FACTOID # 3: South Carolina has the highest rate of violent crimes and aggravated assaults per capita among US states.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Local churches
Christianity in China portal

The local churches (one-city, one-church) (Chinese: 地方教會) is a Christian movement based on the Bible as interpreted by the teachings of Watchman Nee and Witness Lee, and associated with the Living Stream Ministry publishing house. Its members see themselves as part of God's move to recover lost truths and experiences and practices from the Bible -- part of what they sometimes call "the Lord's recovery". One of the defining features of the local churches is their adherence to their interpretation of biblical principle that all of the Christians in a city or locality are in a local church and hence a collection of local churches is what the movement consists of. To follow proper governmental procedures, many of the churches do incorporate a corporate entity and refer to themselves only as "The Church in -insert-locality-" (eg. The Church in Corinth, The Church in Ephesus, and likewise).[11] Watchman Nee (倪柝聲 pinyin: Ní TuòshÄ“ng;, 1903–1972) was a Chinese Christian author and church leader during the 20th Century. ... Witness Lee (李常受 Pinyin: Lǐ Chángshòu) (1905-June 9, 1997) was a Chinese Christian preacher and church leader associated with the Local churches movement and Living Stream Ministry. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Watchman Nee (倪柝聲 pinyin: Ní TuòshÄ“ng;, 1903–1972) was a Chinese Christian author and church leader during the 20th Century. ... Witness Lee (李常受 Pinyin: Lǐ Chángshòu) (1905-June 9, 1997) was a Chinese Christian preacher and church leader associated with the Local churches movement and Living Stream Ministry. ... Living Stream Ministry (LSM), founded in 1968, is a non-profit publisher of the works of Watchman Nee and Witness Lee, and is a member of the Evangelical Christian Publishers Association (since 2002) and the Christian Booksellers Association (since 1981). ... Corinth, or Korinth (Greek: Κόρινθος, Kórinthos; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a Greek city-state, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece. ... For the town in the southern United States, see Ephesus, Georgia. ...


The movement began in China soon after Watchman Nee (倪柝聲) became a Christian in 1920. Between 1920 and 1952 Watchman Nee worked with many others to found numerous local churches throughout mainland China. Watchman Nee was imprisoned by the Communist government of China in 1952 for being a "revolutionary" simply for preaching the gospel of Jesus Christ. He was not tried for his "crimes" until 3 years after his imprisonment. Before his imprisonment, Watchman Nee asked Witness Lee to go to Taiwan in 1948 in the event that the Communists imprisoned him. In 1962 Witness Lee moved to California to carry on his ministry in the United States. From that time until the present the local churches have continued to grow and spread throughout the world, especially in the United States, the far East, Europe, Russia, South America, Africa and now the Middle East.[12] Watchman Nee (倪柝聲 pinyin: Ní TuòshÄ“ng;, 1903–1972) was a Chinese Christian author and church leader during the 20th Century. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Witness Lee (李常受 Pinyin: Lǐ Chángshòu) (1905-June 9, 1997) was a Chinese Christian preacher and church leader associated with the Local churches movement and Living Stream Ministry. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Christianity portal

Affiliated with the movement is a publishing house called Living Stream Ministry (LSM)[13], which translated and publishes a version of the BibleThe Recovery Version, as well as many other books and study guides used by members of the local churches[14]; and Bibles for America, a non-profit organization devoted to distributing the Recovery Version of the Bible in the United States.[15] Image File history File links Portal. ... Living Stream Ministry (LSM), founded in 1968, is a non-profit publisher of the works of Watchman Nee and Witness Lee, and is a member of the Evangelical Christian Publishers Association (since 2002) and the Christian Booksellers Association (since 1981). ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... The Recovery Version The Recovery Version is a study Bible and English language translation of the Bible published by Living Stream Ministry. ... Bibles for America is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the spread and understanding of the Bible. ...

Contents

The name "local churches"

The term local churches was originally used by Watchman Nee to describe Christian churches that form based upon the teaching of the ground of locality;[1] however, its use to refer to any individual Christian congregation in a city has become more popular in recent years. The present day practice of Christians meeting as the local church began when Brother Hammond yelled "Raise the Door" 1903-1972 in Foochow (福州), China c. 1922; and after the Communist takeover of China in 1949 was propagated outside of China by Nee's co-worker Witness Lee (李常受, 1905-1997). The local churches have deliberately avoided incorporation into a single entity, based on their belief that the Christian Church is not an organization, but rather a living spiritual organism. However, as is likely the case when any group refuses or fails to name itself, the local churches have come to be labeled by outsiders as The Local Church, or the The Little Flock ("小群"教會). The original "Little Flock" designation stems from a hymnal used by many of the local churches in China titled "Hymns for the Little Flock." "Little Flock Movement" is still used today to designate underground congregations in present-day communist China that meet in homes apart from and outside of the state-authorized "Church" (三自教會).[citation needed] Watchman Nee (倪柝聲 pinyin: Ní TuòshÄ“ng;, 1903–1972) was a Chinese Christian author and church leader during the 20th Century. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Year 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fuzhou (Chinese: 福州; pinyin: Fúzhōu; Wade-Giles: Fu-chou; also seen as Foochow or Fuchow) is a city on the coast of China, the largest city in and capital of Fujian province. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Communist Party of China (CPC) (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), also known as the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), is the ruling political party of the Peoples Republic of China and also the worlds largest political party. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Witness Lee (李常受 Pinyin: Lǐ Chángshòu) (1905-June 9, 1997) was a Chinese Christian preacher and church leader associated with the Local churches movement and Living Stream Ministry. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ...


While the local churches are popularly called "The Local Church" by outsiders, the churches repudiate this and any name or label used to designate them, as taking a name would cause them to practice "denominationalism", which the movement is opposed to. The Christian members who meet as the local churches often believe that to "denominate" themselves by taking a name is tantamount to denying the name of Christ. Members believe and teach that the local churches include all of the Christian believers who live within the boundaries of their respective cities and, that all genuine Christian believers in their city comprise the local church in that city.[2]


Members of the local churches rarely use the term The Local Church (singular and capitalized) to refer to themselves, and many strongly disavow its use, as it suggests the idea of a denomination or organization whose name is "The Local Church". Outsiders, on the other hand, find it difficult to refer to a group who have no official name and have given the local churches the moniker "The Local Church" for convenience and consistency of reference. Individual local churches are referred to by the name of their respective cities (e.g. "the church in San Francisco", "the church in Taipei" (台北市召會)). Those in the local churches insist that these are not official names, but refers to the New Testament model, pattern and practice of one church in one city (e.g. "the church in Jerusalem", "the church in Antioch"). Some churches have multiple assemblies in a single city, but while they may refer to different assemblies commonly as the church in (city name), each individual assembly location is referred to by their meeting hall (e.g. Hall 1 or Hall 2).


Chinese language lacks capitalization and plural form while Chinese terms of Christianity were all translated from other languages. It is, technically, more difficult for Chinese-speakers to refer to their churches. In the beginning the standard Mandarin term "church" (教會) was used. But in recent years, the original Greek term "ekklesia" (召會) which is a new Chinese word coined by themselves is being adopted. To strangers, many would just call their church buildings "Meeting Halls" (聚會所) or "Assembly Halls". Many members of the local churches do, however, refer to their movement as: the Lord's recovery (主的恢復) which they believe refers to God's move in time which produced the present practice of the local churches; the church life which refers to the corporate experience of enjoying Christ as the believers' life and living; the Church which refers only to "the one true Church", but often also to their particular practice of the local church as is revealed in the New Testament, specifically in Acts and the Epistles; and the local churches (plural) which is a description of how they see themselves in terms of "what" they are, not "who" they are.[3] 中文語法/中文语法 Zhōngwén yÇ”fÇŽ (Chinese grammar) Some web browsers may not be able to view this correctly; you may see transcriptions in parentheses after the character, like this: () instead of on top of the character as intended. ... Capitalization (or capitalisation) is writing a word with its first letter as a majuscule (upper case letter) and the remaining letters in minuscules (lower case letters), in those writing systems which have a case distinction. ... Look up plural in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Topics in Christianity Preaching Prayer Ecumenism Relation to other religions Movements Music Liturgy Calendar Symbols Art Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... This article is on all of the Northern Chinese dialects. ... Ecclesia can refer to: Ecclesia (sociology of religion) Ecclesia (ancient Athens) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ...


Meeting life

Men and women of all ages meet with the local churches, representing a broad range of social, ethnic, and economic groups.[4][5] Some devote a number of years or retire from their jobs to "serve the Lord" full-time. If not self-supported, some of these "full-timers" (全時間) are supported by free-will offerings, whereas others are selectively supported through financial accounts associated with Living Stream Ministry. The purpose of such "full-time" service is to devote their time to studying the Bible and caring for others spiritually, both believers and unbelievers. Young people who have obtained a four-year university degree are encouraged to devote themselves to the Lord by attending a two-year full-time training[6] [7] [8], and to continue full-time service after graduation. Living Stream Ministry (LSM), founded in 1968, is a non-profit publisher of the works of Watchman Nee and Witness Lee, and is a member of the Evangelical Christian Publishers Association (since 2002) and the Christian Booksellers Association (since 1981). ...


Lord's Table Meeting (Sunday Service)

The "Lord's Table meeting or Lord's Day meeting"[9] is usually held in the home of the elder or in some larger gathering place (either owned or rented).[10] The Lord's Table meeting is one where the bread and wine is broken and shared and the church is more than four or five believers.[11] The number of people in each meeting can be as few as two families or as many as will comfortably fit in the meeting area of the house. This varies depending on the number of local members; and the location.[12] The church often consists of several individuals and families.


The order of the meeting is usually as follows:[13] [14][15][16][17][18]

  • the church members call upon the Lord's name audibly and exercise their spirits by praying, calling, and praising the Lord.
  • the church sings two to three hymns of praises and worship.
  • prayer: in turn, all professing members make a short, spontaneous, audible prayer.
  • more hymns are sung and prayers are short.
  • communion: two or three members makes a short prayer before the breaking of the bread; one or a few members pass the bread around to all the members, and all baptized members partake. The cup is shared in the same manner.
  • the member puts back the bread and cup on the table and covers it with a white cloth.
  • a final hymn is sung, usually with the theme of Christ's death, resurrection, coming again, and the Lord's Table.
  • the members sing more hymns of praise to the Father.
  • prophesying: most members in turn prophesy (1 Cor. 14:24) to the Lord and each other and share their enjoyment of the Christ and living God in the last week or in general.[19]
  • the meeting may end with a hymn, or a hymn and prayers. The meeting is dismissed.

New members generally join a church or meeting nearest them, or one at which they know one or more members. The makeup of the fellowship meeting congregation is ordinarily formed on the basis of geographic proximity, although demographic mix is balanced as far as is reasonably attainable. Meetings which have grown too large (in terms of members) or where the believers have exceeded the hall capacity, may be split into two halls; namely (Hall#1); (Hall#2).


Bible study meeting

Each local church holds Bible study meetings once or twice each week[20]. These also take place in private homes and may be led by two or more elder brothers. The topic of study may be a Biblical passage, book, or subject. Some time pray-reading[21] is done on few selected verses. The topic (or "subject") may be taken from a scheduled list, pre-agreed in a previous meeting, or decided on as the Spirit leads. Hymns are sung. In turn, each member shares his or her portion of Christ including their enjoyment, learning of Biblical truths, and practical experience regarding the subject. Preparing for a meeting is usually done by praying, lingering with Christ and in the Word, and calling upon the Lord's name[22] by each member. The purpose of these meetings are just to exercise each member's human spirit and to live a life in the Holy Spirit.[23]


Gospel meeting

Individuals in the community are invited to attend gospel meetings at the meeting halls by the members or 'Believers'. Sometimes printed invitations are handed out on doorsteps or friends may go 'door-to-door' inviting people to attend meetings. Meetings are usually held for one to two hours and are in a rented public hall or school or a private home of one of the church members. Three or four or more believers stand up in the gospel meeting to share their testimonies. All the church members are encouraged to join the gospel meetings.[24]


The order of these services is usually as follows:[25]

  • one or two hymns are sung, often accompanied by piano or guitar.
  • prayer and testimonies.
  • more hymns are sung.
  • the speaker (usually an elder) preaches the gospel to the congregation.
  • another hymn is sung.
  • invitations for the baptism is given.
  • another hymn is sung; people start sharing with each other and with the invited attendee regarding the baptisms, and ask if they feel that they are ready to "walk with the Lord" and become a believer and be baptized.
  • words of dismissal, thanking the audience for attending and inviting them to come again.
  • those (children over twelve or thirteen) who wish to be baptized are baptized.
  • dinner or meal is sometimes provided with members bringing a "pot-luck" style dinner.

In places where the church is not well-established, workers may conduct two or more gospel meetings a week in the same public building for an extended period of months. Most of the gospel meetings are arranged near universities, college campuses, and in urban and rural areas.[26]


Baptism

Often, a baptism is held after the 'Lord's Table Meeting' (Sunday service) or gospel meetings . Baptism place depends upon the locality and availability of lakes, rivers, bath-tubs, or baptism pool. A prayer is offered on behalf of the baptismal candidates by many of the church members, and a hymn is sung. Candidates are fully immersed.[27]


The role of women in the church

Women are accepted both in the church ministry and also to full participation in church worship. Female members take part in prophesying, prayers, testimonies, singing, and communion. Female members do not lead meetings when a male member is present who is qualified for the same role. Also, female members do not teach over the congregation with authority.[28] In the Recovery Version, the translation generally used by the believers in the local churches, one footnote for 1 Corinthians 14:34 reads:[29] The Recovery Version The Recovery Version is a study Bible and English language translation of the Bible published by Living Stream Ministry. ...

"According to 1 Corinthians 11:5, women may prophesy (both in public and meetings), that is, (mainly) speak for the Lord and speak forth the Lord with their head covered, and Acts 2:17, 18 and 21:9 confirm that women did prophesy. However, they must do this under the covering of the brothers, because they are charged here to be subject. But 1 Tim 2:12 says that women are not permitted to teach, that is, teach as authorities (there, teaching is related to the exercising of authority), so as to define doctrine. Hence, according to the New Testament principle, for women not to be permitted to speak in the church meetings means that women are not permitted to teach with authority in relation to the defining of doctrine."

Church Polity

Ecclesiastical polity generally follows in the line of presbytery with key differences in the appointment of elders and their relationships among congregations. The appointment of an Elder is considered to be for life but can be renounced through formal letter of resignation.[citation needed] Emigration of an elder to another locality is not viewed as automatic appointment to the eldership in the new locality. Teaching that only apostles appoint an elder is strongly emphasized by the group, based upon their interpreted beliefs of teachings of the Apostle Paul in the first century [30]. Acceptance of an appointment therefore is based upon the acknowledgement of apostolic authority in the group in conjunction with the consensus of other delegated authorities (workers and elders) in the local churches. However, this practice has been abused by not considering an appointment in coordination with other recognized delegated authorities resulting in some local churches that have government based upon affinity, affiliation or loyalty to an individual worker who is over their respective region of activity.[citation needed] Ecclesiastical polity is the operational and governance structure of a church or Christian denomination. ... A 19th century picture of Paul of Tarsus Paul of Tarsus (originally Saul of Tarsus) or Saint Paul the Apostle (fl. ...


Semi-annual international trainings for “Elders and Responsible Ones” are hosted by The Living Stream Ministry. The objective of these trainings are to facilitate the practical communion between Local Church workers and elders as well as to provide specific ministry considered to be vital to the advancement of the spiritual life of the individuals participating as well as their respective congregations. Participation is not required for all church elders and workers, but it is viewed as a critical factor in preserving the oneness among the local churches.[citation needed] Individual church government is therefore viewed and taught as not being autonomous, but that administration is only local and the exercise of delegated authority cannot violate the oneness of the Body of Christ universally or locally (e.g. exercising discipline under the pretext of “discernment” which is actually divisive in character). All local churches are therefore obligated to be in fellowship and practical oneness with each other. Serious matters involving elders’ exercise of church discipline are exhorted to be in fellowship with delegated authority outside the locality and/or region for proper submission to the authority of Christ.[citation needed] The Body of Christ is a term used by Christians to describe believers in Christ. ...


As the congregations strongly adhere to the expositions of Watchman Nee and Witness Lee, details of Local Church ecclesiastical polity can be found in writings such as Further Talks on the Church Life, The Normal Christian Church Life, Authority and Submission among others written by Watchman Nee. Witness Lee has published a number of spoken messages concerning the function and responsibility of elders and co-workers as well as initiating and conducting the “Elders and Responsible Ones Training”.[citation needed] All church members are considered to have some measure of ministry based upon spiritual maturity and gift. This passes to the "eldership" as well, as no single elder is designated the “teaching elder”, a difference from the traditional definition of Presbyterian Polity.[citation needed] Watchman Nee (倪柝聲 pinyin: Ní TuòshÄ“ng;, 1903–1972) was a Chinese Christian author and church leader during the 20th Century. ... Witness Lee (李常受 Pinyin: Lǐ Chángshòu) (1905-June 9, 1997) was a Chinese Christian preacher and church leader associated with the Local churches movement and Living Stream Ministry. ... Ecclesiastical polity is the operational and governance structure of a church or Christian denomination. ... For other uses, see Polity (disambiguation). ...


The beliefs, practices and worship of the group follow strongly in the puritan form, and in their relatively short history have experienced many of the turbulences (positive and negative) that have passed through Puritanism since the Protestant reformation. In studying the history of different movements in church history[31], the group has been influenced mostly from the practice and government of the Plymouth Brethren in style and expression.[citation needed] For the record label, see Puritan Records. ... The Brethren are a Christian Evangelical movement that began in Dublin, London, Plymouth, and the continent of Europe in the late 1820s. ...


Hymnal

The local churches have their own Hymnal published by the Living Stream Ministry.[32] The current collection of Hymns (1980) includes about 1348 hymns. It included 300 new hymns which were written by members of the group. The other were selected from more than 11,000 existing hymns in various Hymnals.[33] The first Chinese Hymnal printed exclusively by and for the church began when Watchman Nee released a first edition in mainland China, published by The Stream. In year 1932 Witness Lee came under Nee's ministry and there was a Hymnal of 183 hymns. Watchman Nee translated the majority of those hymns (from English), and he and others wrote several new hymns.[34] Living Stream Ministry (LSM), founded in 1968, is a non-profit publisher of the works of Watchman Nee and Witness Lee, and is a member of the Evangelical Christian Publishers Association (since 2002) and the Christian Booksellers Association (since 1981). ... Living Stream Ministry (LSM), founded in 1968, is a non-profit publisher of the works of Watchman Nee and Witness Lee, and is a member of the Evangelical Christian Publishers Association (since 2002) and the Christian Booksellers Association (since 1981). ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In the early 1940s when the gospel work in northern China was advancing, Witness Lee began to collect gospel hymns such as “Rock of Ages” (#1058), “Jesus, lover of my soul” (#1057), and “In tenderness He sought me” (#1068). Lee also compiled an another short hymnal with shorter songs for the young people. In 1961, Lee spent two months to write eighty-five new hymns on Christ, the Spirit, life, and the church. A number of these are in the present English translation of Hymns. Hymn (#499) -“Oh, what a life! Oh, what a peace!”; (#501) -“O glorious Christ, Savior mine”; and (#608) -“What mystery, the Father, Son, and Spirit” were written in 1961 in Taipei and translated into English in 1964 in Los Angeles. Witness Lee came to the United States in 1962. As he traveled throughout the United States from 1962 to 1964, he reviewed a number of existing hymnals to find hymns most suitable for the church meetings. From 1963 to 1964, Witness Lee wrote about 200 new hymns. A number of these are also included in the current edition of Hymns. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the city. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ...


Practices

Children usually have "Children's Meetings" where they will leave their parents after the hymns are sung in the main meeting hall and join their age groups in smaller rooms. Women usually teach these classes. The larger meeting halls might have trips to Bible Camps in the summer. Children generally are raised together and see each other frequently.


Weddings are performed by the senior elder and are usually held at the meeting hall. It is held similar to a Sunday service. Hymns are sung.


Controversy

// The term local church is typically used in Evangelical circles to refer to assemblies of Christian believers organized near each other at the local level. ...

References

  1. ^ Nee, Watchman: The Normal Christian Church Life, pg. 74
  2. ^ Nee, Watchman: The Normal Christian Church Life, pg. 86, 89
  3. ^ Nee, Watchman: What Are We, booklet pg. 1, 8-9.
  4. ^ Nee, Watchman: The Assembly Life, chapter 2 (the practise of fellowship)
  5. ^ Lee, Witness: Having Proper Christian Meetings for the Accomplishment of God's Eternal Purpose, chp. 4
  6. ^ Full-Time Training Anaheim, [1]
  7. ^ Full-Time Training London, [2]
  8. ^ Full-Time Training Malaysia, [3]
  9. ^ Nee, Watchman: The Normal Christian Church Life (pages 163-188)
  10. ^ Nee, Watchman: Church Affairs (pages 61-83)
  11. ^ Lee, Witness: Life Study of 1 Corinthians, msg. 49
  12. ^ Nee, Watchman: The Assembly Life, chp 2 (How to meet)
  13. ^ Lee, Witness: The Way to Practice the Lord's Present Recovery, chp 2
  14. ^ Nee, Watchman: Church Affairs, chp. 5
  15. ^ Nee, Watchman: Further Talks on the Church Life, chp 2 and 5
  16. ^ Lee, Witness: How to Meet chp. 1-16
  17. ^ Lee, Witness: Guidelines for the Lord's Table Meeting, chp 4-8
  18. ^ Lee, Witness: Life Study of 1 Corinthians, msg. 50 (The Lord's Table)
  19. ^ Lee, Witness: The Practice of Prophesying, chp. 3
  20. ^ Nee, Watchman: Church Affairs, Chp. 5 (The Different Kinds of Meetings)
  21. ^ Lee, Witness: Pray-Reading the Word
  22. ^ Lee, Witness: Calling on the Name of the Lord
  23. ^ Lee, Witness: The Home Meetings, chp. 3
  24. ^ Lee, Witness: Basic Principles for the Service in the Church Life, chp. 5
  25. ^ Lee, Witness: Preaching the Gospel in the Way of Life, chp. (3, 4, 9-12)
  26. ^ Lee, Witness: Preaching the Gospel on the College Campuses, booklet (chp. 1-3)
  27. ^ Nee, Watchman: Messages for Building Up New Believers, chp. 1 (Baptism)
  28. ^ Recovery Version, 1 Tim. 2:12, footnote[4]
  29. ^ Recovery Version, 1 Cor. 14:34, footnote[5]
  30. ^ The Normal Christian Church Life, [6]
  31. ^ Encyclopedia of American Religions, 5th Edition , [7]
  32. ^ Living Stream Ministry, Online bookstore, Hymns [8]
  33. ^ Hymns by Witness Lee [9]
  34. ^ Hymns by Watchman Nee [10]

See Also

Watchman Nee (倪柝聲 pinyin: Ní Tuòshēng;, 1903–1972) was a Chinese Christian author and church leader during the 20th Century. ... Witness Lee (李常受 Pinyin: Lǐ Chángshòu) (1905-June 9, 1997) was a Chinese Christian preacher and church leader associated with the Local churches movement and Living Stream Ministry. ... Living Stream Ministry (LSM), founded in 1968, is a non-profit publisher of the works of Watchman Nee and Witness Lee, and is a member of the Evangelical Christian Publishers Association (since 2002) and the Christian Booksellers Association (since 1981). ... The Recovery Version The Recovery Version is a study Bible and English language translation of the Bible published by Living Stream Ministry. ... Bibles for America is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the spread and understanding of the Bible. ...

External links

Official sites of the local churches affiliation

  • The Lord's Recovery - A History of the Lord's Recovery, as written by those inside the movement. Of particular interest is The Present Recovery which covers the recent history of the advance of Lord's Recovery
  • Living Stream Ministry Online Publications - A significant collection of Living Stream Ministry publications online
  • Rhema Literature Distributors - Promotes publications by Witness Lee in Russian, other languages
  • Amana Trust - A nonprofit affiliation of local church advancing the work of the Lord's Recovery in the UK, including Bower House, Rhema Trust, and London Typesetting
  • China Gospel Depot - Describes effort to promote local church/Living Stream publications in eastern Europe, Russia, and elsewhere
  • Statement of Faith - Statement of Faith by the Living Stream Ministry
  • The Testimony of the Local Churches and Living Stream Ministry
  • The Recovery Version Online (English) The Recovery Version Online (Chinese)
  • Bibles for America Request a free Recovery Version New Testament here
  • local churches Contact us
  • Witness Lee's relationship with Watchman Nee
  • Generation Magazine A magazine created by young people with the intent of reaching other young people around the world
  • Watchman Nee -His Life and Ministry and Testimony

The term local churches (地方教會) was originally used by Watchman Nee (倪柝聲) to describe Christian churches that form based upon the teaching of the ground of locality; however, its use to refer to any collection of independent Christian congregations in a city has become more popular in recent years. ... Living Stream Ministry (LSM), founded in 1968, is a non-profit publisher of the works of Watchman Nee and Witness Lee, and is a member of the Evangelical Christian Publishers Association (since 2002) and the Christian Booksellers Association (since 1981). ... Anaheim is a city in Orange County, south_west California, a part of the greater Los Angeles conurbation to the east of Long Beach. ... This article is about the U.S state. ...

Sites supportive of local churches and the Living Stream Ministry

  • Hymns and Spiritual songs A vast collection of Hymns, lyrics, music sheet, instrumental scores, and stories behind hymns with Hymns search and purchase option
  • John Nelson Darby and the Brethren Assemblies
  • The Body of Christ expressed in many cities
  • God's move throughout the ages
  • Precious, divinely-revealed truths elucidated The Scriptures, Triune God, All-Inclusive Christ, Christ's Incarnation, Christ's Death, Christ's Resurrection, Tripartite Man, God's Economy, Regeneration, God's Salvation, Calling on the Lord, Pray Reading the Word of God
  • Christian Websites Christian Websites -Links to many other Christian sites
  • Hymns Online Hymnal with lyrics and scores
  • The Testimony of Church History The Testimony of Church History Concerning the Ground of the Church (1846 - present) -Relevant quotations from twenty-two Bible expositors (such as Augustus Neander, John Nelson Darby, Henry Cotteril, Robert Govett, G. H. Pember, William Moran, G. H. Lang, and others ) who, over the past century and a half, have seen the ground of the church
  • The Last Adam For news, testimonies, fellowships, pictures, and videos of saints in the Lord's recovery from across the globe

Theodore Austin-Sparks (1888 — 1971) (usually known as T. Austin-Sparks or just TAS) was a British Christian evangelist. ... Watchman Nee (倪柝聲 pinyin: Ní TuòshÄ“ng;, 1903–1972) was a Chinese Christian author and church leader during the 20th Century. ... Categories: People stubs | 1648 births | 1717 deaths ... Witness Lee (李常受 Pinyin: Lǐ Chángshòu) (1905-June 9, 1997) was a Chinese Christian preacher and church leader associated with the Local churches movement and Living Stream Ministry. ... F. B. Meyer, c. ... Andrew Murray may refer to: Andrew Moray, commonly referred to as Andrew Murray, Guardian of Scotland during 13th century; key military and political leader of the Scots during the Scottish Wars of Independence Andrew Murray (botanist) (1812–1878), Scottish botanist Andrew Murray (minister) (1828–1917), South African minister of religion... Jessie Penn-Lewis (1861-1927) was an English evangelical speaker and author of a number of Christian evangelical works. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Charles Haddon Spurgeon, commonly C.H. Spurgeon, (June 19, 1834 – January 31, 1892) was a British Reformed Baptist preacher who remains highly influential amongst Christians of different denominations, among whom he is still known as the Prince of Preachers. ... Reuben Archer Torrey (28 January 1856 – 26 October 1928), was an American evangelist, pastor, educator, and writer. ... The tone of this article is inappropriate for an encyclopedia article. ... For other persons named John Darby, see John Darby (disambiguation). ... George Hawkins Pember (1837- 1910), known as G. H. Pember was an English theologian. ... Fuller Theological Seminary, located in Pasadena, California, is the largest multi denominational seminary in the world. ...

Sites critical of the Local churches

  • Two Entries in "Really Bad Theology"
  • Apologetics Index
  • ARC Apologetics
  • Bereans -Cult Profile
  • Boston Christian Bible Study
  • Freedom of Mind
  • Harvest House Christian Publishers
  • LCI - Daniel Azuma's Story
  • LCI - Mike Muno's Story
  • Light of Truth Ministries
  • An Open Letter to the Leadership of Living Stream Ministry and the "Local Churches"
  • Thread of Gold
  • Watchman Nee, Witness Lee: Cult

Response to the Critics and Critical Sites

  • Response to the Open Letter A Brief Response to “An Open Letter to the Leadership of Living Stream Ministry and the Local Churches”
  • A Faithful Word False Accusations Against LSM and What Is Behind Them
  • Contending for Faith This Web site addresses controversies that have arisen from time to time concerning the ministry of Watchman Nee, Witness Lee, and the local churches

  Results from FactBites:
 
Churches (4419 words)
The church joined the Bolton North Group of ten churches in 1974, but this was felt to strain the continuities of fellowship and after much debate the a group of three churches was formed with one minister.
A Church Meeting held on 11 August 2002 resolved to unite as a single congregation with the sister church at Swann Lane, and the fruits of that partnership are now witnessed in goodwill and togetherness.
Though her ministry was brief, the church benefited enormously from her energy and dedication, and from the worship and fellowship with the sister churches.
Witness Lee on the local church (511 words)
The expression of the church in a locality is the local church in that particular locality.
The local churches, as the expressions of the one Body of Christ, are locally one.
The universal Church is simply the sum total of the local churches, and the local churches are simply the local manifestations of the universal Church....God’s plan is to have a Church in the universe as the Body of His Son for His expression.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m