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Encyclopedia > Locust
Nymph of Locust Schistocera americana with distinct wing-rudiments
Nymph of Locust Schistocera americana with distinct wing-rudiments
Locust nymph from the Philippines
Egyptian grasshopper Anacridium aegyptum
Egyptian grasshopper Anacridium aegyptum
Locust from the 1915 Locust Plague
Locust from the 1915 Locust Plague

Locust is the swarming phase of short-horned grasshoppers of the family Acrididae. The origins and apparent extinction of certain species of locust—some of which reached 6 inches (15 cm) in length—are unclear.[citation needed] Photograph courtesy Compton Tucker, NASA GSFC [1] This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Photograph courtesy Compton Tucker, NASA GSFC [1] This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Binomial name Schistocerca gregaria ForsskÃ¥l, 1775 Plagues of the desert locust (Schistocerca gregaria) have threatened agricultural production in Africa, the Middle East and Asia for centuries. ... Image File history File links Nymph_of_Locust_-_Project_Gutenberg_eText_16410. ... Image File history File links Nymph_of_Locust_-_Project_Gutenberg_eText_16410. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 481 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Nymph of locust. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 481 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Nymph of locust. ... Praying mantis nymphs, approximately 4mm long, clustered on a leaf In biology, a nymph is the immature form of some insect species, which undergoes incomplete metamorphosis (Hemimetabolism) before reaching its adult stage; unlike a larva, a nymphs overall form already resembles that of an adult. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 799 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2285 × 1714 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 799 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2285 × 1714 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1872x790, 396 KB)TITLE: The terrible plague of locusts in Palestine, March-June 1915. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1872x790, 396 KB)TITLE: The terrible plague of locusts in Palestine, March-June 1915. ... Locust from the 1915 plague From March to October, 1915, a plague of locusts stripped areas in and around Palestine of almost all vegetation. ... Locust can refer to: In nature: The locust, a swarming grasshopper. ... For other uses, see Grasshopper (disambiguation). ... School of juvenile herring - many fish have the opercula wide open for ram feeding and you can see the red gills The term swarm (schooling or swarming) is applied to fish, birds and insects and describes a behavior of an aggregation (school) of animals of similar size and body orientation... For other uses, see Grasshopper (disambiguation). ... Genera Subfamily: Acridinae Acrida Orthochtha Subfamily: Calliptaminae Acorypha Calliptamus Subfamily: Catantopinae Bettotania Catantops Stenocrobylus Striatosedulia Subfamily: Copiocerinae Chlorohippus Monachidium Subfamily: Coptacrinae Epistaurus Eucoptacra Subfamily: Cyrtacanthacridinae Austracris Nomadacris Schistocerca Valanga Subfamily: Egnatiinae Egnatius Leptoscirtus Subfamily: Eremogryllinae Eremogryllus Notopleura Subfamily: Euryphyminae Acrophymus Phymeurus Subfamily: Eyprepocnemidinae Eyprepocnemis Heteracris Subfamily: Gomphocerinae Chorthippus Dociostaurus Paragonista... For other uses, see Extinction (disambiguation). ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A centimetre (American spelling centimeter, symbol cm) is a unit of length that is equal to one hundredth of a metre, the current SI base unit of length. ...


These are species that can breed rapidly under suitable conditions and subsequently become gregarious and migratory. They form bands as nymphs and swarms as adults — both of which can travel great distances, rapidly stripping fields and greatly damaging crops. Praying mantis nymphs, approximately 4mm long, clustered on a leaf In biology, a nymph is the immature form of some insect species, which undergoes incomplete metamorphosis (Hemimetabolism) before reaching its adult stage; unlike a larva, a nymphs overall form already resembles that of an adult. ... Carpet beetle larvae damaging a specimen of Sceliphron destillatorius in an entomological collection A pest is an organism which has characteristics that are regarded as injurious or unwanted. ...

Contents

Locust species


Though the female and the male look alike, they can be distinguished by looking at the end of their abdomen. The male has a boat-shaped tip while the female has two serrated valves that can be either apart or kept together. These valves aid in the digging of the hole in which an egg pod is deposited. // Locusta migratoria (The migratory locust) A polymorph insect. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Binomial name Schistocerca gregaria ForsskÃ¥l, 1775 Plagues of the desert locust (Schistocerca gregaria) have threatened agricultural production in Africa, the Middle East and Asia for centuries. ...  Northern Africa (UN subregion)  geographic, including above North Africa or Northern Africa is the northernmost region of the African continent, separated by the Sahara from Sub-Saharan Africa. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Map of South Asia (see note) This article deals with the geophysical region in Asia. ... Binomial name Melanoplus spretus Walsh, 1866 The Rocky Mountain locust (Melanoplus spretus) was the major form of locust that ranged through almost the entire western half of the United States (and some western portions of Canada) until the end of the 19th century. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... For the human abdomen, see human abdomen. ...


Locusts in history and literature

In the Bible, a swarm of locusts comprised the eighth plague in the story of the plagues of Egypt. In the Book of Revelation, locusts with scorpion tails and human faces are to torment unbelievers for five months when the fifth trumpet sounds. One Old Testament book, Joel, is written in the context of a recent locust plague. Interestingly, the locusts are described in four different ways - "swarming locusts, cutting locusts, hopping locusts and destroying locusts." Although these were identified by the old Authorised Version as four different creatures, modern translations identify them as four kinds of locusts. This fits with the many molts (called instars) through which locusts go. For example, the "hopper" probably denotes the nymph stage (the first instar), the wings are not developed and the nymph hops about. For more information about the locusts in Joel, see Raymond Dillard in Minor Prophets Vol 1, ed Thomas McComiskey. This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... The book of Exodus (שמות), chapters 7:14 - 12:42, recounts the story of ten plagues (Eser Ha-Makot עשר המכות in Hebrew): 10 disasters, executed against Egypt by God, in order to convince Pharaoh to let the Hebrews go. ... Visions of John of Patmos, as depicted in the Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry. ... Superfamilies Pseudochactoidea Buthoidea Chaeriloidea Chactoidea Iuroidea Scorpionoidea See classification for families. ... This article is about modern humans. ... The trumpet is a musical instrument in the brass family. ... The Book of Joel is part of the Jewish Tanakh, and also the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. ... This page is about the version of the Bible; for the Harvey Danger album, see King James Version (album). ... Ecdysis is the molting of the cuticula in arthropods and related groups (Ecdysozoa). ... An instar is a developmental stage of arthropods, such as insects, between each molt. ...


Locusts are the only invertebrates that are considered kosher. Invertebrate is an English word that describes any animal without a spinal column. ... The circled U indicates that this can of tuna is certified kosher by the Union of Orthodox Congregations. ...


In Plato's Phaedrus, Socrates says that locusts were once human. When the Muses first brought song into the world, the beauty so captivated some people that they forgot to eat and drink until they died. The Muses turned those unfortunate souls into locusts — singing their entire lives. PLATO was one of the first generalized Computer assisted instruction systems, originally built by the University of Illinois (U of I) and later taken over by Control Data Corporation (CDC), who provided the machines it ran on. ... The Phaedrus, written by Plato, is a dialogue between Platos main protagonist, Socrates, and Phaedrus, an interlocutor in several dialogues. ... This page is about the ancient Greek philosopher. ... For other uses see Muse (disambiguation). ...


In her novel On the Banks of Plum Creek, Laura Ingalls Wilder writes of a "glittering cloud" of locusts so large it blocked out the sun as it approached. The swarm descended upon her family's farm near Walnut Grove, Minnesota, destroying a year's wheat crop, and stripping the prairie bare of all vegetation. Laura Ingalls Wilder (February 7, 1867 – February 10, 1957) was an American author. ... Walnut Grove is a city located in Redwood County, Minnesota. ...


Locusts as experimental model

Locusts are used as models in many fields of biology especially in the field of olfactory, visual and locomotor neurophysiology. It is one of the organisms for which scientists have obtained detailed data on information processing in the olfactory pathway of organisms. It is suitable for the above purposes because of the robustness of the preparation for electrophysiological experiments and ease of growing them. Olfaction, the sense of smell, is the detection of chemicals dissolved in air (or, by animals that breathe water, in water). ... Vision can refer to: Visual perception is one of the senses. ... In a general sense, locomotion simply means active movement or travel, applying not just to biological individuals. ...


Swarming behaviour and extinctions

Research at Cambridge University has identified the swarming behaviour as a response to overcrowding. The trigger is increased tactile stimulation of the hind legs. Several contacts per minute over a four hour period are sufficient to induce transformation to the swarming variety.[1] It is estimated that the largest swarms have covered hundreds of square miles and consisted of many millions of locusts. The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world, with one of the most selective sets of entry requirements in the United Kingdom. ...


The extinction of the Rocky Mountain locust has been a source of puzzlement. Recent research suggests that the breeding grounds of this insect, in the valleys of the Rocky Mountains, came under sustained agriculture, destroying the underground eggs of the locust.[2] The farming of those valleys was a response to the large influx of gold miners.[citation needed] Binomial name Melanoplus spretus Walsh, 1866 The Rocky Mountain locust (Melanoplus spretus) was the major form of locust that ranged through almost the entire western half of the United States (and some western portions of Canada) until the end of the 19th century. ... Gold mining consists of the processes and techniques employed in the removal of gold from the ground. ...


Related uses of the word "locust"

The words "lobster" and "locust" are both derived from the Vulgar Latin locusta, which was originally used to refer to various types of crustaceans and insects.[3] Spanish has mostly preserved the original Latin usage, since the cognate term langosta can be used to refer both to a variety of lobster-like crustaceans and to the swarming grasshopper, while semantic confusion is avoided by employing qualifiers such as de tierra (of the land) when referring to grasshoppers, de mar and de rio (of the sea/of the river) when referring to lobsters and crayfish respectively.[4] [5] In Mexican Spanish, this confusion does not arise since the Nahuatl derived word chapulín is used instead. French presents an inverse case, during the 16th century the word sauterelle (literally "little hopper") could mean either grasshopper or lobster (sauterelle de mer).[6] [7] In contemporary French usage langouste is used almost exclusively to refer to the crustacean (two insect exceptions being the langouste de désert and the langouste de Provence).[8] [9] In certain regional varieties of English "locust" can refer to the large swarming grasshopper, the cicada (which may also swarm), and rarely to the praying mantis ("praying locust").[10] Subfamilies and Genera Neophoberinae Acanthacaris Thymopinae Nephropsis Nephropides Thymops Thymopsis Nephropinae Homarus Nephrops Homarinus Metanephrops Eunephrops Thymopides Clawed lobsters comprise a family (Nephropidae, sometimes also Homaridae) of large marine crustaceans. ... Vulgar Latin, as in this political graffito at Pompeii, was the speech of ordinary people of the Roman Empire — different from the classical Latin used by the Roman elite. ... For the Dutch band, see Crustacean (band). ... Orders Subclass Apterygota Archaeognatha (bristletails) Thysanura (silverfish) Subclass Pterygota Infraclass Paleoptera (Probably paraphyletic) Ephemeroptera (mayflies) Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) Infraclass Neoptera Superorder Exopterygota Grylloblattodea (ice-crawlers) Mantophasmatodea (gladiators) Plecoptera (stoneflies) Embioptera (webspinners) Zoraptera (angel insects) Dermaptera (earwigs) Orthoptera (grasshoppers, etc) Phasmatodea (stick insects) Blattodea (cockroaches) Isoptera (termites) Mantodea (mantids) Psocoptera... Look up cognate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The word modifier applies to either the adjective or the adverb in a sentence. ... Families Astacoidea   Astacidae   Cambaridae Parastacoidea   Parastacidae Crayfish, often referred to as crawfish or crawdad, are freshwater crustaceans resembling small lobsters, to which they are closely related. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Nahuatl is a native language of central Mexico. ... Genera Jasus Linuparus Palinurus Panulirus Spiny lobsters, also known as rock lobsters are a family (Palinuridae) of about 45 species of achelate crustaceans, in the Decapoda Reptantia. ... Coat of arms of Provence Provence (Provençal Occitan: Provença in classical norm or Prouvènço in Mistralian norm) was a Roman province and now is a region of southeastern France on the Mediterranean Sea adjacent to Italy. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A praying mantis, or praying mantid, is the common name for an insect of the order Mantodea. ...


The use of "locust" in English as a synonym for "lobster" has no grounding in anglophone tradition, and most modern instances of its use are usually calques of foreign expressions (e.g. "sea locust" as mistranslation of langouste de mer).[11] There are, however, various species of crustaceans whose regional names include the word "locust." Thenus orientalis, for example, is sometimes referred to as the Flathead locust lobster (its French name, Cigale raquette, literally "raquet cicada," is yet another instance of the locust-cicada-lobster nomenclatural connection).[12] Similarly, certain types of amphibians and birds are sometimes called "false locusts" in imitation of the Greek pseud(o)acris, a scientific name sometimes given to a species because of its perceived cricket-like chirping.[13] Often the linguistic non-differentiation of animals that not only are regarded by science as different species, but that often exist in radically different environments is the result of culturally perceived similarities between organisms, as well as of abstract associations formed within a particular group's mythology and folklore (see Cicada mythology). On a linguistic level, these cases also exemplify an extensively documented tendency, in many languages, towards conservatism and economy in neologization, with some languages historically only allowing for the expansion of meaning within already existing word-forms.[14] Also of note is the fact that all three so-called locusts (the grasshopper, the cicada, and the lobster) have been a traditional source of food for various peoples around the world (see entomophagy). Synonyms (in ancient Greek, συν (syn) = plus and όνομα (onoma) = name) are different words with similar or identical meanings. ... Look up Anglophone in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In linguistics, a calque (pronounced [kælk]) or loan translation (itself a calque of German Lehnübersetzung) is a phrase borrowed from another language by literal word-for-word translation. ... In science, a common name is any name by which a species or other concept is known that is not the official scientific name. ... ]];| Moreton Bay bug Caption1 Caption2 ♥! header 1 ! header 2 ! header 3 ]]; ]]; | Scientific classification Caption1 Caption2 ♥! header 1 ! header 2 ! header 3 ]] ]] ]] ]] ]] ]] ]]; The Moreton Bay bug (Thenus orientalis), also known as the Bay lobster, is a species of slipper lobster found throughout the waters of Australias north coast. ... Categories: Sports stubs ... Nomenclature refers to a method of assigning (unique) names. ... For other uses, see Amphibian (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Species (disambiguation). ... Subfamilies See Taxonomy section Crickets, family Gryllidae (also known as true crickets), are insects somewhat related to grasshoppers and more closely related to katydids or bush crickets (family Tettigoniidae). ... Broadly conceived, linguistics is the study of human language, and a linguist is someone who engages in this study. ... abstraction in general. ... The word mythology (from the Greek μυολογία mythología, from mythologein to relate myths, from mythos, meaning a narrative, and logos, meaning speech or argument) literally means the (oral) retelling of myths – stories that a particular culture believes to be true and that use the supernatural to interpret natural events and... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... A neologism (Greek νεολογισμός [neologismos], from νέος [neos] new + λόγος [logos] word, speech, discourse + suffix -ισμός [-ismos] -ism) is a word, term, or phrase which has been recently created (coined) — often to apply to new concepts, to synthesize pre-existing concepts, or to make older terminology sound more contemporary. ... Definition A lexeme is an abstract unit of morphological analysis in linguistics, that roughly corresponds to a set of words that are the same in basic meaning. ... Entomophagy is the habit of eating insects as food. ...


The word "locust" has, at times, been employed controversially in English translations of Ancient Greek and Latin natural histories, as well as of Hebrew and Greek Bibles; such ambiguous renderings prompted the 17th century polymath Thomas Browne to include in the Fifth Book of his Pseudodoxia Epidemica an essay entitled Of the Picture of a Grashopper, it begins: Note: This article contains special characters. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Table of natural history, 1728 Cyclopaedia Natural history is an umbrella term for what are now often viewed as several distinct scientific disciplines of integrative organismal biology. ... 11th century manuscript of the Hebrew Bible with Targum Hebrew Bible is a term that refers to the common portions of the Jewish canon and the Christian canons. ... The Septuagint (LXX) is the name commonly given to the Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) made in the first centuries BC. The Septuagint bible includes additional books beyond those used in todays Jewish Tanakh. ... “Renaissance man” redirects here. ... Sir Thomas Browne (October 19, 1605 – October 19, 1682) was an English author of varied works that disclose his wide learning in diverse fields including medicine, religion, science and the esoteric. ... Sir Thomas Brownes vast work refuting the common errors and superstitions of his age, Pseudodoxia Epidemica, first appeared in 1646 and went through five editions, the last revision occurring in 1672. ...

THERE is also among us a common description and picture of a Grashopper, as may be observed in the pictures of Emblematists, in the coats of severals families, and as the word Cicada is usually translated in Dictionaries. Wherein to speak strictly, if by this word Grashopper, we understand that animal which is implied by τέτιξ (tettix) with the Greeks, and by Cicada with the Latines; we may with safety affirm the picture is widely mistaken, and that for ought enquiry can inform, there is no such insect in England.[15]

Browne revisited the controversy in his Miscellany Tracts (1684), wherein he takes pains (even citing Aristotle's Animalia) to both indicate the relationship of locusts to grasshoppers and to affirm their like disparateness from cicadas: A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The Latins were an ancient Italic people who migrated to central Italy, (Latium Vetus - Old Latium), in the 2nd millennium B.C., maybe from the Adriatic East Coast and Balkanic Area, perhaps from pressures by Illyrian peoples. ... Aristotle (Greek: Aristotélēs) (384 BC – 322 BC) was a Greek philosopher, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. ...

That which we commonly call a Grashopper, and the French Saulterelle being one kind of Locust, so rendered in the plague of Ægypt, and in old Saxon named Gersthop.[16]

Compound-words involving "locust" have also been used by anglophone translators as calques of archaic Arabic, Greek, Hebrew, or other language names for animals; the resulting formations have, just as in the case of the Brownian grasshopper/cicada controversy, been, at times, a cause of lexical ambiguity and false polysemy in English. An instance of this appears in a translation of Pliny included in J.W. McCrindle's book Ancient India as Described in Classical Literature, where an Indian gem is said by the Roman historian to have a "surface [that] is even redder than the shells of the sea-locust."[17] The Plagues of Egypt (Hebrew: ), the Biblical Plagues or the Ten Plagues (Hebrew: ) are the ten calamities inflicted upon Egypt by God in the Biblical story recounted the book of Exodus, chapters 7 - 12, in order to convince Pharaoh[1] to let the Israelite slaves leave. ... Old Saxon, also known as Old Low German, is a Germanic language. ... In linguistics, a compound is a lexeme (a word) that consists of more than one other lexeme. ... In language, an archaism is the deliberate use of an older form that has fallen out of current use. ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... A lexicon is a list of words together with additional word-specific information, i. ... Look up ambiguity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Polysemy (from the Greek πολυσημεία = multiple meaning) is the capacity for a sign to have multiple meanings. ... There are two famous persons named Pliny: Pliny the Elder, a Roman nobleman, scientist and historian who died in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD The great-nephew of the former, Pliny the Younger, a statesman, orator, and writer who lived between 62 AD and 113 AD. This... Digital Library of India, part of the online services of the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore and partner in the Million Book Project, provides free access to many books in English and Indian languages. ... For other uses, see Gemstone (disambiguation). ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Locusts

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... This is a list of locust species. ... Locust from the 1915 plague From March to October, 1915, a plague of locusts stripped areas in and around Palestine of almost all vegetation. ... The 2004 Locust Outbreak was the largest infestation of desert locust in West and North Africa in more than 15 years and affected a number of countries in the fertile northern regions of Africa. ...

External links

  • More detailed information on locusts can be found at the pages of the Australian Plague Locust Commission
  • Desert Locust Meteorological Monitoring at Sahel Resources
  • Locust Video
  • USAID Supplemental Environmental Assessment of the Ertirean Locust Control Program [1]

References

  1. ^ Mechanosensory-induced behavioural gregarization in the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria
  2. ^ Ryckman, Lisa Levitt (1999-06-22). The Great Locust Mystery. Rocky Mountain News. Retrieved on 2007-05-20.
  3. ^ Lobster Derivatives
  4. ^ DICCIONARIO DE LA LENGUA ESPAÑOLA
  5. ^ Translations for: Crayfish
  6. ^ Histoire entière des poissons
  7. ^ sauterelle de mer
  8. ^ Diseases and pests of animals and plants
  9. ^ La Saga des Magiciennes dentelées
  10. ^ Of the erectness of man
  11. ^ Marseille Dining
  12. ^ Flathead locust lobster
  13. ^ Pseudoacris crucifer
  14. ^ Language: An Introduction to the Study of Speech
  15. ^ Of the Picture of a Grashopper
  16. ^ An Answer to Certain Queries Relating to Fishes, Birds, and Insects
  17. ^ Pliny: Indian Minerals and Precious Stones

  Results from FactBites:
 
Welcome to Historic Locust Grove in Louisville, Kentucky. Learn about early Kentucky History and Life (1201 words)
Locust Grove is a National Historic Landmark on 55 acres of the original 694 acre farm established by William and Lucy Clark Croghan in 1790.
Locust Grove also hosted three U.S. Presidents, Monroe, Jackson and Taylor, and was a stopping point for famed explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark upon their return from their expedition to the Pacific.
Locust Grove and Slow Food Bluegrass are teaming up to create a fun, family picnic day that will involve local farmers, chefs and artisans.
PCA Alien Plant Working Group - Black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) (919 words)
Leaves of fl locust alternate along stems and are composed of seven to twenty one smaller leaf segments called leaflets.
Black locust has been planted in many temperate climates and is naturalized throughout the United States, within and outside of its historical range, and in some parts of Europe.
Due to its rapid growth, fl locust has been promoted by state and federal agencies and nurseries, and is sometimes planted in or near prairies, oak savannas and native woodland edges.
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