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Encyclopedia > Liturgical year

The liturgical year, also known as the Christian year, consists of the cycle of liturgical seasons in Christian churches which determines when Feasts, Memorials, Commemorations, and Solemnities are to be observed and which portions of Scripture are to be read. Distinct liturgical colours may appear in connection with different seasons of the liturgical year. The dates of the festivals vary somewhat between the Western (Roman Catholic, Anglican, Lutheran, and Protestant) churches and the Eastern Orthodox Churches, though the sequence and logic is the same. This article is about Dom Guérangers series of books; for the liturgical year of the church see Liturgical year. ... A liturgy is the customary public worship of a religious group, according to their particular traditions. ... Topics in Christianity Preaching Prayer Ecumenism Relation to other religions Movements Music Liturgy Calendar Symbols Art Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ... The memorial at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii commemorates American dead from wars in the Pacific. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Commemoration (observance). ... A Solemnity of the Roman Catholic Church observes an event in the life of Jesus, Mary, and the saints, beginning on the evening prior to actual date. ... Many religions and spiritual movements hold certain written texts (or series of spoken legends not traditionally written down) to be sacred. ... Liturgical colours are colours of vestments and paraments within a Christian liturgy. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Western Christianity... Catholic Church redirects here. ... This box:      Anglicanism most commonly refers to the beliefs and practices of the Anglican Communion, a world-wide affiliation of Christian Churches, most of which have historical connections with the Church of England. ... -1... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ...


In both the East and the West, the dates of many feasts vary from year to year, though in almost all cases this is due to the variation in the date of Passover, and all other dates follow from that. The extent to which the feasts and festivals are celebrated also varies between churches; in general Protestant churches observe far fewer of them than Catholic and Orthodox churches, and in particular are less likely to celebrate feasts of the Virgin Mary and the Saints. See moveable feasts. This article is about the Jewish holiday. ... Our Lady redirects here. ... Saints redirects here. ... For the book by Ernest Hemingway, see A Moveable Feast. ...

Contents

Liturgical cycle

The liturgical cycle divides the year into a series of seasons, each with their own mood, theological emphases, and modes of prayer, which can be signified by different ways of decorating churches, vestments for clergy, scriptural readings, themes for preaching and even different traditions and practices often observed personally or in the home. In churches that follow the liturgical year, the scripture passages for each Sunday (and even each day of the year in some traditions) are specified by a list called a lectionary. Christian doctrine redirects here. ... For other uses, see Prayer (disambiguation). ... Vestments are liturgical garments and articles associated primarily with the Christian religions, especially the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Methodists, Lutheran and Anglican Churches. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... A Lectionary is a book or listing that contains a collection of scripture readings for Christian worship. ...


Among non-Catholic Western Christians, Anglicans and Lutherans have traditionally followed the lectionary since the days of the Protestant Reformation. Following the Roman Catholic liturgical reform of the Roman Rite instituted by Pope Paul VI in 1970, the adoption and use of lectionaries in other Protestant churches (Methodist, Reformed, United, etc.) increased. In particular, the growing influence of the Revised Common Lectionary led to a greater awareness of the Christian year among Protestants in the later decades of the 20th century, especially among mainline denominations. Reformation redirects here. ... This article cites very few or no references or sources. ... For other uses, see Methodism (disambiguation). ... -1... United and uniting churches are churches that bring together (or unite) different (predominantly) Protestant denominations in one organisation. ... The Revised Common Lectionary is a lectionary of readings or pericopes from the Bible for use in Christian Worship, making provision for the liturgical year with its pattern of observances of festivals and seasons. ... In the United States, the mainline (also sometimes called mainstream) or mainline Protestant denominations are those Protestant denominations with a mix of moderate and liberal theologies. ...


Biblical calendar

Main article: Jewish Calendar

Biblical calendars are based on the cycle of the new moon. The year is from the first new moon on or after the spring equinox to the next new moon on or after the spring equinox, which means it has no set starting point like the modern calendar. The basic formula for the calendar is found early in the Bible: "And God said, Let there be lights in the firmament of the heaven to divide the day from the night; and let them be for signs, and for seasons, and for days, and years" (Gen. 1:14). "This month shall be unto you the beginning of months: it shall be the first month of the year to you" (Exo. 12:1-2). "This day came ye out in the month Abib" (Exo. 13:4). A month is one new moon to the next new moon. "And it shall come to pass, that from one new moon to another (month), and from one Sabbath to another, shall all flesh come to worship before me, said the LORD" (Isa. 66:23). "In the first month, that is, the month Nisan, in the twelfth year of king Ahasuerus, they cast Pur, that is, the lot, before Haman from day to day, and from month to month, to the twelfth month, that is, the month Adar" (Est. 3:7). The Biblical Calendar is laid out as follows, Nisan or Nissan (1st month) March-April, Iyar (2nd month) April-May, Sivan (3rd month) May-June, Tammuz (4th month) June-July, Av (5 month) July-August, Elul (6 month) August-September, Tishrei (7th month) September-October, Heshvan or Cheshvan (8th month) October-November, Kislev (9th month) November-December, Tevet (10th month) December-January, Shevat (11th month) January-February, Adar (12th month) February-March. This figure, in a detail of a medieval Hebrew calendar, reminded Jews of the palm branches ( Lulav) and the citron ( Etrog) to be brought to the synagogue at the end of sukkot, closing the solemn convocations of the calendar in autumn. ... The lunar phase depends on the Moons position in orbit around Earth. ... In astronomy, the vernal equinox (spring equinox, March equinox, or northward equinox) is the equinox at the beginning of spring in the northern hemisphere: the moment when the sun appears to cross the celestial equator, heading northward. ... Genesis (Greek: Γένεσις, having the meanings of birth, creation, cause, beginning, source and origin) is the first book of the Torah (five books of Moses) and hence the first book of the Tanakh, part of the Hebrew Bible; it is also the first book of the Christian Old Testament. ... This article is about the second book in the Torah. ... This article is about the Book of Isaiah. ... The Book of Esther is a book of the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible) and of the Old Testament. ...


Western liturgical calendar

The month of October from a liturgical calendar for Abbotsbury Abbey. 13th c. manuscript (British Library, Cotton MS Cleopatra B IX, folio 59r).

Western Christian liturgical calendars are based on the cycle of the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church, including Lutheran, Anglican, and other Protestant calendars since this cycle pre-dates the Reformation. Generally, the liturgical seasons in western Christianity are Advent, Christmas, Ordinary Time (Time after Epiphany), Lent, Easter, and Ordinary Time (Time after Pentecost or after Trinity). Image File history File links Size of this preview: 385 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (419 × 652 pixels, file size: 38 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The month of October from a liturgical calendar for Abbotsbury Abbey found in a 13th century manuscript of a collection of treatises on chess (British Library... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 385 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (419 × 652 pixels, file size: 38 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The month of October from a liturgical calendar for Abbotsbury Abbey found in a 13th century manuscript of a collection of treatises on chess (British Library... The Abbey of St Peter was a Benedictine Monastery in the village of Abbotsbury in Dorset, England. ... British Library main building, London The British Library (BL) is the national library of the United Kingdom. ... μ This article is about the Christian season. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... The Wise Men (Magi) adoring the infant Jesus. ... For other uses, see Lent (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... The Descent of the Holy Spirit in a 15th century illuminated manuscript. ... Trinity Sunday is the first Sunday after Pentecost in the Western Christian liturgical calendar. ...


Advent

Main articles: Advent and Christmastide

From the Latin adventus, "arrival" or "coming", the first season of the liturgical year begins four Sundays before Christmas and ends on Christmas Eve. Historically observed as a "fast", its purpose focuses on preparation for the coming Christ. Although often conceived as awaiting the coming of the Christ-child at Christmas, the modern Lectionary points the season more toward eschatological themes--awaiting the final coming of Christ, when "the wolf shall live with the lamb" (Isaiah 11:6) and when God will have "brought down the powerful from their thrones, and lifted up the lowly" (The Magnificat, Luke 1:52)--particularly in the earlier half of the season. This period of waiting is often marked by the Advent Wreath, a garland of evergreens with four candles. Although the main symbolism of the advent wreath is simply marking the progression of time, many churches attach themes to each candle, most often 'hope', 'faith', 'joy', and 'love'. μ This article is about the Christian season. ... Christmastide (also Christmas or the Christmas season) is one of the seasons of the liturgical year of some Christian churches. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Icon of Christ in a Greek Orthodox church This page is about the title, office or what is known in Christian theology as the Divine Person. ... For the eschatological beliefs of various religions, see End Times. ... The Visitation in the Book of Hours of the Duc of Berry For the David and the Giants album, see Magnificat (album) The Magnificat (also known as the Song of Mary) is a canticle frequently sung (or said) liturgically in Christian church services. ... The Gospel of Luke (literally, according to Luke; Greek, Κατά Λουκαν, Kata Loukan) is a synoptic Gospel, and the third and longest of the four canonical Gospels of the New Testament. ... Advent Wreath lit for the Second Sunday of Advent An advent wreath is a ring or set of four candles, usually made with evergreen cuttings, that is used for household devotion by Christians during the season of Advent. ...


Color: Violet, or in some traditions Blue. On the third Sunday of Advent, also called Gaudete Sunday, Rose/Pink is used in some places. Gaudete Sunday is the third Sunday of Advent in the Christian calendar. ...


Although the Roman Catholic rite omits the "Gloria in Excelsis" during Masses of the season (as opposed to Mass of a feast), "Alleluia" remains (although the traditional Catholic rite has only the Gradual without an "Alleluia", except on Sunday). For other uses of Mass, see Mass (disambiguation). ... The Gradual (Latin: graduale, sometimes called the Grail) is a chant in the Roman Catholic Mass, sung after the reading or singing of the Epistle and before the Alleluia, or, during penitential seasons, before the Tract. ...

Image File history File links Rok_liturgiczny_-_Liturgical_year. ... Image File history File links Rok_liturgiczny_-_Liturgical_year. ...

Epiphany

Main article: Epiphany

Whereas in the Roman Catholic Church and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, Ordinary Time begins after the Epiphany, in some Anglican traditions (including the Church of England) the Christmas season is followed by an Epiphany season, which begins on the Eve of the Epiphany (on 6 January or the nearest Sunday) and ends on the Feast of the Presentation (on 2 February or the nearest Sunday). Ordinary Time then begins after this. Look up epiphany in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Please note: This page is an Abrahamic interpretation of candlemas. To avoid dispute between religious groups please see Imbolc for a non-Abrahamic view. ...


Ordinal or Ordinary Time ("Time after Epiphany" and "Septuagesima")

Main articles: Ordinary Time and Septuagesima

"Ordinary" comes from the same root as our word "ordinal", and in this sense means "the counted weeks". In the Roman Catholic Church and in some Protestant traditions, these are the common weeks which belong to the seasons known as the season after Epiphany (and the same for the season after Pentecost). It consists of either 33 or 34 Sundays, depending on the year. In the modern Roman rite, the first portion of Ordinal/Ordinary Time extends from the day following the Feast of the Baptism of Christ until the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday (the beginning of Lent). This first installment has anywhere from three to eight Sundays, depending on how early or late Easter falls in a given year. In other rites, including Protestant ones, Ordinal/Ordinary Time may start as early as the day after Epiphany or as late as the day after Candlemas. Ordinary Time is a season of the Christian (especially the Catholic) liturgical calendar. ... Septuagesima (in full, Septuagesima Sunday) is the name given to the third from the last Sunday before Lent in the Roman Catholic and Anglican churches. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... The Mass of Pope Paul VI is the liturgy of the Catholic Mass of the Roman Rite as revised after the Second Vatican Council (1962–1965). ... Latin Rite, in the singular and accompanied, in English, by the definite article, refers to the sui juris particular Church of the Roman Catholic Church that developed in the area of western Europe and northern Africa where Latin was for many centuries the language of education and culture. ... The baptism of Jesus is an event recounted in the New Testament in which Jesus is baptised by John the Baptist. ... In the Western Christian calendar, Ash Wednesday is the first day of Lent. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ...


The terminology of "Ordinary Time" replaces the older language of the Seasons of "Time After Epiphany" and "Septuagesima" (pre-Lenten season), which are still in use by Catholilcs who attend the ancient (Tridentine) form of the Roman Rite (also see Traditionalists). Some Protestant rites also use the older terminology. Tridentine Rite refers to the liturgy of the Roman Catholic Church as promulgated by the Council of Trent (December 13, 1545 till December 4, 1563). ... Traditionalist Catholics are Roman Catholics, or persons who identify as Roman Catholics, who believe that there should be a restoration of many or all of the liturgical forms, public and private devotions and presentation of Catholic teachings which prevailed in the Roman Catholic Church before the Second Vatican Council (1962...

Liturgical year
Western
Eastern

In the older form of the roman rite, the Time after Epiphany can have anywhere from one to six Sundays, with Septuagesima as a 17-day season beginning nine Sundays before Easter and ending on the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday. Any omitted Sundays after Epiphany are transferred to the Time after Pentecost and celebrated between the Twenty-Third Sunday and the Last Sunday. If, however, there are not enough Sundays in the year to accommodate all such Sundays, then the one which would otherwise occur on Septuagesima Sunday is celebrated on the previous day (Saturday); in the case of Easter falling so late that there are only 23 Sundays After Pentecost, the Mass for 23rd Sunday is celebrated on the day before the Last Sunday after Pentecost. The 1962 reform of Pope John XXIII changed this, instead dropping the displaced Sunday Mass for that year. During Septuagesima, certain customs of Lent are adopted, including the suppression of the "Alleluja" and, on Sundays, the Gloria, and the vestments are violet. μ This article is about the Christian season. ... Christmastide (also Christmas or the Christmas season) is one of the seasons of the liturgical year of some Christian churches. ... Adoration of the Magi by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, 17th century (Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio). ... For other uses, see Lent (disambiguation). ... Easter Triduum, or Holy Triduum, or Paschal Triduum is a term used by some Christian churches, particularly the Roman Catholic Church, the Lutheran Church, and many Anglicans, to denote, collectively, the three days from the evening of Maundy Thursday (or Holy Thursday) to the evening of Easter Sunday. ... Eastertide, or the Easter Season, begins on Easter Sunday and continues until Pentecost in the Christian liturgical calendar, thus spanning a total of seven weeks. ... Also refers to the process of gaining Enlightenment and several meditation techniques. ... The Descent of the Holy Spirit in a 15th century illuminated manuscript. ... Ordinary Time is a season of the Christian (especially the Catholic) liturgical calendar. ... Eastern Orthodox Icon of the Exaltation of the Cross In the Christian liturgical calendar, there are several different feasts known as Feasts of the Cross, all of which commemorate the cross used in the crucifixion of Jesus. ... The Nativity Fast, practiced by the Eastern Orthodox Church, is believed to enable participants to draw closer to God by denying the body of worldly pleasure in preparation for celebration of the birth of Jesus Christ, which is held on December 25th (Julian Calendar). ... The Nativity by Petrus Christus, c. ... Adoration of the Magi by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, 17th century (Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio). ... Great Lent is the greatest fasting period in the church year in Eastern Christianity, which prepares Christians for the greatest feast of the church year, Easter (or Holy Pascha). Although it is in many ways similar to Lent in Western Christianity, there are important differences in the timing of Lent... This article is about the Christian festival. ... The Descent of the Holy Spirit in a 15th century illuminated manuscript. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... // Great Feasts of the Orthodox Church Easter/Pascha The feast of the Resurrection of Jesus, called Easter or Pascha, is the greatest of the feasts of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... The upper part of The Transfiguration (1520) by Raphael, depicting Christ miraculously discoursing with Moses and Elijah The word Transfiguration means a changing of appearance or form. ... Dormition of the Virgin redirects here. ... The Intercession of Our Most Holy Lady Theotokos and Ever-Virgin Mary (Russian Pokrov, Покров) is one of the most important Russian Orthodoxy feasts (maybe the most important after the Twelve Great Feasts). ... See also: 15th-century Antipope John XXIII. Pope John XXIII (Latin: ; Italian: ), born Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli (November 25, 1881 – June 3, 1963), known as Blessed John XXIII since his beatification, was elected as the 261st Pope of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City on October 28, 1958. ...


Color: Green. (Violet in the older Roman rite's pre-Lenten season.)


Lent and Passiontide

Main articles: Lent, Passiontide, and Easter Triduum

Lent is a major fast taken by the Church to prepare for Easter. It begins on Ash Wednesday and ends on Holy Saturday, at the end of Holy Week. There are forty days of Lent, as the six Sundays in Lent are not counted. During Lent, the Glory to God and the Alleluia are not used at Mass. "Glory and Praise" is generally used in place of the Alleluia where as the Glory to God is just omitted. For other uses, see Lent (disambiguation). ... Passiontide, in the Christian liturgical year, is a name for the last two weeks of Lent, beginning on Passion Sunday and ending on Holy Saturday. ... Easter Triduum, or Holy Triduum, or Paschal Triduum is a term used by some Christian churches, particularly the Roman Catholic Church, the Lutheran Church, and many Anglicans, to denote, collectively, the three days from the evening of Maundy Thursday (or Holy Thursday) to the evening of Easter Sunday. ... Look up Fast, FAST in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... In the Western Christian calendar, Ash Wednesday is the first day of Lent. ... Holy Saturday is the day before Easter in the Christian calendar. ... For the 1958 novel of the same name by Louis Aragon, see La Semaine Sainte. ... Glory to God is a Christmas carol popular among American and Canadian Reformed churches that have Dutch roots. ... Hallelujah, Halleluyah, or Alleluia, is a transliteration of the Hebrew word הַלְלוּיָהּ meaning [Let us] praise (הַלְלוּ) God (יָהּ) (or Praise (הַלְלוּ) [the] Lord (יָהּ)). It is found mainly in the book of Psalms. ...


Before the 1970 reforms, the last two weeks of Lent in the Catholic Church were known as Passiontide. During this season, the Gloria Patri is suppressed except after the Psalms in the Divine Office, the readings begin to focus even more on the Passion of Christ, and, most noticeably, the crucifixes and images of the saints are covered with violet cloth. On the Friday before Good Friday is the Feast of the Seven Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Should the Feasts of St. Joseph or the Annunciation fall during Holy Week, they are transferred to the week following Easter. The Mass of Pope Paul VI is the liturgy of the Catholic Mass of the Roman Rite as revised after the Second Vatican Council (1962–1965). ... A doxology is a short hymn of praise to God the Trinity in various Christian liturgies, often added to the end of canticles, psalms, and hymns. ... Good Friday, also called Holy Friday or Great Friday, is the Friday preceding Easter Sunday. ... Saint Joseph, also referred to as Joseph the Betrothed and as Joseph of Nazareth, was the foster-father of Jesus, according to the New Testament (Matthew 1:16; Luke 3:23). ... For other uses, see Annunciation (disambiguation). ...


Color: Violet. In some traditions, Rose may be used on the 4th Sunday of Lent, called Laetare Sunday. Laetare Sunday (from the Latin verb laetari, meaning to be joyful) is a name formerly often used, and less commonly used today, to denote the fourth Sunday of the season of Lent in the Christian liturgical calendar. ...


The Easter Triduum consists of:

Main article: Maundy Thursday
    • At the evening worship service or Mass of the Lord's Supper.
    • Some churches who celebrate this day as Maundy Thursday engage in the ritual of ceremonial footwashing.
    • It is customary on this night for a Watch service to take place, beginning after the evening service and continuing until midnight. (This is occasionally then re-commenced at dawn of Good Friday, continuing until the morning liturgy.)
    • Color: White.
  • Good Friday
    • The celebration of His passion.
    • In the Roman Catholic Church, Mass is never celebrated on this day, although prayer services are encouraged.
    • Color: Varies: No color, Red, or Black are used in different traditions. (Where colored hangings are removed for this day, liturgical color applies to vestments only.)
    • In the Roman Catholic and High Anglican rites, a crucifix (not necessarily the one which stands on or near the altar on other days of the year) is ceremoniously unveiled. (And in pre-Vatican II, other crucifixes were to be unveiled, without ceremony, after the Good Friday service.)
  • Holy Saturday
    • Commemoration of the day Christ lay in the Tomb.
    • In the Roman Catholic Church, Mass is never offered on this day.
    • Color: None
  • Easter Vigil
    • Held after sunset of Holy Saturday, or before dawn on Easter Day, in anticipation of the celebration of the resurrection.
      See also Paschal candle
    • Color: White, often together with Gold plus an off white.
    • In pre-Vatican II Roman Catholic rite, during the "Gloria in Excelsis" at the Mass, the organ and bells are used in the liturgy for the first time in 2 days, and the statues, which have been veiled during Passion time, are unveiled.

In the Christian calendar, Holy Thursday (also called Maundy Thursday) is the Thursday before Easter, the day on which the Last Supper is said to have occurred. ... The Last Supper - museum copy of Master Pauls sculpture, from the main altar in St. ... The Last Supper - museum copy of Master Pauls sculpture, from the main altar in St. ... Good Friday, also called Holy Friday or Great Friday, is the Friday preceding Easter Sunday. ... Holy Saturday is the day before Easter in the Christian calendar. ... The Easter Vigil, also called the Paschal Vigil or the Great Vigil of Easter, is a service held in many Christian churches as the first official celebration of the Resurrection of Jesus. ... Look up Resurrection in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Paschal Candle. ...

Easter

Main article: Easter

Easter is the celebration of Jesus' resurrection. The date of Easter varies from year to year, according to a lunar-calendar based dating system (see computus for details). The Easter season extends from the Easter Vigil through Pentecost Sunday on the Catholic and Protestant calendars. On the calendar used by traditionalist Catholics, Eastertide lasts until the end of the Octave of Pentecost, at None of the following Ember Saturday. This article is about the Christian festival. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... A diagram of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre based on a german documentary, claimed to be the site of Calvary and the Tomb of Jesus. ... Computus (Latin for computation) is the calculation of the date of Easter in the Christian calendar. ... The Descent of the Holy Spirit in a 15th century illuminated manuscript. ... Traditionalist Catholics are Roman Catholics, or persons who identify as Roman Catholics, who believe that there should be a restoration of many or all of the liturgical forms, public and private devotions and presentation of Catholic teachings which prevailed in the Roman Catholic Church before the Second Vatican Council (1962... Octave in liturgical usage has two senses. ...


In the Roman Catholic tradition, the Easter octave allows for no other feasts to be celebrated or commemorated during it, although if Easter falls on April 25, the Greater Litanies (normally on that date) are said on the following Tuesday. During the fifty days of Eastertide, the Gloria and Te Deum are said every day, even on ferias. Russian Icon of the Resurrection (16th century). ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Ascension Thursday, which celebrates the return of Jesus to heaven following his resurrection, is the fortieth day of Easter, although some places transfer it to the following Sunday. Pentecost is the fiftieth day, and celebrates the sending of the Holy Ghost to the Apostles. Pentecost is commonly seen as the birth of the Church. Also refers to the process of gaining Enlightenment and several meditation techniques. ...


Color: White or Gold, except on Pentecost, on which the color is Red.


Oridnal or Ordinary Time ("Time after Pentecost" and "Kingdomtide")

Main articles: Ordinal (often called "Ordinary") Time and Kingdomtide

Ordinal (ordinal for "counting" as these are "counting weeks" after Pentecost) Time resumes after the Easter Season, on Pentecost Monday, and ends on the Saturday before the First Sunday of Advent. In the ancient, Tridentine form of the Roman Rite, the Sundays in this part of the year are listed as "Sundays after Pentecost" by Roman Catholics; the Eastern Orthodox and some Protestants still adhere to this terminology. The first Sunday after Pentecost is Trinity Sunday and in many traditions the last Sunday of Ordinary Time is the Feast of Christ the King. Kingdomtide is a liturgical season observed in the autumn by the United Methodist Church, particularly in the United States, and certain other Protestant denominations. ... Pentecost Monday is a Christian holiday celebrated the next day after Pentecost. ... Tridentine Rite refers to the liturgy of the Roman Catholic Church as promulgated by the Council of Trent (December 13, 1545 till December 4, 1563). ... ... Trinity Sunday is the first Sunday after Pentecost in the Western Christian liturgical calendar. ... This article is about the figure known by both Jesus of Nazareth and Jesus Christ. For other usages, see Jesus (disambiguation). ...


Variations during this season include:

  • In the traditional Catholic calendar, Christ the King is the last Sunday in October rather than the final Sunday before Advent.
  • In the Catholic and some Anglican traditions the feast of Corpus Christi occurs eleven days after Pentecost, but sometimes transferred to the following Sunday.
  • Also in the Catholic tradition, Friday in the third week after Pentecost is the feast of the Sacred Heart of Jesus.
  • Most Western traditions celebrate All Saints' Day on November 1 or the Sunday following. The liturgical color is White.
  • Some traditions celebrate St. Michael's Day (Michaelmas) on September 29.
  • Some traditions celebrate St. Martin's Day (Martinmas) on November 11.
  • In some Protestant traditions, especially those with closer ties to the Lutheran tradition, Reformation Sunday is celebrated on the Sunday preceding October 31, commemorating the purported day Martin Luther posted the 95 Theses on the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg. The liturgical color is Red, celebrating the Holy Spirit's continuing work in renewing the Church.
  • Many traditions treat the final few weeks of Ordinary Time as having a distinctive focus on the coming of the Kingdom of God (so that the liturgical year turns full circle by anticipating one of the predominant themes of Advent). In the Ordinary (modern) Form of the Roman Rite, the final three Sundays have such an eschatological theme, though without any change in designation for those Sundays. Some other denominations, however, change the designation and sometimes also the liturgical colour. For example, the Church of England uses the term "Sundays before Advent" for the final four Sundays and permits red vestments as an alternative. The term "Kingdomtide" is used by a number of denominations, among them the United Methodist Church and the Christian Church - Synod of Saint Timothy. In the Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod (LCMS), this is known as the "Period of End Times," and red vestments are worn on the first and second Sundays.

Color: Green Corpus Christi Procession in Germany This article is about the Catholic feast of Corpus Christi. ... Typical illustration of the Sacred Heart of Jesus Christ The Sacred Heart is a religious devotion to Jesus physical heart. ... All Saints in Poland The festival of All Saints, also sometimes known as All Hallows, or Hallowmas, is a feast celebrated in honour of all the saints and martyrs, known or unknown. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the first term of many universities in the British Isles, see Michaelmas Term. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... In the Christian calendar, Martinmas, or November 11 is the feast of Saint Martin of Tours and one of the Scottish quarter days. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Reformation Day is a minor festival celebrated in remembrance of the Reformation, particularly by Lutheran and Reformed church communities. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German monk,[1] priest, professor, theologian, and church reformer. ... The 95 Theses. ... Statue of Martin Luther in the main square Wittenberg, officially [Die] Lutherstadt Wittenberg, is a town in Germany, in the Bundesland Saxony-Anhalt, at 12° 59 E, 51° 51 N, on the Elbe river. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      In mainstream... The Mass of Pope Paul VI is the liturgy of the Catholic Mass of the Roman Rite as revised after the Second Vatican Council (1962–1965). ... Latin Rite, in the singular and accompanied, in English, by the definite article, refers to the sui juris particular Church of the Roman Catholic Church that developed in the area of western Europe and northern Africa where Latin was for many centuries the language of education and culture. ... For the eschatological beliefs of various religions, see End Times. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[3] in England, the Mother Church of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the oldest among the communions thirty-eight independent national churches. ... This article is about the current Christian denomination based in the United States. ... The Christian Church – Synod of Saint Timothy is a synod or communion of local Christian churches (currently active only in the United States) that was established as an autocephalous body in 2004. ... LCMS redirects here. ...


Assumption of Mary

Main article: Assumption of Mary

Observed by Roman Catholics and some Anglicans on August 15. On this date, which is the same as the Eastern tradition of the Dormition, the bodily Assumption of Mary into heaven is celebrated. This feast day is perhaps the oldest feast day in the Christian Church,[citation needed] being celebrated in both the East and the West. The Roman Catholic teaching on this feast was defined as dogma on November 1, 1950 by Pope Pius XII in the Papal Bull, Munificentissimus Deus. This article is about the theological concept. ... This article is about the day of the year. ... According to Catholic theology and the traditions of the Roman Catholic Church and Eastern and Oriental Orthodox churches, the body of Mary, the mother of Jesus, venerated by these denominations as the Blessed Virgin Mary or Theotokos, respectively, was taken into Heaven along with her soul after her death. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ... For other senses of this word, see dogma (disambiguation). ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pius XIIs signature Pope Pius XII (Latin: ), born Eugenio Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Pacelli (March 2, 1876 – October 9, 1958), reigned as the 260th pope, the human head of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City, from March 2, 1939 until his death in 1958. ... Papal bull of Pope Urban VIII, 1637, sealed with a leaden bulla. ... Munificentissimus Deus (Latin for The most bountiful God) is the name of an Apostolic constitution written by Pope Pius XII. It defines ex cathedra the dogma of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary. ...


In the Anglican and Lutheran traditions, as well as a few others, August 15th is celebrated as St. Mary, Mother of the Lord.


Color: white


Anglican Church

Further information: List of Anglican Church Calendars

The Church of England uses a liturgical year that is in most respects identical to that of the Catholic Church. While this is less true of the calendars contained within the Book of Common Prayer and the Alternative Service Book (1980), it is particularly true since the Anglican Church adopted its new pattern of services and liturgies contained within Common Worship, in 2000. Certainly, the broad division of the year into the Christmas and Easter seasons, interspersed with periods of Ordinary Time, is identical, and the majority of the Festivals and Commemorations are also celebrated, with some obvious exceptions, chiefly that of the Assumption. Calendars of saints days in churches throughout the Anglican communion. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[3] in England, the Mother Church of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the oldest among the communions thirty-eight independent national churches. ... The name Catholic Church can mean a visible organization that refers to itself as Catholic, or the invisible Christian Church, viz. ... For the novel, see A Book of Common Prayer. ... The Alternative Service book 1980 was the first complete prayer book produced by the Church of England since 1662. ... Common Worship is a series of books of services and prayers, known as a liturgy, published by the Church of England. ... This article is about the theological concept. ...


The Book of Common Prayer contains within it the traditional Western Eucharistic lectionary which traces its roots to the Comes of St. Jerome in the 5th century. Its similarity to the ancient lectionary is particularly obvious during Trinity season (Sundays after the Sunday after Pentecost), reflecting that understanding of sanctification (see a proposed rationale for Trinity season). For the novel, see A Book of Common Prayer. ...


Eastern Orthodox Church

See also: Eastern Orthodox Church calendar

The Liturgical year in the Eastern Orthodox Church is characterized by alternating fasts and feasts, and is in many ways similar to the Roman Catholic year described above. However, Church New Year (Indiction) traditionally begins on September 1, rather than the first Sunday of Advent. It includes both feasts on the Fixed Cycle and the Paschal Cycle (or Moveable Cycle). The most important feast day by far is the Feast of Pascha (Easter)—the Feast of Feasts. Then the Twelve Great Feasts, which commemorate various significant events in the lives of Jesus Christ and of the Theotokos (Virgin Mary). The Eastern Orthodox Church calendar describes or dictates the rhythm of the life of the Church. ... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... Fasting is primarily the act of willingly abstaining from some or all food, drink, or both, for a period of time. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ... An indiction is any of the years in a 15-year cycle used to date medieval documents. ... Aug. ... The Eastern Orthodox Church calendar describes or dictates the rhythm of the life of the Church. ... In the Eastern and Oriental Orthodox Churches, the cycle of the moveable feast is built around Pascha, or Easter. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... // Great Feasts of the Orthodox Church Easter/Pascha The feast of the Resurrection of Jesus, called Easter or Pascha, is the greatest of the feasts of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ... The term Virgin Mary has several different meanings: Mary, the mother of Jesus, the historical and multi-denominational concept of Mary Blessed Virgin Mary, the Roman Catholic theological and doctrinal concept of Mary Marian apparitions shrines to the Virgin Mary Virgin Mary in Islam, the Islamic theological and doctrinal concept...


The majority of Orthodox Christians follow the Julian Calendar in calculating their ecclesiastical feasts, though many have adopted a Revised Julian Calendar, preserving the Julian calculation for feasts on the Paschal Cycle, but using the modern Gregorian Calendar to calculate those feasts which are fixed according to the calendar date. From 1900 until 2100, there has been a thirteen-day difference between the Julian and the Gregorian calendars. In some Eastern Orthodox countries certain civil holidays are calculated according to the Julian Calendar. Thus, for example, Christmas is celebrated on January 7 in these countries. The computation of the day of Pascha (Easter) is, however, computed according to the Julian Calendar, even by those churches which observe the Revised Julian Calendar. The Julian calendar was a reform of the Roman calendar which was introduced by Julius Caesar in 46 BC and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ... The Revised Julian calendar is a calendar that was considered for adoption by the Eastern Orthodox churches at a synod in Istanbul in May 1923. ... For the calendar of religious holidays and periods, see liturgical year. ... Dec. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ...


There are four fasting seasons during the year: The most important fast is Great Lent which is an intense time of fasting, almsgiving and prayer, extending for forty days prior to Palm Sunday and Holy Week, as a preparation for Pascha. The Nativity Fast (Winter Lent) is a time of preparation for the Feast of the Nativity of Christ (Christmas), but whereas Advent in the West lasts only four weeks, Nativity Fast lasts a full forty days. The Apostles' Fast is variable in length, lasting anywhere from eight days to six weeks, in preparation for the Feast of Saints Peter and Paul (June 29). The Dormition Fast lasts for two weeks from August 1 to August 14 in preparation for the Feast of the Dormition of the Theotokos (August 15). The liturgical year is so constructed that during each of these fasting seasons, one of the Great Feasts occurs, so that fasting may be tempered with joy. Great Lent is the greatest fasting period in the church year in Eastern Christianity, which prepares Christians for the greatest feast of the church year, Easter (or Holy Pascha). Although it is in many ways similar to Lent in Western Christianity, there are important differences in the timing of Lent... Zakât (or Zakaat or Zakah) (English:tax, alms, tithe) (Arabic: زكاة, Old (Quran) Arabic: زكوة) is the third of the Five Pillars of Islam. ... For the book by Kurt Vonnegut Jr. ... For the 1958 novel of the same name by Louis Aragon, see La Semaine Sainte. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... The Nativity Fast, practiced by the Eastern Orthodox Church, is believed to enable participants to draw closer to God by denying the body of worldly pleasure in preparation for celebration of the birth of Jesus Christ, which is held on December 25th (Julian Calendar). ... The Nativity by Petrus Christus, c. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... The Feast of Sts. ... June 28 - Eastern Orthodox Church calendar - June 30 All fixed commemorations below celebrated on July 12 by Old Calendarists Saints The holy, glorious, and all-praised leaders of the Apostles, Peter and Paul Saint Peter of Rostov, wonderworker and prince of the Tatar Horde (1290) Other commemorations Uncovering of the... Dormition of the Virgin redirects here. ... July 31 - Eastern Orthodox Church calendar - Aug. ... Aug. ... Dormition of the Virgin redirects here. ... Aug. ...


In addition to these fasting seasons, Orthodox Christians fast on Wednesdays and Fridays throughout the year (and some Orthodox monasteries also observe Monday as a fast day). Certain fixed days are always fast days, even if they fall on a Saturday or Sunday (in which case the fast is lessened somewhat, but not abrogated altogether); these are: The Decollation of St. John the Baptist, and the Exaltation of the Cross. There are several fast-free periods, when it is forbidden to fast, even on Wednesday and Friday. These are: the week following Pascha, the week following Pentecost, and the period from the Nativity of Christ until the eve of Theophany (Epiphany). This article concerns the buildings occupied by monastics. ... Decapitation (from Latin, caput, capitis, meaning head), or beheading, is the removal of a living organisms head. ... For the hip-hop producer with the same name, see John the Baptist (producer). ... In the Christian liturgical calendar, there are several different feasts known as Feasts of the Cross, all of which commemorate the cross used in the crucifixion of Jesus. ... The Descent of the Holy Spirit in a 15th century illuminated manuscript. ... Look up theophany in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Pascha

Main article: Pascha

The greatest feast is Pascha, which for the Orthodox is calculated differently than in the West. Easter for both East and West is calculated as the first Sunday after the full moon that falls on or after March 21 (nominally the day of the vernal equinox). However, whereas Western Christians follow the Gregorian Calendar in their calculations, the Orthodox calculate the fixed date of 21 March according to the Julian Calendar, and observe the additional rule that Easter may not precede or coincide with the first day of the Jewish Passover (see computus for further details). This article is about the Christian festival. ... For other uses, see Full Moon. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of equinox The vernal equinox (or spring equinox) marks the beginning of astronomical spring. ... For the calendar of religious holidays and periods, see liturgical year. ... The Julian calendar was a reform of the Roman calendar which was introduced by Julius Caesar in 46 BC and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ... This article is about the Jewish holiday. ... Computus (Latin for computation) is the calculation of the date of Easter in the Christian calendar. ...


The date of Pascha is central to the entire ecclesiastical year,determining not only the date for the beginning of Great Lent and Pentecost, but affecting the cycle of moveable feasts, of scriptural readings and the Octoechos (texts chanted according to the eight ecclesiastical modes) throughout the year. There are also a number of lesser feasts throughout the year that are based upon the date of Pascha. The moveable cycle begins on the Zacchaeus Sunday (the first Sunday in preparation for Great Lent), though the cycle of the Octoechos continues until Palm Sunday. The Octoechos (Greek Οκτώηχος; Slavonic: Октонхъ, Oktoikh, or Осмогласникъ, Osmoglasnik)—literally, the book of the Eight Tones—contains an eight-week cycle, providing texts to be chanted for every day at Vespers, Matins, the Divine Liturgy, Compline and (on Sundays) the Midnight Office. ... This entry incorporates text from the public domain Eastons Bible Dictionary, originally published in 1897. ...


The date of Pascha affects the following liturgical seasons:

  • The period of the Triodion (the Sundays before Great Lent, Cheesefare Week, Great Lent, Palm Sunday, and Holy Week)
  • The period of the Pentecostarion (Sunday of Pascha through the Sunday After Pentecost)

The Triodion (Greek: ; Slavonic: Постнаѧ Трїωдь/Postnaya Triod; Romanian: ), also called the Lenten Triodion (Τριῴδιον κατανυκτικόν/Triodion katanuktikon), is the liturgical book used by the Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Churches of Byzantine rite during Great Lent and the preparatory weeks leading up to it. ... Boris Kustodiev Maslenitsa tuesday Celebration of Maslenitsa in Australia. ... The Pentecostarion (Greek: Πεντηκοστάριον, Pentekostárion; Slavonic: Цвѣтнаѧ Трїωдь, Tsvyetnaya Triod , literally Flowery Triodon; Romanian: Penticostar) is the liturgical book used by the Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Churches of Byzantine rite during the Paschal Season which extends from Pascha (Easter) to the Sunday following All Saints Sunday (i. ...

The twelve Great Feasts

Main article: Great Feasts

Some of these feasts follow the Fixed Cycle, and some follow the Moveable (Paschal) Cycle. Most of those on the Fixed Cycle have a period of preparation called a Forefeast, and a period of celebration afterward, similar to the Western Octave, called an Afterfeast. Great Feasts on the Paschal Cycle do not have Forefeasts. The lengths of Forefeasts and Afterfeasts vary, according to the feast. // Great Feasts of the Orthodox Church Easter/Pascha The feast of the Resurrection of Jesus, called Easter or Pascha, is the greatest of the feasts of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... An Afterfeast is a period of celebration attached to one of the Great Feasts celebrated by the Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Churches (roughly equivalent to what in the West would be called an Octave). ... For other uses, see Octave (disambiguation). ...

NOTE: In Eastern practice, should this feast fall during Holy Week or on Pascha itself, the feast of the Annunciation is not transferred to another day. In fact, the conjunction of the feasts of the Annunciation and Pascha, known as "Kyriou-Pascha," is considered an extremely wondrous event. The Nativity of the Theotokos is one of the twelve great feasts of the Eastern Orthodox Liturgical year. ... Sep. ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ... For other persons named Joachim, see Joachim (disambiguation). ... Anna can refer to a variety of things. ... In the Christian liturgical calendar, there are several different feasts known as Feasts of the Cross, all of which commemorate the cross used in the crucifixion of Jesus. ... Sep. ... A reliquary in the form of an ornate Christian Cross Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope... Nov. ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ... The Nativity by Petrus Christus, c. ... Dec. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... Look up theophany in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Jan. ... For other uses, see Presentation (disambiguation). ... Feb. ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ... For other uses, see Saint Joseph (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Annunciation (disambiguation). ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ... Mar. ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ...

For the book by Kurt Vonnegut Jr. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... Also refers to the process of gaining Enlightenment and several meditation techniques. ... The Descent of the Holy Spirit in a 15th century illuminated manuscript. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      In mainstream... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      For... The word Transfiguration means a changing of appearance or form. ... Aug. ... Dormition of the Virgin redirects here. ... Aug. ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ... This article is about the theological concept. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Western Christianity...

Other Feasts

Some additional feasts are observed with as though they were Great Fests:

Every day throughout the year commemorates some saint or some event in the lives of Christ or the Theotokos. When a feast on the moveable cycle occurs, the feast on the fixed cycle that was set for that calendar day is transferred, with the propers of the feast often being chanted at Compline on the nearest convenient day. The Intercession of Our Most Holy Lady Theotokos and Ever-Virgin Mary (Russian Pokrov, Покров) is one of the most important Russian Orthodoxy feasts (maybe the most important after the Twelve Great Feasts). ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Feast of Sts. ... For the hip-hop producer with the same name, see John the Baptist (producer). ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... The Proper (Latin proprium) is that part of the Christian liturgy that varies according to the date, either representing an observance within the Liturgical Year, or of a particular saint or significant event. ... Compline or Complin is the final church service (or office) of the day in the Christian tradition of canonical hours. ...


Cycles

See also: Paschal Cycle

In addition to the Fixed and Moveable Cycles, there are a number of other liturgical cycles in the ecclesiastical year that affect the celebration of the divine services. These include, the Daily Cycle, the Weekly Cycle, the Cycle of Matins Gospels, and the Octoechos. In the Eastern and Oriental Orthodox Churches, the cycle of the moveable feast is built around Pascha, or Easter. ... Canonical hours are ancient divisions of time, developed by the Christian Church, serving as increments between the prescribed prayers of the daily round. ... Canonical hours are ancient divisions of time, developed by the Christian Church, serving as increments between the prescribed prayers of the daily round. ... Canonical hours are ancient divisions of time, developed by the Christian Church, serving as increments between the prescribed prayers of the daily round. ... The Octoechos (Greek Οκτώηχος; Slavonic: Октонхъ, Oktoikh, or Осмогласникъ, Osmoglasnik)—literally, the book of the Eight Tones—contains an eight-week cycle, providing texts to be chanted for every day at Vespers, Matins, the Divine Liturgy, Compline and (on Sundays) the Midnight Office. ...


Secular observance

Because of the dominance of Christianity in Europe throughout the Middle Ages, many features of the Christian year became incorporated into the secular calendar. Many of its feasts (i.e., Mardi Gras, Saint Patrick's Day) remain holidays, and are now celebrated by people of all faiths and none — in some cases worldwide. The secular celebrations bear varying degrees of likeness to the religious feasts from which they derived, often also including elements of ritual from pagan festivals of similar date. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... For other uses, see Mardi Gras (disambiguation). ... St. ... Pagan and heathen redirect here. ...


Resources

  • Stookey, L.H. Calendar: Christ's Time for the Church, 1996. ISBN 0-687-01136-1
  • Hickman, Hoyt L., et al. Handbook of the Christian Year, 1986. ISBN 0-687-16575-X
  • Webber, Robert E. Ancient-Future Time: Forming Spirituality through the Christian Year, 2004. ISBN 0-8010-9175-6
  • Schmemann, Fr. Alexander. The Church Year (Celebration of Faith Series, Sermons Vol. 2), 1994. ISBN 0-88141-138-8

See also

The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ... Each day in the Catholic liturgical calendar has a rank. ... Monument honoring the right to worship, Washington, D.C. In Christianity, worship has been considered by most Christians to be the central act of Christian identity throughout history. ... Computus (Latin for computation) is the calculation of the date of Easter in the Christian calendar. ... The Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar describes and dictates the rhythm of the life of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... For the calendar of religious holidays and periods, see liturgical year. ... The Julian calendar was a reform of the Roman calendar which was introduced by Julius Caesar in 46 BC and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ...

External links

  • Universalis — A liturgical calendar of the Catholic Church including the liturgy of the hours and the mass readings.
  • Greek Orthodox Calendar - Greek Orthodox Calendar & Online Chapel
  • Orthodox Calendar at HOLY TRINITY RUSSIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH
  • Lectionary Central - For the study and use of the traditional Western Eucharistic lectionary.
Kan-laon means he who is king of the ancient of days which means the supreme God in Visayan. ... Hinduism is a religious tradition[1] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... A kalpa is a Sanskrit word meaning an aeon, or a long period of time in Hindu and Buddhist cosmology. ... Manvantara (Sanskrit). ... Yuga (Devnāgari: युग) in Hindu philosophy refers to an epoch or era within a cycle of four ages: the Satya Yuga (or Krita Yuga), the Treta Yuga, the Dvapara Yuga and finally the Kali Yuga. ... is the Sanskrit for time (from a root to enumerate; unrelated to black whence ). It denotes a fixed or right point in time (compare rtu, kairos). ... A page from the Hindu calendar 1871-72. ... // The astronomical time cycles mentioned in ancient Hindu astronomical and Puranic texts are remarkably similar to each other. ... Buddhism is a variety of teachings, sometimes described as a religion[1] or way of life that attempts to identify the causes of human suffering and offer various ways that are claimed to end, or ease suffering. ... Wheel of time may refer to: The Wheel of time or history, a religious concept predominant in Buddhism and Hinduism The Wheel of Time, a fantasy book series by author Robert Jordan The Wheel of Time (computer game), an action first-person shooter based on the series The Timewheel, a... Kālacakra (Sanskrit कालचक्र; Tibetan དུས་ཀྱི་འཁོར་ལོ་ dus kyi khor lo) is a term used in Tantric Buddhism that means time-wheel or time-cycles. It refers both to a Tantric deity (Tib. ... This article is about the Buddhist bodhisattva Maitreya. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Ancient of Days is a name for God in Aramaic (Atik Yomin); in the Greek Septuagint: (Palaios Hemeron); and in the Vulgate: (Antiquus Dierum). ... Ein Sof (Hebrew: without end denoting boundlessness), also known as Divine Being, is the name for God, within the Kabbalah of Judaism, as he is unknown, or the mysterious and ultimate source of all existence. ... The Hebrew calendar (‎) or Jewish calendar is a lunisolar calendar used by Jews for predominantly religious purposes. ... The missing years in the Hebrew calendar refer to a discrepancy of some 165 years between the traditional Hebrew dating for the destruction of the First Temple (3338 AM) and the modern secular dating for it (586 BCE) that results if the traditional date is interpreted according to the standard... A Jewish holiday or Jewish Festival is a day or series of days observed by Jews as holy or secular commemorations of important events in Jewish history. ... This article is about the Jewish holiday. ... For other uses, see Sabbath. ... Topics in Christianity Preaching Prayer Ecumenism Relation to other religions Movements Music Liturgy Calendar Symbols Art Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... For the calendar of religious holidays and periods, see liturgical year. ... For other uses, see Sabbath. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... Computus (Latin for computation) is the calculation of the date of Easter in the Christian calendar. ... For the book by Ernest Hemingway, see A Moveable Feast. ... The Easter controversy is a series of controversies about the proper date to celebrate Easter. ... Quartodecimanism (derived from the Vulgate Latin: quarta decima[1], meaning fourteen) refers to the custom of Christians celebrating Passover on the 14th day of Nisan in the Old Testaments Hebrew Calendar (Lev 23:5). ... The current system for determining the date of Easter has two problems: (1) its date varies from year to year (not considered a problem by many Christians), and (2) Eastern and Western churches use different methods of determining its date, and hence in most years it is celebrated on a... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... The Islamic calendar or Muslim calendar (Arabic: التقويم الهجري; at-taqwÄ«m al-hijrÄ«; Persian: تقویم هجري قمری ‎ taqwÄ«m-e hejri-ye qamari; also called the Hijri calendar) is the calendar used to date events in many predominantly Muslim countries, and used by Muslims everywhere to determine the proper day on which to celebrate... Muslim holidays generally celebrate the events of the life of Islams main prophet, Muhammad, especially the events surrounding the first hearing of the Kuran. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... opens chapter nine of The Dreaming Universe (1994) entitled The Dreamtime with a quote from The Last Wave, a film by Peter Weir: Aboriginals believe in two forms of time. ... This article is about Australian Aboriginal cosmogony, cosmology and spirituality. ... Replica of an oracle bone -- turtle shell Oracle bones (Chinese: 甲骨; pinyin: jiÇŽgÇ”piàn) are pieces of bone or turtle shell used in royal divination from the mid Shang to early Zhou dynasties in ancient China, and often bearing written inscriptions in what is called oracle bone script. ... The Maya calendar is a system of distinct calendars and almanacs used by the Maya civilization of pre-Columbian Mesoamerica, and by some modern Maya communities in highland Guatemala. ... This article is about days of the week. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Liturgical year (698 words)
The liturgical year consists of the cycle of liturgical seasons in some Christian churches which determines when Feasts, Memorials, Commemorations and Solemnities are to be observed and which portions of Scripture are to be read.
Distinct liturgical colours may appear in connection with different seasons of the liturgical year.
The Liturgical year in the Eastern Orthodox Church is characterized by alternating fasts and feasts, and is in many ways similar to the Roman Catholic year described above.
Liturgical Year (1555 words)
The liturgical year of the Church is the annual cycle of seasons and feasts that celebrate the central mystery and the central event of salvation history namely, the death and the resurrection of Jesus Christ.
Within the cycle of a year, moreover, she unfolds the whole mystery of Christ, not only from his Incarnation and birth until his ascension, but also as reflected in the day of Pentecost, and in the expectation of a blessed, hoped-for return of the Lord.
There is a connection between the annual celebration of the liturgical seasons and the yearly repetition of the seasons of nature; the phenomenon of equinox and solstice, the change from darkness to light are all natural phenomena.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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