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Encyclopedia > Logos
Look up logos in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Logos (Greek λόγος) is an important term in philosophy, analytical psychology, rhetoric and religion. Logos as a Greek noun, and several meanings deriving from that: see Logos. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... The philosopher Socrates about to take poison hemlock as ordered by the court. ... Analytical psychology is part of the Jungian psychology movement started by Carl Jung and his followers. ... Rhetoric (from Greek , rhêtôr, orator, teacher) is generally understood to be the art or technique of persuasion through the use of oral or written language; however, this definition of rhetoric has expanded greatly since rhetoric emerged as a field of study in universities. ...


Its semantic field extends beyond "word" to notions such as "thought, speech, account, meaning, reason, proportion, principle, standard", or "logic". In English, the word is the root of "log" (as in record), of "logic," and of the "-ology" suffix (e.g., geology). The semantic field of a word is the sum of the sememes expressed by it. ... In linguistics, meaning is the content carried by the words or signs exchanged by people when communicating through language. ... For other uses, see Reason (disambiguation). ... Logic (from Classical Greek λόγος logos; meaning word, thought, idea, argument, account, reason, or principle) is the study of the principles and criteria of valid inference and demonstration. ...


Heraclitus established the term in Western philosophy as meaning the fundamental order of the cosmos. The sophists used the term to mean discourse, and Aristotle applied the term to argument from reason. After Judaism came under Hellenistic influence, Philo adopted the term into Jewish philosophy. The Gospel of John identifies Jesus as the incarnation of the Logos, through which all things are made. The gospel further identifies the Logos as God (theos), providing scriptural support for the trinity. It is this sense, the Logos as Jesus Christ and God, that is most common in popular culture. Heraclitus of Ephesus (Ancient Greek - Herákleitos ho Ephésios (Herakleitos the Ephesian)) (about 535 - 475 BC), known as The Obscure (Ancient Greek - ho Skoteinós), was a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher, a native of Ephesus on the coast of Asia Minor. ... Sophism was originally a term for the techniques taught by a highly respected group of philosophy and rhetoric teachers in ancient Greece. ... Discourse is a term used in semantics as in discourse analysis, but it also refers to a social conception of discourse, often linked with the work of French philosopher Michel Foucault (1926-1984) and Jürgen Habermas The Theory of Communicative Action (1985). ... Aristotle (Greek: Aristotélēs) (384 BC – 322 BC) was a Greek philosopher, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. ... Hellenistic Judaism was a movement in the early (pre-70 AD) Jewish diaspora attempting to establish the Hebraic-Jewish religious tradition within the culture and language of Hellenism. ... Philo (20 BC - 50 AD), known also as Philo of Alexandria and as Philo Judaeus And as Yedidia, was a Hellenized Jewish philosopher born in Alexandria, Egypt. ...


Psychologist Carl Jung used the term for the masculine principle of rationality. “Jung” redirects here. ...

Contents

Uses in ancient Greek

In ordinary, non-technical Greek, logos had two overlapping meanings: It meant an instance of speaking: "sentence, saying, oration"; the antithesis with ergon ("action" or "work") was a commonplace. Despite the conventional translation as "word", it is not used for a word in the grammatical sense; that's lexis. It also means the inward intention underlying the speech act: "opinion, thought, grounds for belief, common sense". [1] Antithesis (Greek for setting opposite, from against + position) means a direct contrast or exact opposition to something. ... For other uses, see Word (disambiguation). ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ...


Use in ancient philosophy

Heraclitus (c 535–475 BCE) established the term in Western philosophy and was one of the first to associate it with fire.[citation needed]

One must not follow what is common; but, even though the Logos is common, most people live as though they possessed their own understanding of it. (Heraclitian fragment 2) The common is what is open to all, what can be seen and heard by all. To see is to let in with open eyes what is open to view, i.e. what is lit up and revealed to all. The dead (the completely private ones) neither see nor hear; they are not closed. No light (fire) shines in them; no speech sounds in them. And yet, even they participate in the cosmos. The extinguished ones also belong to the continuum of lighting and extinguishing that is the common cosmos. The dead touch upon the living sleeping, who in turn touch upon the living waking. (Heraclitian fragment 26)[citation needed]

Heraclitus also used Logos to mean the undifferentiated material substrate from which all things came: "Listening not to me but to the Logos it is wise to agree that all [things] are one." [citation needed] In this sense, Logos is the arche, the first principle of the cosmos in Pre-Socratic philosophy. Logos therefore designates both the material substrate itself and the universal, mechanical, "just" way in which this substrate manifests itself in and as individual things; that is, it subsumes within itself the later Platonic distinction (in Timaeus) between "form" and "matter".[citation needed] Heraclitus of Ephesus (Ancient Greek - Herákleitos ho Ephésios (Herakleitos the Ephesian)) (about 535 - 475 BC), known as The Obscure (Ancient Greek - ho Skoteinós), was a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher, a native of Ephesus on the coast of Asia Minor. ... In the ancient Greek philosophy, arche (ἀρχή) is the beginning or the first principle of the world. ... Pre-Socratic philosophers are often very hard to pin down, and it is sometimes very difficult to determine the actual line of argument they used in supporting their particular views. ... Timaeus is a theoretical treatise of Plato in the form of a Socratic dialogue, written circa 360 BC. The work puts forward speculation on the nature of the physical world. ...


By the 300s BC, the time of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, logos described the faculty of human reason and the knowledge men had of the world and of each other. [dubious ] Plato allowed his characters to engage in the conceit of describing logos as a living being in some of his dialogues. [citation needed] The development of the Academy with hypomnemata brought logos closer to the literal text. [citation needed] Aristotle, who studied under Plato, first developed the concept of logic as depicting the rules of human rationality. [citation needed] This page is about the ancient Greek philosopher. ... PLATO was one of the first generalized Computer assisted instruction systems, originally built by the University of Illinois (U of I) and later taken over by Control Data Corporation (CDC), who provided the machines it ran on. ... Aristotle (Greek: Aristotélēs) (384 BC – 322 BC) was a Greek philosopher, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. ... For other uses, see Reason (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Academy (disambiguation). ... The hypomnemata is a special type of notebook used by philosophers, theologians, and students to fomulate opinions and keep a personal record about the experience of the self. ... Logic (from Classical Greek λόγος logos; meaning word, thought, idea, argument, account, reason, or principle) is the study of the principles and criteria of valid inference and demonstration. ...


The Stoics understood Logos as the animating power of the universe. A restored Stoa in Athens. ...


Aristotle's rhetorical logos

Aristotle defined logos as argument from reason, one of the three modes of persuasion. The other two modes are pathos, emotional appeal, and ethos, reputation and credibility. An argument based on logos needs to be logical, and in fact the term logic derives from it. Logos normally implies numbers, polls, and other mathematical or scientific data.[citation needed] The modes of persuasion are devices in rhetoric that classify the speakers appeal to the audience. ... Look up Pathos in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Ethos (ἦθος) (plurals: ethe, ethea) is a Greek word originally meaning the place of living that can be translated into English in different ways. ...


Logos has many advantages:

  • Data is hard to manipulate, so it is harder to argue against a logos argument.
  • Logos makes the speaker look prepared and knowledgeable to the audience, enhancing ethos.

Philo of Alexandria

Philo (20 BC - 50 AD), a Hellenized Jew, used the term logos to mean the creative principle. Philo followed the Platonic distinction between imperfect matter and perfect idea. The logos was necessary, he taught, because God cannot come into contact with matter. He sometimes identified logos as divine wisdom.


Use in Christianity

See also: Jesus Christ the Logos and John 1:1

In Christianity, the prologue of the Gospel of John calls Jesus "the Logos" (usually translated as "the Word" in English Bibles such as the KJV). Christians who profess belief in the Trinity often consider this to be a central text in their belief that Jesus is the Divine Son of God, in connection with the idea that God and Jesus are equals. Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... Shortcut: WP:NPOVD Articles that have been linked to this page are the subject of an NPOV dispute (NPOV stands for Neutral Point Of View; see below). ... Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... In Christology, the conception that Jesus Christ is the Logos (a Greek word meaning word, wisdom, or reason) has been important in establishing the doctrine of Jesus divinity, as well as that of the Trinity, as set forth in the Chalcedonian Creed. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... A prologue (Greek πρόλογος, from προ~, pro~ - fore~, and lógos, word), or rarely prolog, is a prefatory piece of writing, usually composed to introduce a drama. ... For other uses, see Gospel of John (disambiguation). ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Look up translate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... The King James or Authorized Version of the Bible is an English translation of the Christian Bible first published in 1611. ... This article is about the Christian Trinity. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Son of God is...


Other scholars[citation needed], however, disagree with this translation and the subsequent interpretation of the text. Some Translations render John 1:1 to state "and the Word was a god" rather than the more Traditional "the Word was God." This translation is seen in Bible Versions such as the NWT, as well as several German Translations. The New World Translation of the Holy Scriptures (NWT) is a modern-language translation of the Bible published by the Jehovahs Witnesses, specifically Watchtower Bible and Tract Society of New York, Inc. ...


The Latin Vulgate states, "In principio erat Verbum et Verbum erat apud Deum et Deus erat Verbum" ("In the beginning was the Word: and the Word was with God: and the Word was God.").


The literal Greek text reads: “In beginning was the word, and the word was toward the god, and god was the word.” There are no capitals, and thus the translator must supply them. It is clearly proper to capitalize “God” in translating the phrase “the god,” since this must identify the Almighty God with whom the Word, or Logos, was. However, capitalizing the second instance of the word “god” cannot be justified in the same way.[citation needed] As noted below, some translations say "the Word was God", while others say "the Word was a god". While it is true that there is no indefinite article ('a', or 'an') in the original Greek text, this is because Koine Greek had no indefinite article in the language. Thus, translators are required to use the indefinite article, or not, based on their understanding of the text. Koine redirects here. ...


There is good reason for utilizing the indefinite article in translation of this text.[citation needed] Note first that the Word was "with" God, and hence could not "be" Almighty God, although this could be describing the oftentimes unclear relationship between God the Father and Christ the Son, and their equality. Additionally, the word for "god' in it's second occurence is significantly without the definite article "the". Regarding this fact, Ernst Haenchen, in a commentary on the Gospel of John (chapters 1-6), stated: “[the·os′] and [ho the·os′] (‘god, divine’ and ‘the God’) were not the same thing in this period. . . . In fact, for the . . . Evangelist, only the Father was ‘God’ ([ho the·os′]; cf. 17:3); ‘the Son’ was subordinate to him (cf. 14:28). But that is only hinted at in this passage because here the emphasis is on the proximity of the one to the other . . . . It was quite possible in Jewish and Christian monotheism to speak of divine beings that existed alongside and under God but were not identical with him. Phil 2:6-10 proves that. In that passage Paul depicts just such a divine being, who later became man in Jesus Christ . . . Thus, in both Philippians and John 1:1 it is not a matter of a dialectical relationship between two-in-one, but of a personal union of two entities.”—John 1, translated by R. W. Funk, 1984, pp. 109, 110. This may , however, contradict the assertion in many parts of both the New and Old Testament that there is only one God. In Christianity, the concept of the Trinity is used to describe a God of three Persons. The Gospel of John can be seen to confirm that God can be a God of multiple Persons while remaining at the same time One God. For the Celtic Frost album, see Monotheist (album) In theology, monotheism (from Greek one and god) is the belief in the existence of one deity or God, or in the oneness of God. ... The Epistle to Philippians is a book included in the New Testament of the Christian Bible. ...


After giving as a translation of John 1:1c “and divine (of the category divinity) was the Word,” Haenchen goes on to state: “In this instance, the verb ‘was’ ([en]) simply expresses predication. And the predicate noun must accordingly be more carefully observed: [the·os′] is not the same thing as [ho the·os′] (‘divine’ is not the same thing as ‘God’).” Other scholars, such as Philip B. Harner elaborate on the grammatical construction found here. (Journal of Biblical Literature, 1973, pp. 85, 87)



Translation A:


1973 "the Word was God" New International Version The New International Version (NIV) is an English translation of the Christian Bible which is the most popular of the modern translations of the Bible made in the twentieth century. ...


1611 "the Word was God" King James Version (Authorized Version) This page is about the version of the Bible; for the Harvey Danger album, see King James Version (album). ...


1995 "and was truly God" Contemporary English Version The Contemporary English Version or CEV (also known as Bible for Todays Family) is a new translation of the Bible into English, published by the American Bible Society. ...


2001 "and God was the word." Wycliffe New Testament


Translation B:


1808 “and the word was a god” -- The New Testament, in An Improved Version, Upon the Basis of Archbishop William Newcome’s New Translation: With a Corrected Text, London. The Church of Ireland Archbishop of Armagh is the senior cleric of the Church of Ireland, the oldest and most wide-spread non-roman episcopal denomination in the island of Ireland. ...


1864 “and a god was the Word” -- Emphatic Diaglott (J21, interlinear reading), by Benjamin Wilson, New York and London. The Emphatic Diaglott is a translation of the New Testament by Benjamn Wilson. ...


1935 “and the Word was divine” -- The Bible—An American Translation, by J. M. Powis Smith and Edgar J. Goodspeed, Chicago. Edgar Johnson Goodspeed (b. ...


1950 “and the Word was a god” -- New World Translation of the Holy Scriptures, Brooklyn. The New World Translation of the Holy Scriptures (NWT) is a modern-language translation of the Bible published by the Jehovahs Witnesses, specifically Watchtower Bible and Tract Society of New York, Inc. ...


1975 “and a god (or, of a divine kind) was the Word” -- Das Evangelium nach Johannes, by Siegfried Schulz, Göttingen, Germany.


Some scholars of the Bible have suggested that John made creative use of double meaning in the word "Logos" to communicate to both Jews, who were familiar with the Wisdom tradition in Judaism, and Hellenic polytheism, especially followers of Philo. Each of these two groups had its own history associated with the concept of the Logos, and each could understand John's use of the term from one or both of those contexts. Especially for the Hellenists, however, John turns the concept of the Logos on its head when he claimed "the Logos became flesh and dwelt among us" (v. 14). Similarly, some translations of the Gospel of John into Chinese have used the word "Tao (道)" to translate the "Logos" in a provocative way. A scholar is either a student or someone who has achieved a mastery of some academic discipline, perhaps receiving financial support through a scholarship. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... Wisdom Tradition is a term that is sometimes given to the inner core or mystic aspects of a religious or spiritual tradition, without the trappings, doctrinal literalism, sectarianism, and power structures that are associated with institutionalised religion. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Hellenic Polytheism is an umbrella term for a wide variety of polytheistic religious movements which are ideologically related by their reverence for the ancient Greek pantheon and/or their adoption of ancient Greek religious practices. ... Philo (20 BC - 50 AD), known also as Philo of Alexandria and as Philo Judaeus And as Yedidia, was a Hellenized Jewish philosopher born in Alexandria, Egypt. ... This article is about the Chinese character and the philosophy it represents. ...


Christian apologist Justin Martyr (c 150) identified Jesus as the Logos. He portrayed Jesus not as "the Maker of all things" but as "the Angel of the Lord", subject to the Maker of all things.[2] Justin Martyr (also Justin the Martyr, Justin of Caesarea, Justin the Philosopher) (100–165) was an early Christian apologist and saint. ... Death, as a skeleton which carries a scythe, visiting a dying man. ...


Early Christians who opposed the concept of Jesus as the Logos were known as alogoi. The Alogi were a group of heretics to the Christian church in the second century. ...


John's placement of the Word at creation reflects Genesis, in which God (Elohim) speaks the world into being, beginning with the words "Let there be light." The term Logos ("word") also reflects the term dabar Yahweh" ("Word of God") in the Hebrew Bible. For other uses, see Genesis (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Hebrew word. ... Dabar (Hebrew: used in the Hebrew Bible in referece to the Divine Word. Ha-Dabar Elohim The Word of God is used in the Christian sense as refering to Christ. ...


Gordon Clark (1902 - 1985), a Calvinist theologian and expert on pre-Socratic philosophy, famously translated Logos as "Logic": "In the beginning was the Logic, and the Logic was with God and the Logic was God." He meant to imply by this translation that the laws of logic were contained in the Bible itself and were therefore not a secular principle imposed on the Christian world_view. His theology was founded on propositional truth and logic. Gordon Haddon Clark (August 31, 1902-April 9, 1985) was an American philosopher and Calvinist theologian. ... These laws of classical logic are valid in propositional logic and any boolean algebra. ... This article concerns secularity, that is, being secular, in various senses. ... A world view (or worldview) is a term calqued from the German word Weltanschauung (pronounced ) Welt is the German word for world, and Anschauung is the German word for view or outlook. It implies a concept fundamental to German philosophy and epistemology and refers to a wide world perception. ...


On April 1, 2005, Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger (who would become Pope Benedict XVI just over two weeks later) referred to the Christian religion as the religion of the Logos: is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is becoming very long. ...

Christianity must always remember that it is the religion of the "Logos." It is faith in the "Creator Spiritus," in the Creator Spirit, from which proceeds everything that exists. Today, this should be precisely its philosophical strength, in so far as the problem is whether the world comes from the irrational, and reason is not, therefore, other than a "sub-product," on occasion even harmful of its development or whether the world comes from reason, and is, as a consequence, its criterion and goal. The Christian faith inclines toward this second thesis, thus having, from the purely philosophical point of view, really good cards to play, despite the fact that many today consider only the first thesis as the only modern and rational one par excellence. However, a reason that springs from the irrational, and that is, in the final analysis, itself irrational, does not constitute a solution for our problems. Only creative reason, which in the crucified God is manifested as love, can really show us the way. In the so necessary dialogue between secularists and Catholics, we Christians must be very careful to remain faithful to this fundamental line: to live a faith that comes from the "Logos," from creative reason, and that, because of this, is also open to all that is truly rational.[3]

Catholics can use logos to refer to the moral law written in human hearts. This comes from Jeremiah 31:33 (prophecy of new covenant): "I will write my law on their hearts." St. Justin wrote that those who have not accepted Christ but follow the moral law of their hearts (logos) follow God, because it is God who has written the moral law in each person's heart. Though man may not explicitly recognize God, he has the spirit of Christ if he follows Jesus' moral laws, written in his heart. According to Fr. William Most's article for EWTN (Catholic television network), those who have the spirit of Christ belong to the body of Christ. He writes, "Those who follow the Spirit of Christ, the Logos who writes the law on their hearts, are Christians, are members of Christ, are members of His Church. They may lack indeed external adherence; they may never have heard of the Church. But yet, in the substantial sense, without formal adherence, they do belong to Christ, to His Church." EWTN - or The Eternal Word Television Network - is a television and radio operation that broadcasts Catholic religious programming, via satellite and shortwave radio. ...


Jung's analytical psychology

In Carl Jung's analytical psychology, the logos is the masculine principle of rationality and consciousness. Its female counterpart, eros (Greek, love), represents interconnectedness. “Jung” redirects here. ... Look up eros, Eros, EROS in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Similar concepts

In modern philosophy

Early 20th century movements towards specificity of operational definitions have developed an analog to logos in the concept of world view (or worldview) when used as Weltanschauung (pronounced [ˈvɛlt.anˌʃaʊ.ʊŋ]) meaning a "look onto the world." It implies a concept fundamental to German philosophy and epistemology and refers to a wide world perception. Additionally, it refers to the framework of ideas and beliefs through which an individual interprets the world and interacts in it. The German word is also in wide use in English, as well as the translated form world outlook. (Compare with ideology). Weltanschauung is the conceptualization that all ideology, beliefs and political movements is both limited and defined by this schemata of common linguistic understanding. A world view, also spelled as worldview is a term calqued from the German word Weltanschauung (look onto the world). The German word is also in wide use in English, as well as the translated form world outlook. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... The philosopher Socrates about to take poison hemlock as ordered by the court. ... It has been suggested that Meta-epistemology be merged into this article or section. ... The world is, in a philosophical sense, everything that is seen and percieved by human intellect and human senses, even though some branches of philosophy may refer to different worlds, making a reference to the different realms of philosophy (such as the mathematical world, the intelligible world, the world of... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Political Ideologies Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      An ideology is an organized collection of ideas. ...


Goethe has his Faust translate John's logos as "Will", an idea taken up by Aleister Crowley Thelema, equating a person's "Word" with their "True Will". Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (pronounced [gø tə]) (August 28, 1749–March 22, 1832) was a German writer, politician, humanist, scientist, and philosopher. ... Front cover of Faust, Leipzig 1832 Johann Wolfgang von Goethes Faust is a tragic play and the best known version of the Faust story. ... Aleister Crowley, born Edward Alexander Crowley, (12 October 1875 – 1 December 1947; the surname is pronounced // i. ... Thelema is the English transliteration of the Ancient Greek noun : will, from the verb θέλω: to will, wish, purpose. ... The phrase True Will does not appear in the Book of the Law, the central sacred text of Thelema. ...


The idea is similar to Apollinarism. Apollinarism or Apollinarianism was a view proposed by Apollinaris of Laodicea (d. ...


Logos as it is also presently understood today in Theosophical terms and by the Rosicrucians (in their conception of the cosmos) which further influenced how this word was understood later on (in 20th century psychology, for instance)[citation needed]. Theosophy, literally god-wisdom (Greek: θεοσοφία theosophia), designates several bodies of ideas. ... The Temple of the Rose Cross, Teophilus Schweighardt Constantiens, 1618. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Psychology (from Greek: ψυχή, psukhÄ“, spirit, soul; λόγος, logos, knowledge) is both an academic and applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes and behavior. ...


Contemporary references

The Logos was also the name of a a ship in the popular movie series The Matrix, piloted by Niobe. Besides this ship, many other things, such as ships and the main city, are named after philosophical or theological things. See also: Thematic motifs of the Matrix series. This article is about the 1999 film. ...


A 2004 episode of "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation" (episode #419, "Bad Words") featured a fictional, Scrabble-like board game played with round, lettered tiles. The game was called "Logos." CSI: Crime Scene Investigation is a popular Alliance Atlantis/CBS police procedural television series, running since October 2000, about a team of forensic scientists. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ...


In R. Scott Bakker's "The Prince of Nothing" trilogy the monastic sect of the Dünyain, which believes that enlightenment can be found through control of all desire and circumstance, uses the Logos as a base of law, order, logic, and judgement.


In the MMORPG Tabula Rasa, Logos refers to a mysterious power that allows players to "harness the very fabric of the cosmos to offer rebel forces an advantage against an overwhelming foe."[1] World of Warcraft. ... This article is about the upcoming computer game. ...


Anne Sexton refers to the Logos in her poem "When Man Enters Woman."


In the anime series Gundam SEED DESTINY, Logos is the name of an organization that manipulates world politics in order to profit from war. It is destroyed during the Second Bloody Valentine War. Mobile Suit Gundam SEED Destiny is the second TV series set in the Cosmic Era universe of Gundam. ... The Second Bloody Valentine War is a fictional conflict that occurs within the Gundam anime universe. ...


See also

ρημα and λόγος in the New Testament Rhema (ρημα) is the Ancient Greek word that describes the act of speaking. ... Spirituality, in a narrow sense, concerns itself with matters of the spirit. ... Nous (Νους) is a Greek word (pronounced noose), that corresponds to the English words intelligence, intellect, or mind. ... Parmenides of Elea (Greek: , early 5th century BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher born in Elea, a Hellenic city on the southern coast of Italy. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... Look up Sophia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

References

Notes

  1. ^ LSJ s. logos, lexis.
  2. ^ In the account of the Angel of the Lord who visited Gideon (Judges 6), the visitor is alternately spoken of as "the Angel of the Lord" and as "the Lord". Similarly, in {{Judges 13:13, the Angel of the Lord appears, and both Manoah and his wife exclaim: "We shall certainly die because we have seen God. Justin interpreted as Christ the angel who spoke with Abraham in Genesis 18, and argued for the divinity of Christ by saying: "(T)here is ... another God and Lord subject to the Maker of all things; who is also called an Angel, because He announces to men whatsoever the Maker of all things — above whom there is no other God — wishes to announce to them" (Dialogue with Trypho, 56). For a detailed study of the significance Justin saw in the title of "Angel" given to the Messiah in the Septuagint version of Isaiah 9:6, the then most widely known version of that text, see <ref>[http://www.forananswer.org/Top_JW/angel_juncker.pdf Günther Juncker, "Christ As Angel: The Reclamation Of A Primitive Title", ''Trinity Journal'' 15:2 (Fall 1994): 221–250.</li> <li id="_note-2">'''[[#_ref-2|^]]''' Cardinal Ratzinger on Europe's crisis of culture, retrieved from http://www.catholiceducation.org/articles/politics/pg0143.html</li></ol></ref>

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