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Encyclopedia > Listed building
The Forth Bridge, designed by Sir Benjamin Baker and Sir John Fowler, opened in 1890, and now owned by Network Rail, is designated as a Category A listed building by Historic Scotland.

A listed building in the United Kingdom is a building or other structure officially designated as being of special architectural, historical or cultural significance. It is a widely used status, applied to around half a million buildings. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 1465 KB) Summary The Forth Railway Bridge taken by Euchiasmus (me) on 27th June 2005 from the northern end. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 1465 KB) Summary The Forth Railway Bridge taken by Euchiasmus (me) on 27th June 2005 from the northern end. ... For the nearby road bridge, see Forth Road Bridge. ... Sir Benjamin Baker (March 31, 1840 - May 19, 1907), English engineer, was born near Bath in 1840, and, after receiving his early training in a South Wales ironworks, became associated with Sir John Fowler in London. ... Sir John Fowler (July 15, 1817–November 10, 1898) was born in Wadsley, South Yorkshire, England. ... Network Rail is a British not for dividend company limited by guarantee whose principal asset is Network Rail Infrastructure Limited, a company limited by shares. ... Historic Scotland is the Scottish agency looking after historic monuments. ...


A listed building may not be demolished, extended or altered without special permission from the local planning authority (who typically consult the relevant central government agency, particularly for significant alterations to the more notable listed buildings). Owners of listed buildings are, in some circumstances, compelled to repair and maintain them and can face criminal prosecution if they fail to do so or if they perform unauthorised alterations. Because of this, and because listing can limit the options available for significant expansion or improvement, the law allows for owners of listed buildings to object to the listing.


Although most structures appearing on the lists are buildings, other structures such as bridges, monuments, sculptures, war memorials, and even milestones and mileposts may also be listed. Ancient, military and uninhabited structures (such as Stonehenge) are sometimes instead classified as Scheduled Ancient Monuments and protected by much older legislation whilst cultural landscapes such as parks and gardens are currently "listed" on a non-statutory basis. In England, this complex system may be rationalised under the Heritage Protection Review, see below. This article is about the structure. ... For other uses, see Monument (disambiguation). ... Sculptor redirects here. ... This memorial in England lists the names of soldiers who died in the First World War. ... A Spanish kilometre stone A milestone on the Boston Post Road in Harvard Square, Massachusetts, USA Slate milestone near Bangor, Wales A milestone or kilometre sign is one of a series of numbered markers placed along a road at regular intervals, typically at the side of the road or in... For other uses, see Stonehenge (disambiguation). ... A Scheduled Ancient Monument is defined in the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 and the National Heritage Act 1983 of the United Kingdom government. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


Listing was begun by a provision in the Town and Country Planning Act 1947. Prinicpal planning Act of Parliament of the United Kingdom, the Town and Country Planning Act 1947 established the principles and mechanisms of the Plan Lead System. ...

Contents

England and Wales

In England and Wales the authority for listing is granted by the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 and is presently administered by English Heritage, an agency of the Department for Culture, Media & Sport, and Cadw in Wales (where it is a devolved issue). Listed buildings in danger of decay are listed on English Heritage's Buildings At Risk Register. The Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 is an Act of Parliament of the United Kingdom that altered the laws on granting of planning permission for building works, notably including those of the listed building system. ... The standard of English Heritage English Heritage is a non-departmental public body of the United Kingdom government (Department for Culture, Media and Sport) with a broad remit of managing the historic environment of England. ... The Department for Culture, Media and Sport (sometimes abbreviated DCMS) is a department of the British government. ... Cadw is a semi-autonomous publicly-funded body which with the mission to protect, conserve, and to promote the built heritage of Wales — the Welsh equivalent of English Heritage and Historic Scotland. ... This article is about the country. ... Devolution or home rule is the granting of powers from central government to government at regional or local level. ... hello this does not have a page yet, please make one for us!! Thanks ...


There are three types of listed status (in descending order of "importance" and difficulty to obtain planning permission):

  • Grade I: buildings of outstanding or national architectural or historic interest.
  • Grade II*: particularly significant buildings of more than local interest.
  • Grade II: buildings of special architectural or historic interest.

There was formerly a non-statutory Grade III, which was abolished in 1970.[1] Additionally, Grades A, B and C were used in pre-1977 lists, for Anglican churches in use – these correspond to Grades I, II* and II. The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[3] in England, the Mother Church of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the oldest among the communions thirty-eight independent national churches. ...


The government is currently proposing to abolish Grade II*. Despite 91% of respondents to the Heritage Protection Review voicing their opposition, English Heritage says it expects the proposal to become law, which would see many Grade II* buildings downgraded to Grade II.[2] The standard of English Heritage English Heritage is a non-departmental public body of the United Kingdom government (Department for Culture, Media and Sport) with a broad remit of managing the historic environment of England. ...


As of May 2003 there are approximately 442,000 listings in place, of which 418,000 (94.5%) are Grade II, 18,000 (4.1%) are Grade II*, and 6,000 (1.4%) are Grade I. Forty five per cent of Grade I buildings are Church of England parish churches.[3] There are estimated to be about 500,000 actual buildings listed, as listing entries can apply to more than one building. The criteria for listing include architectural interest, historic interest and close historical associations with significant people or events. Buildings which are not individually noteworthy may still be listed if they form part of a group that is – for example, all the buildings in a square. Sometimes large areas comprising many buildings may not warrant listing but are given the looser protection of designation as a conservation area. The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[3] in England, the Mother Church of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the oldest among the communions thirty-eight independent national churches. ... A conservation area is a tract of land that has been awarded protected status in order to ensure that natural features or biota are safeguarded. ...


Government general policy is to list all buildings erected before 1700 "which survive in anything like their original condition" and most buildings of 1700–1840. More selection is exercised among buildings of the Victorian period and the 20th century. Buildings less than 30 years old are rarely listed, and buildings less than 10 years old never.


Although the decision to list may be made on the basis of the architectural or historic interest of one small part of the building, the listing protection nevertheless applies to the whole building.


De-listing is possible but rare in practice. One example being the November 30, 2001 de-listing of North Corporation Primary School, Liverpool. is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The North Corporation Primary School 151 Bevington Bush, Liverpool, was a Listed building. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ...


Heritage Protection Review

In March 2007 The Department for Culture, Media & Sport proposed in a government White Paper major reforms to the system in England and Wales. This was the culmination of a 4 year review process. If approved, the term Listed Building will be replaced by Designated Structure.[citation needed] This was a result of a wide-ranging review to rationalise designations in which Scheduled Ancient Monuments, Listed Landscapes on the non-statutory parks and gardens register, monuments and maritime heritage sites would all also become Designated Structures or Sites. It is proposed that the three Grades I, II* and II then apply to all Designated Buildings and Sites. The Department for Culture, Media and Sport (sometimes abbreviated DCMS) is a department of the British government. ... A white paper is an authoritative report. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... A Scheduled Ancient Monument is defined in the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 and the National Heritage Act 1983 of the United Kingdom government. ...


If approved by Parliament managing these new proposals will be the sole responsibility of English Heritage instead of the Department of Culture Media and Sport, as at present. The standard of English Heritage English Heritage is a non-departmental public body of the United Kingdom government (Department for Culture, Media and Sport) with a broad remit of managing the historic environment of England. ...


Examples of Grade I listed buildings

See also: Category:Grade I listed buildings for a list of buildings across England and Wales
Buckingham Palace, the official London residence of the British monarch.
Buckingham Palace, the official London residence of the British monarch.
Clevedon Pier, showing boards and seating.
St. Catherine's College, Oxford, one of a handful of modern buildings awarded Grade 1 Listing.
The West Front of Stonyhurst College, Lancashire
The West Front of Stonyhurst College, Lancashire

Image File history File links Buckingham_Palace,_London,_England,_24Jan04. ... Image File history File links Buckingham_Palace,_London,_England,_24Jan04. ... Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 2. ... Clevedon Pier is a seaside pier in the town of Clevedon, on the English side of the estuary of the River Severn. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1056 × 792 pixel, file size: 101 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) image provided by St. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1056 × 792 pixel, file size: 101 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) image provided by St. ... St Catherines College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... The front of Stonyhurst College, taken in 1988 by Nico Morgan. ... The front of Stonyhurst College, taken in 1988 by Nico Morgan. ... Stonyhurst College is an independent, Roman Catholic school in the Jesuit tradition. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... North elevation of Liverpool Anglican Cathedral. ... Ashridge Business School is an independent, not for profit organisation, near Berkhamsted in Hertfordshire. ... For the similarly named county in the West Midlands region, see Herefordshire. ... Aston Hall, after the coming of the railways, in 1851 Aston Hall is a Jacobean-style mansion in Aston, Birmingham, England, completed in 1635. ... This article is about the British city. ... Ashby-de-la-Zouch Castle Ashby-de-la-Zouch has an historic 15th century castle which was formerly owned by the Hastings family. ... Leicestershire ( IPA: (RP), IPA: (locally)), abbreviation Leics. ... For other bridges bearing the name Albert, see Albert Bridge. ... Location within the British Isles Saltash (Cornish: Essa) is a town in Cornwall, UK. It has a population of about 16,000. ... The Town Hall emerging after years of refurbishment. ... Looking down to the road below through the glass floor The Blackpool Tower is a tourist attraction in the town of Blackpool, Lancashire, in Northern England (grid reference SD306360). ... Bramall Hall Part of the grounds and lakes Bramall Hall near Bramhall and Cheadle Hulme, Stockport, England is one of the remaining Tudor halls, a timber framed manor house, with 66 acres of landscaped parkland featuring lakes, woodland walks and gardens. ... The British Museum Reading Room, situated in the centre of the Great Court of the British Museum, used to be the main reading room of the British Library. ... Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ... The Norman keep Burgess summer smoking room Cardiff Castle (Welsh: Castell Caerdydd) in Wales was founded by the Normans in 1091, on the site of a Roman fort whose remains can still be seen. ... The Church of Christ the King, Bloomsbury The Church of Christ the King is on Gordon Square, Bloomsbury, London, beside the Dr Williamss Library and near University College London (whose university Christian Union uses it for their annual carol service, though not for regular worship). ... Clevedon Pier is a seaside pier in the town of Clevedon, on the English side of the estuary of the River Severn. ... The Clifton Suspension Bridge is a suspension bridge, spanning the Avon Gorge and linking Clifton in Bristol to Leigh Woods in North Somerset, England. ... The front of the station Curzon Street Station was a railway station in Birmingham in the 19th century and is the worlds oldest surviving piece of monumental railway architecture. ... Cutty sark is 18th century Scots for short chemise or short undergarment[1]. Hyphenated, Cutty-sark was a nickname for a fictional character created by Robert Burns, and from there it became part of an idiom - Weel done, Cutty-sark! (Well done, Cutty-sark!) in colloquial English, especially Scottish English. ... The Dock Tower is a 309-foot tall tower in Great Grimsby, England. ... Saint Gregorys Abbey, commonly known as Downside Abbey, is a Benedictine monastery of the English Benedictine Congregation. ... Durham Cathedrals famous Sanctuary Knocker on the North Door Ground plan of Durham Cathedral Legend of the founding of Durham depicted on cathedral The Cathedral Church of Christ, Blessed Mary the Virgin and St Cuthbert of Durham, which is almost always referred to as Durham Cathedral, in the city... The Foreign and Commonwealth Office, more commonly known as the Foreign Office (or the FCO), is the United Kingdom government department responsible for promoting the interests of the United Kingdom abroad. ... Fountains Abbey in North Yorkshire, England, is a ruined Cistercian monastery, founded in 1132. ... Christ Church, Spitalfields Christ Church Spitalfields, lies on Commercial Street, E1, just outside the eastern border of the City of London, and was started in 1714 and completed in 1729. ... A royal residence 1327-1649, on The Green, Richmond-upon-Thames, Surrey. ... Built in c. ... Grosvenor Bridge The Grosvenor Bridge is a single-span arch road bridge which crosses the River Dee at Chester in England. ... Hampton Court redirects here. ... Holland House, built in 1605 for Sir Walter Cope and originally known as Cope Castle, was one of the first great houses built in Kensington, UK. The 500 acre (2. ... The Isokon building in Lawn Road, Hampstead, London is a concrete block of 34 flats designed by architect Wells Coates for Jack and Molly Pritchard. ... Kirkstall Abbey Kirkstall Abbey is a ruined Cistercian monastery in the outskirts of Leeds in Yorkshire, set in grounds on the north bank of the River Aire. ... Leeds Town Hall - Victorian civic confidence Leeds Town Hall was built in 1858 in Park Lane, Leeds, West Yorkshire to a design by architect Cuthbert Brodrick. ... Town-Hall, Liverpool The Liverpool Town-Hall is built in a striking style of architecture. ... Manchester Town Hall Manchester Town Hall is a building in Manchester, England that houses the citys government and administrative functions. ... Margam Castle is a castle built in Margam, Port Talbot, South Wales for the Talbot family. ... Newcastle Central Station Newcastle Central Station is the principal railway station in the city of Newcastle upon Tyne, England. ... The Newport Transporter Bridge is a crossing of the River Usk in the city of Newport, Wales, United Kingdom. ... “Houses of Parliament” redirects here. ... The Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art was founded in 1970 through a generous grant from Paul Mellon, KBE to Yale University. ... The Aqueduct, view from the ground Crossing the aqueduct A view of the ground below from the aqueduct The Pontcysyllte Aqueduct is an aqueduct which carries the Llangollen Canal over the valley of the River Dee, east of Llangollen in north Wales. ... Reading Abbey Reading Abbey is a large, ruined abbey in Reading, Berkshire, founded by Henry I in 1121 for the salvation of my soul, and the souls of King William, my father, and of King William, my brother, and Queen Maud, my wife, and all my ancestors and successors. // History... Albert Hall redirects here. ... The Royal Festival Hall reopening celebrations The Royal Festival Hall is a concert, dance and talks venue within Southbank Centre in London, England. ... The Floral Hall of the Royal Opera House The Royal Opera House is a performing arts venue in London. ... The Bristol Old Vic (located at , ) is a theatre complex and theatrical company in the centre of Bristol, England. ... Sackville College from the High street Sackville College is a Jacobean almshouse in town of East Grinstead, England. ... , East Grinstead (archaically spelt Grimstead[1]) is a town and civil parish in the northeastern corner of Mid Sussex, West Sussex in England near the East Sussex, Surrey, and Kent borders. ... St Annes Church in Haughton, Denton is Grade I Listed Building. ... St Catherines College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... St Elisabeths is an Anglo Catholic church in Reddish, Stockport designed by Alfred Waterhouse in the Victorian Gothic style. ... Reddish is an area of Stockport, in Greater Manchester, England. ... Stockport is a large town in the north west of England. ... Main Entrance to the Hall St Georges Hall is a neoclassical building in Liverpool city centre located on Lime Street, opposite Lime Street railway station. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Stonyhurst College is an independent, Roman Catholic school in the Jesuit tradition. ... The Casbah Coffee Club was started by Mona Best (3 January 1924 - 9 September 1988) who was born in India. ... The present-day Theatre Royal in Drury Lane, sketched when it was new, in 1813. ... See also: Haymarket Theatre (Leicester) Haymarket Theatre, ca. ... The Cenotaph, London. ... The Main Building of University College London, including the Octagon (building), Quad, Cloisters and the Wilkins building. ... The Cromwell Road entrance to the Victoria and Albert Museum The Victoria and Albert Museum viewed from Thurloe Square The Victoria and Albert Museum (often abbreviated as the V&A) is on Cromwell Road in Kensington, West London. ... This article is about the English city; for other places called Brighton, see Brighton (disambiguation). ... For other places with the same name, see Brighton (disambiguation). ... This article is about the castle in Windsor. ... Willis Faber and Dumas Headquarters, Ipswich, was one of Norman Fosters earliest commissions after founding Foster Associates. ... York Minster is the largest Gothic cathedral in northern Europe and is situated in the city of York in Northern England. ...

Examples of Grade II* listed buildings

See also: Category:Grade II* listed buildings for a list of buildings across England and Wales
The Johnny Haynes stand at Craven Cottage is a Grade II* listed building.
The Johnny Haynes stand at Craven Cottage is a Grade II* listed building.
Centre Point, a Grade II listed building.
Centre Point, a Grade II listed building.

Image File history File links Ccffc. ... Image File history File links Ccffc. ... John Norman Haynes (October 17, 1934 - October 18, 2005), better known as Johnny Haynes, was an English footballer who played a club-record 658 games and scored 158 goals for Fulham Football Club between 1952 and 1970. ... Craven Cottage is the name of a picturesque sports stadium in the Hammersmith and Fulham area that has been the 6. ... Image File history File links Centre_Point_London. ... Image File history File links Centre_Point_London. ... Stoke-on-Trent railway station is a main-line train station in the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Broadcasting House (disambiguation). ... The Criterion Theatre The Criterion Theatre is a theatre situated on Piccadilly Circus in the West End of London. ... John Norman Haynes (October 17, 1934 - October 18, 2005), better known as Johnny Haynes, was an English footballer who played a club-record 658 games and scored 158 goals for Fulham Football Club between 1952 and 1970. ... Craven Cottage is the name of a picturesque sports stadium in the Hammersmith and Fulham area that has been the 6. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Middlesbrough Transporter Bridge (or simply Transporter Bridge) is the furthest downstream bridge across the River Tees. ... The Old Crown at 188 Digbeth High Street (A41), Digbeth, a inn, is the oldest secular building in Birmingham, England. ... Park Hill from Sheffield City Centre. ... The Senate House of the University of London Senate House, the administrative centre of the University of London, lies in the heart of Bloomsbury between the School of Oriental and African Studies to the north and the British Museum to the south. ... Leasowe is a small town on the north coast of the Wirral Peninsula in Merseyside in the north west of England, near Moreton and Meols. ... , Headingley is a suburb of the English city of Leeds in the county of West Yorkshire. ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ... Designed by Sir Alfred Brumwell Thomas, Stockport Town Hall , in Stockport, England, has a ‘twin’ in Belfast City Hall, which he also designed. ... The Sunderland Empire Theatre is located in High Street West in Sunderland. ... The Theatre Royal in Bath has been established for over 200 years and is one of the more important provincial (ie not in London) theatres in the UK, with a capacity for an audience of 950. ... The Trellick Tower, seen from Golborne Road. ... Victoria Baths, Manchester Victoria Baths is a Grade II* listed building, situated on the edges of the Longsight, Ardwick and Rusholme areas of Manchester, UK. It was designed by Henry Price and opened in 1906 by the Manchester Corporation. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... The modern 84 Plymouth Grove 84 Plymouth Grove is a grade-II*-listed neoclassical villa in Manchester, UK,[1] which was home to the Gaskell family between 1850 and 1913. ... Elizabeth Gaskell, in the 1832 miniature by William John Thomson Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell (née Stevenson; 29 September 1810–12 November 1865), often referred to simply as Mrs. ... The William Brown Library is a library situated in Liverpool, UK on William Brown Street. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... Watts Warehouse is a large, ornate Victorian Grade II* listed building which stands on Portland Street in the centre of Manchester, United Kingdom. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... The giant ZSL London Zoo aviary ZSL London Zoo is the worlds oldest scientific zoo. ... Dorchester-on-Thames is a village on the River Thames in Oxfordshire, England. ... Hull or Kingston upon Hull is a British city situated on the north bank of the Humber estuary. ...

Examples of Grade II listed buildings

See also: :Category:Grade II listed buildings for a list of buildings across England and Wales

BT Tower from the Euston Road, looking south. ... See also Sydney Tower, for Centrepoint in Australia Centre Point An advert for tenants willing to rent Centre Point. ... Coal tax obelisk by the railway at Wormley, Hertfordshire. ... Arsenal Stadium was a football stadium in North London, the home ground of Arsenal Football Club between 6 September 1913 and 7 May 2006. ... For other uses, see Highbury (disambiguation). ... Derby Independent Grammar School is an independent and selective Church of England secondary school at Littleover near the city of Derby. ... The Elfin Oak is a 900-year-old tree stump in Kensington Gardens in London, carved and painted to look as though elves, gnomes and small animals are living in its bark. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Website http://www. ... The Whitechapel Bell Foundry is a bell foundry based in the Whitechapel district of east London. ...

Mixed designations

  • In 2002 there were 80 seaside piers in England that were listed, variously at Grades I, II* and II.
  • Golden Lane Estate, Clerkenwell, London is an example of a site which includes buildings of different Grades, II & II*
  • Cobham Park, Kent is a Listed Landscape (Humphry Repton and older landscape), contains Grade I structures (Cobham Hall and Darnley Mausoleum) Grade II structures (ornamental dairy etc), plus a Scheduled Ancient Monument (a buried Roman villa).
  • West Norwood Cemetery is a Gothic Revival metropolitan cemetery and crematorium which contains 65 structures of Grade II or II*, mainly sepulchral monuments but also boundary structures and mausolea.

For architectural piers, see Pier (architecture). ... The Golden Lane Estate is a 1950s housing complex in the City of London. ... Notable gardeners Luis Barragán Geoffrey Bawa Lancelot Capability Brown Charles de lÉcluse Esther Dean Charlie Dimmock A. J. Downing Ian Hamilton Finlay Bob Flowerdew Pippa Greenwood C. Z. Guest Robert Hart Michael Heseltine Hotsukimaru Derek Jarman Thomas Jefferson Gertrude Jekyll William Kent André Le Nôtre Peter Joseph... Cobham Hall circa 1880. ... A Scheduled Ancient Monument is defined in the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 and the National Heritage Act 1983 of the United Kingdom government. ... West Norwood Cemetery is a cemetery in West Norwood, Lambeth, London. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ...

Locally listed buildings

Many councils, for example, Birmingham City Council, maintain a register of Locally listed buildings in addition to the statutory list. There is no statutory protection of a building or object on this list. Councils hope that owners will recognise the merits of their properties and keep them unaltered if at all possible. Local Government History Most of Birmingham was historically a part of Warwickshire, though the modern city also includes villages and towns formerly in Staffordshire or Worcestershire. ...


These grades are used by Birmingham:

Grade A
This is of statutory list quality. To be the subject of notification to English Heritage and/or the serving of a Building Preservation Notice if imminently threatened.
Grade B
Important in the city wide architectural or local street scene context, warranting positive efforts to ensure retention.
Grade C
Of significance in the local historical/vernacular context, including industrial archaeological features, and worthy of retention.

Northern Ireland

Listed buildings in Northern Ireland are administered by the Environment and Heritage Service, under powers granted by Article 42 of the Planning (Northern Ireland) Order 1991. The Environment and Heritage Service is the United Kingdom Governments conservation agency for Northern Ireland. ...


The scheme of listing is as follows:

  • Grade A: buildings of national importance and superior examples of a specific type.
  • Grade B+: buildings of regional importance, or important buildings that would qualify as Grade A but for lower-quality design or subsequent additions.
  • Grade B1: buildings of local importance, or good examples of some type.
  • Grade B2: buildings of local importance, or good examples of some type, but of a lower quality than Grade B1.

Examples of Grade A listed buildings

Established by Saint Comghall - Bangor was featured in the Mappa Mundi, the first map of the world. ... The Grand Opera House The Grand Opera House is a theatre in Belfast, Northern Ireland. ... St Columbs Cathedral flying the Crimson Banner of the Apprentice Boys of Derry St Columbs Cathedral in the walled city of Londonderry, Northern Ireland is the mother church of the Church of Ireland Diocese of Derry and Raphoe and the parish church of Templemore. ...

Examples of Grade B+ listed buildings

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Necarne Castle or Castle Irvine, as it was formerly known, is situated within walking distance of Irvinestown in the lakeland County of Fermanagh. ...

Examples of Grade B1 listed buildings

Campbell College is a voluntary grammar school in Belfast, Northern Ireland. ... The Linen Hall Library is located at 17 Donegall Square, Belfast, Northern Ireland. ...

Scotland

In Scotland the Town and Country Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997 applies. As with other powers regarding planning, conservation is a power devolved to the Scottish Parliament and Scottish Government. Historic Scotland is the agency charged by the Executive for protecting listed buildings and scheduled monuments. This article is about the country. ... Devolution or home rule is the granting of powers from central government to government at regional or local level. ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... The logo of the Governemnt, incorporating the Saltire. ... Historic Scotland is the Scottish agency looking after historic monuments. ...


The scheme for classifying buildings is:

  • Category A: "buildings of national or international importance, either architectural or historic, or fine little-altered examples of some particular period, style or building type"
  • Category B: "buildings of regional or more than local importance, or major examples of some particular period, style or building type which may have been altered"
  • Category C(s): "buildings of local importance, lesser examples of any period, style or building type, as originally constructed or altered; and simple, traditional buildings which group well with others in categories A and B or are part of a planned group such as an estate or an industrial complex"

As of 2007, approximately 8% of listings are category A, 60% are category B, and 32% are category C(s). 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Examples of Category A listed buildings

The National Gallery of Scotland, in Edinburgh, designed by William Henry Playfair and opened in 1859, is one of the National Galleries of Scotland, a public body funded by the Scottish Government Education Department. It is a Category A listed building.
The National Gallery of Scotland, in Edinburgh, designed by William Henry Playfair and opened in 1859, is one of the National Galleries of Scotland, a public body funded by the Scottish Government Education Department. It is a Category A listed building.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (4283x1561, 1714 KB) The Mound in Edinburgh with the National Gallery of Scotland and the Royal Scottish Academy Building seen from the south. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (4283x1561, 1714 KB) The Mound in Edinburgh with the National Gallery of Scotland and the Royal Scottish Academy Building seen from the south. ... The National Gallery of Scotland viewed from the south in front of the Royal Scottish Academy and Princes Street The National Gallery of Scotland, viewed from the north The Entrance of National Gallery of Scotland Montagne Sainte-Victoire by Paul Cézanne (1839-1906) Mrs Robert Scott Moncrieff by Sir... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... Old College, University of Edinburgh, courtyard facade: detail by Playfair William Henry Playfair (1790-1857) was one of the greatest Scottish architects of the 19th Century. ... The National Galleries of Scotland are: The National Gallery of Scotland The Royal Scottish Academy Building The Scottish National Portrait Gallery The Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art The Dean Gallery The Partner Galleries are: Duff House Paxton House See Also The Playfair Project ... Scottish public bodies are a group of organisations that are funded by the Scottish Executive. ... The logo of the Governemnt, incorporating the Saltire. ... The Scottish Executive Education Department (SEED) is the civil service department of the Scottish Executive with responsibility for schooling. ... An artists rendition of the house Abbotsford is a historic house in the region of Scottish Borders in the south of Scotland, near Melrose, on south bank of the River Tweed. ... Melrose Abbey Eildon Hills Melrose (Am Maol Ros in Gaelic) is a small, historic town in the Scottish Borders. ... Scottish Borders (often referred to locally as The Borders or The Borderland) is one of 35 local government unitary council areas of Scotland. ... For the first Premier of Saskatchewan see Thomas Walter Scott Sir Walter Scott (August 14, 1771 - September 21, 1832) was a prolific Scottish historical novelist and poet popular throughout Europe. ... Location of Airth Castle at NS898868. ... Falkirk (an Eaglais Bhreac in Gaelic) is one of the 32 unitary authority council areas in Scotland. ... Amisfield Tower is an impressive, well-preserved castle about 5 miles north of Dumfries, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland. ... Dumfries and Galloway (Dùn Phris agus an Gall-Ghaidhealaibh in Gaelic) is one of 32 council areas of Scotland. ... View of the Bell Rock Signal Tower shore station in Arbroath, looking out to sea. ... The Signal Tower is a museum in the coastal town of Arbroath, Angus, Scotland. ... , Arbroath or Aberbrothock (Scottish Gaelic: Obair Bhrothaig which translates literally as at the mouth of the Brothock[1]) is a former royal burgh and the largest town in the council area of Angus in Scotland, and has a population of 22,785. ... This article is about the council area in Scotland. ... Bute House is the official residence of the First Minister of Scotland, who is the head of the Scottish Executive, the countrys devolved government created in 1999. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... The First Minister of Scotland (Scottish Gaelic: ; Scots: ) is, in practice, the political leader of Scotland, as head of Scotlands national devolved government, the Scottish Executive, which was established in 1999 along with the Scottish Parliament. ... Fleming Printing, Edinburgh, 1825 Cambusnethan House, or Cambusnethan Priory, in North Lanarkshire, Scotland, was designed by James Gillespie Graham and completed in 1820. ... Location Geography Area Ranked 19th  - Total 470 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Motherwell ISO 3166-2 GB-NLK ONS code 00QZ Demographics Population Ranked 4th  - Total (2006) 323,800  - Density 689 / km² Scottish Gaelic  - Total () {{{Scottish council Gaelic Speakers}}} Politics North Lanarkshire Council http://www. ... , Newton Mearns is a small suburban town 7 miles southwest of Glasgow, Scotland on the main road to Ayrshire. ... East Renfrewshire (Siorrachd Rinn Friù an Ear in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland. ... The Church of Scotland (CofS; Scottish Gaelic: ), known informally by its pre-Union Scots name, The Kirk, is the national church of Scotland. ... Illustration of the bridge from the 1838 Atlas to the Life of Thomas Telford. ... Moray (pronounced Murray, spelled A Moireibh in Gaelic) is one of the 32 council areas of Scotland. ... Thomas Telford (August 9, 1757 - September 2, 1834) was born in Westerkirk, Scotland. ... Crossraguel Abbey is a ruin of a former abbey near the town of Maybole, South Ayrshire, Scotland. ... St Benedict of Nursia (c. ... Location Geography Area Ranked 15th  - Total 1,222 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Ayr ISO 3166-2 GB-SAY ONS code 00RE Demographics Population Ranked 17th  - Total (2005) 111,780  - Density 91 / km² Scottish Gaelic  - Total () {{{Scottish council Gaelic Speakers}}} Politics South Ayrshire Council http://www. ... Donnchad mac Gillai Brigte (or alternatively, Duncan fils de Gilbert) (d. ... Dollan Baths (Dollan Aqua Centre) is a Grade A listed building in East Kilbride, Scotland. ... East Kilbride (Cille Bhrìghde an Ear in Scottish Gaelic) is a large town in South Lanarkshire, Scotland. ... South Lanarkshire (Siorrachd Lannraig a Deas in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland, covering the southern part of the traditional county of Lanarkshire. ... Dollar Academy is Scotlands oldest boarding school, with a 70-acre campus set in the shadow of the Ochil Hills in the village of Dollar, Clackmannanshire. ... Look Aboot Ye Clackmannanshire (Siorrachd Chlach Mhannainn in Gaelic) is one of the 32 council areas of Scotland, and a lieutenancy area, bordering Perth and Kinross, Stirling and Fife. ... Dumbarton Central railway station is a railway station serving the town of Dumbarton in the West Dunbartonshire region of Scotland. ... West Dunbartonshire (Siorrachd Dhùn Bhreatainn an Iar in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary authority areas in Scotland. ... Photo of the broch Dún Chàrlabhaigh or, in English, Dun Carloway is a broch some 2 km to the south-west of Carloway, on the west coast of the Isle of Lewis, Scotland. ... For other uses, see Lewis (disambiguation). ... The Western Isles are an archipelago in Scotland. ... Dun Carloway broch, Lewis, Scotland The Broch is an Iron Age dry stone structure of a type which is only found in Scotland. ... Dunfermline Abbey and Church - illustration from Cassells History of England circa 1902 Dunfermline Abbey is the remains of a great Benedictine abbey founded in 1070 by Queen Margaret, wife of Malcolm Canmore and granddaughter of Edmund Ironside, King of England. ... This article is about the area in Scotland. ... King David I (or Dabíd mac Maíl Choluim), known as the Saint (1084 – May 24, 1153), was king of Scotland from 1124 until his death, and the youngest son of Malcolm Canmore and of Saint Margaret (sister of Edgar Ætheling). ... The Finnieston Crane is a crane and landmark in Glasgow, Scotland. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... Fort Charlotte in Shetland, Scotland was built by Robert Mylne under the orders of Charles II at the start of the Second Anglo-Dutch Wars in 1665, and it held off a Dutch fleet in 1667 who thought it was far more heavily manned and gunned than it actually was. ... For other uses, see Shetland (disambiguation). ... Charles II King of England, Scotland and Ireland Charles II (29 May 1630–6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 30 January 1649 (de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. ... The Second Anglo-Dutch War was fought between England and the United Provinces from 4 March 1665 until 31 July 1667. ... Gartnavel Royal Hospital is a mental health facility based in the west end of Glasgow. ... The Assembly Hall is located between the Lawnmarket and the Mound in Edinburgh. ... The front of the City Chambers, from George Square. ... View from the Jacobite steam train in typical weather conditions. ... Lochaber (Scottish Gaelic, Loch Abar) refers to a large area of the central and western Scottish Highlands. ... The Highland council area (Roinn na Gàidhealtachd[1] in Gaelic) is a local government area in the Scottish Highlands and the largest local government area in Scotland. ... Greyfriars Kirk, today Greyfriars Tolbooth & Highland Kirk, is a parish church of the Church of Scotland in central Edinburgh. ... Photograph dated 1848 by David Octavius Hill and Robert Adamson, showing D O Hill sketching at the Dennystoun Monument, watched by the Misses Morris. ... The statue of Greyfriars Bobby is designated as a Category A listed building. ... India of Inchinnan India of Inchinnan is a commercial site located in Inchinnan, Renfrewshire, Scotland. ... Renfrewshire (Siorrachd Rinn Friù in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary authority regions in Scotland. ... Wallis, Gilbert and Partners were a British architectural partnership responsible for the design of many Art Deco buildings in the UK in the 1920s and 1930s. ... Jarlshof is the best known prehistoric archaeological site in Shetland, Scotland. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... For the process of shaping metal by localized compressive forces, see Forging. ... Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ... Dun Carloway broch, Lewis, Scotland The Broch is an Iron Age dry stone structure of a type which is only found in Scotland. ... A replica of the Hilton of Cadboll Stone. ... For other uses, see Viking (disambiguation). ... In archaeology and anthropology, a long house or longhouse is a type of long, narrow single room building built by peoples in various parts of the world including Asia, Europe and North America. ... Bridge of the brigantine LEtoile The bridge of a ship is an area or room where the ships navigational controls and other essential equipment related to ship operations are housed and operated. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... An estate comprises the houses and outbuildings and supporting farmland and woods that surround the gardens and grounds of a very large property, such as a country house or mansion. ... Lufe God abufe al and yi nychtbour as yi self: an example older Scots on John Knox House, Edinburgh The John Knox House is a historic house in Edinburgh, Scotland, UK, reputed to have been owned and lived in by Protestant Reformer John Knox during the 16th century. ... Much of the Royal Mile is cobbled, as seen in this view looking east down the High Street past the old Tron Kirk. ... The south face of Linlithgow Palace Linlithgow Palace from the east North and west faces of Linlithgow Palace The ruins of Linlithgow Palace are situated in the town of Linlithgow, West Lothian, Scotland, 15 miles west of Edinburgh. ... Location Geography Area Ranked 20th  - Total 427 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Livingston ISO 3166-2 GB-WLN ONS code 00RH Demographics Population Ranked 10th  - Total (2005) 163,780  - Density 384 / km² Scottish Gaelic  - Total () {{{Scottish council Gaelic Speakers}}} Politics West Lothian Council http://www. ... James I (December 10, 1394 – February 21, 1437) reigned as King of Scots from April 4, 1406 until February 21, 1437. ... The Royal Coat of Arms of Scotland, as used before 1603 The monarch of Scotland was the head of state of the Kingdom of Scotland. ... Marschal College viewed from Upper Kirkgate Marischal College was founded in 1593 in Aberdeen by George Keith, 5th Earl Marischal of Scotland. ... For other uses, see Aberdeen (disambiguation). ... Morgan Academy Morgan Academy is a secondary school in Dundee, Scotland. ... For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ... New Register House New Register House houses the Court of the Lord Lyon as well as the main building of the General Register Office for Scotland, located near St Andrew Square to the east end of Princes Street in the New Town of Edinburgh, Scotland. ... The Renaissance mansion of Newark Castle as seen from the west is linked to the original 15th century tower house to the left . ... Port Glasgow is a burgh in Inverclyde, Scotland on the River Clyde. ... For other uses, see Inverclyde (disambiguation). ... Newbattle Abbey was a Cistercian monastic community founded in 1140 by monks from Melrose Abbey. ... Cistercians coat of arms The Order of Cistercians (OCist) (Latin: ), otherwise White Monks (from the colour of the habit, over which a black scapular or apron is sometimes worn) is a Roman Catholic order of enclosed monks. ... The central portions of the old province of Lothian in Scotland, centred around Edinburgh, became known as Midlothian, Scotland. ... Holyrood Palace The Palace of Holyroodhouse, more commonly known as Holyrood Palace, originally founded as a monastery by David I of Scotland in 1128, has served as the principal residence of the Kings and Queens of Scotland since the 15th century. ... This article is about the monarchy of the United Kingdom, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. For information about other Commonwealth realm monarchies, as well as other relevant articles, see... The Robert Reid designed facade to Parliament Square Parliament House in Edinburgh, Scotland, was home to the pre-1707 Parliament of Scotland, and now houses the Supreme Courts of Scotland. ... The Acts of Union were a pair of Acts of Parliament passed in 1706 and 1707 (taking effect on 1 May 1707) by, respectively, the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland. ... The parliament of Scotland, officially the Estates of Parliament, was the legislature of the independent Kingdom of Scotland. ... The College of Justice is a term used to describe the Supreme Courts of Scotland, and its associated bodies. ... Historical drawing of Pinkie House c. ... East Lothian (Lodainn an Ear in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council areas in Scotland, and a lieutenancy Area. ... Pollokshields Burgh Hall Designed by A listed architect Henry Edward Clifford the Pollokshields Burgh Hall stands at the edge of Maxwell Park, Glasgow. ... A 17th century Grade-A listed building in Canongate, Edinburgh, incorporated into the Scottish Parliament Building. ... The new Scottish Parliament Building at Holyrood designed by the Catalan architect Enric Miralles and opened in October 2004. ... The Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh (RCPE) was established in the 17th century. ... Scone Palace. ... Perth and Kinross (Peairt agus Ceann Rois in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council areas in Scotland, and a Lieutenancy Area. ... Southern aspect of St Andrews House on Calton Hill. ... The logo of the Governemnt, incorporating the Saltire. ... St. ... Kirkwall is the largest town and capital of the Orkney Islands, off the coast of northern mainland Scotland. ... Location Geography Area Ranked 16th  - Total 990 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Kirkwall ISO 3166-2 GB-ORK ONS code 00RA Demographics Population Ranked 32nd  - Total (2006) 19,800  - Density 20 / km² Scottish Gaelic  - Total () {{{Scottish council Gaelic Speakers}}} Politics Orkney Islands Council http://www. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Logo of the Scottish Episcopal Church with the motto: Evangelical truth and Apostolic order. ... Stirling Castle southwest aspect from the Kings Knot Parterre below the castle crags. ... The Wallace Monument Wallaces sword The Wallace National Monument was opened in 1869, in memory of William Wallace, the 13th century Scottish folk hero. ... The Abbey Craig is the hill upon which the Wallace Monument stands, at Causewayhead, just to the north of Stirling. ... Stirling (Sruighlea in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland with a population of about 85,000. ... Sir William Wallace (c. ... The Guardians of Scotland were the de facto heads of state of Scotland during the First Interregnum of 1290-1292, and the Second Interregnum of 1296-1306. ... Wemyss Bay railway station is a railway station on the Inverclyde Line. ... The Willow Tearooms entrance and jewellers shop frontage on Sauchiehall Street. ... Sauchiehall Street is one of the main shopping/business streets in Glasgow city centre. ... Charles Mackintosh redirects here. ...

Examples of Category B listed buildings

The main stand of Ibrox Stadium, the home of Rangers, was designed by Archibald Leitch in 1929. It is designated as a Category B listed building by Historic Scotland.
The main stand of Ibrox Stadium, the home of Rangers, was designed by Archibald Leitch in 1929. It is designated as a Category B listed building by Historic Scotland.

The main stand of Ibrox Stadium, in Glasgow, Scotland. ... The main stand of Ibrox Stadium, in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Ibrox Stadium, originally Ibrox Park, is the stadium of Rangers F.C. It is located on the south side of the River Clyde in the Ibrox district of Glasgow, Scotland. ... For other uses, see Rangers F.C. (disambiguation). ... Archibald Leitch (April 27, 1865 – 1939) was a Scottish architect, most famous for his work designing football stadiums throughout the United Kingdom. ... Historic Scotland is the Scottish agency looking after historic monuments. ... Ardencaple Castle or Ardincaple Castle is situated about a statute mile from Helensburgh,[3] Argyll and Bute, Scotland. ... The Beach Ballroom is an art deco building on the sea front of Aberdeen, Scotland. ... Bedlam Theatre is a student-run theatre owned by Edinburgh University. ... The Automatic tide signalling apparatus at Irvine harbour in North Ayrshire, Scotland, is probably unique, having been invented and patented by Martin Boyd, the Irvine harbourmaster, in 1905 and opened in 1906. ... The Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service is a government department in Scotland that is responsible for the public prosecution of alleged criminals. ... Harlaw Academy is a six year comprehensive secondary school situated some 200 metres from the junction of Union Street and Holburn Street in the centre of the city of Aberdeen, Scotland. ... The Harbourmasters House is a B-listed[1] 18th-century building located by Dysart Harbour, near Kirkcaldy in Fife, Scotland. ... This article is about the area in Scotland. ... The Inverurie railway station is a railway station serving the town of Inverurie, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. ... Logo of Aberdeenshire Council Aberdeenshire (Siorrachd Obar Dheathain in Gaelic) is one of the 32 unitary council areas in Scotland. ... Kilmarnock railway station is a railway station in Kilmarnock, East Ayrshire, Scotland. ... Logo of East Ayrshire Council East Ayrshire (Siorrachd Inbhir Àir an Ear in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland. ... The main stand of Ibrox Stadium Ibrox Stadium, originally Ibrox Park, is the stadium of Rangers F.C. It is located on the south side of the River Clyde in the Ibrox district of Glasgow. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... The building on George IV bridge The National Library of Scotland is the legal deposit library of Scotland. ... The National War Museum of Scotland is housed in Edinburgh, Scotland, and forms part of the National Museums of Scotland. ... The castle dominates the Edinburgh skyline as seen here from Princes Street Gardens Edinburgh Castle is an ancient fortress which, from its position atop Castle Rock, dominates the sky-line of the city of Edinburgh, and is Scotlands second most visited tourist attraction, after the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and... Noup Head Lighthouse lies on the north west headland of the isle of Westray, in Orkney, Scotland. ... Westray shown within Orkney Islands Westray is one of the Orkney Islands in Scotland, with a population of around 700 people. ... Saddell Abbey was a Cistercian monastery in Argyll, Scotland, founded in 1207 by Raghnall, son of Somairle mac Gille Brigte. ... Location Geography Area Ranked 2nd  - Total 6,909 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Lochgilphead ISO 3166-2 GB-AGB ONS code 00QD Demographics Population Ranked 23rd  - Total (2005) 90,870  - Density 13 / km² Scottish Gaelic  - Total () {{{Scottish council Gaelic Speakers}}} Politics Argyll & Bute Council http://www. ... Sabhal Mòr Ostaig is a Scottish Gaelic medium college based in Sleat, on the Isle of Skye in north west Scotland. ... The Old Man of Storr, Skye The Isle of Skye, usually known simply as Skye (Scottish Gaelic: An t-Eilean Sgiathanach) is the largest and most northerly island in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland. ... // The college has a reputable music programme, consisting of the college choir, orchestra and band, music tuition and music as an academic subject. ... Woodend Hospital is a hospital in the Mastrick area of Aberdeen, Scotland. ...

Examples of Category C(s) listed buildings

  • a large number of notable private homes are designated Category C(s) (some A and B category listed buildings are also private homes)
  • Statue of John Knox, New College Quadrangle, Edinburgh (New College is itself designated as a Category A listed building)
  • War Memorial to Dundee City Police, West Bell Street, Dundee

For other persons named John Knox, see John Knox (disambiguation). ... New College, Edinburgh was founded in 1846 as a college of the Free Church of Scotland, later of the United Free Church of Scotland, and currently the School of Divinity of the University of Edinburgh and a Divinity college of the Church of Scotland. ... Tayside Police is the police force covering the Scottish council areas of Angus, City of Dundee and Perth and Kinross (the former Tayside region). ...

References

  1. ^ About Listed Buildings. heritage.co.uk.
  2. ^ Grade II* to be axed for historic buildings. Daily Telegraph.
  3. ^ The Church of England today. Church of England.

See also

The standard of English Heritage English Heritage is a non-departmental public body of the United Kingdom government (Department for Culture, Media and Sport) with a broad remit of managing the historic environment of England. ... The National Monuments Record is the public archive of English Heritage. ... A conservation area is a tract of land that has been awarded protected status in order to ensure that natural features or biota are safeguarded. ... Images of England was a lottery (Heritage Lottery Fund) funded project run by English Heritage to photograph every listed building and item in England and to make the images freely available to public on the web. ... The protection in France known as Monument historique is a State procedure by which heritage is instituted for a building or a specific part of a building, a collection of buildings or an entire neighborhood, plus gardens, bridges, and other structures because of their architectural and historical importance. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... Grade I historic buildings are those selected as those outstanding merits of which every effort should be made to preserve if possible.[1] These buildings may be protected under the Antiquities and Monuments Ordinance; after consulting the Antiquities Advisory Board, with the approval of the Chief Executive and the publication... Grade II historic buildings are those of special merit in Hong Kong. ... Grade III historic buildings are those selected by Hong Kongs Antiquities and Monuments Office as those buildings which are Buildings of some merit, but not yet qualified for consideration as possible monuments. ... In England, the Register of Parks and Gardens is a list maintained by English Heritage of significant open spaces which have historical interest in their design. ... A Scheduled Ancient Monument is defined in the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 and the National Heritage Act 1983 of the United Kingdom government. ... A Site of Special Scientific Interest or SSSI is a conservation designation denoting a protected area in the United Kingdom. ... A Tree Preservation Order or TPO is a part of town and country planning in the United Kingdom. ... The Historic Places Trust is a non-profit trust which advocates for the protection of heritage buildings in New Zealand. ...

External links

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