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Encyclopedia > Liverpool
City of Liverpool
Liverpool's new business district, as seen from across the River Mersey
Liverpool's new business district, as seen from across the River Mersey
Location within England
Coordinates: 53°24′N 2°59′W / 53.4, -2.983
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Constituent country England
Region North West England
Ceremonial county Merseyside
Admin HQ Liverpool City Centre
Founded 1207
City Status 1880
Government
 - Type Metropolitan borough, City
 - Governing body Liverpool City Council
Area
 - Borough & City 43.2 sq mi (111.84 km²)
Elevation 230 ft (70 m)
Population (2005 est / Urban=2006)
 - Borough & City 436,100 (Ranked 6th)
 - Density 12,952.5/sq mi (5,001/km²)
 - Urban 816,900
 - Ethnicity
(2005 Estimate)[1]
92.3% White
1.9% S. Asian
1.8% Black British
2.1% Chinese and other
1.9% Mixed Race
Time zone Greenwich Mean Time (UTC+0)
 - Summer (DST) British Summer Time (UTC+1)
Postal Code L postcode area
Area code(s) 0151
ISO 3166-2 GB-LIV
ONS code 00BY
OS grid reference SJ437905
NUTS 3 UKD52
Website: www.liverpool.gov.uk

Liverpool (pronunciation ) (Middle English: Lerpoole) is a city and metropolitan borough in the county of Merseyside, England, along the eastern side of the Mersey Estuary. The largest and best-known Liverpool is in England. ... The River Mersey is a river in north west England. ... map showing Liverpool within England File links The following pages link to this file: Liverpool Categories: GFDL images ... // Constituent country is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a historical, currently non-legally officially recognised country makes up a part of a larger entity or grouping. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... -1... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Merseyside is a metropolitan county in North West England, with a population of 1,365,900. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... Cathedral city redirects here. ... See City of Liverpool for other meanings Liverpool City Council is the governing body for the city of Liverpool in Merseyside, England. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... Cathedral city redirects here. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... Cathedral city redirects here. ... The figures are mid-year estimates for 2005, unless otherwise stated, from the Office for National Statistics [1]. See also: List of towns and cities in England by population - List of English counties by population - List of ceremonial counties of England by population - List of English districts by area - List... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... GMT redirects here. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries not observing daylight saving British Summer Time (BST) is the changing of the clocks in effect in the United Kingdom and Irish Summer Time (IST) in Republic of Ireland between the last Sunday in March and the last Sunday in October each... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... The L postcode area, also known as the Liverpool postcode area[2], is a group of postal districts around Bootle, Liverpool, Ormskirk and Prescot in England. ... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... The ISO 3166-2 codes for the United Kingdom correspond to the nations administrative divisions. ... The Office for National Statistics coding system is a hierarchical code used in the United Kingdom for tabulating census and other statistical data. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) is a geocode standard for referencing the administrative division of countries for statistical purposes. ... Image File history File links En-uk-Liverpool. ... Middle English is the name given by historical linguistics to the diverse forms of the English language spoken between the Norman invasion of 1066 and the mid-to-late 15th century, when the Chancery Standard, a form of London-based English, began to become widespread, a process aided by the... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... Merseyside is a metropolitan county in North West England, with a population of 1,365,900. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Mersey Estuary is a large estuary where the River Mersey flows into Liverpool Bay. ...


Inhabitants of Liverpool are referred to as Liverpudlians but are also known as "Scousers", in reference to the local meal known as 'scouse', a form of stew. The word 'scouse' is probably a contraction of 'lobscouse'. If that is the case, then the Lancashire stew known as 'lobby' may well also have the same roots. The word scouse has also become synonymous with the Liverpool accent and dialect. In 2007 the city celebrated its 800th anniversary, and in 2008 it holds the European Capital of Culture title together with Stavanger, Norway.[2] The developments associated with this title has brought in an estimated £2 billion in investment in the city; similar to the economic, cultural and commercial expansion that Barcelona saw following the 1992 Olympics.[3] This article is about the accent. ... Scouse was orignally a mutton stew. ... Lancashire is a non-metropolitan county of historic origin in the North West of England, bounded to the west by the Irish Sea. ... Look up Accent in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For dialects of programming languages, see Programming language dialect. ... The European Capital of Culture is a city designated by the European Union for a period of one year during which it is given a chance to showcase its cultural life and cultural development. ... County District Jæren Municipality NO-1103 Administrative centre Stavanger Mayor (1995-) Leif Johan Sevland (H) Official language form BokmÃ¥l Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 406 71 km² 68 km² 0. ... Location Coordinates : Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Barcelona (Catalan) Spanish name Barcelona Nickname Ciutat Comtal (City of Counts) Postal code 08001–08080 Area code 34 (Spain) + 93 (Barcelona) Website http://www. ... The 92 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXV Olympiad, were held in 1992 in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Liverpool
A map of Liverpool from 1947

King John's letters patent of 1207 announced the foundation of the borough of Liverpool, but by the middle of the 16th century the population was still only around 500. In the 17th century there was slow progress in trade and population growth. Battles for the town were waged during the English Civil War, including an eighteen-day siege in 1644. In 1699 Liverpool was made a parish by Act of Parliament, that same year its first slave ship, Liverpool Merchant, set sail for Africa. As trade from the West Indies surpassed that of Ireland and Europe, and as the River Dee silted up, Liverpool began to grow. The first wet dock in Britain was built in Liverpool in 1715. Substantial profits from the slave trade helped the town to prosper and rapidly grow. By the close of the century Liverpool controlled over 41% of Europe's and 80% of Britain's slave commerce. The History of Liverpool can be traced back to 1190 when the place was known as Liuerpul, possibly meaning a pool or creek with muddy water. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (954x1314, 271 KB) Reproduced from the 1947 OS map File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (954x1314, 271 KB) Reproduced from the 1947 OS map File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ... A parish is a type of administrative subdivision. ... An Act of Parliament or Act is law enacted by the parliament (see legislation). ... The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ... For other Rivers Dee in the UK, see River Dee. ... A wet dock is a dock where the level of water in the dock is maintained. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


By the start of the 19th century, 40% of the world's trade was passing through Liverpool and the construction of major buildings reflected this wealth. In 1830, Liverpool and Manchester became the first cities to have an intercity rail link, through the Liverpool and Manchester Railway. The population continued to rise rapidly, especially during the 1840s when Irish migrants began arriving by the hundreds of thousands as a result of the Great Famine. By 1851, approximately 25% of the city's population was Irish-born. During the first part of the 20th century, Liverpool was drawing immigrants from across Europe. This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... Inaugural journey of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway The Liverpool and Manchester Railway (L&MR) was the worlds first intercity passenger railway in which all the trains were timetabled and operated for most of the distance solely by steam locomotives. ... Bridget ODonnell and her two children during the famine The Great Famine or the Great Hunger (Irish: An Gorta Mór or An Drochshaol), known more commonly outside of Ireland as the Irish Potato Famine, is the name given to a famine in Ireland between 1845 and 1849. ...


The Housing Act 1919 resulted in mass council housing building across Liverpool during the 1920s and 1930s. Thousands of families were rehoused from decrepit inner-city slums to well-equipped new homes on suburban housing estates which offered a far higher standard of living. A great deal of private houses were also built during this era. The process continued after the Second World War, with many more new housing estates being built in suburban areas, while some of the older inner city areas where also redeveloped for new homes. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


The population of Liverpool peaked in the 1931 census, which reported 855,688 inhabitants. This had declined to 610,114 by 1961, and decreased further to 439,476 in the 2001 census.[4]


During World War II there were 80 air-raids on Merseyside, killing 2500 people and causing damage to almost half the homes in the metropolitan area. Since 1952 Liverpool has been twinned with Cologne, Germany, a city which also shared the horrific experience of excessive aerial bombing. Significant rebuilding followed the war, including massive housing estates and the Seaforth Dock, the largest dock project in Britain. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Liverpool Blitz was the heavy and sustained bombing of the city of Liverpool in the United Kingdom during the Second World War. ... Cologne (German: , IPA: ; local dialect: Kölle ) is Germanys fourth-largest city after Berlin, Hamburg and Munich, and is the largest city both in the German Federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia and within the Rhine-Ruhr Metropolitan Area, one of the major European metropolitan areas with more than... The Royal Seaforth dock is a purpose built container dock, on the River Mersey and part of the Port of Liverpool it is operated by the Mersey Docks and Harbour Company. ...


In the 1960s Liverpool became a centre of youth culture. The "Merseybeat" sound which became synonymous with The Beatles and fellow Liverpudlian rock bands of the era catapulted the city to the front of the popular music scene. The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... For the TV program please see Merseybeat Merseybeat, sometimes referred to as Merseysound, was a style of music popular during the 1960s. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ...


From the mid-1970s onwards Liverpool's docks and traditional manufacturing industries went into sharp decline. The advent of containerization meant that the city's docks became largely obsolete. In the early 1980s unemployment rates in Liverpool were among the highest in the UK. In recent years, Liverpool's economy has recovered and has experienced growth rates higher than the national average since the mid-nineties. Manufacturing is the application of tools and a processing medium to the transformation of raw materials into finished goods for sale. ... Shipping containers at a terminal in Port Elizabeth, New Jersey A container freight train in the UK Containerization is a system of intermodal freight transport cargo transport using standard ISO containers (known as shipping containers or isotainers) that can be loaded and sealed intact onto container ships, railroad cars, planes... CIA figures for world unemployment rates, 2006 Unemployment is the state in which a person is without work, available to work, and is currently seeking work. ...

20 Forthlin Road is one of many Tourist attractions related to The Beatles.

Previously part of Lancashire, and a county borough from 1889, Liverpool became in 1974 a metropolitan borough within the newly created metropolitan county of Merseyside. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 1. ... 20 Forthlin Road is a National Trust property in south Liverpool, Merseyside, England. ... Lancashire is a non-metropolitan county of historic origin in the North West of England, bounded to the west by the Irish Sea. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... The six metropolitan counties shown within England The metropolitan counties are a type of county-level subnational entity in current use in England. ... Merseyside is a metropolitan county in North West England, with a population of 1,365,900. ...


At the end of the 20th century Liverpool was concentrating on regeneration, a process which still continues today, with the city winning the accolade of European Capital of Culture for 2008. The European Capital of Culture is a city designated by the European Union for a period of one year during which it is given a chance to showcase its cultural life and cultural development. ...


To celebrate the Golden Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II in 2002, the conservation charity Plantlife organised a competition to choose county flowers, the sea-holly was Liverpool's final choice Queen Elizabeth II makes an official appearance at the CBC Headquarters as part of her Jubilee goodwill tour, October 2002. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... Plantlife is a U.K. plant conservation charity. ... A county flower is a flowering plant chosen to symbolise a county. ... It has been suggested that Eringoes be merged into this article or section. ...


Capitalising on the popularity of the 1960s pop group The Beatles and other groups of the Merseybeat era, tourism has also become a significant factor in Liverpool's economy. The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ...


In 2004, property developer Grosvenor started the Paradise Project, a £920 m development centered on Paradise Street, which will involve the most significant changes to Liverpool's city centre since the post-war reconstruction. Now known as Liverpool one, parts are nearing completion. The Grosvenor Group is a property company which is privately owned by the Duke of Westminster, who is the third wealthiest man in the United Kingdom after Lakshmi Mittal and Roman Abramovich. ... The Paradise Project is a redevelopment project in Liverpool, England. ...


2007 is the anniversary of the foundation of the city (1207), for which a number of events were planned.


Governance

Liverpool is governed by Liverpool City Council, one of five councils within the metropolitan county of Merseyside, and is one of England's core cities and its third most populous — 447,500 in 2006, with 816,000 jobs in the Liverpool Urban Area, the conurbation around the city that includes other towns (such as St. Helens and Haydock) on the Liverpool side of the Mersey but not those on the Wirral Peninsula. The term Greater Merseyside is sometimes used to describe a broader area, which also includes the borough of Halton. See City of Liverpool for other meanings Liverpool City Council is the governing body for the city of Liverpool in Merseyside, England. ... The six metropolitan counties shown within England The metropolitan counties are a type of county-level subnational entity in current use in England. ... The English Core Cities Group is an association of eight large regional cities in England: Birmingham, Bristol, Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester, Newcastle upon Tyne, Nottingham and Sheffield. ... This is a list of the largest cities and towns of England ordered by population. ... The Liverpool Urban Area is a name given by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) to the urban area of Liverpool and the built-up areas immediately adjacent to it. ... St Helens is a town in Merseyside in North West England. ... Haydock is a ward within of the Metropolitan Borough of St Helens, Merseyside, England and is in the historic County of Lancashire. It was one of the United Kingdoms richest areas in coal and coal mining. ... Map showing the location of the Wirral at grid reference SJ285850 Wirral or The Wirral (IPA: [wɪɹəɫ]) is a peninsula in the north west of England, bounded by the River Dee to the west and the River Mersey to the east. ... Greater Merseyside is an informal term for a sub-region of North West England including Merseyside, Halton, West Lancashire, and Ellesmere Port and Neston. ... Halton is a borough in North West England, administered by a unitary authority. ...


Geography

Built across a ridge of sandstone hills rising up to a height of around 230 feet (70 metres) above sea-level at Everton Hill, these represent the southern boundary of the West Lancashire Coastal Plain. The Liverpool Urban Area runs directly into Bootle, Crosby and Maghull in south Sefton to the north, and Kirkby, Huyton, Prescot and Halewood in Knowsley to the east. It faces Wallasey and Birkenhead across the River Mersey to the west. This article is about the geological formation. ... The West Lancashire Coastal Plain is a large area in the south west of Lancashire, England. ... The Liverpool Urban Area is a name given by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) to the urban area of Liverpool and the built-up areas immediately adjacent to it. ... Bootle is a town on the Mersey Estuary, North West England. ... Crosby may refer to: Geography Crosby, Merseyside Crosby, North Dakota People Bing Crosby - 1940s era entertainer Bobby Crosby - Oakland As baseball player Bubba Crosby - New York Yankees baseball player David Crosby - Musical artist from Crosby Stills Nash and Young Gary Crosby - singer and actor, son of Bing Crosby Sidney... Maghull is a town in Sefton, Merseyside, England, within the traditional borders of Lancashire, and on the West Lancashire Coastal Plain. ... See Sefton, New South Wales for the suburb of Sydney, Australia. ... Arms of the former Kirkby Urban District Council Kirkby (pronounced - the second k is silent) is a new town in the Metropolitan Borough of Knowsley, Merseyside, England. ... , Huyton is a town within the Metropolitan Borough of Knowsley, in Merseyside, England. ... Prescot is a town with the status of civil parish, 8 miles to the east of Liverpool in northwest England. ... Halewood is a town (population c 22,000) in the Metropolitan Borough of Knowsley, Merseyside, England, situated to the south-east of Liverpool. ... The placename Knowsley in Merseyside in England can mean:- Knowsley (village) Metropolitan Borough of Knowsley, includes the village Knowsley Safari Park Knowsley North and Sefton East (UK Parliament constituency) parliamentary constituency Knowsley North (UK Parliament constituency) former parliamentary constituency Knowsley South (UK Parliament constituency) parliamentary constituency Knowsley (UK Parliament constituency... Wallasey is a large town on the mouth of the River Mersey, at the north-eastern corner of the Wirral. ... For other uses, see Birkenhead (disambiguation). ... The River Mersey is a river in north west England. ...


Economy

This is a chart of trend of regional gross value added (GVA) of Liverpool at current basic prices published (pp.240-253) by the Office for National Statistics with figures in millions of pounds sterling. The Gross value added is GDP - taxes on products + subsidies on products = GVA GVA + taxes on products - subsidies on products = GDP See also Measures of national income and output External links GVA - Gross Value Added ... Office for National Statistics logo The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is the United Kingdom government executive agency charged with the collection and publication of statistics related to the economy, population and society of the United Kingdom at national and local levels. ... GBP redirects here. ...

Year Regional Gross Value Added[5] Agriculture[6] Industry[7] Services[8]
1995 4,394 3 950 3,440
2000 5,681 4 1,033 4,644
2003 6,595 6 953 5,636

The economy of Liverpool is beginning to recover from its long, post-World War II decline. Between 1995 and 2001 GVA per head grew at 6.3% annum. This compared with 5.8% for inner London and 5.7% for Bristol. The rate of job growth was 9.2% compared with a national average of 4.9% for the same period, 1998-2002. However, Liverpool is still comparatively poor; a 2001 report by CACI showed that Liverpool still had four of the ten poorest postcode districts in the country,[9] and almost 30% of people aged 65 or over are without central heating.[10] Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article is about the English city. ...


Like the rest of the United Kingdom the city has seen a large growth in the service sector, both public and private. Government offices include parts of the National Health Service, Revenue and Customs and Home Office agencies such as the Criminal Records Bureau and the Identity and Passport Service, formerly the UK Passport Agency. Private sector service industries have invested in Liverpool too with major call centres opening in recent years.[citation needed] The activities of the port have left the site with a communications infrastructure that had for a long time exceeded requirements. NHS redirects here. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP        Her Majestys Revenue and Customs (HMRC) is a non-ministerial department of the British Government primarily responsible for the collection of taxes, some forms of state support, some aspects of UK frontier protection and import controls. ... The modern concept of Small Office and Home Office or SoHo , or Small or Home Office deals with the category of business which can be from 1 to 10 workers. ... The Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) is an executive agency of the Home Office in the United Kingdom, which conducts criminal record checks on potential employees on behalf of organisations and recruiters throughout England and Wales. ... The Identity and Passport Service is an Executive Agency of the Home Office in the United Kingdom which became operational on 1 April 2006 after the passing of the Identity Cards Act 2006. ...


Growth in the areas of New Media has been helped by the existence of a relatively large computer game development community. Sony based one of only a handful of European PlayStation research and development centres in Wavertree, after buying out noted software publisher Psygnosis. Indeed, according to a 2006 issue of industry magazine 'Edge' (issue 162), the first professional quality PlayStation software developer's kits were largely programmed by Sony's Liverpool 'studio' – the console has since become one of the World's most successful consumer products ever. New Media is the marriage of mediated communications technologies with digital computers. ... A computer game is a game composed of a computer-controlled virtual universe that players interact with in order to achieve a defined goal or set of goals. ... For other uses, see PlayStation (disambiguation). ... The logo that introduced most Psygnosis games was designed by fantasy artist Roger Dean. ...


Tourism is a major factor in the economy and will be of increasing importance in the run up to the Liverpool's year as European Capital of Culture. This has led to a great increase in the provision of high quality services such as hotels, restaurants and clubs. The buildings of Liverpool not only attract tourists but also film makers, who regularly use Liverpool to double for cities around the world and making it the second most filmed city in the UK.[citation needed]


Car-manufacturing also takes place in the city at the Halewood plant where the Jaguar X-Type and Land Rover Freelander models are assembled. Halewood is a town (population c 22,000) in the Metropolitan Borough of Knowsley, Merseyside, England, situated to the south-east of Liverpool. ... The Jaguar X-TYPE is an entry-level luxury car / compact executive car produced by the Ford owned British luxury marque Jaguar Cars since 2001. ... The Land Rover Freelander is a compact crossover SUV made by the British Land Rover, a subsidiary of the Tata Motors. ...


The owner of Liverpool's port and airport, Peel Holdings, announced on March 6 2007 that is had plans to redevelop the city's northern dock area with a scheme entitled Liverpool Waters, which may see the creation of 17,000 jobs and £5.5bn invested in the vicinity over a 50 year period.[citation needed] is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Liverpool Waters is a large scale £5. ...


Liverpool's main shopping area is Church Street, lying between Bold Street to the East and Lord Street to the West. Bold Street is a street in Liverpool, England. ...


Landmarks

Liverpool waterfront by night, as seen from the Wirral, is a UNESCO World Heritage site
The Royal Liver Building towers over Water Street and the Town Hall
The Royal Liver Building towers over Water Street and the Town Hall
Liverpool's skyline, as seen from the River Mersey. The Liver Building on the left
Liverpool's skyline, as seen from the River Mersey. The Liver Building on the left
The Parish Church of St. Nicholas and the Atlantic Tower hotel near Pier Head. The Atlantic Tower was designed to resemble the prow of a ship to reflect Liverpool's maritime history
The Parish Church of St. Nicholas and the Atlantic Tower hotel near Pier Head. The Atlantic Tower was designed to resemble the prow of a ship to reflect Liverpool's maritime history
Liverpool's inner city has Georgian terraced streets
Liverpool's inner city has Georgian terraced streets
Liverpool's docks, facing the 'Three Graces'
Liverpool's docks, facing the 'Three Graces'

Liverpool contains over 2,500 listed buildings (of which 26 are Grade I listed and 85 are Grade II* listed). It has been the beneficiary of high-minded public spirit since the late 18th century, largely with Dissenter impetus, resulting in more public sculpture than in any UK city aside from Westminster, more listed buildings than any city apart from London and, surprisingly, more Georgian houses than the city of Bath. Well-known architects are represented in Liverpool, including Peter Ellis, Harvey Lonsdale Elmes, John Foster, Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, Sir Edwin Lutyens, Sir Frederick Gibberd, and Norman Shaw. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (9488x1100, 2917 KB) Summary Liverpool Waterfront by night, taken 20th January 2005 from the Seacombe Ferry terminal on the Wirral. ... The Wirral is a peninsula in North West England bounded by the River Dee to the west and the River Mersey to the east. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2016x1512, 883 KB) Royal Liver Building above Dale Street - Liverpool - 2005-06-27. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2016x1512, 883 KB) Royal Liver Building above Dale Street - Liverpool - 2005-06-27. ... The Royal Liver Building The Royal Liver Building - Matthew Street Festival 2006 Liver birds tower over Dale Street and the Guildhall The Royal Liver Building as seen from the Pier Head The Royal Liver Building (prounced ) is one of the city of Liverpools most recognisable landmarks. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2856x2142, 1440 KB) Summary Anglican Cathedral picture by Rob Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2856x2142, 1440 KB) Summary Anglican Cathedral picture by Rob Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... North elevation of Liverpool Anglican Cathedral. ... Download high resolution version (900x575, 160 KB)A closeup view of Liverpools skyline. ... Download high resolution version (900x575, 160 KB)A closeup view of Liverpools skyline. ... The Royal Liver Building The Royal Liver Building - Matthew Street Festival 2006 Liver birds tower over Dale Street and the Guildhall The Royal Liver Building as seen from the Pier Head The Royal Liver Building (prounced ) is one of the city of Liverpools most recognisable landmarks. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3008x2000, 2653 KB) Summary (C), Gerry Lynch, 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3008x2000, 2653 KB) Summary (C), Gerry Lynch, 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3008x2000, 2438 KB) Summary (C), Gerry Lynch, 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3008x2000, 2438 KB) Summary (C), Gerry Lynch, 2006. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x590, 69 KB) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x590, 69 KB) (All user names refer to en. ... Partial and incomplete lists of listed buildings in Liverpool, England. ... The term dissenter (from the Latin dissentire, to disagree), labels one who dissents or disagrees in matters of opinion, belief, etc. ... The City of Westminster is a borough of London, England with city status. ... , Bath is a small city in Somerset, England most famous for its historic baths fed by three hot springs. ... For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ... Peter Ellis is a virtually unknown 19th century Liverpool architect. ... Harvey Lonsdale Elmes born 1813, died 26/9/1847 a British architect. ... John Foster, Junior (circa 1787 - 26 September 1846) was an English architect. ... Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, OM, FRIBA (November 9, 1880 – February 8, 1960) was an English architect known for his work on such buildings as Liverpool Cathedral and Battersea Power Station. ... Edwin Lutyens Sir Edwin Landseer Lutyens, OM, KCIE, PRA (29 March 1869 – 1 January 1944) was a leading 20th century British architect who is known for imaginatively adapting traditional architectural styles to the requirements of his era. ... Sir Frederick Ernest Gibberd (b. ... House in Frognal, 1885 Richard Norman Shaw (Edinburgh May 7, 1831 – London November 17, 1912), was the most influential British architect from the 1870s to the 1900s, known for his country houses and for commercial buildings. ...


Waterfront and docks museums

In 2004 Liverpool's waterfront was declared as a UNESCO World Heritage site, reflecting the city's importance in the development of the world's trading system and dock technology. UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... St Petersburg Docks in the early morning smog. ...


The docks are central to Liverpool's history, with the best-known being Albert Dock: the first enclosed, non-combustible dock warehouse system in the world and is built in cast iron, brick and stone. It was designed by Jesse Hartley. Restored in the 1980s, the Albert Dock is the largest collection of Grade I listed buildings in Britain. Part of the old dock complex is now the home to the Merseyside Maritime Museum (an Anchor Point of ERIH, The European Route of Industrial Heritage), the International Slavery Museumand the Tate Liverpool. Other relics of the dock system include the Stanley Dock Tobacco Warehouse, which at the time of its construction in 1901, was the world's largest building in terms of area, and is still the world's largest brick-work building. Also the ill-fated passenger liner RMS Titanic was registered in Liverpool. ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Jesse Hartley 1780-1860 Architect, designed The Albert Dock at Liverpool, England. ... Liverpool’s seafaring heritage brought to life in the historic Albert Dock. ... The European Route of Industrial Heritage (ERIH) is a network of the most important industrial heritage sites in Europe. ... A new International Slavery Museum is being created in Liverpool as part of the National Museums Liverpool group. ... The Tate Liverpool is located in Albert Dock, Liverpool. ... Stanley Dock Tobacco Warehouse, Stanley Dock, Liverpool, the worlds largest brick warehouse, and at the time of its construction,in 1901, the worlds largest building. ... Superliner is a term sometimes used for an ocean liner of over 10,000 gross tons. ... For other uses, see Titanic (disambiguation). ...


The Pier Head is the most famous image of Liverpool, the location of the Three Graces (a fairly recent phrase), three of Liverpool's most recognisable buildings. The first is the Royal Liver Building, built in the early 1900s and surmounted by two bronze domes with a Liver Bird (the symbol of Liverpool) on each. The second is the Cunard Building, the headquarters of the former Cunard shipping company. The third is the Port of Liverpool Building, the home of the former Mersey Docks and Harbour Board which regulated the city's docks. Kings Dock immediately to the South of the Albert dock is the site of the Liverpool Echo Arena and BT Convention Centre which officially opened on the 12 January 2008. The Pier Head is a riverside location in the city-centre of Liverpool, England. ... The Royal Liver Building The Royal Liver Building - Matthew Street Festival 2006 Liver birds tower over Dale Street and the Guildhall The Royal Liver Building as seen from the Pier Head The Royal Liver Building (prounced ) is one of the city of Liverpools most recognisable landmarks. ... Liver Bird on a tower of the Liver Building The Liver bird is the symbol of the city of Liverpool, England. ... Cunard Building is a building of elegant proportion, sited on the Pier Head at Liverpool. ... Cunard may refer to: Samuel Cunard (1787–1865), British shipping magnate. ... The Port of Liverpool Liverpool, United Kingdom were built in 1907 and designed by Arnold Thornley. ... The Mersey Docks and Harbour Company is the sucessor to the Mersey Docks and Harbour Board. ... Liverpool Echo Arena is the Arena half of ACC Liverpool currently being built on the Liverpool waterfront and scheduled to open in January 2008. ...


In front of these buildings at the waters edge are the memorials to the men of the merchant navy who sailed out of the port during both World Wars. Memorials to the British mariners, Norwegian, Dutch and to the thousands of Chinese seamen who manned Britain's ships cluster together here. Perhaps most interesting is the Chinese memorial to the men forcibly deported from the city after World War Two and to the families they left behind.[11]


Places of worship

The thousands of migrants and sailors passing through Liverpool resulted in a religious diversity that is still apparent today. This is reflected in the equally diverse collection of religious buildings, and two Christian cathedrals.


The parish church of Liverpool is the Anglican Our Lady and St Nicholas, colloquially known as "the sailors church", which has existed near the waterfront since 1257. It regularly plays host to Catholic masses. Other notable churches include the Greek Orthodox Church of St Nicholas (built in the Neo-Byzantine architecture style), and the Gustav Adolfus Kyrka (the Swedish Seamen's Church, reminiscent of Nordic styles). The Church of Our Lady and Saint Nicholas is known locally as The Sailors Church and simply St Nicks. The Church of Our Lady and Saint Nicholas is the parish church of Liverpool. ... The Greek Orthodox Church of St Nicholas in Liverpool, built 1871. ... Alexander Nevsky Cathedral, Sofia. ... Gustav Adolfus Kyrka or The Swedish Seamens Church is on Park Lane, Liverpool. ...


Liverpool's wealth as a port city enabled the construction of two enormous cathedrals, both dating from the 20th century. The Anglican Cathedral which was designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott and plays host to the annual Liverpool Shakespeare Festival, has one of the longest naves, largest organs and heaviest and highest peals of bells in the world. The Roman Catholic Metropolitan Cathedral, on Mount Pleasant next to Liverpool Science Park was initially planned to be even larger. Of Sir Edwin Lutyens' original design, only the crypt was completed. The cathedral was eventually built to a simpler design by Sir Frederick Gibberd; while this is on a smaller scale than Lutyens' original design, it still manages to incorporate the largest panel of stained glass in the world. Appropriately enough, the road running between the two cathedrals is called Hope Street. The cathedral is colloquially referred to as "Paddy's Wigwam" due to its shape and the vast number of Irish men who worked on its construction and are living in the area. For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... North elevation of Liverpool Anglican Cathedral. ... Links to full descriptions of the elements of a Gothic floorplan are also found at the entry Cathedral diagram. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral steps The south elevation and main entrance to the Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral, a Roman Catholic cathedral in Liverpool, has the official name of Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. ... Strictly speaking, stained glass is glass that has been painted with silver stain and then fired. ... Hope Street, Liverpool, England stretches from Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral past Liverpool Cathedral to Upper Parliament Street. ...


Liverpool contains several synagogues, of which the Grade I listed Moorish Revival Princes Road Synagogue is architecturally the most notable. Princes road is widely considered to be the most magnificent of Britain's Moorish Revival synagogues and one of the finest buildings in Liverpool. [12] Liverpool has a thriving Jewish community with a further 2 Synagogues, one in the Greenbank Park area of L17 and a second in the Childwall district of the city where a significant Jewish community reside. Liverpool has had a Jewish community since the mid-18th century. The current Jewish population of Liverpool is around 3000.[13] Arc de Triomf, Barcelona, 1888. ... The Princes Road Synagogue in Toxteth, Liverpool. ... Arc de Triomf, Barcelona, 1888. ... Greenbank park Liverpool, England is situated in the south of the city close to Sefton Park. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ...


Liverpool also has an increasing Hindu community, with a Mandir on Edge Lane; the Radha Krishna Hindu Temple from the Hindu Cultural Organisation based there. The current Hindu population in Liverpool is about 1147. In comparison, Manchester has nearly 3000. Liverpool also has the Guru Nanak Sikh Gurudwara in L15. This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... The Gopuram of temples, in south India, are adorned with colourful icons depicting a particular story surrounding the temples deity. ... Guru Nanak (Gurmukhi: ਗੁਰੂ ਨਾਨਕ, Devanagari: गुरु नानक) (20 October 1469 - 7 May 1539), the founder of Sikhism and the first of the ten Gurus of the Sikhs, was born in the village of Talwandi, now called Nankana Sahib, near Lahore in present-day Pakistan. ... Religions Sikhism Scriptures Guru Granth Sahib Languages English, Punjabi] A Sikh (English: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ) is an adherent to Sikhism. ... A Gurdwara is the Sikh place of worship. ...


The city had one of the earliest mosques in Britain, founded in 1887 by William Abdullah Quilliam, a lawyer who had converted to Islam. This mosque, however, no longer exists. Plans have been ongoing to re-convert the building where the mosque once stood into a museum. Currently there are three mosques in Liverpool: the largest and main one,Al-Rahma mosque, in the Toxteth area of the city and a mosque recently opened in the Mossley Hill district of the city. The third mosque was also recently opened in Toxteth and is on Granby Street. The Masjid al-Haram in Mecca as it exists today A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... William Abdullah or W. H Quilliam (1851 – 1932) was a poet, solicitor, ambassador, Islamic scholar, journalist, and leader, who is particularly noted for founding Englands first mosque and Islamic centre. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... The Al-Rahma mosque is on Hatherley Street, Liverpool, United Kingdom, and can hold up to 1,000 worshippers. ... , Toxteth is an inner-city area of Liverpool, Merseyside. ... Mossley Hill is a suburb of Liverpool, Merseyside. ...


Other notable buildings and main museums

The area around William Brown Street has been labeled the city's 'Cultural Quarter', owing to the presence of the William Brown Library, Walker Art Gallery and World Museum Liverpool, just three of Liverpool's neo-classical buildings. Nearby is St George's Hall, perhaps the most impressive of these neo-classical buildings. It was built to serve a variety of civic functions, including both as a concert hall and as the city's law courts. Its doors, inscribed "S.P.Q.L." (Latin senatus populusque Liverpudliensis - "the senate and people of Liverpool"), as well as its grand architecture proclaim the municipal pride and ambition of the city in the mid-nineteenth century. Also in this area are Wellington's Column and the Steble Fountain. William Brown Street in Liverpool England is a road that gives its name to the William Brown Street conservation area. ... The William Brown Library is a library situated in Liverpool, UK on William Brown Street. ... This page is about the Walker Art Gallery in Liverpool. ... Liverpool Museum and Library steps Liverpool Museum and Library World Museum Liverpool is one of Britains finest museums, with extensive collections covering archaeology, ethnology and the natural and physical sciences. ... St Georges Hall has regularly been called The greatest Neo-Classical building in the world. ... For the series of murder mystery novels, see SPQR series. ... Wellingtons Column is a monument in William Brown Street, Liverpool, UK. It is in memory of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington. ... The Steble fountain, William Brown Street, Liverpool, England. ...


Liverpool's Town Hall dates from 1754 and has an interior considered beautiful. The city's stock exchange and financial district are set immediately behind this building, and show how closely government and commerce were tied in the city's development. Town-Hall, Liverpool The Liverpool Town-Hall is built in a striking style of architecture. ...


The term Red Brick University, applied to British universities dating from a similar period, was inspired by the University of Liverpool's Victoria Building, noted for its clock tower. The Aston Webb building, Birmingham Victoria Building tower, Liverpool Firth Court, University of Sheffield The main Entrance to Old College at the University of Wales Aberystwyth Red Brick (or perhaps better, Redbrick) originally referred to the six civic British universities which were founded in the industrial cities of England in... The University of Liverpool is a university in the city of Liverpool, England. ... The grade II listed red-brick Victoria Building, designed by architect Alfred Waterhouse was opened in 1892 and is a well known landmark in The University of Liverpool The Building was the inspiration for the term red brick university. The term was coined by Professor Edgar Allison Peers to describe...


Some of Liverpool's landmarks are better known for their oddness rather than for their role. Williamson's tunnels are architecturally unique as being the largest underground folly in the world. The Philharmonic Dining Rooms are noteworthy for their ornate Victorian toilets, which have become a tourist attraction in their own right. Graffiti circa 1960s on the wall of The Williamson Tunnels The Corner tunnel and arch constructed out of individual sandstone blocks with view of Biddulphs factory rubbish chute. ... The Philharmonic Dining Rooms in Liverpool, England is situated on the junction of Hope Street and Hardman Street, diagonally opposite the Liverpool Philharmonic Hall. ...


On Renshaw Street there is the new alternative shopping centre Grand Central Hall - which has not only fine external architecture but also has much to offer inside, such as the metalwork and ceiling decoration of the Ground floor and the fantastic domed ceiling of Roscoe Hall. It was originally built in 1905, under the guidance of the Methodist Church, as a 2,000-seat cinema. The original organ of Roscoe Hall still remains and is a listed item itself, although recent shop additions to the hall have obscured the view somewhat. Grand Central Hall Built just after the start of the 20th Century, Grand Central Hall in Liverpool began life as a meeting hall / cinema under the guidance of the Methodist Church. ... The United Methodist Church is the largest Methodist denomination, and the second-largest Protestant one, in the United States. ... A typical megaplex (AMC Rolling Hills 20 in Rolling Hills Estates, California). ...


Everton water tower is a Grade II listed building.


Transport

Mersey crossings

There are three tunnels under the River Mersey: one railway tunnel, the Mersey Railway Tunnel; and two road tunnels, Queensway Tunnel and Kingsway Tunnel. A disused railway tunnel now converted to pedestrian and bicycle use, near Houyet, Belgium A tunnel is an underground passage. ... The River Mersey is a river in north west England. ... Sign from the Water Street entrance to James Street. ... The Queensway Tunnel is a road tunnel under the River Mersey in Merseyside, in the north west of England, between Liverpool and Birkenhead. ... The Kingsway Tunnel is a road tunnel under the River Mersey in Merseyside, northwest England, between Liverpool and Wallasey. ...


The Mersey Ferry continues to provide an important link between Liverpool and the Wirral, as well as a tourist attraction. Made famous by the song Ferry Cross the Mersey by Gerry and the Pacemakers, the song is now played on the ferryboats themselves every time they prepare to dock at Liverpool after a tourist cruise. The Mersey Ferry is a ferry operating on the River Mersey in England. ... The film and soundtrack album of 1965 is one of the more uncommon artefacts of Merseybeat, shown very rarely on TV and never issued on video The title song is more famous nowadays and has charted twice. ... Gerry & the Pacemakers was a British rock and roll group during the 1960s, and one of the few groups to challenge the Beatles in popularity. ...


The Mersey is crossed upstream from Liverpool at Runcorn and Widnes, by the Silver Jubilee Bridge (usually known simply as the "Runcorn Bridge") and the Runcorn Railway Bridge. The River Mersey is a river in the north west of England. ... This article is about the town in England. ... , Widnes is an industrial town within the borough of Halton, in the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England, with an urban area population of 57,663 in 2004. ... The Silver Jubilee Bridge is a compression arch suspended-deck bridge bridge built in 1961 between Runcorn and Widnes (Widnes was originally in Lancashire), which are both now part of Cheshire. ... The Runcorn Bridge is bridge of steel construction which crosses the River Mersey linking the towns of Runcorn and Widnes. ... The Runcorn Railway Bridge crosses the River Mersey from Runcorn to Widnes in Cheshire, England. ...


Leeds and Liverpool Canal

Built between 1770 and 1816 the Leeds and Liverpool Canal links Liverpool and the Mersey to Leeds and the River Aire. Its terminus had been at Old Hall Street, Pall Mall, Chisenhale Street, but that section now ends at Eldonian Village. A flight of locks just north of there takes the canal down to Stanley Dock, famous for the Tobacco Warehouse, and on to the main dock system. The Leeds and Liverpool Canal is a canal in the north of England running from Liverpool, Merseyside to Leeds, West Yorkshire. ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ... Gordale Beck flows out of Gordale Scar to join the Aire. ... Canal locks in England. ... The Stanley Dock is a dock, on the River Mersey and part of the Port of Liverpool it is situated in the northern end of the dock system, connected to Leeds and Liverpool Canal to the east and Collingwood Dock to the west. ...


A new link across the front of the Pier Head buildings will link the northern docks to the Albert Dock is presently under construction, with the plan being to open it during Liverpool's Capital of Culture Year of 2008.


Airport

Opened in the 1930s, Liverpool Airport, is situated near Speke in the south of the city. It was renamed Liverpool John Lennon Airport in 2001, in honour of the late Beatle John Lennon. The airport's logo consists of a sketch that John Lennon had drawn of himself, and the words "Above us only sky", lyrics from his song Imagine. The sensitivity surrounding the airport's name change meant that the logo had to be designed in secret before it could be unveiled by John Lennon's widow Yoko Ono. The airport was the starting point for Beatles tours in the sixties, and images of the boys boarding planes there were seen throughout the world. In 2006 the airport handled nearly 5 million passengers and now serves 64 destinations, including the key European cities of Amsterdam, Barcelona, Berlin, Dublin, Geneva, Madrid, Paris, and Rome. New routes to New York and Toronto in summer 2007 were withdrawn towards the end of the year, as was the route to London City Airport. Image File history File links Liverpool_John_Lennon_Airport. ... Image File history File links Liverpool_John_Lennon_Airport. ... Liverpool John Lennon Airport (IATA: LPL, ICAO: EGGP) is an airport serving the English city of Liverpool. ... Liverpool John Lennon Airport (IATA: LPL, ICAO: EGGP) is an airport serving the English city of Liverpool. ... For other uses, see Speke (disambiguation). ... Liverpool John Lennon Airport (IATA: LPL, ICAO: EGGP) is an airport serving the English city of Liverpool. ... The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... Imagine is a utopian-themed song performed by John Lennon, which appears on his 1971 album, Imagine. ... For the song by Die Ärzte, see Yoko Ono (song). ... For other uses, see Amsterdam (disambiguation). ... Location Coordinates : Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Barcelona (Catalan) Spanish name Barcelona Nickname Ciutat Comtal (City of Counts) Postal code 08001–08080 Area code 34 (Spain) + 93 (Barcelona) Website http://www. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Geneva (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... This article is about the state. ... London City Airport (IATA: LCY, ICAO: EGLC) is a single-runway airport, intended for use by STOL (Short Take Off and Landing) airliners, and principally serving the financial districts of London. ...


Port

In 2002, 716,000 passengers used the Port of Liverpool, with the Isle of Man and Ireland being the two most important passenger routes, goods trade which was very low in the past decades, is growing up now. Together, the Port of Liverpool and Manchester Ship Canal offer a comprehensive range of port facilities, handling more than 40 million tonnes of cargo and 15,000 ship movements a year – making the River Mersey Britain's third busiest estuary.[14] Garston Docks, Liverpool, 1962 The Port of Liverpool is the name for the enclosed dock system that runs from Herculaneum Dock to Seaforth Dock, on the east side of the River Mersey, combined with the facilities built around the Great Float on the west side of the river. ... Garston Docks, Liverpool, 1962 The Port of Liverpool is the name for the enclosed dock system that runs from Herculaneum Dock to Seaforth Dock, on the east side of the River Mersey, combined with the facilities built around the Great Float on the west side of the river. ... The canal at its Manchester end, looking towards Old Trafford. ... The River Mersey is a river in north west England. ...


The Port and Canal form the "green" gateway to an economy of more than 120,000 industrial and commercial enterprises and a population equal to that of greater London. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Once the fiercest commercial rivals, the Port of Liverpool and the Manchester Ship Canal are now as one under the banner of Peel Ports, the UK's second largest ports group. The canal at its Manchester end, looking towards Old Trafford. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent...


Peel Ports' planned investment amounting to more than £200 million, will further enhance the potential of the Port and Canal as hubs for international trade and a unique environment friendly waterborne alternative to inland road haulage.


Railways

Liverpool is served by the Merseyrail urban rail network. The sections in the city centre are mostly underground. It has three lines: the Northern Line, which runs to Southport, Ormskirk, Kirkby and Hunts Cross; the Wirral Line, which runs through the Mersey Railway Tunnel and has branches to New Brighton, West Kirby, Chester and Ellesmere Port; and the City Line, only from Lime Street, for St Helens,Wigan, preston, Warrington and Manchester. The main entrance to Liverpool Lime Street Station Liverpool Lime Street railway station on Lime Street is the mainline railway station serving Liverpool, England. ... The main entrance to Liverpool Lime Street Station Liverpool Lime Street railway station on Lime Street is the mainline railway station serving Liverpool, England. ... Merseyrail is the name given to the electric commuter train network centred on Liverpool. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... railroads redirects here. ... A Northern Line train at Liverpool Central. ... For other uses, see Southport (disambiguation). ... Ormskirk is a market town in North West England, situated thirteen miles north of Liverpool and fifteen miles south of Preston. ... Arms of the former Kirkby Urban District Council Kirkby (pronounced - the second k is silent) is a new town in the Metropolitan Borough of Knowsley, Merseyside, England. ... Hillfoot Avenue and the district sign for Hunts Cross. ... A Wirral Line train at Liverpool Central. ... , New Brighton is a seaside resort located in the town of Wallasey, on the north east tip of the Wirral Peninsula, in Merseyside, England. ... , West Kirby is a town located on the north west corner of the coast of the Wirral Peninsula, Merseyside, England. ... For the larger local government district, see Chester (district). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The City Line is the name given to local rail routes out of Liverpool Lime Street station, Liverpool, Merseyside. ... The main entrance to Liverpool Lime Street Station Liverpool Lime Street railway station on Lime Street is the mainline railway station serving Liverpool, England. ... For the larger local government district, see Metropolitan Borough of St Helens. ... , Wigan is a town in Greater Manchester, England. ... This article is about Preston, Lancashire. ... This article is about the Borough in the north-west of England. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ...


The city's main railway station for longer-distance services is Lime Street station, one of the most famous train stations in Britain . Trains operate to destinations including London in 2 hours 1/2 with Pendolino trains, Birmingham, Newcastle upon Tyne, Manchester, Preston, Leeds, Scarborough, Sheffield, Nottingham and Norwich. The main entrance to Liverpool Lime Street Station Liverpool Lime Street railway station on Lime Street is the mainline railway station serving Liverpool, England. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Pendolino (from Italian Pendolo [pndolo] Pendulum and -ino, a diminutive suffix) is an Italian family of tilting trains used in Italy, Spain, Portugal, Slovenia, Finland, the Czech Republic, United Kingdom,Switzerland and China. ... This article is about the British city. ... This article is about a city in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... This article is about Preston, Lancashire. ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ... This article is on the English seaside resort. ... For other uses, see Sheffield (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Nottingham (disambiguation). ... For other places with the same name, see Norwich (disambiguation). ...


The London line was one of the first electrified in Britain with wire (with Manchester and Glasgow). This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ...


Liverpool had been home to the first electrically powered overhead railway in the world. Known as the Liverpool Overhead Railway or (Dockers Umbrella) it opened on February 4, 1893 with an eventual total of 14 stations. The line suffered extensive damages during the second world war and was eventually closed down on December 30, 1956 with considerable protest. The tunnel portal in Dingle is one of the only surviving signs of the railway's existence as the iron bridges were removed for scrap. The Liverpool Overhead Railway opened the February 4, 1893. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference Q445012 Statistics Province: Munster County: Population (2006) 1,920  John Street, Dingle Dingle (Irish: or ) is a town in County Kerry in the Republic of Ireland, on the Atlantic coast some 50 km west-south-west of Tralee and 80 km west-north...


Buses

Long distance coach services arrive at and depart from the Norton Street Coach Station. Local buses serve the whole of the city and its surrounding areas. The two principal termini for local buses are Queen Square Bus Station (located near Lime Street railway station) for services north and east of the city, and Paradise Street Interchange (located near the Albert Dock) for services to the south and east. Cross-river services to the Wirral use roadside terminus points in Castle Street and Sir Thomas Street. National Express coach on route 561 National Express is the brand under which the majority of long distance bus and coach services in the United Kingdom are marketed, and also the company that manages this network and operates some of the services. ... The main entrance to Liverpool Lime Street Station Liverpool Lime Street railway station on Lime Street is the mainline railway station serving Liverpool, England. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Wirral is a metropolitan borough in Merseyside, North West England, which occupies the northern part of the Wirral Peninsula, more commonly known as The Wirral. ...


Historic tramway and railways

Historically, Liverpool had an extensive tram network, consturction of which started in 1869 by the Liverpool Tramways Company; however, this was dismantled in the 1950s. Other railway lines, such as the Canada Dock Branch from Edge Hill to Kirkdale, no longer see passenger services, or have been removed completely, such as the North Liverpool Extension Line. This article refers to public transport vehicles running on rails. ... The Liverpool Tramways Company was authorised by Act of Parliament in 1868 it opened in November 1869 it ran until 14th September 1957. ... The Canada Dock Branch is a railway line in Liverpool, England, built by the London and North Western Railway (LNWR). ... Edge Hill is a district of Liverpool, England The area was first developed in the late 18th/early 19th century. ... Kirkdale is an area of Liverpool. ... The North Liverpool Extension Line is a now-disused railway line in Liverpool, England. ...


Proposed new tram

In 2001, a plan to build new a light rail system, Merseytram was developed. After central government insisted on additional guarantees prior to the release of previously committed funds, it was cancelled in November 2005. However, it is to be included in the transport plan from 2006-2011, as it is deemed to be an important part of Liverpool's development.[15] This article is about light rail systems in general. ... Merseytram was a proposed tramway for Liverpool and surrounding districts of Merseyside, England. ...


Culture

Liverpool European Capital of Culture 2008 flag, flying in front of the Port of Liverpool Building
Liverpool European Capital of Culture 2008 flag, flying in front of the Port of Liverpool Building

Liverpool is internationally known as a cultural centre, with a particularly rich history in popular music (most notably The Beatles), performing and visual arts. In 2003, Liverpool was named a European Capital of Culture for 2008, the other site being Stavanger, Norway. A series of cultural events during 2004-9 is planned, peaking in 2008. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (884x689, 386 KB)Liverpool European Capital of Culture 2008 flag, flying in front of the Port of Liverpool building. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (884x689, 386 KB)Liverpool European Capital of Culture 2008 flag, flying in front of the Port of Liverpool building. ... The Port of Liverpool Liverpool, United Kingdom were built in 1907 and designed by Arnold Thornley. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... County District Jæren Municipality NO-1103 Administrative centre Stavanger Mayor (1995-) Leif Johan Sevland (H) Official language form BokmÃ¥l Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 406 71 km² 68 km² 0. ...


Poetry

During the late 1960s the city became well-known for the Liverpool poets, of whom Roger McGough and the late Adrian Henri are among the best known. The anthology The Mersey Sound, by Henri, McGough and Brian Patten, has sold over 500,000 copies since first being published in 1967. (The) Liverpool Poets refers to a number of influential 1960s poets from Liverpool, England, heavily influenced by 1950s Beat poetry. ... Front cover of the 1983 revised edition of The Mersey Sound Roger McGough CBE (born November 9, 1937) is a well-known British performance poet. ... Adrian Henri (April 10, 1932 – December 21, 2000) was a British poet and painter. ... Front cover, designed by Alan Spain, of the original UK paperback edition of the anthology The Mersey Sound. ... Brian Patten (photo by Hugo Glendinning) Brian Patten (born 7 February 1946, Liverpool) is a British poet, born in a working-class neighbourhood near the docks. ...


In recent years The Dead Good Poets Society and particularly poets like David Bateman and Jim Bennett, both of whom at various times have been called the best in Liverpool, have ensured that the reputation of Liverpool based performance poetry has been maintained. David Bateman can refer to: David Bateman (English poet), a member of the Liverpool-based Dead Good Poets Society David Bateman (Canadian poet) Category: ... Jim Bennett (born 1951 in Liverpool) is a poet. ...


Theatre & Performing Arts

Liverpool has a strong history of performing arts which is reflected in its annual theatrical highlight The Liverpool Shakespeare Festival which takes place inside Liverpool Cathedral and in the adjacent historic St James' Gardens every summer, and in the number of theatres in the city, including the Empire, Everyman, Neptune, Royal Court and Unity Theatres, and the Liverpool Playhouse. The Everyman and Playhouse run their own theatre company[16] as does the Unity Theatre.[17] The Liverpool Shakespeare Festival is an annual celebration of some of Shakespeares greatest plays. ... North elevation of Liverpool Anglican Cathedral. ... Liverpool Empire Theatre is located on Lime Street in Liverpool, England. ... Everyman Theatre at dusk from the steps of the Roman Catholic Cathedral of Christ the King The Everyman Theatre is a theatre located on Hope Street in Liverpool, United Kingdom. ... The Neptune Theatre, built in 1913, is one of Liverpools many theatres. ... The Royal Court Theatre is a theatre at 1 Roe Street, Liverpool, England. ... The Unity Theatre is based in Liverpool, United kingdom formed as the Merseyside Left Theatre in the 1930s, in 1944 it became Merseyside Unity Theatre. The company was radical and experimentalist also staged classics alongside contemporary left wing theatre and made theatre accessible to the working class. ... The Liverpool Playhouse is a theatre in Williamson Square in the city of Liverpool, England. ... The Unity Theatre is based in Liverpool, United kingdom formed as the Merseyside Left Theatre in the 1930s, in 1944 it became Merseyside Unity Theatre. The company was radical and experimentalist also staged classics alongside contemporary left wing theatre and made theatre accessible to the working class. ...


A flourishing orchestra, the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra, performs in its own home, the Philharmonic Hall. The city also features a youth orchestra. The Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra is one of the UKs longest established orchestras, and is based in Liverpool. ... Liverpool Philharmonic Hall is a Grade II* listed concert hall located mid way along Hope Street in Liverpool, England. ...


Since the 1960s, Liverpool has been famous for its thriving music scene. The pop and rock music scene in Liverpool, England has been active for decades, and been important in the development of a number of bands and artists who went on to national and international fame. ...


Visual arts

SuperLambBanana, a well-known sculpture in the Albert Dock area, recently relocated to Tithebarn Street
SuperLambBanana, a well-known sculpture in the Albert Dock area, recently relocated to Tithebarn Street
Albert Docks, home to the Tate Liverpool

Liverpool has long had a reputation in the visual arts. Painter George Stubbs was born in the city in 1724. Pre-Raphaelites are among the important paintings in the Walker Art Gallery. Sudley House contains another major collection of pre 20th century art.[18] Liverpool has more galleries and national museums than any other city in the United Kingdom apart from London. The Tate Liverpool gallery houses the modern art collection of the Tate in the north of England, and was until the opening of Tate Modern the largest exhibition space dedicated to modern art in the United Kingdom. The FACT centre hosts touring multimedia exhibitions. Download high resolution version (3072x2048, 2362 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (3072x2048, 2362 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Super Lamb Banana is a sculpture in Liverpool, England. ... Download high resolution version (1000x710, 217 KB)Albert Dock in Liverpool. ... Download high resolution version (1000x710, 217 KB)Albert Dock in Liverpool. ... A self portrait by George Stubbs George Stubbs (born in Liverpool on August 25, 1724 – died in London July 10, 1806) was a British painter, best known for his paintings of horses. ... The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood was a group of English painters, poets and critics, founded in 1848 by John Everett Millais, Dante Gabriel Rossetti and William Holman Hunt. ... This page is about the Walker Art Gallery in Liverpool. ... Sudley House, Aigburth, Liverpool, England is an art gallery which contains the collection of George Holt in its original setting. ... The Tate Liverpool is located in Albert Dock, Liverpool. ... Tate Modern from the Millennium Bridge Tate Modern from St Pauls Cathedral. ... The FACT (Foundation for Art & Creative Technology) centre is a multimedia complex based in Liverpool, United Kingdom. ...


The Liverpool Biennial[19] is a festival of arts held (as the name implies) every two years. The festival generally runs from mid-September to late November and comprises three main sections; the International, The Independents and New Contemporaries although fringe events are timed to coincide. It was during this event in 2004 that Yoko Ono's work "My mother is beautiful" caused widespread public protest by exhibiting photographs of a naked woman's pubic area on the main shopping street. Despite protests the work remained in place. The Liverpool Biennial is the UKs largest international festival of contemporary art. ... For the song by Die Ärzte, see Yoko Ono (song). ...


The 2006 Biennial ran until mid-November: exhibitions could be found dotted around Liverpool City centre and included such features as the lions in front of St George's Hall being caged, St Luke's Church being filled with upturned boats, and an artist (Birgit R. Deubner) walking across downtown Liverpool wearing wings made from lead feathers (the "Icarus Project").Michael Bisping beat everyone including Copnstantine in a MMA fight.


Education

In Liverpool primary and secondary education is available in various forms supported by the state including secular, Church of England, Jewish, and Roman Catholic. Islamic education is available at primary level, but there is currently no secondary provision. One of Liverpool's important early schools was The Liverpool Blue Coat School; founded in 1708 as a charitable school. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2136x2848, 1918 KB)Victoria Building, University of Liverpool. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2136x2848, 1918 KB)Victoria Building, University of Liverpool. ... The University of Liverpool is a university in the city of Liverpool, England. ... Victoria Building The Victoria Building was historically the administrative heart of the University of Liverpool, housing the University Library as well as offices for most of the senior academic staff. ... This article concerns secularity, that is, being secular, in various senses. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[3] in England, the Mother Church of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the oldest among the communions thirty-eight independent national churches. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Islam (Arabic: ; ( â–¶ (help· info)), the submission to God) is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions and the worlds second-largest religion. ... The Liverpool Blue Coat School was founded in 1708 by Mr Bryan Blundell and Rev. ...


The Liverpool Institute High School for Boys opened in 1825 closed in 1985, the building after extensive renovation and rebuilding for the Liverpool Institute of Performing Arts is no longer a secondary school. Prior to closure it had been an English grammar school for boys ages 11 to 18 with an excellent academic reputation built up over more than a century. Its list of scholarships and places at Oxford University and Cambridge University runs to some 300 names – in addition to distinctions gained at Liverpool University and at many other prominent British universities like . The school was a true measure of Liverpool's intellectual capital and its old boys could and can be found in later life in many fields of professional distinction including: law, the Church, armed forces, politics, academia, government and colonial administration as well as in trade & commerce. The Liverpool Institute High School for Girls also closed in 1985. The Liverpool Institute for Boys was an all-boys grammar school in the English port city of Liverpool. ... The Liverpool Institute of Performing Arts opened in 1996. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... This article is about the city in England. ... The University of Liverpool is a university in the city of Liverpool in the United Kingdom. ... Liverpool Institute High School for Girls Liverpool, England was established in 1874. ...


The Liverpool Blue Coat School is the top-performing school in the city all down to [20] attaining 100% 5 or more A*-C grades at GCSE resulting in the 30th best GCSE results in the country and an average point score per student of 1087.4 in A/AS levels. Other notable schools include Liverpool College[21] founded in 1840 Merchant Taylors' School founded in 1620. Another of Liverpool's notable senior schools is St. Edward's College situated in the West Derby area of the city. Historic grammar schools, such as the Liverpool Institute High School & Liverpool Collegiate, closed in the 1980s are still remembered as centres of academic excellence. Bellerive Catholic College is the city's top performing non selective school, based upon GCSE results in 2007. The Liverpool Blue Coat School was founded in 1708 by Mr Bryan Blundell and Rev. ... Liverpool College is a public school located in the suburbs of Liverpool, England. ... See also Merchant Taylors School, Northwood. ... St. ... The Liverpool Institute for Boys was founded in 1825, but occupied other premises while the money was found to build a dedicated building. ... The Liverpool Collegiate Institution is a former school in Liverpool, England, established in 1843. ...


Liverpool has three universities: the University of Liverpool, Liverpool John Moores University and Liverpool Hope University. Edge Hill University, originally founded as a teacher-training college in the Edge Hill district of Liverpool, is now located in Ormskirk in South-West Lancashire. For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... The University of Liverpool is a university in the city of Liverpool, England. ... Liverpool John Moores University is a university in Liverpool, England. ... Liverpool Hope University is a university in Liverpool, England. ... Edge Hill University is situated in Ormskirk in Lancashire, England. ... A college (Latin collegium) can be the name of any group of colleagues; originally it meant a group of people living together under a common set of rules (con-, together + leg-, law). As a consequence members of colleges were originally styled fellow and still are in some places. ... Edge Hill is a district of Liverpool, England The area was first developed in the late 18th/early 19th century. ... Ormskirk is a market town in North West England, situated thirteen miles north of Liverpool and fifteen miles south of Preston. ...


The University of Liverpool was established in 1881 as University College Liverpool. In 1884, became part of the federal Victoria University. Following a Royal Charter and Act of Parliament in 1903, it became an independent university, the University of Liverpool, with the right to confer its own degrees.


Liverpool Hope University, founded in 1844, is situated on both sides of Taggart Avenue in Childwall and a second Campus in the City Centre (The Cornerstone). Hope is quickly making a name for itself within the Liberal Arts, the University has also enjoyed successes in terms of high graduate employability, campus development, and a substantial increase in student applications from outside of the City. Liverpool Hope University is a university in Liverpool, England. ...


The Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, founded to address some of the problems created by trade, continues today as a post-graduate school affiliated with the University of Liverpool and is one of only two institutions internationally that house the de facto standard anti-venom repository.[citation needed] The Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM), England, was founded on 12 November 1898, by a donation from Sir Alfred Lewis Jones, a Liverpool Shipowner. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... The University of Liverpool is a university in the city of Liverpool, England. ...


Liverpool John Moores University was previously a Taylor, and gained status in 1992. It is named in honour of Sir John Moores, one of the founders of the Littlewoods football pools and retail group, who was a major benefactor. The institution was previously owned and run by Liverpool City Council. Liverpool John Moores University is a university in Liverpool, England. ... Taylor is an English surname, originally an occupational surname meaning tailor. [1] Taylor has also been commonly used as a given name in English-speaking countries. ... Sir John Moores (1896-1993) was a British merchant. ... Littlewoods Shop Direct Home Shopping Ltd. ...


The city has one further education college, Liverpool Community College. The college will recruit around 21,000 students in the academic year 2006/07. Further education (often abbreviated FE) is post-secondary, post-compulsory education (in addition to that received at secondary school). ... Liverpool Community College is the only college of further education in Liverpool. ...


There are two Jewish schools in Liverpool, both belonging to the King David Foundation. King David School, Liverpool is the High School, located on Childwall Road, close to Childwall Comprehensive and Childwall Fiveways. The King David Primary School is situated at Beauclair Drive. There is also a King David Kindergarten, featured in the community centre of Harold House. These schools are all run by the King David Foundation based in Harold House in Childwall; conveniently next door to the Childwall Synagogue The King David School is located in Liverpool, United Kingdom. ... Childwall is a suburb of Liverpool, Merseyside and a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... The synagogue Scolanova Trani in Italy. ...


Sport

Anfield, the home of Liverpool F.C
Anfield, the home of Liverpool F.C
Goodison Park, the home of Everton F.C
Goodison Park, the home of Everton F.C

Liverpool is associated with a variety of sports, most notably football, but also a number of others. Image File history File links 76693565_b44605f726_2. ... Image File history File links 76693565_b44605f726_2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1224x918, 130 KB) Summary author=Biloblue source=self-taken photo at goodison park url=n/a Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1224x918, 130 KB) Summary author=Biloblue source=self-taken photo at goodison park url=n/a Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU... “Soccer” redirects here. ...


Liverpool has two Premier League football clubs: Everton F.C. at Goodison Park and Liverpool F.C. at Anfield. Liverpool are statistically the most successful English football club of all-time, having won the league title 18 times, FA Cup seven times, Football League Cup seven times, European Cup/UEFA Champions League five times and UEFA Cup three times. Everton have also enjoyed spells of dominance, having won the league title nine times, FA Cup five times, and the European Cup Winners' Cup once. Their most recent success was the FA Cup in 1995. South Liverpool F.C. were once another successful professional side, however they have experienced a turbulent history and are currently in the Liverpool County Premier League. For the Scottish equivalent see Scottish Premier League The FA Premier League (often referred to as the Barclays Premiership in England and the Barclays English Premier League or just simply The EPL internationally) is a league competition for football clubs located at the top of the English football league system... Everton Football Club is an English football club located in the city of Liverpool. ... Goodison Park is the home ground of Everton F.C. in Liverpool. ... Liverpool Football Club are an English professional football club based in Liverpool, Merseyside, who play in the Premier League; they are historically the most successful club in the history of English football, having won more trophies than any other English club. ... This article is about the football stadium. ... England national football team playing at Wembley Stadium Football is the national sport of England, and as such has an important place within English national life. ... The English football champions are the winners of the highest league in English football, which is currently the Premier League. ... This article is about the English FA Cup. ... The Carling Cup Trophy The Football League Cup, commonly known as the League Cup, is an English football competition. ... UEFA Champions League, which replaced the European Champions Cup, is a seasonal club football competition organised by UEFA since 1992 for the most successful football clubs in Europe. ... The UEFA Cup (also known as European Cup 3, CE3 or C3) is a football competition for European club teams, organized by the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). ... The English football champions are the winners of the highest league in English football, which is currently the Premier League. ... This article is about the English FA Cup. ... The Cup Winners Cup was a football club competition between the winners of the European domestic cup competitions. ... This article is about the English FA Cup. ... South Liverpool F.C. are a football club from the Aigburth suburb of Liverpool, England. ... The Liverpool County Premier League is a football competition based in Merseyside, England. ...


Liverpool is the only city to have staged top division football every season since the formation of the Football League in 1888, and both Liverpool and Everton have played in the top division every season since 1962. The Football League is an organisation representing 72 professional football clubs in England and Wales, and runs the oldest professional football league competition in the world. ...


Professional basketball is played in the city with the addition of Everton Tigers into the elite British Basketball League in 2007. The club is associated with Everton Football Club, and is part of the Toxteth Tigers youth development programme, which reaches over 1,500 young people every year.[22] The Tigers will commence play in Britain's top league for the 2007-08 season, though their home venue has yet to be confirmed. Their closest professional rivals are the Chester Jets, based 18 miles away in Chester. This article is about the sport. ... The Everton Tigers are a professional basketball team based in the city of Liverpool, in England. ... “BBL” redirects here. ... The 2007-08 BBL season, the 21st since the establishment of the British Basketball League, is due to start on September 9, 2007, when the Plymouth Raiders face the Guildford Heat in the inaugural BBL Cup Winners Cup. ... The TCS Chester Jets are a British basketball team based in Chester. ... For the larger local government district, see Chester (district). ...


County cricket is occasionally played in Liverpool, with Lancashire County Cricket Club typically playing one match every year at Liverpool Cricket Club, Aigburth. In the UK, County cricket is the domestic form of the sport of cricket that is considered to be first-class cricket. ... Lancashire County Cricket Club is one of the eighteen major county clubs which make up the English domestic cricket structure, representing the historic county of Lancashire. ... Aigburth (pronounced egg-birth) is a suburb of Liverpool, England. ...


Aintree Racecourse to the north of Liverpool in the adjacent borough of Sefton is home to the famous steeplechase, the Grand National, One of the most famous events in the international horse racing calendar, it is held in early April each year. In addition to horse-racing, Aintree has also hosted motor racing, including the British Grand Prix in the 1950s and 1960s. Aintree Racecourse is a racecourse in Aintree, Liverpool, England. ... See Sefton, New South Wales for the suburb of Sydney, Australia. ... A steeplechase race The steeplechase is a form of horse racing (primarily conducted in the United Kingdom, United States, and Ireland) and derives its name from early races in which orientation of the course was by reference to a church steeple, jumping fences and ditches and generally traversing the many... The Grand National is the most valuable National Hunt handicap horse race in the United Kingdom. ... Horse-racing is an equestrian sporting activity which has been practiced over the centuries; the chariot races of Roman times were an early example, as was the contest of the steeds of the god Odin and the giant Hrungnir in Norse mythology. ... Auto racing (also known as automobile racing or autosport) is a sport involving racing automobiles. ... The British Grand Prix is a race in the calendar of the FIA Formula One World Championship. ...


Speedway racing was formerly staged at Stanley Stadium in Prescot Road from the 1920s until the late 1930s. It then reopened in 1949, with the Liverpool Chads taking part in the National League, until the track closed mid-season in 1953. A brief open season in 1959 was followed by the final season in 1960 when the Liverpool Pirates participated in the Provincial League. Peter Craven, the World Champion in 1955 and 1962, started out at Stanley Stadium before moving on to Belle Vue in Manchester. Motorcycle speedway, normally referred to as Speedway, is a motorcycle sport that involves usually 4 and sometimes up to 6 riders competing over 4 laps of an oval circuit. ... Peter Theodore Craven[1] (June 21, 1934 — September 20, 1963[2]) was an English motorcycle racer. ... The World Championship of Speedway is an international competition between the highest ranked motorcycle speedway riders of the world. ... Belle Vue Aces, Manchester United Kingdom Belle Vue Aces are a highly successful British speedway team once based at Hyde road from 1928 to 1987, then returned to its origins, where they now continue to race at their birth place (1927) at Kirkmanshulme Lane stadium. ...


A speedway track also operated in the mid-1930s at Seaforth Stadium.


Liverpool Harriers, who meet at Wavertree Athletics Centre, are one of five athletic clubs. Liverpool has a long history of boxing that has produced John Conteh, Alan Rudkin and Paul Hodkinson and hosts high level amateur boxing events. Park Road Gymnastics Centre provides training to a high level. The City of Liverpool Swimming Club has been National Speedo League Champions 8 out of the last 11 years. Liverpool Tennis Development Programme based at Wavertree Tennis Centre is one of the largest in the UK.[23] Liverpool is also home to the Red Triangle Karate Club, which provided many of the 1990 squad that won the World Shotokan Championships in Sunderland. Luminaries include Sensei Keinosuke Enoeda, Sensei Frank Brennan, Sensei Omry Weiss, Sensei Dekel Kerer, Sensei Andy Sherry and Sensei Terry O'Neill, who is also famous for various acting roles. John Conteh (born Kirkby, May 27, 1951) was a British boxer and former world Light-Heavyweight boxing champion. ... Alan Rudkin (1941-Present) is a former British, Commonwealth, and European Bantamweight Boxing Champion (1965-1970). ... Paul Hodkinson aka Hoko (born 14 September 1965 in Liverpool, England]) is former professional boxer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Terry ONeill (born July 30, 1938 in London, United Kingdom) is a photographer, who achieved his greatest success documenting the fashion style, and celebrities of the 1960s. ...


Rugby league is played at amateur and student level within the city; the last professional team bearing the city's name was Liverpool City, which folded in the 1960s. Liverpool St Helens F.C. is one of the oldest rugby union teams in the UK. Liverpool City were a professional rugby league team from the city of Liverpool in England. ... Liverpool St Helens Football Club, previously Liverpool Football Club, have been playing rugby football since 1858. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ...


Liverpool is one of three cities which still host the traditional sport of British Baseball and it hosts the annual England-Wales international match every two years, alternating with Cardiff and Newport. Liverpool Trojans are the oldest existing baseball club in the UK. The origins of the sport known as British baseball, or sometimes (less accurately) as Welsh baseball, date to 1892 when the governing bodies of England and Wales agreed to change the name of their sport from rounders to baseball. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... This article is about the city of Newport in Wales. ...


The Royal Liverpool Golf Club, situated in the nearby town of Hoylake on the Wirral Peninsula, has hosted The Open Championship on a number of occasions, most recently in 2006. It has also hosted the Walker Cup. The Royal Liverpool Golf Club is a leading golf club in North West England. ... , Hoylake beach, looking towards Hilbre Island Arms of the former Hoylake Urban District Council Hoylake is a seaside town in Merseyside, England, a few miles to the west of Liverpool. ... “British Open” redirects here. ... The Walker Cup is a golf trophy contested biennially in odd numbered years between teams comprising the leading amateur golfers of the United States and Great Britain and Ireland (in political terms the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland). ...


Liverpool has a Lacrosse Club, open to both Men and Women. Playing at Liverpool Cricket Club in Aigburth, South Liverpool, the Mens team is mainly built around the University squad, but with University old boys and locals joining the team. Having started in the lowest division in the north, Division 5, they have successfully gained promotion to Division 4 in their first competitive season.


Parkour/freerunning is a popular sport in liverpool. Two well-known traceurs from the city are Daniel Ilabaca and Ryan Doyle. A traceur performs a cat balance, which in French is called an équilibre de chat. ... Free running has the following meanings: Free running is another name for the sport of parkour Free-running sleep is sleep that is not artificially regulated A free running timer is an electronic timer that continues to run without external stimulus To be free running means to move smoothly This...


Sports stadia

The town of Liverpool is home to two professional football clubs, Everton and Liverpool. Liverpool is the only English city to have staged top division football every single season since the formation of the Football League in 1888, and both of the city's clubs play in high-capacity stadiums. Everton Football Club is an English football club located in the city of Liverpool. ... Liverpool Football Club are an English professional football club based in Liverpool, Merseyside, who play in the Premier League; they are historically the most successful club in the history of English football, having won more trophies than any other English club. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Football League is an organisation representing 72 professional football clubs in England and Wales, and runs the oldest professional football league competition in the world. ...


Liverpool have played at Anfield since 1892, when the club was formed to occupy the stadium following Everton's departure following a dispute with their landlord. Liverpool are still playing there 116 years later, although the ground has been completely rebuilt since the 1970s and only the Main Stand survives from before 1992. The Spion Kop (rebuilt as an all-seater stand in 1994/1995) was the most famous part of the ground, gaining cult status across the world due to the songs and celebrations of the many fans who packed onto its terraces. Anfield can now hold more than 45,000 spectators in comfort, and is a distinctive landmark in an area filled with smaller and older buildings. Liverpool Football Club are an English professional football club based in Liverpool, Merseyside, who play in the Premier League; they are historically the most successful club in the history of English football, having won more trophies than any other English club. ... This article is about the football stadium. ... Everton Football Club is an English football club located in the city of Liverpool. ...


Everton moved to Goodison Park in 1892 after a dispute with their landlord caused them to pull out of Anfield. The ground is situated at the far side of Stanley Park to Anfield. Goodison Park was the first major football stadium built in England. Molineux (Wolves' ground) had been opened three years earlier but was still relatively undeveloped. St. James's Park, Newcastle, opened in 1892, was little more than a field. Only Scotland had more advanced grounds. Rangers opened Ibrox in 1887, while Celtic Park was officially inaugurated at the same time as Goodison Park. Everton performed a miraculous transformation at Mere Green, spending up to £3000 on laying out the ground and erecting stands on three sides. For £552 Mr. Barton prepared the land at 4½d a square yard. Kelly Brothers of Walton built two uncovered stands each for 4,000 people, and a covered stand seating 3,000, at a total cost of £1,460. Outside, hoardings cost a further £150, gates and sheds cost £132 10s and 12 turnstiles added another £7 15s to the bill. The ground was immediately renamed Goodison Park and proudly opened on 24 August 1892, by Lord Kinnaird and Frederick Wall of the FA. But instead of a match the 12,000 crowd saw a short athletics meeting followed by a selection of music and a fireworks display. Everton's first game there was on 2 September 1892 when they beat Bolton 4-2. It now has the capacity for more than 40,000 spectators all-seated, but the last expansion took place in 1994 when a new goal-end stand gave the stadium an all-seater capacity. The Main Stand dates back to the 1970s, while the other two stands are refurbished pre-Second World War structures. Everton Football Club is an English football club located in the city of Liverpool. ... Goodison Park is the home ground of Everton F.C. in Liverpool. ... This article is about the football stadium. ... Stanley Park is a 45 hectare park in Liverpool, England, designed by Edward Kemp which opened in 1870. ... This article is about the football stadium. ... Molineux, home of Wolverhampton Wanderers Molineux stadium is the home ground of Wolverhampton Wanderers F.C., who are currently members of the Football League Championship. ... Ibrox is a district of the city of Glasgow in western Scotland. ... This page is about the soccer stadium in Glasgow. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


There are currently plans for both stadiums to be pulled down and for the teams to relocate. Liverpool have been considering a move to a new stadium in Stanley Park since 2000; seven years on work has started and the 60,000-seat stadium is expected to be ready by 2010. Liverpool Football Club are an English professional football club based in Liverpool, Merseyside, who play in the Premier League; they are historically the most successful club in the history of English football, having won more trophies than any other English club. ... Stanley Park Stadium is a proposed title of the planned football stadium to be built in Stanley Park, Liverpool, England. ...


Everton have been considering relocation since 1996, and in 2003 were forced to scrap plans for a 55,000-seat stadium at King's Dock due to financial reasons. The latest plan has been to move beyond Liverpool's council boundary to Kirkby, but this has proved controversial with some fans, as well as members of the local community. At one point there were plans for Everton to ground-share with Liverpool at the proposed new stadium in Stanley Park, but these were abandoned. Everton Football Club is an English football club located in the city of Liverpool. ... The Kings Dock was a dock on the River Mersey and part of the Port of Liverpool. ... Arms of the former Kirkby Urban District Council Kirkby (pronounced - the second k is silent) is a new town in the Metropolitan Borough of Knowsley, Merseyside, England. ... Stanley Park is a 45 hectare park in Liverpool, England, designed by Edward Kemp which opened in 1870. ...


Media

The ITV region which covers Liverpool is ITV Granada. In 2006, the Television company opened a new newsroom in the Royal Liver Building. Granada's regional news broadcasts were produced at the Albert Dock News Centre during the 1980s and 1990s.[24] The BBC also opened a new newsroom on Hanover Street in 2006. But with both broadcasters based in Manchester, the arrangement is sometimes controversial,[citation needed] with Manchester's perceived influence over the region's media. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2856x2142, 1906 KB) Summary Photo taken by Rob May 28th Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2856x2142, 1906 KB) Summary Photo taken by Rob May 28th Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Public Space Broadcasting is a project involving the British Broadcasting Corporation, Philips and other technology providers and local councils to install LED screens with sound systems in prominent locations in historic city centres. ... For other uses, see ITV (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ...


ITV's daily magazine programme This Morning was famously broadcast from studios at Albert Dock until 1996, when production was moved to London. Granada's short-lived shopping channel "Shop!" was also produced in Liverpool until it was axed in 2002. This Morning logo (ITV1) This Morning is a British, ITV1 daytime television programme that started on 3 October 1988 and includes celebrity guests, entertainment, advice, competitions and features. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ...


Liverpool is the home of the TV production company Lime Pictures, formerly Mersey Television, which produced the now-defunct soap opera, Brookside, and currently produces Hollyoaks for Channel 4 and Grange Hill for the BBC. Lime Pictures is owned by All3Media. These programmes are regularly filmed in and around the Childwall area. Lime Pictures, formerly known as Mersey Television, is a British television production company, founded by renowned producer and writer Phil Redmond in the early 1980s. ... For other uses, see Brookside (disambiguation). ... Hollyoaks is a British television soap opera, first broadcast on 23 October 1995, on Channel 4. ... This article is about the British television station. ... Grange Hill is a British childrens television drama series which is shown on BBC1. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Lime Pictures, formerly known as Mersey Television, is a British television production company, founded by renowned producer and writer Phil Redmond in the early 1980s. ... Childwall is a suburb of Liverpool, Merseyside and a Liverpool City Council Ward. ...


The city fares better with regards to other media. The city has two daily newspapers: the morning Daily Post and the evening Echo, both published by the same company, the Trinity Mirror group. The Daily Post, especially, serves a wider area, including north Wales. The UK's first online only weekly newspaper called Southport Reporter[25] (Southport & Mersey Reporter), is also one of the many other news outlets that covers the city. Radio stations include BBC Radio Merseyside, Juice FM, KCR 106.7 FM and Radio City 96.7 as well as Magic 1548. The last two are both based in St. John's Beacon which, along with the two cathedrals, dominates the city's skyline. The independent media organisation Indymedia also covers Liverpool, while 'Nerve' magazine publishes articles and reviews of cultural events. The Liverpool Echo and Liverpool Daily Post are two newspapers published by Trinity Mirror on Merseyside in the United Kingdom. ... The Liverpool Echo and Liverpool Daily Post are two newspapers published by Trinity Mirror on Merseyside in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the country. ... Southport Reporter, an e-newspaper that was started by Patrick Trollope BA(Hons) LBPPA, is the UK’s very first internet only regional newspaper. ... Screenshot of site in 2004. ... BBC Radio Merseyside is the BBC Local Radio service for the English metropolitan county of Merseyside and north Cheshire. ... 107. ... Radio City 96. ... Magic 1548 is a local commercial radio station in the Liverpool area of England, on the frequency of 1548 AM. Magic is a sister station to Radio City, with which it shares studios atop St. ... St. ... The Independent Media Center, also called Indymedia or the IMC, is a loose network of amateur or alternative media organizations and journalists who organize into decentralized collectives, normally around geographic locations. ... Nerve is a free magazine published by Catalyst Media (formerly Catalyst Creative Media) in Liverpool, North West England. ...


Liverpool has also featured in films; see List of films set in Liverpool for some of them. Films set in Liverpool The Arrest of Goudie (1901) arguably the worlds first filmed crime reconstruction by Mitchell and Kenyon. ...


Liverpool will be the host city for the 2008 MTV Europe Music Awards. 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... The MTV Europe Music Awards were established in 1994 by MTV Europe to celebrate the most popular music videos in Europe. ...


Famous Liverpudlians

Many famous names have been associated with Liverpool; see Liverpudlians.


Liverpool has also played a large part in UK (and sometimes world) Pop Music culture since the 1960s. For a list of some noteworthy groups from the area, consult the list of famous bands from Liverpool. The most popular group from Liverpool are The Beatles. The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... This article is about the genre of popular music. ... This is a list of famous music groups or people from the English city of Liverpool for individuals see List of famous people from Liverpool. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ...


The Wall of Fame is located opposite the famous Cavern Club, near the original one where bricks are engraved with the name of bands and musicians who have played at the Cavern Club. The Liverpool Wall of Fame on Mathew Street in front of the famous Cavern Club is a tribute to acts from the city which have reached number one in the UK charts. ... External view of the New Cavern Club, January 2006 The Cavern Club, which was opened on January 16, 1957, is a legendary rock and roll club at 10 Mathew Street, Liverpool, England, where Brian Epstein was introduced to the Beatles on 9 November 1961. ... External view of the New Cavern Club, January 2006 The Cavern Club, which was opened on January 16, 1957, is a legendary rock and roll club at 10 Mathew Street, Liverpool, England, where Brian Epstein was introduced to the Beatles on 9 November 1961. ...


Liverpool has also been home to numerous football stars. Robbie Fowler, Steven Gerrard, Jamie Carragher, Phil Thompson, Mick Quinn, Peter Reid, Wayne Rooney, Lee Trundle, Tommy Smith and Steve McManaman are just some of the many footballers to have been born in the city. Robert Bernard Robbie Fowler, born 9 April 1975 is an English footballer who currently plays for Championship side Cardiff City. ... Steven George Gerrard MBE (IPA: []) (born 30 May 1980, Whiston, Merseyside) is an English football player. ... -1... Phil Thompson (born Liverpool, 21st January 1954) was a cultured defender in the dominant Liverpool team of the 1970s and 1980s who later returned to the club as first team coach. ... Michael Micky Quinn, (born May 2, 1963), was an English footballer of Irish descent. ... Peter Reid (born 20 June 1956 in Knowsley, Lancashire (Now Merseyside) is an English former professional football player, manager and pundit. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Lee Trundle (born 10 October 1976 in Liverpool) is a professional footballer who currently plays for Bristol City in the Championship. ... Thomas Tommy Smith MBE (born 5 April 1945) was a long-serving footballer with Liverpool, known for his uncompromising defensive style. ... Steven Steve McManaman (born 11 February 1972, in Liverpool, England) is an English former footballer of the 1990s and early 2000s, who played as a winger in a career spanning two of European Footballs biggest club football sides in Liverpool F.C. and Real Madrid. ...


In the late 90's Melanie Chisholm of the spice girls lived there with her family. Melanie Jayne Chisholm (born 12 January 1974 in Whiston, Lancashire), also known as Melanie C or Mel C, is an English singer, songwriter, and television personality best known as one of the five members of the English girl group Spice Girls, who was nicknamed Sporty Spice. As a solo artist...


Nel Tarleton, who held the British featherweight championship on three separate occasions, and who was one of only a handful of fighters to win two Lonsdale Belts outright, was born in Liverpool, and fought many of his fights in the city. The Lonsdale Belt is the oldest championship belt in boxing and its origins started in London back in 1909. ...


Ian Broudie who fronted 1990's band The Lightning Seeds is also from Liverpool. Ian Broudie (born August 4, 1958 in Liverpool, England) is a prolific musician and producer, best known for his 1990s band the Lightning Seeds. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Natasha Hamilton grew up in the Kensington area of Liverpool, and started singing and performing from the age of 12 in the Starlight Show Group. Joined the fledgling Atomic Kitten band at aged 16.[26] Natasha Maria Hamilton (born July 17, 1982, Liverpool) is an English singer and member of Atomic Kitten. ... Kensington is an inner city area of Liverpool. ... Atomic Kitten is an English girl group from Liverpool composed of Liz Lil McClarnon, Natasha Tash Hamilton, and Jenny Frost - who replaced original member Kerry Katona in January 2001. ...


Television and film personalities born in Liverpool include: stage and film actor Rex Harrison, renowned comedian Ken Dodd, Singer/TV personality Cilla Black, BAFTA and Golden Globe nominee Cathy Tyson (for cult movie Mona Lisa (film) and Band of Gold (TV series)), 2 times BAFTA award-nominee Lesley Sharp, actor, (Shaun of the Dead) Peter Serafinowicz, anarchic comedian/author Alexei Sayle (star of The Young Ones (TV series)), Margi Clarke (star of cult movie Letter to Brezhnev), John Gregson (star of Treasure Island (1950 film), The Treasure of Monte Cristo and Gideon's Way), Olivier award-winning and 2 times BAFTA nominee Alison Steadman, 3 times BAFTA award-nominee Leonard Rossiter (Star of 2001: A Space Odyssey (film), Oliver! (film) and TV show Rising Damp), Actor Craig Charles (star of TV show Red Dwarf, Robot Wars and Coronation Street), 2 times BAFTA nominee Tom Bell (actor) (starring in Prime Suspect and The Krays (film)), the McGann brothers (Paul, Joe, Stephen and Mark), David Yip (star of Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom and James Bond movie A View to a Kill) and 2 times Golden Globe nominee Tom Baker and Elisabeth Sladen (both of Doctor Who fame) Also Kim Cattrall of Sex and the City was born in Wavertree, a Liverpool suburb. Sir Reginald Rex Carey Harrison, KBE (5 March 1908 – 2 June 1990) was an Academy Award- and Tony Award-winning English theatre and film actor. ... Kenneth Arthur Dodd OBE (born 8 November 1927, in Knotty Ash, Liverpool), better known as Ken Dodd, is a veteran English comedian and singer, famous for selling over 100 million records, his buck teeth, frizzy hair, feather duster (or tickling stick), and his catchphrases, often playing on the tickled motif... Cilla Black OBE (born 27 May 1942) is an English singer-songwriter and television personality, born Priscilla Maria Veronica White to a Protestant father and a Catholic mother in Liverpool. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organization that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Cathy Tyson (born June 12, 1965 in Liverpool) is an English actress. ... Mona Lisa is a 1986 British film which tells the story of a petty criminal who becomes entangled in the dangerous life of a high-class call girl. ... Band of Gold was a television series shown on ITV between 1995 and 1997, written by Kay Mellor and produced by Granada Television. ... Lesley Sharp (born in 1964 in Liverpool, Merseyside, England) is a British actress. ... Peter Serafinowicz (born 10 July 1972) is an English comic actor, voice artist and composer of Polish descent. ... Alexei David Sayle (born 7 August 1952, Anfield, Liverpool) is an English comedian, actor and author. ... The Young Ones was a popular British sitcom, first seen in 1982, which aired on BBC2. ... Margi Clarke (born 1954) is a British actress, whose name is pronounced Margee (with a hard g). She was born and raised in Liverpool, and is known for her trademark Scouse accent and platinum-blonde hair. ... A request has been made on Wikipedia for this article to be deleted. ... John Gregson (15 March 1919 - 8 January 1975) was a British actor. ... Treasure Island is a 1950 Disney film based on Robert Louis Stevensons novel Treasure Island. ... The Treasure of Monte Cristo is a British movie released in 1961. ... Gideons Way was a British TV crime series made by ITC Entertainment in 1964/65, based on the novels by John Creasey. ... Alison Steadman OBE (born on July 26, 1945) is an award-winning English stage, television and film actress. ... DVD of first series of The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin starring Leonard Rossiter Leonard Rossiter (21 October 1926 – 5 October 1984) was a distinguished English actor, known for his comedy roles in two British television series of the 1970s, and for his roles in two Stanley Kubrick films. ... Oliver! is an Academy Award winning film and 1968 musical film directed by Carol Reed and based on the stage musical Oliver!. Both the film and play are based on the famous Charles Dickens novel Oliver Twist. ... Rising Damp was a UK television sitcom produced by Yorkshire Television for ITV, first broadcast from 1974 to 1978. ... Craig Charles as Dave Lister Craig Charles (born July 11, 1964 in Liverpool, England) is an English actor, stand up comedian, author, poet, and radio and television presenter, best known for playing Dave Lister in the British cult-favourite sci-fi sitcom Red Dwarf. ... This article is about the British sitcom. ... Robot Wars was a US based robot competition from 1994-1997, and is a British game show broadcast on BBC Two from 1997 until 2002, with a final series broadcast on Five in 2003. ... Coronation Street is an award-winning British soap opera. ... Tom Bell (August 2, 1933 – October 4, 2006) was an English actor on stage, film and television. ... Prime Suspect is a highly-acclaimed Granada Television police procedural television drama series of the decades of the 1990s and 2000s, which has been followed up by several sequels. ... The Krays is a 1990 film based on the lives and crimes of the British gangsters Ronald and Reginald Kray, twins who are often referred to as The Krays. ... Paul McGann (born November 14, 1959 in Surrey, England, United Kingdom) is an English actor who made his name on the BBC serial The Monocled Mutineer, in which he played the lead role. ... Joe McGann (born July 24, 1958 in Liverpool) is an English actor. ... Stephen McGann (born 2 February 1963 in Liverpool) is an English actor. ... Mark McGann (born 12 July 1961 in Liverpool) is an English actor. ... David Yip is a British actor of Chinese ethnicity, born in Liverpool on 4 June 1951. ... This article is about the film. ... This article is about the spy series. ... A View to a Kill is a 1985 spy film. ... For other persons named Tom Baker, see Tom Baker (disambiguation). ... Elisabeth Sladen (born February 1, 1948, Liverpool, England) is an English actress best known for her work as the character Sarah Jane Smith on the television series Doctor Who and related spin-offs. ... This article is about the television series. ... Kim Victoria Cattrall (born August 21, 1956, in Widnes, England) is an English-born Canadian actress. ... This article is about the television series. ...


Famous writers such as, Academy Award and BAFTA nominee playwright Willy Russell (author of Blood Brothers (musical), Shirley Valentine, Our Day Out and Educating Rita), Brian Jacques (author of the Redwall and Castaways of the Flying Dutchman), award-winning horror author/director/artist Clive Barker ( mostly credited for Rawhead Rex (film), Candyman (film) and Hellraiser fame) and BAFTA award-winning scriptwriter Jimmy McGovern (author of Cracker (UK TV series), Hillsborough (a dramatised reconstruction of the events of the 1989 Hillsborough disaster) and The Street (TV series)) are from Liverpool. Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organization that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... For other uses, see William Russell. ... For other uses, see Blood Brothers (disambiguation). ... Shirley Valentine is a play by Willy Russell, first staged in 1986. ... Our Day Out is a made-for-TV film about deprived children from Liverpool, United Kingdom. ... Educating Rita is a stage comedy by British playwright Willy Russell which premièred at The Warehouse, London, in 1980; and a film (1983) directed by Lewis Gilbert and starring Julie Walters, Michael Caine, and Maureen Lipman with a screenplay by Russell. ... (James) Brian Jacques (born June 15, 1939) is an English author, best known for his Redwall series of novels, as well as the Tribes of Redwall and Castaways of the Flying Dutchman series. ... Redwall was the first book in the series by Brian Jacques. ... Castaways of the Flying Dutchman is the first novel in the Castaways series by Brian Jacques, published in 2001. ... For the South African football (soccer) coach, see Clive Barker (soccer). ... Rawhead Rex is a 1986 film based on a short story by Clive Barker which originally appeared in Volume 3 of his Books of Blood series. ... Candyman is a 1992 slasher film movie starring Virginia Madsen, Tony Todd and Xander Berkeley. ... For other topics with similar names, see Hellraiser (disambiguation). ... Jimmy McGovern (born 1949 in Liverpool, England, UK) is a British television scriptwriter, known for his powerful and thought-provoking dramas often based around hard-hitting social issues or controversial real-life events. ... Cracker is the title of a television crime series in the United Kingdom, made by Granada Television for ITV and created and principally written by Jimmy McGovern. ... The Memorial at Hillsborough. ... The Street is a BBC television series created by Jimmy McGovern which follows the lives of different residents of one street. ...


Alois Hitler, Jr. the half-brother of Adolf Hitler lived in the city, was married, and had a child. There is a rumour that Adolf visited Liverpool in 1911, before the outbreak of World War I, and that he drank in the Poste House pub on Cumberland Street.[27][28] Alois Hitler, Jr. ... Hitler redirects here. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Cumberland is one of the 39 traditional counties of England. ...


William Gladstone, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom on four separate occasions (1868–74, 1880–85, 1886 and 1892–94), was born in Liverpool and lived there till the age of 11. Gladstone redirects here. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ...


International links

Like many cities, Liverpool participates in international town twinning schemes.[29] It has six twin towns: Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Furthermore the city has "friendship links" with other cities, which are less formal than twinning arrangements. These are: Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Cologne (German: , IPA: ; local dialect: Kölle ) is Germanys fourth-largest city after Berlin, Hamburg and Munich, and is the largest city both in the German Federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia and within the Rhine-Ruhr Metropolitan Area, one of the major European metropolitan areas with more than... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ireland. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ukraine. ... The ODESSA, which stands for the German phrase Organisation der ehemaligen SS-Angehörigen, which phrase in turn translates as “Organization of Former Members of the SS,” is the name commonly given to an international Nazi network alleged to have been set up towards the end of World War II... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... For other uses, see Shanghai (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Taree is a major town on the mid-North Coast, New South Wales, Australia. ...

In addition, there are links with New York, USA (which has been granted the Freedom of the City of Liverpool); Riga, Latvia; and Stavanger, Norway. Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Motto: E Mari Merces(Latin) From the Sea, Wealth Coordinates: , Country Province Established April 1, 1996 Government  - Type Regional Municipality  - Mayor Peter Kelly  - Governing body Halifax Regional Council  - MPs List of MPs Alexa McDonough Geoff Regan Michael Savage Peter Stoffer (Bill Casey) (Gerald Keddy) (Peter MacKay)  - MLAs List of MLAs... Image File history File links Flag_of_Cuba. ... This article is about the capital of Cuba. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Argentina. ... La Plata is the capital city of the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina, as well as of the partido of La Plata. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Minamata (水俣市; -shi) is a city located in Kumamoto, Japan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Location of the city of Naples (red dot) within Italy. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Country Italy Region Tuscany Province Province of Pisa (PI) Mayor Elevation 24 m Area 19. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Romania. ... Râmnicu Vâlcea (population: 107,656) is a city in Vâlcea county, Romania. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Chile. ... Valparaiso is the name of at least three cities and a village: Valparaíso, Chile Valparaiso, Florida Valparaiso, Indiana Valparaiso, Nebraska This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland. ... ElblÄ…g (IPA: ; German: ) is a city in northern Poland with 127,892 inhabitants (2006). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... For other uses, see Riga (disambiguation). ... County District Jæren Municipality NO-1103 Administrative centre Stavanger Mayor (1995-) Leif Johan Sevland (H) Official language form BokmÃ¥l Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 406 71 km² 68 km² 0. ...


City districts

Districts of Liverpool include:

Aigburth (pronounced egg-birth) is a suburb of Liverpool, England. ... Allerton is a suburb of Liverpool, England. ... Anfield is a district of Liverpool, England and a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... Belle Vale is an area of Liverpool is a Liverpool City Council Ward with Netherley. ... ± Broadgreen is a suburb of Liverpool, Merseyside. ... Childwall is a suburb of Liverpool, Merseyside and a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... Clubmoor is an area in the city of Liverpool, north_west England. ... Croxteth is a suburb of Liverpool, on Merseyside and a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... Dingle is an area in the city of Liverpool, north-west England. ... Dovecot is a district of Liverpool, England. ... Edge Hill is a district of Liverpool, England. ... Everton is a district of Liverpool, Merseyside and a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... Fairfield is an area of Liverpool encompassing streets between Tuebrook and Kensington and stretching to Old Swan. ... Fazakerley IPA: is a suburb of north Liverpool, England, and a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... Garston is a district of Liverpool, on Merseyside, postcode L19. ... Gateacre is an area of Liverpool, England. ... Grassendale is a district of Liverpool, Merseyside. ... Hillfoot Avenue and the district sign for Hunts Cross. ... Kensington is an inner city area of Liverpool. ... Kirkdale is a district of Liverpool, England and a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... Knotty Ash is an area of Liverpool and a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... Mossley Hill is a suburb of Liverpool, Merseyside. ... , Netherley is an area in the city of Liverpool, England. ... // Norris Green is a large housing estate and council ward in Liverpool, England comprising some 1,500 dwellings, it is locally known as Noggsy. It was built in the 1920s on land donated to the city by Lord Derby, who was at the time resident at nearby Knowsley Hall. ... For the Blackfoot chief, see Old Swan (chief). ... Orrell is a district in Sefton, Merseyside, North West England. ... St Michaels Hamlet is a suburb of Liverpool, England. ... For other uses, see Speke (disambiguation). ... Tuebrook is an area of inner-city Liverpool, England and part of the Tuebrook and Stoneycroft ward. ... , Toxteth is an inner-city area of Liverpool, Merseyside. ... Tuebrook is an area of inner-city Liverpool, England. ... , Walton-on-the-Hill, usually shortened to Walton, is an area of Liverpool, in Merseyside, England, situated to the north of Anfield and the east of Bootle and Orrell. ... Location within the British Isles Wavertree is an area of Liverpool. ... West Derby is a leafy well-to-do and popular suburb of Liverpool, England, that achieved significance far earlier than Liverpool itself. ... , Woolton Street Woolton is a suburb of Liverpool, Merseyside, England and a Liverpool City Council Ward. ...

Council wards

Liverpool City Council as of May 2007 is controlled by the Liberal Democrats with 51 seats to Labour's 35. The Green Party also hold one seat. Liverpool has been under Lib Dem control for over 9 years. City council wards of Liverpool include: The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long... The Labour Party is a centre-left or social democratic political party in Britain (see British politics), and one of the United Kingdoms three main political parties. ...

Allerton and Hunts Cross is a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... Anfield is a district of Liverpool, England and a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... Belle Vale is a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... Central is a a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... Childwall is a suburb of Liverpool, Merseyside and a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... Church is a a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... Clubmoor is an area in the city of Liverpool, north_west England. ... County is a a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... Cressington is a a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... Croxteth is a suburb of Liverpool, on Merseyside and a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... Everton is a district of Liverpool, Merseyside and a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... Fazakerley IPA: is a suburb of north Liverpool, England, and a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... Greenbank is a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... Kensington is an inner city area of Liverpool. ... Kirkdale is an area of Liverpool. ... Knotty Ash is an area of Liverpool and a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... Mossley Hill is a suburb of Liverpool, Merseyside. ... // Norris Green is a large housing estate and council ward in Liverpool, England comprising some 1,500 dwellings, it is locally known as Noggsy. It was built in the 1920s on land donated to the city by Lord Derby, who was at the time resident at nearby Knowsley Hall. ... For the Blackfoot chief, see Old Swan (chief). ... Picton can refer to: Picton, New Zealand Picton, Australia Picton, Cheshire, England This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Princes Park, Carlton is a park in Carlton, Melbourne, Australia. ... Riverside is a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... Speke Garston is a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... St Michaels Hamlet is a suburb of Liverpool, England. ... Tuebrook and Stoneycroft is a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... Warbreck is a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... Location within the British Isles Wavertree is an area of Liverpool. ... West Derby is a leafy well-to-do and popular suburb of Liverpool, England, that achieved significance far earlier than Liverpool itself. ... , Woolton Street Woolton is a suburb of Liverpool, Merseyside, England and a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... Yew Tree is a Liverpool City Council Ward. ...

Parliamentary constituencies and MPs

See also: List of Parliamentary constituencies on Merseyside

Liverpool has five parliamentary constituencies: Liverpool Garston, Liverpool Riverside, Liverpool Walton, Liverpool Wavertree and Liverpool West Derby. At the 2005 general election, these were held by the Labour Party, and are represented by Maria Eagle, Louise Ellman, Jane Kennedy, Peter Kilfoyle and Robert Wareing respectively. Liberal Democrat candidates finished second in every Liverpool seat. The ceremonial county of Merseyside is divided into 16 Parliamentary constituencies - 14 Borough constituencies and 2 County constituencies. ... In the United Kingdom each of the electoral areas or divisions called constituencies elects one or more members to a parliament or assembly. ... Liverpool Garston is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Liverpool Riverside is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Liverpool Walton is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Liverpool Wavertree is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Liverpool West Derby is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Maria Eagle (born 17 February 1961, Bridlington) is a British politician and lawyer. ... Louise Ellman (born 14 November 1945) is the Labour and Co-operative Member of Parliament for Liverpool Riverside. ... Jane Elizabeth Kennedy (born 4 May 1958, as Jane Elizabeth Hodgson) is a Labour Party politician in the United Kingdom. ... Peter Kilfoyle (born on June 9, 1946 in Liverpool) is a UK politician. ... Robert Nelson Wareing (born August 20, 1930) is a Labour politician in the United Kingdom and member of Parliament for Liverpool West Derby. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ...


See also

The 1911 Liverpool General Transport Strike involved dockers, railway workers and sailors, as well people from other trades. ... The Mens 2008 European Amateur Boxing Championships are to be held in Liverpool, England in July 2008. ... The Big Dig is collection of various civil engineering projects in Liverpool to regenerate the city. ... This is a list of television shows set in Liverpool Boys from the Blackstuff Bread Brookside A Family At War Softly, Softly Z-Cars Category: Lists of TV series by city setting ... Commemorative coffee mug from the festival, showing a cartoon Liver bird. ... Garston Docks, Liverpool, 1962 The Port of Liverpool is the name for the enclosed dock system that runs from Herculaneum Dock to Seaforth Dock, on the east side of the River Mersey, combined with the facilities built around the Great Float on the west side of the river. ... Graffiti circa 1960s on the wall of The Williamson Tunnels The Corner tunnel and arch constructed out of individual sandstone blocks with view of Biddulphs factory rubbish chute. ...

Further reading

  • Bygone Liverpool, David Clensy, 2008. ISBN 978-143570897-6
  • Liverpool 800, John Belchem, 2006. ISBN 978-1846310355
  • Chinese Liverpudlians, Maria Lin Wong, 1989. ISBN 978-1871201031

References

  1. ^ Neighbourhood Statistics
  2. ^ Official EU website. Retrieved on 2007-04-23.
  3. ^ "Welcome to Liverpool - the new Barcelona" Liverpool Daily Post by Deborah James, July 14, 2004. Retrieved on 2008-05-19.
  4. ^ Vision of Britain: Liverpool population. Retrieved on 2007-04-23.
  5. ^ Components may not sum to totals due to rounding
  6. ^ includes hunting and forestry
  7. ^ includes energy and construction
  8. ^ includes financial intermediation services indirectly measured
  9. ^ www.wsws.org/articles/2001/feb2001/pov-f09.shtml. Retrieved on 2007-04-23.
  10. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/7063120.stm. Retrieved on 2007-10-26.
  11. ^ www.halfandhalf.org.uk. Retrieved on 2007-04-23.
  12. ^ Sharples, Joseph, Pevsner Architectual guide to Liverpool, Yale University Press, 2004, p. 249
  13. ^ Liverpool's Jewish heritage. Retrieved on 2007-05-13.
  14. ^ http://www.merseydocks.co.uk/
  15. ^ Local Transport Plan 2006-2011. Retrieved on 2007-04-23.
  16. ^ Everyman & Playhouse. Retrieved on 2007-04-23.
  17. ^ Unity Theatre Liverpool. Retrieved on 2007-04-23.
  18. ^ National Museums Liverpool. Retrieved on 2007-04-23.
  19. ^ Liverpool Biennial. Retrieved on 2007-04-23.
  20. ^ Secondary schools in Liverpool. Retrieved on 2008-01-10.
  21. ^ Liverpool College. Retrieved on 2007-04-23.
  22. ^ Liverpool Toxteth Tigers website. Retrieved on 2008-05-02.
  23. ^ Liverpool Sports Development website. Retrieved on 2007-04-23.
  24. ^ "ITV North West News", TV Ark, September 9, 2006. 
  25. ^ Published in UK as the "UK's only web-based newspaper" in January 2005 in hard copy magazine called "Web Pages Made Easy." and on the Trade Mark Register as a newspaper patent.gov.uk No. 2292469 Also see UK Office's 2007 MEP press briefing Also listed as Patrick Trollope, Editor of Southport Reporter" is a contributor and referred to in a book called Viking Mersey, written by Stephen Harding. ISBN 1901231 34 8 Published by Countryvise Publication, Wirral UK in 2002.
  26. ^ http://www.natashahamilton.biz/
  27. ^ www.merseysidetoday.co.uk/hitler.php. Retrieved on 2007-04-23.
  28. ^ Adolf Hitler - did he visit Liverpool during 1912-13?. Mike Royden's Local History Pages.
  29. ^ Liverpool City Council: twinning. Retrieved on 2007-04-24.

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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Coordinates: 53.4° N 3° W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Lord Liverpool (2330 words)
Liverpool was educated initially at Albion House, Fulham; he was at Charterhouse between and 1783 and 1787 and then he was admitted to Christ Church College, Oxford.
In June 1796 Liverpool's father was elevated to the peerage as Earl of Liverpool; his son took the courtesy title of Lord Hawkesbury and was known as such until he inherited the title in 1808.
On 31 October 1809 Lord Liverpool accepted the post of Secretary of State for War and the Colonies in the new ministry headed by Spencer Perceval, taking a major part in the establishment of the regency that was needed because of the illness of George III.
Liverpool - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3572 words)
Liverpool is governed by Liverpool City Council, one of five councils within the Metropolitan county of Merseyside, and is one of England's core cities and its fifth most populous.
The population of Liverpool in 2002 was 441,477, and that of the Merseyside conurbation was 1,362,026.
In 2001, Liverpool Airport, situated near Speke in the south of the city, was renamed Liverpool John Lennon Airport, in honour of the late Beatle John Lennon.
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