicted on the mosaics at Piazza Amerina.) An ancient version of the loincloth, the breechcloth, was found in the Alps on a ca. 2000 BCE archaeological find named Ötzi the Iceman. A breechcloth, or breechclout, is a form of Loincloth consisting in a strip of material (usually a narrow rectangle) passed between the thighs and secured before and behind under a belt or string. ... Template:Miss shoreman “Ötzi” redirects here. ...


After the fall of the Roman empire, the loincloth disappeared in Europe. Trousers of one kind or another, which had been considered a Celtic oddity in the Ancient Mediterranean cultures, were prescribed for men. Germanic trousers of the 4th century found in the Thorsberg moor, Germany Early use of trousers in France: a sans-culotte by Louis-Léopold Boilly. ...


Loincloth-wearing peoples consider the loincloth an expression of modesty, but when Europeans conquered societies among whom the loincloth was traditional, the Europeans banned this garment as uncivilized and offensive to the Christian morality they usually preached[citation needed].


Connotations

wearing just a loin cloth and sometimes a blanket in modern Wellington, Maori Ben Hana
wearing just a loin cloth and sometimes a blanket in modern Wellington, Maori Ben Hana

The connection of loincloth-wearing with "backwardness" became even more pronounced in the 19th century heyday of colonialism and industrialisation. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (589x800, 158 KB) Summary Ben Hana, on Courtney Place (Burger King corner) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (589x800, 158 KB) Summary Ben Hana, on Courtney Place (Burger King corner) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Ben Hana, who prefers to be called Brother but is more widely known as Blanket Man as headlined by the local media is an infamous character in Wellington, New Zealand. ...


Often the only garment black male slaves in the tropical colonies (e.g. in Surinam) were permitted to wear was a scanty breechcloth, while even working class in the West wears at least shirt and trousers. A breechcloth, or breechclout, is a form of Loincloth consisting in a strip of material (usually a narrow rectangle) passed between the thighs and secured before and behind under a belt or string. ...


During the Second World War, Allied prisoners of war in the reputedly harsh Japanese camps often had nothing but a breechcloth to wear.


The popular western mind also associates the man's loincloth with infants' diapers, which added to the sense of indignity and backwardness associated with the loincloth. This article is about the garment. ...


At present the loincloth is nearly extinct as normal male wear in the industrialized world, except in certain contexts in Japan. However, in some cases it is worn as part of tribal - or national dress, either for the benefit of tourists, by tradition or as a statement.


See also

The fundoshi (褌) is a traditional Japanese male loincloth, made from a strip of cotton cloth, one shaku (traditional Japanese foot, 35 cm = 14 inches) wide and about 2. ... See Thong for other meanings. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Bikini Science--Loincloth (371 words)
It has been said that the loincloth is the merger of the waistband and the fig leaf.
The loincloth should not be confused with the g-string, which similarly covers the genitals but which also has a string through the posterior rugae, giving it three edges as opposed to the two edges of the loincloth.
The loincloth merges the waistband and the fig leaf and is one of the most widely worn costumes on the planet.
Interactive Dig Hierakonpolis - Nubian Cemetery Week 1: A Loincloth (1706 words)
Although we found the coarser "loincloth" and pieces of the fine leather in close proximity, we can see no evidence that they were part of the same garment.
Instead it may be possible that "loincloths" were one of those all-purpose articles of clothing, kind of like bandanas, so that when not need to gird the loins they could keep the hair in place.
Loincloths are considered articles of the male wardrobe while tattoos are almost exclusively found on women.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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