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Encyclopedia > Little Richard
Little Richard

Little Richard being interviewed by Army Archerd on the red carpet at the 60th Annual Academy Awards, April 11, 1988
Background information
Birth name Richard Wayne Penniman
Also known as The True King Of Rock 'n' Roll
Born December 5, 1932 (1932-12-05) (age 74)
Origin Macon, Georgia, U.S.
Genre(s) Rock
R&B
Gospel
Instrument(s) Vocals
Piano
Keyboard
Guitar
Years active 1951 - present
Label(s) Atlantic
Bell
Brunswick
Coral
Critique
Elektra
End
Kent
Lost-Nite
Mainstream
Manticore
MCA
Mercury
Modern
Okeh
Peacock
RCA Victor
Reprise
Specialty
Vee Jay
Warner Bros.
WTG

Richard Wayne Penniman (born December 5, 1932), better known by the stage name Little Richard, is an African-American singer, songwriter, and pianist, who began performing in the 1940s and was a key figure in the transition from rhythm & blues to rock and roll in the mid-1950s. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (593x649, 77 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Little Richard ... Army Archerd, columist, Variety. ... The red carpet at the 2007 Tribeca Film Festival; to the left is Rachael Harris A red carpet is a strip of carpet in the colour red, which is laid out to welcome VIPs such as dignitaries and celebrities at formal events. ... 60th Academy Awards Hosts Preshow: Show: Crew Producer: Director: Duration Network The 60th Academy Awards were presented April 29, 1989 at the Shrine Civic Auditorium, Los Angeles. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Macon is a city located in central Georgia, USA. It is among the largest metropolitan areas in Georgia, and the county seat of Bibb County, It lies near the geographic center of Georgia, approximately 75 miles (129 km) south of Atlanta, hence the citys nickname as the Heart of... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... Gospel, from the Old English good tidings is a calque of Greek () used in the New Testament (see Etymology below). ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... In music a singer or vocalist is a type of musician who sings, i. ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Atlantic Records (Atlantic Recording Corporation) is an American record label, and operates as a wholly owned subsidiary of Warner Music Group. ... First US Bell Records Bell Records was the name of at least four different record companies in the 20th century. ... The Brunswick Records logo Brunswick Records is a United States based record label. ... Coral Records was a Decca Records subsidiary based in the United States of America. ... Elektra Records is an American record label owned by Warner Music Group, and today operates under Atlantic Records Group. ... End Records was acquired by Morris Levy and incorporated into Roulette Records. ... Kent Records was a record label launched in the late fifties. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Manticore Records was the record label launched by Emerson, Lake and Palmers production company Manticore in the early 1970s. ... MCA Records was an American-based record company owned by MCA Inc. ... Mercury Records was a record label founded in Chicago, Illinois in 1945 by Irving Green, Berle Adams and Arthur Talmadge. ... Modern Record was a record label formed in 1945 by Jules, Saul, Lester and Joe Bidhari. ... Okeh Records began as an independent record label based in the United States of America in 1918; from the late 1920s on was a subsidiary of Columbia Records. ... Peacock Records was a record label started in 1949 by Don D. Robey. ... Sony BMG Music Entertainment is the result of a 50/50 joint venture between Sony Music Entertainment (part of Sony) and BMG Entertainment (part of Bertelsmann AG) completed in August 2004. ... Reprise Records is an American record label, owned by Warner Music Group, operated through Warner Bros. ... Specialty Records was an American record label. ... Vee-Jay Records was a record label, specializing in blues, jazz, rhythm and blues and rock and roll. ... Warner Bros. ... Epic Records is an American record label, and subsidiary of Sony BMG. // Epic was launched originally as a jazz and classical music label in 1953 by CBS. Its bright-yellow, black and blue logo became a familiar trademark for many jazz and classical releases. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A stage name, also called a screen name, is a pseudonym used by performers and entertainers such as actors, comedians, musicians, djs, clowns, and professional wrestlers. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... A pianist is a person who plays the piano. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ...


Penniman's reputation rests on a string of groundbreaking hit singles from 1955 through 1957, such as "Tutti Frutti" and "Long Tall Sally", which helped lay the foundation for rock and roll music,[1] influencing generations of rhythm and blues, rock and soul music artists. Little Richard's injection of funk during this period[1] also influenced the development of that genre of music. Tutti Frutti was Little Richards first hit record in 1955; with its opening cry of Womp-bomp-a-loom-op-a-womp-bam-boom! and its hard-driving sound and wild lyrics, it became not only a model for many future Little Richard songs, but also one of the... Long Tall Sally is a rock and roll song first recorded by Little Richard in the mid-1950s, when it became one of the singers best-known hits. ... For other uses, see Rhythm and blues (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... This article is about the novel Soul Music. ... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ...


Little Richard's early work was a mix of boogie-woogie, rhythm and blues and gospel music, but with a heavily accentuated back-beat, funky saxophone grooves and raspy, shouted vocals, moans, screams, and other emotive inflections that marked a new kind of music. In 1957, while at the height of stardom, he became a born-again Christian and withdrew from recording and performing secular music.[2] Boogie woogie has two different meanings: a piano based music style, boogie woogie (music) a dance that imitates the rocknroll of the 50s, boogie woogie (dance) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For other uses, see Rhythm and blues (disambiguation). ... Gospel music is a musical genre characterized by dominant vocals (often with strong use of harmony) referencing lyrics of a religious nature, particularly Christian. ... In music a back beat (also called the, or a, backbeat) is a term applied to the beats 2 and 4 in a 4/4 bar or a 12/8 bar [1] as opposed to the odd downbeat, (quarter beat 1). ... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ... Born again is a soteriological term used primarily in the Evangelical, Fundamentalist, and Pentecostal branches of Protestant Christianity, where it is associated with salvation, conversion and spiritual birth. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is...


James Brown, who called Little Richard his idol,[2] credited him with "first putting the funk in the rock and roll beat"[1] via his saxophone-studded, mid-'50s road band, by Smokey Robinson, in 1997 as, "the start of that driving, funky, never let up rock 'n' roll", by Dick Clark as "the model for almost every rock and roll performer of the '50s and years thereafter", and Ray Charles, in 1989, as "the man that started a kind of music that set the pace for a lot of what's happening today." In 1969, Elvis Presley told Little Richard, "Your music has inspired me - you are the greatest.".[2] Otis Redding, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Mick Jagger, John Fogerty, Bob Dylan, Dick Dale, Bob Seger, Jimi Hendrix, David Bowie, and numerous other rock n roll icons have also cited Little Richard as being their first major influence. For other persons named James Brown, see James Brown (disambiguation). ... William Smokey Robinson, Jr. ... For other persons named Dick Clark, see Dick Clark (disambiguation). ... For the composer and conductor of the Ray Charles Singers, see Ray Charles (composer). ... “Elvis” redirects here. ... Otis Ray Redding, Jr. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an English singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who first gained worldwide fame as one of the founding members of The Beatles. ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ... Michael Phillip Mick Jagger CBE (born July 26, 1943) is an English rock musician, actor, songwriter, record and film producer and businessman. ... This article is about the musician. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... This article is about the surf guitarist. ... Robert Clark Seger (born May 6, 1945) is a Rock and Roll singer, songwriter, and musician from Michigan. ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ... David Bowie (IPA: []) (born David Robert Jones on 1947 January 8) is an English singer, songwriter, actor, multi-instrumentalist, producer, arranger and audio engineer. ...

Contents

Biography

Penniman was born in Macon, Georgia, to Leva Mae Stewart and Charles ("Bud") Penniman, a bootlegger.[1][3] He grew up in a spiritual family, amid poverty and prejudice, and it was singing that made his family feel closer to God. His family had a group called the Penniman Singers, who would go around and sing in local churches, and enter contests with other singing families. Richard's siblings called him 'War Hawk' because of his loud, screaming singing voice. His paternal grandfather, Walter Penniman, was a preacher, and his father's family were members of the Foundation Templar African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church in Macon, Georgia. Richard's maternal grandmother was a member of the Holiness Temple Baptist Church, also in Macon. Richard regularly attended the New Hope Baptist Church in Macon, where his mother was a member. However, of all the churches he frequented, Richard's favorite were the Pentecostal churches because of the music and the fun he and his friends would have doing the holy dance and talking in tongues along with members of the congregation. When he was as young as ten, he would go around as a healer, singing Gospel songs and touching people, who would testify that they felt better after he ministered to them. Inspired by Brother Joe May, a singing evangelist known as 'The Thunderbolt of the West', Richard wanted to become a preacher. It was in and through the church where Richard's life in music all began.[2] Macon is a city located in central Georgia, USA. It is among the largest metropolitan areas in Georgia, and the county seat of Bibb County, It lies near the geographic center of Georgia, approximately 75 miles (129 km) south of Atlanta, hence the citys nickname as the Heart of... The Rum Runner nightclub was opened on Broad Street in the Birmingham city centre in 1979. ... The African Methodist Episcopal Church, usually called the AME Church, is a Christian denomination founded by Bishop Richard Allen in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1816. ... Baptist churches are part of a Christian movement often regarded as an evangelical, protestant denomination. ... The Pentecostal movement within Protestant Christianity places special emphasis on the gifts of the Holy Spirit. ...


Nearly all of Richard Penniman's dramatic phrasing and swift vocal turns are derived from Black Gospel artists of the 1930s and 1940s. He referred to Sister Rosetta Tharpe as his favorite singer when he was a child. She had invited him to sing a song with her onstage at the Macon City Auditorium in 1945, after hearing him sing before the concert. The crowd applauded and cheered and she paid him more money than he had ever seen after the show.[2] He was also heavily influenced by Marion Williams, from whom he got the trademark "whoooo" in his vocal,[2] Mahalia Jackson,[2] and Brother Joe May.[2] He was heavily influenced in appearance (hair, clothing, shoes, makeup, etc.) and sound by late 1940s gospel-style, jump blues shouter Billy Wright, who was known as the 'Prince of the Blues'.[2] It is reported that he got one of the inflections ("Lucille-uh") in his vocal from Ruth Brown.[citation needed] Sister Rosetta Tharpe (March 20, 1915 - October 9, 1973) was a gospel artist who attained great popularity in the 1930s and 1940s with a unique mixture of Holiness vocals and jazzy guitar accompaniment. ... Marion Williams (August 29, 1927 - July 2, 1994) was a legendary American gospel singer, often regarded as one of the most powerful voices in American music history. ... Mahalia Jackson (October 26, 1911[1] – January 27, 1972) was an American gospel singer, widely regarded as the best in the history of the genre. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Jump blues is a type of up-tempo blues music influenced by big band sound. ... Ruth Brown (January 12, 1928–November 17, 2006) was an American R&B singer. ...


One of Penniman's main influences on his piano-playing was Esquerita (Eskew Reeder Jr.), who demonstrated to Penniman how to play high notes without compromising bass. Penniman met Esquerita when he traveled through Macon with a preacher named Sister Rosa. Another influence was Brother Joe May. Penniman explained, "I used to get in a room and try to make my piano sound just like him. He had so much energy." May generated energy by moving from a subtle whisper to a thunderous tenor and back in a four-bar phrase. Esquerita, real name Eskew Reeder Jr, was born in Greenville, South Carolina, in 1935. ... Bass (IPA: [], rhyming with face), when used as an adjective, describes tones of low frequency or range. ...


He learned to mix ministerial qualities with theatrics by watching the traveling medicine shows that rolled through his native Macon. Colorful medicine men would wear lavish capes, robes and turbans, all of which left an impression on Penniman. Clark Stanleys Snake Oil Liniment. ...


In 1952, Penniman's father was murdered. After this, he returned to Macon and performed blues and boogie-woogie music at the "Tick Tock Club" in the evening, whilst also washing dishes at the cafeteria of a Greyhound Lines bus station during the day. “Blues music” redirects here. ... Boogie woogie has two different meanings: a piano based music style, boogie woogie (music) a dance that imitates the rocknroll of the 50s, boogie woogie (dance) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Greyhound Lines is the largest inter-city common carrier of passengers by bus in North America, serving 2,200 destinations in the United States. ...


Recording career

Modeled after recording artist Billy Wright, Little Richard had recorded songs for the Peacock Records label between 1951 and 1954, including "Little Richard's Boogie". These records sold poorly and Penniman had little success until he sent a demo tape to Specialty Records on February 17, 1955. Specialty's owner Art Rupe placed Richard's career in the hands of Robert 'Bumps' Blackwell, who had nurtured and groomed Ray Charles (then known as R.C. Robinson) and Quincy Jones at the start of their careers in the music business. Peacock Records was a record label started in 1949 by Don D. Robey. ... Specialty Records was an American record label. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... For the composer and conductor of the Ray Charles Singers, see Ray Charles (composer). ... This article is about the producer and songwriter. ...


Blackwell had intended to pit Little Richard against Ray Charles and B.B. King by having him record blues tracks. He arranged for a recording session in New Orleans in the late summer of 1955, when, during a break, Penniman began singing an impromptu recital of "Tutti Frutti", in his raspy, shouted vocal style, while pounding out a boogie-woogie based rhythm on the piano. Blackwell, who knew a hit when he heard one, was knocked out and had Little Richard record the song. However, in order to make it commercially acceptable, he had Little Richard's lyrics changed from "tutti-frutti, loose booty" to "tutti frutti, aw rooty."[4] Riley B. King aka B. B. King (b. ... “Blues music” redirects here. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Tutti Frutti was Little Richards first hit record in 1955; with its opening cry of Womp-bomp-a-loom-op-a-womp-bam-boom! and its hard-driving sound and wild lyrics, it became not only a model for many future Little Richard songs, but also one of the... Rhythm (Greek = flow, or in Modern Greek, style) is the variation of the length and accentuation of a series of sounds or other events. ... Bottom commonly refers to the human buttocks but also has other uses. ...


The song, with Little Richard shouting its unique introductory "A-wop-bop-a-loo-mop-a-whop-bam-boom!", became the model for many subsequent Little Richard songs, with a driving piano, boogie-woogie bass, funky saxophone arrangements, with sax solos usually from Lee Allen. Over the next few years, Little Richard had many hit singles, such as "Long Tall Sally", "Rip It Up", "The Girl Can't Help It", "Slippin' and Slidin'", "Jenny, Jenny", "Good Golly, Miss Molly", and "Keep A Knockin'". His performing style can be seen in such period films as Don't Knock the Rock (1956) and The Girl Can't Help It (also 1956), for which he sang the title song. The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored instrument of the woodwind family. ... Lee Allen (1926 - 1994) was a tenor saxophone player. ... Long Tall Sally is a rock and roll song first recorded by Little Richard in the mid-1950s, when it became one of the singers best-known hits. ... Rip It Up is a song written by Robert Blackwell and John Marascalco. ... The Girl Cant Help It is the title song to the film The Girl Cant Help It, sung by Little Richard. ... Slippin and Slidin is an R&B/rock song written by Little Richard, Edwin Bocage, Albert Collins, and James Smith. ... Good Golly, Miss Molly is a hit song recorded in 1958 by the American musician Little Richard. ... Dont Knock the Rock was a 1956 rock and roll film starring Alan Dale as a rock star who returns to his hometown to rest up for the summer only to find that rock and roll has been banned there by disapproving adults. ... The Girl Cant Help It is a 1956 comedy, musical film, starring Tom Ewell, Edmund OBrien and Jayne Mansfield. ...


In the commercial fashion of the day, several of his early hits were re-recorded in other styles. Little Richard's first national success, "Tutti Frutti," was covered by Pat Boone, whose version outdid the source record, #12 to #17. Boone also released a version of "Long Tall Sally," with slightly bowdlerized lyrics. But this time, the Little Richard original outperformed it on the Billboard charts, #6 to #8. Bill Haley tackled Little Richard's third major hit, "Rip It Up," but again, Little Richard prevailed. With the record-buying public's preference established, Little Richard's subsequent releases did not face the same chart competition. Charles Eugene Patrick Pat Boone (born June 1, 1934) is a singer whose smooth style made him a popular performer of the 1950s. ... Thomas Bowdler (July 11, 1754 – February 24, 1825), an English physician, has become (in)famous as the editor of a childrens edition of William Shakespeare, the Family Shakespeare, in which he endeavoured to remove every thing that could give just offence to the religious and virtuous mind. ... Billboard can refer to: Billboard magazine Billboard (advertising) Billboard antenna In 3D computer graphics, to billboard is to rotate an object so that it faces the viewer. ... Bill Haley, with his band, the Comets, was one of the first rock and roll acts to tour the United Kingdom. ...


Despite the raw sound of his music, the singles were carefully arranged, as documented on the three-volume album The Specialty Sessions, which include many false starts and variations. A collection of various CD singles In music, a single is a short recording of one or more separate tracks. ...


Born-again Christianity

Little Richard quit the music business in 1957, while on tour in Australia, claiming he had been warned of his own damnation in a vision. The music industry is the industry that creates and performs music, both in the form of compositions and performances. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... “Dammit” redirects here. ...


Since then, he has been in and out of rock and roll as well as in and out of religion. He took the Voice of Prophecy courses run by members of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, attended Oakwood College in Huntsville, Alabama, and was ordained a minister in the Church of God of the Ten Commandments.[5] His stance at that time in his life was that rock music was of the devil and that it is not possible to play rock and roll and to please God at the same time. He began performing Gospel music throughout the United States of America, often with Gospel artists who inspired him, including Mahalia Jackson, whom he met one day in Los Angeles, where he invited her to hear him sing at the Mount Maria Baptist Church.[2] In 1959, he married a Christian girl named Ernestine. The Voice Of Prophecy was founded in 1929 by H.M.S. Richards, Sr. ... The Seventh-day Adventist (abbreviated Adventist[1]) Church is a Christian denomination which is distinguished by its observance of Saturday, the seventh day of the week, as the Sabbath. ... Oakwood College is a historically black college located in Huntsville, Alabama. ... Huntsville, Alabama (top center), near the Tennessee border, is north of Birmingham and northeast of Decatur, across the Tennessee River flowing northwest. ... This article is about the concept of Satan. ... Mahalia Jackson (October 26, 1911[1] – January 27, 1972) was an American gospel singer, widely regarded as the best in the history of the genre. ...


While Specialty Records released a few new songs based on past sessions, Richard recorded only Gospel music in the late 1950s and early 1960s. He performed only Gospel material on the Gospel circuit. During this time, he did not perform his early rock and roll hits, resenting the secular themes of the songs. The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ...


In 1962, Little Richard was invited to tour Europe. He took a young Billy Preston with him on the road as part of his band. They intended on performing only Gospel music, but were lured into performing his old, secular hits. That year, an unknown British group called The Beatles were his opening act. In 1963, his opening band was another young band, the Rolling Stones. In 1964, Little Richard then introduced another then-unknown artist, Jimi Hendrix, as part of his band. Hendrix said in 1966, "I want to do with my guitar what Little Richard does with his voice."[2] Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... William Everett Preston (September 2, 1946 – June 6, 2006) was an American soul musician from Houston, Texas, raised mostly in Los Angeles, California. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... This article is about the rock band. ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ...


Richard performed on the rock revival circuit through the remainder of the 1960s and into the 1970s. He also recorded live and studio albums over this period of time. He experienced moderate chart success with new material in mid-1960s and again in the early 1970s. The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ...


Back to religion

In 1977, following the death of a nephew that he loved like a son, and with his own life spiraling out of control with drug abuse in the seedy underworld of LA, Little Richard returned to God and the ministry, this time for the Universal Remnant Church of God.[6] During this time, he traveled and preached to hundreds of thousands of people, and recorded more gospel music. He also represented Memorial Bibles International and sold the Black Heritage Bible for a short while. In his sermons in the late 1970s and early 1980s, Little Richard proclaimed that it is not possible to perform rock and roll music and to serve God at the same time. He said, "I like Pat Boone as a friend, but he's trying to serve two masters. Pat believes he can go to Las Vegas and do his thing, then preach on Sunday. I don't believe we can do that. God has not called us to do that. I can never see myself going back to rock 'n' roll."[2] The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ...


In 1984, Charles White released his authorized biography of Penniman, "The Life and Times of Little Richard," in which Little Richard testified about his conversion to Christianity and subsequent deliverance.[2] Mick Jagger proclaimed on the cover, "Little Richard is King." He launched yet another comeback, this time recording an album of inspirational rock and roll music. Ever since he has attempted to reconcile his role as a rock and roll star and his role as a minister. Penniman once said, "I believe that there is good and bad in everything. I believe some rock 'n' roll music is really bad, but I believe there is some not as bad. I believe if the message is positive and elevating, and wholesome and uplifting, this makes you think clearly. If it's not then it is not good even in Gospel." Charles Dodd White (born 1976) is an American novelist, publisher and poet. ... Michael Phillip Mick Jagger CBE (born July 26, 1943) is an English rock musician, actor, songwriter, record and film producer and businessman. ... For other uses, see Monarch (disambiguation). ...


As detailed in White's biography (2003 revision, pg. 221),[2] Richard's dilemma - whether to be a minister or to sing rock 'n roll - came to a head again while recording the soundtrack to the 1985 hit movie Down and Out in Beverly Hills, so he enrolled his old friend Billy Preston to help him write a song with spiritual lyrics that would sound like rock 'n' roll. The result was a song called "Great God A'Mighty", which he changed to "It's A Matter of Time", reflecting the conflict in his mind. Down and Out in Beverly Hills is a 1986 American comedy motion picture starring Nick Nolte, Bette Midler and Richard Dreyfuss. ... William Everett Preston (September 2, 1946 – June 6, 2006) was an American soul musician from Houston, Texas, raised mostly in Los Angeles, California. ...


The song became his first hit in over a decade and became part of a Little Richard "messages in rhythm" album entitled Lifetime Friend released by WEA in 1986. Little Richard called his new music "message music", stating, "my mother died not long ago and it was only a few months before she died that she made me promise that I'd stay with the Lord. I have contentment and peace of mind, which is more important than anything. I am going to stay with God and just travel around."[2] This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Recent events

Through the remainder of the 1980s, 1990s and into the twenty-first century, Little Richard has remained a popular guest on television, in music videos, commercials, movies and as a recording artist. He has contributed new recordings to movie soundtracks (ex. Twins, Casper the Friendly Ghost, Why Do Fools Fall in Love) and wrote and performed a song for the 2001 film The Trumpet of the Swan. He also sang background vocals on the U2 / BB King hit song "When Love Comes to Town, and preaches, as well, at times amid funky saxophone playing, in the extended "Live From The Kingdom Mix' of the track". Penniman appeared on Living Colour's "Elvis Is Dead", and also recorded new tracks for tribute albums, such as Folkways: A Vision Shared ("The Rock Island Line") (1989) and Kindred Spirits: A Tribute to Johnny Cash ("Get Rhythm") (2002). He also recorded duets in the 1990s with Jon Bon Jovi, Hank Williams Jr., Living Color, Elton John, Tanya Tucker, Solomon Burke, and in 2006 with Jerry Lee Lewis, in which they covered the Little Richard-influenced, early 1960s, hit Beatles track "I Saw Her Standing There." He also recently headlined the University of Texas event "40 Acres Fest".[7] A music video (also video clip, promo) is a short film or video meant to present a visual representation of a popular music song. ... The Trumpet of the Swan is a 2001 animated film produced by RichCrest Animation Studios, and directed by Richard Rich. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ... Riley B. King aka B. B. King (b. ... When Love Comes To Town, a duet between U2 and B. B. King, was the third single released from the Rattle And Hum album. ... The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored instrument of the woodwind family. ... Living Colour is a hard rock band formed in New York City in 1983 by Vernon Reid. ... A tribute album is a recorded collection of cover versions of a specific artists songs. ... For the song of the same name, recorded by Tracy Byrd and later by Jason Aldean, see Johnny Cash (song). ... Jon Bon Jovi (born March 2, 1962) is an American singer, musician, and actor. ... Hank Williams, Jr. ... Living color could refer to at least two things: In Living Color, a sketch comedy television series that was produced in the early 1990s Living Colour, a band This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a five-time Grammy and one-time Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... Tanya Denise Tucker (born October 10, 1958) is an American country music singer, who had her first hit, Delta Dawn at the age of 13 in 1972. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Jerry Lee Lewis (born September 29, 1935), also known by the nickname The Killer, is an American rock and roll and country music singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... The University of Texas System comprises fifteen educational institutions in Texas, of which nine are general academic universities, and six are health institutions. ...


In the 1990's, CNN's World Championship Wrestling/WCW signed a contract with Marc Mero to play a flamboyant character by the name of Johnny B. Badd, based loosely on Little Richard, due to Mero's resemblance to the singer. Mero's impersonation helped made him a superstar in the wrestling world, and he continues to wrestle under the persona as of 2006. The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... WCW logo until 1999 World Championship Wrestling or WCW, was a professional wrestling promotion that existed from 1988 to 2001. ... Marc Mero (born July 9, 1960) is an American retired amateur boxer and professional wrestler. ...


In 2006 he was a judge on Celebrity Duets. In 2006/2007 he was featured in a Geico advertisement, wherin he uses his signature "whoop" to denote the joy he would receive while consuming "mashed potatoes, gravy and cranberry sauce" at a Thanksgiving dinner. In 2007 his song "All Around The World" was featured on a Cravendale Advertisement for an animation by PicPic which features a cow, a pirate, and a biker. In 2007, he also performed at the Capitol Fourth - a July 4th celebration (televised live on PBS) in front of the White House in Washington D.C. In 2001, he performed at the July 4th music event in Dublin, Ohio. Celebrity Duets, a U.S. reality television show of the progressive game-show type, combined celebrities of different backgrounds with professional singers in a weekly elimination competition. ... The Government Employees Insurance Company, usually known by the acronym GEICO, is an American auto insurance company. ... This article is about the food. ... for the guitarist, see Dave Felton Gravy is a type of sauce, usually made from the juices that naturally run from meat or vegetables during cooking. ... COW is an acronym for a number of things: Can of worms The COW programming language, an esoteric programming language. ... Look up pirate and piracy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Motorcycle (disambiguation). ...


On July 25th, 2007, he made an appearance on the ABC show The Next Best Thing. The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... The Next Best Thing: Who is the Greatest Celebrity Impersonator? is a Variety show. ...


Awards/honors

Cash Box magazine was a weekly publication devoted to the music and coin-operated machine industry. ... Long Tall Sally is a rock and roll song first recorded by Little Richard in the mid-1950s, when it became one of the singers best-known hits. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... Buskers perform on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences is known variously as NARAS or The Recording Academy. ... For the composer and conductor of the Ray Charles Singers, see Ray Charles (composer). ... Aretha Louise Franklin (born March 25, 1942) is an American singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... The Rhythm and Blues Foundation is an independent American nonprofit organization dedicated to the historical and cultural preservation of rhythm and blues music. ... The American Music Awards show is one of four annual major US music awards shows (the others being the Billboard Music Awards, the Grammy Awards, and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony). ... Broadcast Music Incorporated (BMI) is a collecting society that protects composers intellectual property in the communications business, especially radio. ... Bo Diddleys emphasis on rhythm largely influenced popular music, especially that of rock and roll in the 1960s. ... Charles Edward Anderson Chuck Berry (born 18 October 1926, St. ... Broadcast Music Incorporated (BMI) is a collecting society that protects composers intellectual property in the communications business, especially radio. ... The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP, generally pronounced as EN Double AY SEE PEE) is one of the oldest and most influential civil rights organizations in the United States. ... The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), is one of the oldest and most influential hate organizations in the United States. ... The Songwriters Hall of Fame is an arm of the National Academy of Popular Music. ... This article is about the music magazine. ... Apollo Theater marquee, c. ... Ella Jane Fitzgerald (April 25, 1917 – June 15, 1996), also known as Lady Ella and the First Lady of Song, is considered one of the most influential jazz vocalists of the 20th Century. ... The Pips redirects here. ...

Discography

See Little Richard discography A Little Richard discography 1957: Heres Little Richard (Specialty) 1958: Volume 2 (Specialty) 1959: The Fabulous Little Richard (Specialty) 1960: Clap Your Hands 1960: 1960: 1962: King of the Gospel Singers 1963: Sings Spirituals 1964: Sings the Gospel 1964: Little Richard Is Back (And Theres A Whole Lotta...


References

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
  1. ^ a b c d Little Richard. Inductees. Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o White, Charles. (2003). The Life and Times of Little Richard: The Authorised Biography. Omnibus Press.
  3. ^ William Addams Reitwiesner. Ancestry of Little Richard. WARGS.
  4. ^ http://www.wwnorton.com/college/music/rockhistory/reverb/int01_01.htm
  5. ^ http://www.adherents.com/people/pr/Little_Richard.html
  6. ^ http://www.adherents.com/people/pr/Little_Richard.html
  7. ^ http://media.www.dailytexanonline.com/media/storage/paper410/news/2007/03/23/TopStories/40.Acres.Fest.To.Rock.Ut.Campus.For.Its.15th.Year-2788987.shtml
  8. ^ http://www.rockhall.com/hof/inductee.asp?ID=179
  9. ^ http://www.hollywoodchamber.net/icons/walk_directory.asp
  10. ^ http://www.grammy.com/Recording_Academy/Awards/Lifetime_Awards/
  11. ^ http://www.rhythm-n-blues.org/pubs/101_333_1403.CFM
  12. ^ http://www.bmi.com/news/200205/20020514a.asp
  13. ^ http://archives.cnn.com/2002/SHOWBIZ/News/02/06/showbuzz/index.html
  14. ^ http://www.songwritershalloffame.org/inductee_ceremony_detail.asp?ceremonyId=24&inducteeCeremonyId=177
  15. ^ http://www.rollingstone.com/news/story/5939210/8_little_richard/
  16. ^ The Immortals: The First Fifty. Rolling Stone Issue 946. Rolling Stone.

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External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Little Richard - MSN Encarta (590 words)
Little Richard, born in 1932, American singer and songwriter, one of the originators of rock-and-roll music in the late 1950s (see Rock Music: Rock and Roll).
Little Richard was one of the first rock-and-roll artists to appeal to a broad audience, gaining a following among both white and fl teenagers.
In 1986 Little Richard was chosen as one of the founding members of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and in 1993 he was presented with a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.
New Georgia Encyclopedia: "Little Richard" Penniman (b. 1932) (888 words)
Born Richard Wayne Penniman in Macon on December 5, 1932, Little Richard was one of twelve children.
At the 81 Theater, Little Richard met and was influenced by the singer Billy Wright, whose big hair, heavy stage makeup, and gospel-styled blues shouting made him a local favorite.
Little Richard was among the first inductees into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1986.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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