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Encyclopedia > Little Germany, New York
A German band in New York, around 1876

Little Germany, also called in German Kleindeutschland was a densely populated German neighborhood around Tompkins Square, in an area bounded by Avenues A and B and 7th and 10th Sts, in the Lower East Side, Manhattan, New York. The neighbourhood disappeared within one year in 1904 after the General Slocum disaster wiped out the social core of the neighbourhood. A German band in New York. ... A German band in New York. ... 1876 is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Categories: Manhattan neighborhoods | Stub ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Firefighters working to extinguish the General Slocum Wreckage of the General Slocum Victims of the General Slocum washed ashore at North Brother Island Carrying away a body from North Brother Island The General Slocum was a steamship launched in 1891. ...

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Growth

Germans boarding a Ship in Hamburg for New York in 1876

A constant flow of immigrants entering the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries through Ellis Island provided a constant population influx for Little Germany. In the 1850s alone, 800,000 Germans passed through New York. The German immigrants differed as they usually were educated and had marketable skills in crafts. More than half of the bakers and cabinet makers were Germans or of German origin, and many Germans also worked in the construction business. Educated Germans were important players in the creation of Trade unions, and were also often politically active. At the beginning of the 20th century, Little Germany had a population of almost 500,000 people. The neighborhood was the cultural center of German activities in New York, including beer gardens, sport clubs, libraries, choirs, shooting clubs, German schools, and churches. German emigrants headed for New York board a steamer in Hamburg, Germany. ... German emigrants headed for New York board a steamer in Hamburg, Germany. ... Position of Hamburg in Germany Hamburgs central broadway Jungfernstieg at the Alster lake, between 1900 and 1914 This article is about the city in Germany. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... 1876 is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Immigration Museum on Ellis Island Ellis Island, located in New York Harbor at the mouth of the Hudson River, was at one time the main immigration port for immigrants entering the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. ... Events and Trends Technology Production of steel revolutionised by invention of the Bessemer process Benjamin Silliman fractionates petroleum by distillation for the first time First transatlantic telegraph cable laid First safety elevator installed by Elisha Otis Science Charles Darwin publishes The Origin of Species, putting forward the theory of evolution... Bakery foods A baker is someone who bakes and sells bread, cakes and similar foods. ... Cabinet making is the practice of utilizing many woodworking skills to create cabinets, shelving and furniture. ... A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers... A beer garden (or in the German language, Biergarten) is an open-air drinking establishment that originated in Bavaria, where beer gardens in general are distinguished from traditional beer gardens today. ... Modern-style library In its traditional sense, a library is a collection of books and periodicals. ... A choir or chorus is a musical ensemble of singers. ...


General Slocum Disaster

Firefighters working to extinguish the General Slocum.

Disaster struck Little Germany on June 15, 1904. The Evangelical Lutheran Church organized their 17th annual picnic to commemorate the end of the school year and chartered a ship, the General Slocum, for a cruise on the New York East River to a picnic site on Long Island. Over 1,300 passengers, mostly women and children, participated in the event. Shortly after departing, a fire started in a storage compartment in the forward section. Although the ship was equiped with lifeboats and preservers, both were in disrepair. Passengers found the boats stuck and inoperable, and the life preservers were rotten and failed to float. The absence of adequate safety equipment, compounded with the poor leadership of Captain William Van Schaick, caused an estimated 1,021 passengers to die by immolation or drowning. Although only one percent of Little Germany's population was killed by the disaster, those lost were members of the most established families, the social foundation of Little Germany's community. The remaining, newly immigrated population had lacked the funds for pleasure outings. (For details of the disaster see General Slocum) General Slocum burning in East River, fireboat on scene This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... General Slocum burning in East River, fireboat on scene This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... June 15 is the 166th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (167th in leap years), with 199 days remaining. ... 1904 is a leap year starting on a Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... In contemporary usage, picnic can be defined simply as a pleasure excursion at which a meal is eaten outdoors, ideally, taking place in a beautiful landscape. ... Firefighters working to extinguish the General Slocum Wreckage of the General Slocum Victims of the General Slocum washed ashore at North Brother Island Carrying away a body from North Brother Island The General Slocum was a steamship launched in 1891. ... This entry is about the East River in New York City. ... For the 1944 movie, see Lifeboat (movie). ... A life preserver is a personal flotation device that can be deployed from a vessel or from land to provide an individual with a means of maintaining boyancy in water, thereby preventing drowning. ... Immolation is destruction by fire, that is, burning something to destroy it. ... Firefighters working to extinguish the General Slocum Wreckage of the General Slocum Victims of the General Slocum washed ashore at North Brother Island Carrying away a body from North Brother Island The General Slocum was a steamship launched in 1891. ...


The End of Little Germany

Ultimately, Little Germany did not survive the disaster. Schools had no children, shops had no owners, and some bereaved parents, spouses, children and friends committed suicide. The desire to find a culprit led to conflicting public opinion, and family quarrels about the distribution of money amongst survivors led the society of Little Germany to turn sour. Families moved and dispersed. Businesses closed. The community that was Little Germany ceased to exist. Suicide (from Latin sui caedere, to kill oneself) is the act of intentionally ending ones own life; it is sometimes a noun for one who has committed, or attempted the act. ...


The General Slocum disaster is the principle reason that New York City, home to such iconic neighborhoods as Chinatown and Little Italy, no longer has a Little Germany. City nickname: The Big Apple Location in the state of New York Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area  - Land  - Water 1,214. ... Manhattans Chinatown in 1995, with 1 World Trade Center (the North Tower) in the background. ... Mulberry Street looking north from Canal Street, Manhattan, New York City Little Italy is a neighborhood in lower Manhattan, New York City, once known for its large population of Italian immigrants. ...


After the disaster, the remaning German settlers in New York moved to the Upper East Side of Manhattan, Yorkville.


See also


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