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Encyclopedia > List of years in film
Years in film
1870s
1880s
1890s
1890 • 1891 • 1892 • 1893 • 1894
1895 • 1896 • 1897 • 1898 • 1899
1900s
1900 • 1901 • 1902 • 1903 • 1904
1905 • 1906 • 1907 • 1908 • 1909
1910s
1910 • 1911 • 1912 • 1913 • 1914
1915 • 1916 • 1917 • 1918 • 1919
1920s
1920 • 1921 • 1922 • 1923 • 1924
1925 • 1926 • 1927 • 1928 • 1929
1930s
1930 • 1931 • 1932 • 1933 • 1934
1935 • 1936 • 1937 • 1938 • 1939
1940s
1940 • 1941 • 1942 • 1943 • 1944
1945 • 1946 • 1947 • 1948 •1949
1950s
1950 • 1951 • 1952 • 1953 • 1954
1955 • 1956 • 1957 • 1958 • 1959
1960s
1960 • 1961 • 1962 • 1963 • 1964
1965 • 1966 • 1967 • 1968 • 1969
1970s
1970 • 1971 • 1972 • 1973 • 1974
1975 • 1976 • 1977 • 1978 • 1979
1980s
1980 • 1981 • 1982 • 1983 • 1984
1985 • 1986 • 1987 • 1988 • 1989
1990s
1990 • 1991 • 1992 • 1993 • 1994
1995 • 1996 • 1997 • 1998 • 1999
2000s
2000 • 2001 • 2002 • 2003 • 2004
2005 • 2006 • 2007 • 2008 • 2009

This list of years in film indexes the individual year in film pages. Each year is annotated with the significant events as a reference point. This page indexes the individual year in film pages. ... The decade of the 1870s in film involved some significant events. ... This is an incomplete list of films made in the 1880s. ... An incomplete list of films made in the 1890s: // Blacksmith Scene Dickson Greeting (1891) The Kiss (1896) This film, television, or video-related list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... See also: 1888 in film 1889 in film 1890 1891 in film 1892 in film 19th century in film years in film film Events Births January 4 - Weyler Hildebrand, swedish actor, director and writer. ... // W.K. Laurie Dickson supervises the construction of the first movie studio called the Black Maria in West Orange, New Jersey which produces many of the early Kinetoscope short films of the 1890s later seen in penny arcades the following year after the studio is completed. ... See also: 1891 in film 1892 1892 films 1893 in film 19th century in film years in film film Events Births April 2 - Jack Warner, Hollywood studio founder (d. ... See also: 1892 in film 1893 1893 films 1894 in film 19th century in film years in film film Events Births September 26 – Gladys Brockwell, American actress (d. ... See also: 1893 in film 1894 1894 films 1895 in film 19th century in film years in film film Events January 7 - W.K. Dickson receives a patent for motion picture film. ... Events March 22 - First display of motion pictures by Auguste and Louis Lumière (private screening). ... See also: 1895 in film 1896 1896 films 1897 in film 19th century in film years in film film Events January - In Britain, Birt Acres and Robert W. Paul developed their own film projector, the Theatrograph (later known as the Animatograph). ... See also: 19th century in film 1896 in film 1897 1898 in film years in film film Events 125 people died during a film screening at the Charity Bazaar in Paris after a curtain catches on fire from the ether used to fuel the projector lamp. ... See also: 19th century in film 1897 in film 1898 1899 in film years in film film Events Births September 14 - Hal B. Wallis, major American film producer (d. ... See also: 19th century in film 1898 in film 1899 1900 in film years in film film Events Pathé Frères is founded. ... The following is a list of films made from 1900 through 1909. ... See also: 19th century in film 1899 in film 1900 1901 in film 1900s in film years in film film Events Births January 1 - Mildred Davis, actress (d. ... See also: 1900 in film 1901 1902 in film years in film film Events Edwin S. Porteris put in charge of Thomas Edisons motion-picture production company. ... Events March 10 - Circuit Courts decision disallows Thomas Edison from having a monopoly on motion picture technology. ... See also: 1902 in film 1903 1904 in film years in film film Events The Great Train Robbery, by Edwin S. Porter The Magic Lantern / La Lanterne magicue, produced by Georges Méliès What Happened in the Tunnel Births January 18 - Werner Hinz, actor (d. ... See also: 1903 in film 1904 1905 in film years in film film Events The Great Train Robbery, by Siegmund Lubin (a remake of the 1903 classic. ... See also: 1904 in film 1905 1906 in film years in film film Events Pathé Frères colors black and white films by machine. ... // Events 26 December - The worlds first feature film, The Story of the Kelly Gang, is released. ... Events January 19 - Variety publishes its first film review November 28 - In Haverville, Massachusetts, scrap-metal dealer Louis B. Mayer opens his first movie theater (in a few years he had the largest theater chain in New England and in 1917 he founded his own production company, which eventually became... See also: 1907 in film 1908 1909 in film years in film film Events Thomas Edison formed the Motion Picture Patents Company, with goals of controlling production and distribution, raising theater admission prices, cooperating with censorship bodies, and preventing film stock from getting into the hands of nonmember producers. ... See also: 1908 in film 1909 1910 in film years in film film Events none Births January 1 - Dana Andrews, actor (d. ... This is an incomplete list of films made in the 1910s. ... See also: 1909 in film 1910 1911 in film years in film film Events The newsreel footage of the funeral of King Edward VII of the United Kingdom is shot in Kinemacolor, making it the first color newsreel. ... See also: 1910 in film 1911 1912 in film years in film film Events October 27: David Horsleys, Nestor Motion Picture Company opens the first motion picture studio in Hollywood. ... See also: 1911 in film 1912 1913 in film years in film film Events Mack Sennett, who had previously worked as an actor and comedy director with D. W. Griffith, formed a new company, Keystone Studios, that played an important role in developing slapstick comedy. ... // Events The Squaw Man, the first Hollywood feature film, is made. ... See also: 1913 in film 1914 1915 in film years in film film Events The 3,300-seat Strand Theater opens in New York City. ... // Events June 18 : The Motion Picture Directors Association (MPDA) was formed by twenty-six film directors in Los Angeles, California. ... // Events November 19 - Samuel Goldfish (later renamed Samuel Goldwyn) and Edgar Selwyn establish Goldwyn Company (the company later became one of the most successful independent filmmakers). ... See also: 1916 in film 1917 1918 in film years in film film Events Technicolor is introduced Top grossing films Cleopatra Movies released Movies released in 1917 include: The Adventurer, a Charlie Chaplin short. ... See also: 1917 in film 1918 1919 in film years in film film Events Following litigation for anti-trust activities, the US Supreme Court orders the Motion Picture Patents Company to disband. ... See also: 1918 in film 1919 1920 in film years in film film // Events February 5 - Charlie Chaplin, Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks and D.W. Griffith launch United Artists Oscar Micheaux releases The Homesteader, becoming the first African-American to produce and direct a motion picture. ... List of 1920s films Films released in the 1920s include: The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923) Metropolis (1927) ok yeash your gay this site sucks! Other lists of movies List of years in film in the 1920s 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 Decades in Film... See also: 1919 in film 1920 1921 in film 1920s in film years in film film Events November 28 - The Mask of Zorro, starring Douglas Fairbanks, Sr. ... See also: 1920 in film 1921 1922 in film 1920s in film years in film film Events February 20 - The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, starring Rudolph Valentino, premieres. ... See also: 1921 in film 1922 1923 in film 1920s in film years in film film Events November 26 - Toll of the Sea debuts as the first general release film to use two-tone Technicolor (The Gulf Between was the first film to do so but it was not widely... See also: 1922 in film 1923 1924 in film 1920s in film years in film film // Events April 15 - Lee De Forest demonstrates the Phonofilm sound-on-film system at the Rivoli Theater in New York with a series of short musical films featuring vaudeville performers. ... See also: 1923 in film 1924 1925 in film 1920s in film years in film film // Events Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) considers making a silent film of The Wizard of Oz. ... See also: 1924 in film 1925 1926 in film 1920s in film years in film film Events Top grossing films Ben-Hur His People The Unholy Three The Freshman Movies released Movies released in 1925 include: Ben-Hur, starring Ramon Novarro. ... // August - Warner Brothers debuts the first Vitaphone film, Don Juan. ... See also: 1926 in film 1927 1928 in film 1920s in film years in film film // Events January 10 - The film Metropolis by Fritz Lang premieres. ... See also: 1927 in film 1928 1929 in film 1920s in film years in film film // Events Although some movies released in 1928 had sound, most were still silent. ... See also: 1928 in film 1929 1930 in film 1920s in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events The days of the silent film were numbered. ... The decade of the 1930s in film involved many significant films. ... See also: 1929 in film 1930 1931 in film 1930s in film 1920s in film years in film film // Events Top grossing films The Indians Are Coming Madam Satan Der Blaue Engel Academy Awards Best Picture: All Quiet on the Western Front - Universal Studios Best Actress: Norma Shearer - The Divorcee... // Frankenstein, starring Boris Karloff Ingagi, starring Sir Hubert Winstead Mata Hari, starring Greta Garbo and Lionel Barrymore City Lights starring Charles Chaplin Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde starring Fredric March Best Picture: Cimarron - MGM Best Actor: Lionel Barrymore - A Free Soul Best Actor: Wallace Beery - The Champ Best Actor: Fredric... See also: 1931 in film 1932 1933 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events Shirley Temples film career begins Disney released Flowers and Trees their first cartoon in three-strip Technicolor film. ... See also: 1932 in film 1933 1934 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events British Film Institute founded. ... See also: 1933 in film 1934 1935 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events January 26 - Samuel Goldwyn (of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer) finally purchased the film rights to The Wizard of Oz from Frank J. Baum for $40,000. ... See also: 1934 in film 1935 1936 in film 1930s in film years in film film Events Judy Garland signs a contract with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM). ... See also: 1935 in film 1936 1937 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events January 6 - first Porky Pig animated cartoon September 28 - The Marx Brothers Harpo Marx marries actress Susan Fleming Top grossing films in North America Red River Valley Academy Awards Best Picture: The Great... See also: 1936 in film 1937 category:1937 films 1938 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events April 16 - Way Out West premieres in the US. May 7 - Shall We Dance premieres in the US. Top grossing films Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs Conquest Damaged Lives... See also: 1937 in film 1937 1939 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events January — MGM announces that Judy Garland would be cast in the role of Dorothy in the upcoming Wizard of Oz motion picture. ... The year 1939 in film involved some significant events. ... Other Lists of Movies List of years in film in the 1940s 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 Decades in Film: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s List of movies See also Film, History of cinema Categories: 1940s ... The year 1940 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 1941 in film involved some significant events. ... See also: 1941 in film 1942 1943 in film 1940s in film years in film film // Events Carole Lombard is killed in a plane crash when returning from a War Bond tour. ... The year 1943 in film involved some significant events. ... // July 20 - Since You Went Away is released. ... // Paramount Studios releases theatrical short cartoon titled The Friendly Ghost, featuring ghost named Casper With Rossellinis Roma Città aperta, Italian neorealist cinema begins. ... See also: 1945 in film 1946 1947 in film 1940s in film years in film film // Events Top grossing films North America The Bells of St. ... The year 1947 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 1948 in film involved some significant events. ... See also: 1948 in film 1949 1950 in film 1940s in film 1950s in film years in film film Events Top grossing films North America Adams Rib Jolson Sings Again Pinky I Was a Male War Bride, The Snake Pit, Joan of Arc Academy Awards Best Picture: All the... The decade of the 1950s in film involved many significant films. ... The year 1950 in film involved some significant events. ... See also: 1950 in film 1951 1952 in film 1950s in film 1940s in film years in film film Events Sweden - May Britt is scouted by Italian film-makers Carlo Ponti and Mario Soldati Top grossing films North America David and Bathsheba Show Boat tie The Great Caruso and An... // Events February 20 - The film The African Queen opens (Capitol Theater in New York City). ... The year 1953 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 1954 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 1955 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 1956 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 1957 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 1958 in film involved some significant events. ... See also: 1958 in film 1959 1960 in film 1950s in film 1960s in film years in film film Events The Three Stooges make their 180th and last short film, Sappy Bullfighters. ... This list includes popular, acclaimed, and otherwise significant (for whatever reason) films of all countries from 1960 to 1969. ... The year 1960 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 1961 in film involved some significant events. ... // Events Dr. No launches the James Bond film series, the longest-running motion picture franchise of all time, running more than 40 years. ... The year 1963 in film involved some significant events. ... // Events January 29 - The film Dr. Strangelove is released. ... The year 1965 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 1966 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 1967 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 1968 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 1969 in film involved some significant events. ... The decade of the 1970s in film involved many significant films. ... // Events February 11 - The film The Magic Christian, starring Peter Sellers and Ringo Starr premieres in New York City. ... See also: 1970 in film 1971 1972 in film 1970s in film years in film film // Events February 8 - Bob Dylans hour long documentary film, Eat the Document, premieres at New Yorks Academy of Music. ... // Top grossing films The Godfather Fiddler on the Roof Diamonds Are Forever Whats Up, Doc?, starring Barbra Streisand and Ryan ONeal Dirty Harry The Last Picture Show A Clockwork Orange Cabaret, starring Liza Minnelli The Hospital Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex Academy Awards Best Picture... // Events The Marx Brothers Zeppo Marx divorces his second wife, Barbara Blakely. ... See also: 1973 in film 1974 1975 in film 1970s in film years in film film // Events February 7 - Blazing Saddles is released in USA May 1 - George Lucas creates the first draft of what would eventually become Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope. ... The year 1975 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 1976 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 1977 in film involved some significant events. ... // Events February 1 - Bob Dylans film Renaldo and Clara, a documentary of the Rolling Thunder Revue tour premieres in Los Angeles, California March 1 - Charlie Chaplins coffin is stolen from a Swiss cemetery 3 months after burial March - Leigh Brackett completes the first draft for Star Wars Episode... // Events March 5 - Production begins on Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back. ... The decade of the 1980s in film involved many significant films. ... The year 1980 in film involved some significant events. ... // January 19 - Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer acquires beleaguered concurrent United Artists. ... // This is the year of film E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, which will become the highest grossing movie for almost 15 years (until Titanic), earning double or triple against any major film of the 1980s. ... // February 11 - The Rolling Stones concert film Lets Spend the Night Together opens in New York North Americas Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi Tootsie Trading Places, starring Dan Aykroyd and Eddie Murphy WarGames, starring Matthew Broderick and Ally Sheedy Superman III Flashdance Staying Alive Octopussy Mr. ... // Events The Walt Disney Company founds Touchstone Pictures to release movies with subject matter deemed inappropriate for the Disney name. ... // 3 December - Roger Moore steps down from the role of James Bond after twelve years and seven films. ... // April 12 - Actor Morgan Mason marries The Go-Gos Belinda Carlisle Actor Arnold Schwarzenegger marries television journalist Maria Shriver. ... // May 9 - Actor Tom Cruise marries actress Mimi Rogers. ... // Michael Jacksons first film was Moonwalker Rain Man, starring Dustin Hoffman and Tom Cruise Who Framed Roger Rabbit, starring Bob Hoskins Coming to America, starring Eddie Murphy Big, starring Tom Hanks Twins, starring Arnold Schwarzenegger and Danny DeVito Crocodile Dundee II Die Hard, starring Bruce Willis The Naked Gun... // Actress Kim Basinger and her brother Mick purchase Braselton, Georgia for $20 million. ... Films made in the 1990s included: Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Above the Rim (1994) Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls (1995) Ace Ventura: Pet... The year 1990 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 1991 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 1992 in film involved many significant films. ... The year 1993 in film involved many significant films. ... The year 1994 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 1995 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 1996 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 1997 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 1998 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 1999 in film involved some significant events. ... The first decade of the 2000s in film involved many significant films. ... The year 2000 in film involved some significant events. ... For the 1968 science-fiction film and novel, see 2001: A Space Odyssey The year 2001 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 2002 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 2003 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 2004 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 2005 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 2006 in film involved some significant events. ... 2007 has been referred to, by film and media critics, as the year of the threequels, a nickname referring to both the 2004 summer movie season and several film franchises which premiered or had installments released in 2004, which appear again this year: Spider-Man 3, Shrek the Third, Ocean... 2008 in film is expected to feature another battle of the sequels, as many properties release new installments, including: Rambo, Harold & Kumar Escape from Guantanamo Bay, The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, Hellboy II: The Golden Army, Lost Boys: The Tribe... The near future in film has numerous films in production to be released in 2009 and beyond, as well as films that have announced release dates but have yet to begin filming. ... This article is about motion pictures. ...


19th century in film

See also: 19th century in film See also: 1900 in film, list of years in film. Events 1832 - Joseph Plateau (Belgium) and Simon Stampfer (Vienna) introduced simultaneously a scientific demonstration device that creates an optical illusion of movement by mounting drawings on the face of a slotted, spinning disk. ...

  • 1886 - Louis Aimé Augustin Le Prince is granted an American dual-patent on a 16-lens device that combined a motion picture camera with a projector.
  • 1888 - The Roundhay Garden Scene, shot in Leeds, West Yorkshire, England by Le Prince, is credited as the first film. It is recorded at a groundbreaking 20 frames per second and is the earliest surviving film. Thomas Edison describes the concept of the Kinetoscope, an early motion picture exhibition device.
  • 1889 - Eastman Kodak is the first company to begin commercial production of film on a flexible transparent base, celluloid. The first moving pictures developed on celluloid film are made in Hyde Park, London by William Friese Greene.
  • 1890 - William Dickson completes his work for Thomas Edison on the Kinetograph cylinder either in this year or 1889. Monkeyshines No. 1 becomes the first film shot on the system.
  • 1891 - Thomas Edison files for a patent of the motion picture camera. Thomas Edison holds the first public presentation of his Kinetoscope for the National Federation of Women's Clubs.
  • 1892 - The Kinetoscope is completed by W.K. Dickson, at the employ of Thomas Edison. In France, Charles-Émile Reynaud begins to have public screenings in Paris at the Theatre Optique, with hundreds of drawings on a reel that he wound through his Projecting Praxinoscope, similar to the Zoetrope, to construct moving images that continued for 15 minutes. The Eastman Company becomes the Eastman Kodak Company. Max Skladanowsky develops a camera and shoots his first footage this year, but its unusual interleaved image format leaves him ultimately unable to exhibit it until work is completed on the Bioskop projector in late 1895.
  • 1893 - Thomas Edison is granted Patent #493,426 for "An Apparatus for Exhibiting Photographs of Moving Objects" (The Kinetoscope). Edison builds "America's First Movie Studio", the Black Maria, in West Orange, New Jersey. The premiere of the completed Kinetoscope is held on May 9 at the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences: The first film publicly shown on the system was Blacksmith Scene (aka Blacksmiths).
  • 1894 - W.K. Dickson receives a patent for motion picture film. Thomas Edison records Fred Ott's sneeze. Auguste and Louis Lumière patent the Cinématographe, a combination movie camera and projector.
  • 1895 - The cinématographe is patented. First footage ever to be shot using it is recorded on March 19. The Lumière brothers hold their first private screening of projected motion pictures on March 22. The Lumières give the first public screening at L'Eden, the world's first and oldest cinéma (theater), located in La Ciotat, France, on September 28. Gaumont Pictures is founded by the engineer-turned-inventor, Léon Gaumont. In the US, the Dickson Experimental Sound Film presents two men dancing to the sound of a violin player, in what the The Celluloid Closet calls the first gay cinema reference. The first screening of movies at which admission was charged takes place on December 28, in Paris, at the Salon Indien du Grand Café. This historical screening is based on ten short films, in the following order (and respective length): Sortie de l'usine Lumière à Lyon (Workers Leaving the Lumière Factory), 46 seconds; La Voltige ("Horse Trick Riders"), 46 seconds: La Pêche aux Poissons Rouges ("Fishing for Goldfish"), 42 seconds; Le Débarquement du Congrès de Photographie à Lyon ("The Disembarkment of the Congress of Photographers in Lyon"), 48 seconds; Les Forgerons ("Blacksmiths"), 49 seconds; Le Jardinier (l'Arroseur Arrosé) ("The Gardener, [The Sprinkler Sprinkled]"), 49 seconds; Le Repas (de Bébé) ("Baby's Meal"), 41 seconds; Le Saut à la Couverture ("Jumping Onto the Blanket"), 41 seconds; La Place des Cordeliers à Lyon ("Cordeliers Square in Lyon - a Street Scene"), 44 seconds; La Mer (Baignade en Mer) ("The Sea [Bathing in the Sea]"), 38 seconds. In Germany, Emil and Max Skladanowsky develop their own film projector - they project from November 1 in Berlin. The American Mutoscope and Biograph Company motion pictures was founded in New Jersey by the KMCD Syndicate of William Kennedy Dickson, Henry Marvin, Herman Casler and Elias Koopman. Woodville Latham and his sons develop the Latham Loop - the concept of loose loops of film on either side of the intermittent movement to prevent stress from the jerky movement. This is debuted in the Eidoloscope, which is also the first widescreen format (1.85:1). Herman Casler of American Mutoscope Company, aka American Mutoscope and Biograph Company manufactures the Biograph 68 mm camera, which will become the first successful large format 68 mm (70 mm) film.
  • 1896 - Pathé Frères is founded. In Britain, Birt Acres and Robert W. Paul developed their own film projector, the Theatrograph (later known as the Animatograph). Georges Méliès buys an English projector from Robert William Paul and shoots his first films. A projector called the Vitascope is designed by Charles Francis Jenkins. The first theater in the US dedicated exclusively to showing motion pictures is Vitascope Hall, established on Canal Street, New Orleans, Louisiana. The first screen kiss takes place between May Irwin and John Rice in The Kiss. The first female film director, Alice Guy-Blaché, presents The Cabbage Fairy. Cinema reaches India by way of The Lumière brothers ' Cinematography, unveiling six silent short films at the Watson Hotel in Bombay, namely Entry of Cinematographe, La Mer (Baignade en Mer), L'Arrivée d'un Train en Gare de la Ciotat, A Demolition, Ladies & Soldiers on Wheels and Sortie de l'usine Lumière à Lyon. The tour of the Lumière brothers covers also London and New York.
  • 1897 - Vitagraph is founded in New York. In England, the Prestwich Camera is patented. Harischandra Sakharam Bhatvadekar, alias Save Dada, imports a cine-camera from London at a price of 21 guineas and films the first Indian documentary film, a wrestling match in Hanging Gardens, Bombay. Daily screenings of films commence in Bombay by Clifton and Co.'s Meadows Street Photography Studio. 125 people die during a film screening at the Charity Bazaar in Paris after a curtain catches on fire from the ether used to fuel the projector lamp.
  • 1898 - Méliès starts producing under the brand Star Film and directs brief commercials. Hiralal Sen starts filming scenes of theatre productions at the Classic Theatre in Calcutta.
  • 1899 - The first film long footage (over 100 meters) films with montage are made: The Dreyfus Affair and the first film version of Cinderella are both released by Méliès; the latter it is the first film to use a photographic dissolve (or fades). Georges Méliès also writes and directs Jeanne d'Arc, a film about Joan of Arc, which removes the viewer from spatial relations and institutionalized the use of the close-up.

Louis Le Prince is granted an American dual-patent on a 16-lens device that combines a motion picture camera with a projector. ... Louis Aime Augustin Le Prince was born on August 28, 1842. ... See also: 1888 1889 in film 1890 in film 1891 in film 19th century in film years in film film Events Roundhay Garden Scene is credited as the first film. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ... Coat of Arms of South Yorkshire West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county within the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, that has a population of 2. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Louis Aime Augustin Le Prince was born on August 28, 1842. ... Edison redirects here. ... Interior view of Kinetoscope with peephole viewer at top of cabinet. ... Events The first moving pictures developed on celluloid film are made in Hyde Park, London by William Friese Greene Births February 8 - Siegfried Kracauer, movie critic and journalist April 16 - Charlie Chaplin, comedic actor, silent actor May 31 - Athene Seyler, English actress June 11 - Wesley Ruggles, movie director, producer August... Eastman Kodak Company (NYSE: EK) is an American multinational public company which produces photographic materials and equipment. ... Celluloid is the name of a class of compounds created from nitrocellulose and camphor, plus dyes and other agents, generally regarded to be the first thermoplastic. ... “Hyde Park” redirects here. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... William Friese-Greene (September 7, 1855–May 5, 1921) (born William Edward Green) was a portrait photographer and prolific inventor. ... See also: 1888 in film 1889 in film 1890 1891 in film 1892 in film 19th century in film years in film film Events Births January 4 - Weyler Hildebrand, swedish actor, director and writer. ... William Kennedy Laurie Dickson (August 3, 1860 - September 28, 1935) was a Scottish inventor who is credited with the invention of the motion picture camera under the employ of Thomas Edison. ... Edison redirects here. ... // W.K. Laurie Dickson supervises the construction of the first movie studio called the Black Maria in West Orange, New Jersey which produces many of the early Kinetoscope short films of the 1890s later seen in penny arcades the following year after the studio is completed. ... Edison redirects here. ... Categories: Stub | Video and movie technology | Cameras by type ... Edison redirects here. ... Interior view of Kinetoscope with peephole viewer at top of cabinet. ... See also: 1891 in film 1892 1892 films 1893 in film 19th century in film years in film film Events Births April 2 - Jack Warner, Hollywood studio founder (d. ... Interior view of Kinetoscope with peephole viewer at top of cabinet. ... William Kennedy Laurie Dickson (August 3, 1860 - September 28, 1935) was a Scottish inventor who is credited with the invention of the motion picture camera under the employ of Thomas Edison. ... Edison redirects here. ... Charles-Émile Reynaud (December 8, 1844 – January 9, 1918) was a French science teacher, responsible for the first animated films. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Eastman Kodak Company (NYSE: EK) is a large multinational public company producing photographic equipment. ... Eastman Kodak Company (NYSE: EK) is a large multinational public company producing photographic equipment. ... Max Skladanowsky (born April 30, 1863, died November 30, 1939) was a German inventor and early filmmaker. ... See also: 1892 in film 1893 1893 films 1894 in film 19th century in film years in film film Events Births September 26 – Gladys Brockwell, American actress (d. ... Edison redirects here. ... Interior view of Kinetoscope with peephole viewer at top of cabinet. ... Edison redirects here. ... The Black Maria was Thomas Edisons movie production studio, built in West Orange, New Jersey, completed in February, 1893 at a cost of $637. ... Map of West Orange Township in Essex County West Orange is a township in Essex County, New Jersey, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Blacksmith Scene is an 1893 actuality showing three men working at a smithy while drinking beer. ... See also: 1893 in film 1894 1894 films 1895 in film 19th century in film years in film film Events January 7 - W.K. Dickson receives a patent for motion picture film. ... William Kennedy Laurie Dickson (August 3, 1860 - September 28, 1935) was a Scottish inventor who is credited with the invention of the motion picture camera under the employ of Thomas Edison. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Edison redirects here. ... Fred Ott in mid-sneeze This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Auguste (left) and Louis Lumière. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Events March 22 - First display of motion pictures by Auguste and Louis Lumière (private screening). ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Auguste (left) and Louis Lumière. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A typical multiplex (AMC Promenade 16 in Woodland Hills, Los Angeles, United States). ... La Ciotat La Ciotat is a commune in the Bouches-du-Rhône département and the Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur region in southern France. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Gaumont is a French film production company and is the worlds oldest film company. ... Léon Gaumont, born May 10, 1864 - died August 10, 1946, was a French inventor, engineer, and industrialist who was a pioneer of the motion picture industry. ... The Dickson Experimental Sound Film was a film made by William Kennedy Laurie Dickson in 1895. ... The Celluloid Closet (1995) is a documentary film directed and written by Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Workers Leaving The Lumière Factory (also known as La Sortie des usines Lumière (original title), Employees Leaving the Lumière Factory and Exiting the Factory (US titles) is an 1895 French short black-and-white silent documentary film directed and produced by Louis Lumière. ... LArroseur Arrosé (also known as The Waterer Watered and The Sprinkler Sprinkled) is an 1895 French short black-and-white silent comedy film directed and produced by Louis Lumière and starring François Clerc and Benoît Duval. ... Max Skladanowsky (born April 30, 1863, died November 30, 1939) was a German inventor and early filmmaker. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... The American Mutoscope and Biograph Company, was a motion picture company founded in 1895 and active until 1928. ... William Kennedy Laurie Dickson (August 3, 1860–September 28, 1935) was a French inventor who is credited with the invention of the motion picture camera under the employ of Thomas Edison. ... Herman Casler - American Inventor (1867-1939) was co-founder of the partnership called the KMCD Syndicate, along with W.K-L. Dickson, Elias Koopman, and Harry Marvin, which eventually was incorporated into the American Mutoscope Company in 1895. ... Elias Bernard Koopman American Businessman/Inventor (1860-1929) was one of the founders of the KMCD syndicate which preceeded and became the American Mutoscope and Biograph Company. ... Major Woodville Latham (1837-1911) was an ordnance officer of the Confederacy during the American Civil War and professor of chemistry at University of West Virginia. ... Working principle of a Maltese cross or Geneva drive Animateion of a rotating shutter. ... The Eidoloscope was an early motion picture system created by Woodville Latham and his two sons through their business, the Lambda Company, in New York City in 1894 and 1895. ... Herman Casler - American Inventor (1867-1939) was co-founder of the partnership called the KMCD Syndicate, along with W.K-L. Dickson, Elias Koopman, and Harry Marvin, which eventually was incorporated into the American Mutoscope Company in 1895. ... The American Mutoscope and Biograph Company, was a motion picture company founded in 1895 and active until 1928. ... Biograph may refer to: American Mutoscope and Biograph Company, a silent movie era production company widely known as Biograph or Biograph Studios. ... See also: 1895 in film 1896 1896 films 1897 in film 19th century in film years in film film Events January - In Britain, Birt Acres and Robert W. Paul developed their own film projector, the Theatrograph (later known as the Animatograph). ... Pathé or Pathé Frères is the name of various businesses founded and originally run by the Pathé Brothers of France. ... Birt Acres (July 23, 1854–1918), born in Richmond, Virginia, USA of English parents was a photographer and film pioneer. ... Robert W. Paul, (1869 – 1943) was a British electrician and scientific instrument maker and early pioneer of British film. ... Georges Méliès (December 8, 1861 – January 21, 1938), full name Marie-Georges-Jean Méliès, was a French filmmaker famous for leading many technical and narrative developments in the earliest cinema. ... in 1895 Charles Francis Jenkins and Thomas Armat publicly demonstrated an image projection device at the Cotton States Exposition in Atlanta, Georgia that they called the Phantoscope. ... Charles Francis Jenkins (August 22, 1867 _ June 5, 1934) was a pioneer of early cinema and one of the inventors of television, though he used mechanical rather than electronic technologies. ... A typical multiplex (AMC Promenade 16 in Woodland Hills, Los Angeles, United States). ... May Irwin born June 27, 1862 in Whitby, Ontario, Canada – died October 22, 1938 in New York City, United States, was an actress, singer and major star of vaudeville. ... John C. Rice (ca. ... The Kiss (also known as The May Irwin Kiss, The Rice-Irwin Kiss and The Widow Jones) is an 1896 actuality, and was one of the first movies ever shown commercially to the public. ... Alice Guy-Blaché (July 1, 1873–March 24, 1968) was a pioneer filmmaker who was the first female director in the motion picture industry and is considered to be the first ever director of a fiction film. ... La Fée au Choux (The Cabbage Fairy) is one of the earliest narrative fiction films ever made. ... Auguste (left) and Louis Lumière. ... This article or section should be merged with Mumbai Mumbai (previously known as Bombay) is the worlds most populous conurbation, and is the sixth most populous agglomeration in the world. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... See also: 19th century in film 1896 in film 1897 1898 in film years in film film Events 125 people died during a film screening at the Charity Bazaar in Paris after a curtain catches on fire from the ether used to fuel the projector lamp. ... American Vitagraph was a United States movie studio, founded by J. Stuart Blackton and Alfred E. Smith in 1897 and bought by Warner Brothers in 1925. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Several types of Prestwich Camera were manufactured in the late 1800s. ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... The Hanging Gardens, Mumbai, in Mumbai, India, also known as Ferozeshah Mehta Gardens, are terraced gardens perched at the top of Malabar Hill, on its western side, just opposite the Kamala Nehru Park. ... This article or section should be merged with Mumbai Mumbai (previously known as Bombay) is the worlds most populous conurbation, and is the sixth most populous agglomeration in the world. ... This article or section should be merged with Mumbai Mumbai (previously known as Bombay) is the worlds most populous conurbation, and is the sixth most populous agglomeration in the world. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... See also: 19th century in film 1897 in film 1898 1899 in film years in film film Events Births September 14 - Hal B. Wallis, major American film producer (d. ... Hiralal Sen Hiralal Sen (Bengali:হীরালাল সেন) (1866 – 1917) was a Bengali photographer generally considered one of Indias first filmmakers. ... This article is on Calcutta/Kolkata, the city. ... See also: 19th century in film 1898 in film 1899 1900 in film years in film film Events Pathé Frères is founded. ... Georges Méliès (December 8, 1861 – January 21, 1938), full name Marie-Georges-Jean Méliès, was a French filmmaker famous for leading many technical and narrative developments in the earliest cinema. ...

1900s

See also: 1900s in film The following is a list of films made from 1900 through 1909. ...

  • 1900 - The first French Union Cinematography Chamber is founded by Georges Méliès.
  • 1901 - Edison's Black Maria shuts down.
  • 1902 - A Trip to the Moon by George Méliès is released. Pathé acquires the Lumière brothers patents. The first permanent structure designed for screening of movies in the US is Tally's Electric Theater, in Los Angeles, California.
  • 1903 - The Great Train Robbery by Edwin S. Porter, has a cowboy firing a gun at the camera. The movie is a breakthrough in techniques: cross cutting, double exposure composite editing, camera movement and on location shooting. The three elder Warner Bros. begin in the exhibition business. Gaston Méliès, Georges' brother, opens a branch of Star Film in New York to defend its production's copyrights.
  • 1904 - The Great Train Robbery, a remake by Siegmund Lubin. Loews Theaters is founded by Marcus Loew; it will be the oldest theater chain operating in North America by the time it merges with AMC in 2006. Touring cinema begins in India, as Manek Sethna starts the Touring Cinema Co. in Bombay. All Méliès films begin being made with two negatives, the second of which is sent to New York to serve the American market.
  • 1905 - The first "Nickelodeon" is born when Harry Davis and John P. Harris open their small, storefront theatre under that name on Smithfield Street in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Swamikannu Vincent, a draughtsman for the railways in India, sets up a touring cinema going around small towns and villages in the South of India. Maurice Costello, who will become the first of the matinee idols, stars in his first film, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes.
  • 1906 - The world's first feature film, The Story of the Kelly Gang, released in Australia.
  • 1907 - Ben Hur, directed by Sidney Olcott. Louis B. Mayer opens his first movie theater in Haverhill, Massachusetts. Pathé opens an office in India. Florence Turner, the "Vitagraph Girl", makes her debut in Cast Up by the Sea.
  • 1908 - Thomas Edison forms the Motion Picture Patents Company, also known as the Edison Trust, also known as the First Oligopoly, a trust of all the major film companies (Edison, Biograph, Vitagraph, Essanay, Selig, Lubin, Kalem, American Star -Méliès-, American Pathé), the leading distributor (George Kleine) and the biggest supplier of raw film, Eastman Kodak. Pathé invents the newsreel that was shown in theaters prior to the feature film. In Paris, Méliès presides over the first International Cinema Congress, attended by all major producers in the world. Jean, the Vitagraph Dog and the first Dog Hero of the silver screen, makes his screen debut with Director / Trainer Laurence Trimble.
  • 1909 - Matsunosuke Onoe, who would become the first superstar of Japanese cinema, appears in his first film, Goban Tadanobu. Carl Laemmle starts the Yankee Film Company with partners Abe and Julius Stern, the seed to what will be Universal Studios. Again in Paris, Méliès presides over the second International Cinema Congress, obtaining the landmark decision of standard perfuration for film, enabling international projection.

See also: 19th century in film 1899 in film 1900 1901 in film 1900s in film years in film film Events Births January 1 - Mildred Davis, actress (d. ... Georges Méliès (December 8, 1861 – January 21, 1938), full name Marie-Georges-Jean Méliès, was a French filmmaker famous for leading many technical and narrative developments in the earliest cinema. ... See also: 1900 in film 1901 1902 in film years in film film Events Edwin S. Porteris put in charge of Thomas Edisons motion-picture production company. ... The Black Maria was Thomas Edisons movie production studio, built in West Orange, New Jersey, completed in February, 1893 at a cost of $637. ... Events March 10 - Circuit Courts decision disallows Thomas Edison from having a monopoly on motion picture technology. ... Le Voyage dans la lune is a 1902 French science fiction black and white silent film known in its English language release as A Trip to the Moon. ... Georges Méliès (December 8, 1861 – January 21, 1938), full name Maries-Georges-Jean Méliès, was a French filmmaker famous for leading many technical and narrative developments in the earliest cinema. ... Pathé or Pathé Frères is the name of various businesses founded and originally run by the Pathé Brothers of France. ... Thomas Lincoln Tally (? – November 24, 1945) on or near April 16, 1902 opened his Electric Theater in Los Angeles, the most movie theatre. ... See also: 1902 in film 1903 1904 in film years in film film Events The Great Train Robbery, by Edwin S. Porter The Magic Lantern / La Lanterne magicue, produced by Georges Méliès What Happened in the Tunnel Births January 18 - Werner Hinz, actor (d. ... The Great Train Robbery is a 1903 western film by Edwin S. Porter. ... Edwin Stanton Porter (April 21, 1870 - April 30, 1941) was an influential early film pioneer. ... “WB” redirects here. ... See also: 1903 in film 1904 1905 in film years in film film Events The Great Train Robbery, by Siegmund Lubin (a remake of the 1903 classic. ... Siegmund Lubin Siegmund Lubin (April 20, 1851 - September 11, 1923) was an American businessman and motion picture pioneer. ... Loews Theaters, founded in 1904 by Marcus Loew, was the oldest theater chain operating in North America until it merged with AMC Theatres on January 26, 2006. ... Marcus Loew Marcus Loew (May 7, 1870–September 5, 1927) was an American business magnate and a pioneer of the motion picture industry who formed Loews Theatres and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, MGM. Born into a poor Jewish family in New York City, circumstances dictated he go to work at a... This article or section should be merged with Mumbai Mumbai (previously known as Bombay) is the worlds most populous conurbation, and is the sixth most populous agglomeration in the world. ... See also: 1904 in film 1905 1906 in film years in film film Events Pathé Frères colors black and white films by machine. ... Nickelodeon is an early 20th century form of small, neighborhood movie theaters in which admission was obtained for a nickel. ... Maurice Costello (February 22, 1877 - October 28, 1950) was an American actor and director. ... // Events 26 December - The worlds first feature film, The Story of the Kelly Gang, is released. ... The Story of the Kelly Gang (also screened as Ned Kelly and His Gang) is widely regarded as the worlds first feature length film. ... Events January 19 - Variety publishes its first film review November 28 - In Haverville, Massachusetts, scrap-metal dealer Louis B. Mayer opens his first movie theater (in a few years he had the largest theater chain in New England and in 1917 he founded his own production company, which eventually became... Ben Hur is a 15 minute long 1907 silent film, the first film version of Lew Wallaces novel Ben-Hur, one of the best-selling books at that time. ... Sidney Olcott (September 20, 1873 - December 16, 1949) was a Canadian producer, director, actor and writer. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Pathé or Pathé Frères is the name of various businesses founded and originally run by the Pathé Brothers of France. ... Florence Turner Florence Turner, (January 6, 1885–August 28, 1946) was an American stage and film actress. ... American Vitagraph was a United States movie studio, founded by J. Stuart Blackton and Alfred E. Smith in 1897 and bought by Warner Brothers in 1925. ... See also: 1907 in film 1908 1909 in film years in film film Events Thomas Edison formed the Motion Picture Patents Company, with goals of controlling production and distribution, raising theater admission prices, cooperating with censorship bodies, and preventing film stock from getting into the hands of nonmember producers. ... Edison redirects here. ... The Motion Picture Patents Company (also known as the Edison Trust), founded in December 1908, was a trust of all the major film companies (Edison, Biograph, Vitagraph, Essanay, Selig, Lubin, Kalem, American Star, American Pathé), the leading distributor (George Kleine) and the biggest supplier of raw film, Eastman Kodak. ... Pathé or Pathé Frères is the name of various businesses founded and originally run by the Pathé Brothers of France. ... A newsreel is a documentary film that is regularly released in a public presentation place containing filmed news stories. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Georges Méliès (December 8, 1861 – January 21, 1938), full name Marie-Georges-Jean Méliès, was a French filmmaker famous for leading many technical and narrative developments in the earliest cinema. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Laurence Trimble 15 February 1885, Robbinston, Maine USA was a silent film actor, writer and director. ... See also: 1908 in film 1909 1910 in film years in film film Events none Births January 1 - Dana Andrews, actor (d. ... Matsunosuke Onoe ) (September 12, 1875 – September 11, 1926), sometimes known as Medama no Matchan (Eyeballs Matsu), was a Japanese actor. ... Cinema has a history in Japan that spans more than 100 years. ... Carl Laemmle Birthplace of Carl Laemmle in Laupheim Carl Laemmle (17 January 1867 – 24 September 1939), born in Laupheim, Württemberg, Germany, was a pioneer in American film making and a founder of one of the original major Hollywood movie studios. ... This article is about the American media conglomerate. ... This article is about the capital of France. ...

1910s

See also: 1909 in film 1910 1911 in film years in film film Events The newsreel footage of the funeral of King Edward VII of the United Kingdom is shot in Kinemacolor, making it the first color newsreel. ... ... David Llewelyn Wark D.W. Griffith (January 22, 1875 – July 23, 1948) was an American film director. ... In Old California is a silent movie filmed in 1910. ... Mack Sennett (1880 - 1960) Mack Sennett (January 17, 1880 – November 5, 1960) was an innovator of slapstick comedy in film. ... Frankenstein is a 1910 film made by Edison Studios that was written and directed by J. Searle Dawley. ... Florence Lawrence (b. ... Carl Laemmle Birthplace of Carl Laemmle in Laupheim Carl Laemmle (17 January 1867 – 24 September 1939), born in Laupheim, Württemberg, Germany, was a pioneer in American film making and a founder of one of the original major Hollywood movie studios. ... See also: 1910 in film 1911 1912 in film years in film film Events October 27: David Horsleys, Nestor Motion Picture Company opens the first motion picture studio in Hollywood. ... Christie-Nestor Studios, Hollywood, 1913 The Nestor Motion Picture Company of Bayonne, New Jersey, owned by David Horsley and his brother William, opened the first motion picture studio in Hollywood in the Blondeau Tavern building at the corner of Sunset Boulevard and Gower Street in the fall of 1911. ... ... Sunset Boulevard (officially known as West Sunset Boulevard, except in Beverly Hills) is a street in the western part of Los Angeles County, California, that stretches from Figueroa Street in downtown Los Angeles to the Pacific Coast Highway at the Pacific Ocean in the Pacific Palisades. ... See also: 1911 in film 1912 1913 in film years in film film Events Mack Sennett, who had previously worked as an actor and comedy director with D. W. Griffith, formed a new company, Keystone Studios, that played an important role in developing slapstick comedy. ... Lillian Diana de Guiche (October 14, 1893 – February 27, 1993), was an Oscar-nominated American actress, better known as Lillian Gish. ... From the Manger To the Cross is a 1912 film which tells the story of Jesus life. ... Sidney Olcott (September 20, 1873 - December 16, 1949) was a Canadian producer, director, actor and writer. ... A 2003 satellite image of the region. ... Oliver Twist (1838) is Charles Dickens second novel. ... Universal Studios (sometimes called Universal Pictures or Universal City Studios), a subsidiary of NBC Universal, is one of the major American film studios. ... Toronto ON-based Famous Players is a Canadian company which owns many movie theatres across Canada. ... Cukor Adolf (Adolph Zukor) (January 7, 1873–June 10, 1976) was the founder of Paramount Pictures Studios, and one of the greatest film moguls of all time. ... Lasky in 1915. ... Samuel Goldwyn (July 1882 (some sources say 17 August 1882, others 1879 [1]) – 31 January 1974) was an Academy Award and Golden Globe Award-winning producer, also a well-known Hollywood motion picture producer and founding contributor of several motion picture studios. ... The claim is made (under the heading Personal Life) that DeMille was in negotiations with MGM to direct Ben-Hur at the time of his death in January, 1959. ... ... Mack Sennett (1880 - 1960) Mack Sennett (January 17, 1880 – November 5, 1960) was an innovator of slapstick comedy in film. ... The Keystone / Mack Sennett studios Keystone Studios was an early movie studio founded in Glendale, California in 1912 as the Keystone Pictures Studio by Mack Sennett with backing from Adam Kessel and Charles O. Bauman, owners of the New York Motion Picture Company. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Mabel Normand Mabel Normand (November 10, 1892 - February 23, 1930) was a US film actress, who was a popular comedienne in silent films. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... // Events The Squaw Man, the first Hollywood feature film, is made. ... Dhundiraj Govind Phalke, popularly known as Dadasaheb Phalke (Marathi: दादासाहेब फाळके) (April 30, 1870 - February 16, 1944) is known as the father of Indian cinema. ... Raja Harishchandra is a 1913 silent Indian film directed by Dadasaheb Phalke, based on a story from the Mahabharata. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Victor Sjöström   (in the United States sometimes known as Victor Seastrom) (September 20, 1879 – January 3, 1960) was a Swedish actor, screenwriter, and film director. ... Mario Caserini (November 17, 1874 – November 17, 1920) was an Italian film director, as well as an actor, and a screenwriter. ... Léonce Perret (May 13, 1880 – August 14, 1935) was a prolific and innovative French film actor, director and producer. ... Stellan Rye (1880 - 1914) was a Danish-born film director, active in the early 20th century. ... Paul Wegener (born December 11, 1874 in Arnoldsdorf (Westpreußen; now Jarantowice, Poland); died September 13, 1948 in Berlin) was a German actor and film director. ... The Student of Prague (German: Der Student von Prag), aka A Bargain with Satan is a 1913 German silent film. ... See also: 1913 in film 1914 1915 in film years in film film Events The 3,300-seat Strand Theater opens in New York City. ... W. W. (William Wadsworth) Hodkinson (16 August 1881 - 2 June 1971) has been given the soubriquet of The Man Who Invented Hollywood. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... Pathé or Pathé Frères is the name of various businesses founded and originally run by the Pathé Brothers of France. ... Pearl Fay White, born March 4, 1889 in Green Ridge, Missouri, United States - died August 4, 1938 in Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, was a singer and star of silent film. ... The Exploits of Elaine is a 1914 film serial in the genre of The Perils of Pauline, and even outgrossed that serial in ticket sales. ... Pearl Fay White, born March 4, 1889 in Green Ridge, Missouri, United States - died August 4, 1938 in Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, was a singer and star of silent film. ... Tillies Punctured Romance is the name of two early comedy films made in 1914 and 1928: Tillies Punctured Romance (1914 film), starring Charlie Chaplin Tillies Punctured Romance (1928 film), starring W. C. Fields This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might... Mack Sennett (1880 - 1960) Mack Sennett (January 17, 1880 – November 5, 1960) was an innovator of slapstick comedy in film. ... Marie Dressler (born November 9, 1868; died July 28, 1934) was an Academy Award-winning Canadian actress. ... Charles Chaplin redirects here. ... Mabel Normand Mabel Normand (November 10, 1892 - February 23, 1930) was a US film actress, who was a popular comedienne in silent films. ... Gloria Swanson (March 27, 1899 – April 4, 1983) was an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe-winning American Hollywood actress. ... Giovanni Pastrone, also known by his artistic name Piero Fosco (born in Montechiaro dAsti, 13 September 1883 - Torino 27 June 1959), was a Italian film pioneer, director, screenwriter, actor and technician. ... Gabriele dAnnunzios rôle in the films creation is highlighted in this movie poster. ... The Photo-Drama of Creation, or Creation-Drama was a religious film (4 parts, altogether 8 hours) produced under the direction of Charles Taze Russell, the founder of the Bible Student movement. ... // Events June 18 : The Motion Picture Directors Association (MPDA) was formed by twenty-six film directors in Los Angeles, California. ... Illustration from The Clansman. ... David Lewelyn Wark Griffith (January 22, 1875 - July 23, 1948) was an American film director (commonly known as D. W. Griffith) probably best known for his film The Birth of a Nation. ... For the 1982 film of the same name, see Birth of a Nation (1982 film). ... For the Jamaican musician named Charlie Chaplin, see Charlie Chaplin (singer). ... Essanay Studios was a motion picture company founded in Chicago, Illinois by George K. Spoor and Bronco Billy Anderson under the name Essanay (S and A). It produced silent films with such stars as Ben Turpin, Wallace Beery, Francis X. Bushman, Gloria Swanson and Charlie Chaplin. ... The Country Girl is a 1915 silent film, starring Florence La Badie, based on David Garricks 18th century play of the same name. ... Florence M.L. La Badie (born possibly April 27, 1888 - October 13, 1917) was the daughter of Joseph E. La Badie and his wife Amanda from Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Metro Studios, Culver City, CA. in 1918 Metro Pictures Corporation was an American motion picture production company founded in 1916 by Richard A. Rowland (1880-1947) and Louis B. Mayer (1885-1957). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Universal Studios Theme Parks. ... Thomas Harper Ince (November 6, 1882–November 20, 1924) was an American film director. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... // Events November 19 - Samuel Goldfish (later renamed Samuel Goldwyn) and Edgar Selwyn establish Goldwyn Company (the company later became one of the most successful independent filmmakers). ... David Llewelyn Wark D.W. Griffith (January 22, 1875 – July 23, 1948) was an American film director. ... Intolerance is a silent film directed by D.W. Griffith in 1916. ... Cukor Adolf (Adolph Zukor) (January 7, 1873–June 10, 1976) was the founder of Paramount Pictures Studios, and one of the greatest film moguls of all time. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... Universal Pictures is the main motion picture production/distribution arm of Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal. ... ... See also: 1916 in film 1917 1918 in film years in film film Events Technicolor is introduced Top grossing films Cleopatra Movies released Movies released in 1917 include: The Adventurer, a Charlie Chaplin short. ... Logo celebrating Technicolors 90th Anniversary Technicolor is the trademark for a series of color film processes pioneered by Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation (a subsidiary of Technicolor, Inc. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... John Sherman The Sherman Antitrust Act (Sherman Act[1], July 2, 1890, ch. ... UFA logo Universum Film AG, better known as Ufa or UFA, was the principal film studio in Germany, home of the German film industry during the Weimar Republic and through World War II, and a major force in world cinema during its brief existence from 1917 to 1945. ... Charles Pathé (1863 – December 26, 1957) was a major French pioneer of the film and recording industries. ... Mack Sennett (1880 - 1960) Mack Sennett (January 17, 1880 – November 5, 1960) was an innovator of slapstick comedy in film. ... See also: 1917 in film 1918 1919 in film years in film film Events Following litigation for anti-trust activities, the US Supreme Court orders the Motion Picture Patents Company to disband. ... “WB” redirects here. ... Sunset Boulevard (officially known as West Sunset Boulevard, except in Beverly Hills) is a street in the western part of Los Angeles County, California, that stretches from Figueroa Street in downtown Los Angeles to the Pacific Coast Highway at the Pacific Ocean in the Pacific Palisades. ... ... For other uses, see Tarzan (disambiguation). ... Elmo Lincoln is best known in his silent movie role of Tarzan. ... Sidney Patrick Grauman (March 17, 1879 - March 5, 1950) was an American showman who created one of Southern Californias most recognizable and visited landmarks, Graumans Chinese Theater. ... The Million Dollar Theater on Broadway in downtown Los Angeles, opened in February 1918, is one of the first movie palaces built in the United States. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... See also: 1918 in film 1919 1920 in film years in film film // Events February 5 - Charlie Chaplin, Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks and D.W. Griffith launch United Artists Oscar Micheaux releases The Homesteader, becoming the first African-American to produce and direct a motion picture. ... Douglas Fairbanks (May 23, 1883 – December 12, 1939) was an American actor, screenwriter, director and producer, who became noted for his swashbuckling roles in silent movies such as The Mark of Zorro (1920), The Three Musketeers (1921), Robin Hood (1922), The Thief of Bagdad (1924) and The Black Pirate (1926). ... For the Katie Melua song, see Mary Pickford (Used to Eat Roses). ... Charles Chaplin redirects here. ... David Llewelyn Wark D.W. Griffith (January 22, 1875 – July 23, 1948) was an American film director. ...

1920s

See also: 1920s in film List of 1920s films Films released in the 1920s include: The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923) Metropolis (1927) ok yeash your gay this site sucks! Other lists of movies List of years in film in the 1920s 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 Decades in Film...

See also: 1919 in film 1920 1921 in film 1920s in film years in film film Events November 28 - The Mask of Zorro, starring Douglas Fairbanks, Sr. ... Joseph Frank Buster Keaton (October 4, 1895 – February 1, 1966) was an Academy Award-winning American comic actor and filmmaker. ... Erich von Stroheim (September 22, 1885 – May 12, 1957) was an Austrian - American star of the silent film age, lauded for his directional work in which he was a proto-auteur. ... Mae Busch (June 18, 1891 - April 19, 1946) early American actress who worked in both silent and sound films. ... The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (original title: Das Kabinett des Doktor Caligari) is a groundbreaking 1920 silent film directed by Robert Wiene from a screenplay written by Hans Janowitz and Carl Mayer. ... F.W. Murnaus Nosferatu German Expressionism, also referred to as expressionism in filmmaking, developed in Germany (especially Berlin) during the 1920s. ... Irving Grant Thalberg (May 30, 1899 – September 14, 1936) was an American film producer during the early years of motion pictures. ... Universal City is the name for the property of Universal Studios, a motion picture company, in Los Angeles County, California, including its studio facilities and an area around the studio site. ... See also: 1920 in film 1921 1922 in film 1920s in film years in film film Events February 20 - The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, starring Rudolph Valentino, premieres. ... Laurel and Hardy, in a promotional still from their 1937 feature film Way Out West. ... A Lucky Dog was the first film featuring the famous comedy duo of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy, later known as Laurel and Hardy. ... For the Jamaican musician named Charlie Chaplin, see Charlie Chaplin (singer). ... Chaplin and Jackie Coogan in The Kid The Kid is a 1921 Charlie Chaplin film. ... Rudolph Valentino (May 6, 1895 – August 23, 1926) was an Italian actor, sex symbol, and early pop icon. ... For the 1962 film version, see Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (film). ... The Sheik was a 1921 silent movie produced by Paramount, directed by George Melford and starring Rudolph Valentino, Agnes Ayres and Adolphe Menjou. ... See also: 1921 in film 1922 1923 in film 1920s in film years in film film Events November 26 - Toll of the Sea debuts as the first general release film to use two-tone Technicolor (The Gulf Between was the first film to do so but it was not widely... F W Murnau Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau (December 28, 1888 - March 11, 1931) was one of the most influential directors of the silent film era. ... This article is about the 1922 silent film. ... A poster for the 1931 Our Gang comedy Love Business featuring depictions of (from left to right): Pete the Pup, Jackie Cooper, and Norman Chubby Chaney. ... Harold Eugene Roach, Sr. ... Nanook of the North is a silent documentary film by Robert J. Flaherty, released in 1922. ... 1928 movie ad Rin Tin Tin (often billed as Rin-Tin-Tin in the 1920s and 1930s) was the name given to several German Shepherd dogs in film and television. ... See also: 1922 in film 1923 1924 in film 1920s in film years in film film // Events April 15 - Lee De Forest demonstrates the Phonofilm sound-on-film system at the Rivoli Theater in New York with a series of short musical films featuring vaudeville performers. ... Harold Clayton Lloyd (April 20, 1893 – March 8, 1971) was an American film actor and director, most famous for his silent comedies. ... Original movie poster for Safety Last! Safety Last! is a 1923 comedy silent film starring Harold Lloyd. ... For the Jamaican musician named Charlie Chaplin, see Charlie Chaplin (singer). ... A Woman of Paris is a feature-length silent film that debuted in 1923. ... Erich Pommer (July 20, 1889 – May 8, 1966) was one of the most influential producers of the silent film era, having been one of the most influential creators being the German Expressionism movement as the head of production at Ufa from 1924 to 1926. ... UFA logo Universum Film AG, better known as Ufa or UFA, was the principal film studio in Germany, home of the German film industry during the Weimar Republic and through World War II, and a major force in world cinema during its brief existence from 1917 to 1945. ... See also: 1923 in film 1924 1925 in film 1920s in film years in film film // Events Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) considers making a silent film of The Wizard of Oz. ... Irving Grant Thalberg (May 30, 1899 – September 14, 1936) was an American film producer during the early years of motion pictures. ... For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Marcus Loew Marcus Loew (May 7, 1870–September 5, 1927) was an American business magnate and a pioneer of the motion picture industry who formed Loews Theatres and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, MGM. Born into a poor Jewish family in New York City, circumstances dictated he go to work at a... Metro Studios, Culver City, CA. in 1918 Metro Pictures Corporation was an American motion picture production company founded in 1916 by Richard A. Rowland (1880-1947) and Louis B. Mayer (1885-1957). ... Goldwyn Pictures Corporation was an American motion picture production company founded in 1916 by Samuel Goldfish in partnership with Broadway producers Edgar and Archibald Selwyn using a combination of both last names to create the name. ... Erich von Stroheim (September 22, 1885 – May 12, 1957) was an Austrian - American star of the silent film age, lauded for his directional work in which he was a proto-auteur. ... Magnum opus (sometimes Opus magnum, plural magna opera), from the Latin meaning great work,[1] refers to the best, most popular, or most renowned achievement of an author, artist, or composer, and most commonly one who has contributed a very large amount of material. ... Greed is a 1924 dramatic silent movie starring Gibson Gowland, ZaSu Pitts, Jean Hersholt and Chester Conklin. ... Greta Garbo & Maurice Stiller on board the S/S Drottningholm in 1925 en route to the United States Mauritz Stiller (July 17, 1883 – November 18, 1928) was an actor, screenwriter and an influential silent film director. ... Greta Garbo (September 18, 1905 – April 15, 1990) was a Swedish-born actress during Hollywoods silent film period and part of its Golden Age. ... Gösta Berlings saga was Nobel laureate Selma Lagerlöfs first novel, published in 1891. ... UFA logo Universum Film AG, better known as Ufa or UFA, was the principal film studio in Germany, home of the German film industry during the Weimar Republic and through World War II, and a major force in world cinema during its brief existence from 1917 to 1945. ... Michael (also known as Mikaël, Chained: The Story of the Third Sex, and Hearts Desire) was a movie released in 1924 directed by Carl Theodor Dreyer (director of other notable silents such as The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928), Master of the House (1925), and Leaves From... The Last Laugh (Der Letzte Mann) is a 1924 silent film by German director F. W. Murnau and based on a Broadway play by Charles W. Goddard. ... Friedrich Christian Anton Fritz Lang (December 5, 1890 – August 2, 1976) was an Austrian-German-American film director, screenwriter and occasional film producer, one of the best known émigrés from Germanys school of Expressionism. ... Die Nibelungen is a duology of fantasy films created by Austrian director Fritz Lang in 1924. ... Léonce Perret (May 13, 1880 – August 14, 1935) was a prolific and innovative French film actor, director and producer. ... Film poster Madame Sans-Gêne is a 1961 Spanish-Italian-French film co-production distributed by Embassy Pictures. ... Gloria Swanson (March 27, 1899 – April 4, 1983) was an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe-winning American Hollywood actress. ... See also: 1924 in film 1925 1926 in film 1920s in film years in film film Events Top grossing films Ben-Hur His People The Unholy Three The Freshman Movies released Movies released in 1925 include: Ben-Hur, starring Ramon Novarro. ... Lon Chaney (April 1, 1883 – August 26, 1930), nicknamed The Man of a Thousand Faces, was an American actor during the age of silent films. ... Lon Chaney in The Phantom of the Opera The 1925 film version of The Phantom of the Opera, starring Lon Chaney, Sr. ... Sergei Mikhailovich Eisenstein (Russian: Сергей Михайлович Эйзенштейн) (January 23, 1898 – February 11, 1948) was a revolutionary Soviet Russian film director and film theorist noted in particular for his silent films Strike, Battleship Potemkin and Oktober. ... The Battleship Potemkin (Russian: , ), sometimes rendered as The Battleship Potyomkin, is a 1925 silent film directed by Sergei Eisenstein and produced by Mosfilm. ... “WB” redirects here. ... American Vitagraph was a United States movie studio, founded by J. Stuart Blackton and Alfred E. Smith in 1897 and bought by Warner Brothers in 1925. ... The Big Parade is a 1925 silent film which tells the story of an idle rich boy who is shipped off to France to fight World War I, becomes friends with two working class men, experiences the horrors of trench warfare, and finds love with a French girl. ... King Vidor King Wallis Vidor (February 8, 1894 – November 1, 1982) was an American film director. ... Irving Grant Thalberg (May 30, 1899 – September 14, 1936) was an American film producer during the early years of motion pictures. ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... UFA logo Universum Film AG, better known as Ufa or UFA, was the principal film studio in Germany, home of the German film industry during the Weimar Republic and through World War II, and a major force in world cinema during its brief existence from 1917 to 1945. ... Herr Tartüff is a German silent film produced by Erich Pommer for UFA and released in 1926. ... Variety (original title: Varieté) is a 1925 silent drama film directed by Ewald Andre Dupont based on the novel Der Eid des Stephan Huller by Felix Hollaender. ... UFA logo Universum Film AG, better known as Ufa or UFA, was the principal film studio in Germany, home of the German film industry during the Weimar Republic and through World War II, and a major force in world cinema during its brief existence from 1917 to 1945. ... For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... This article is about the 1925 film. ... Prehistory (Greek words προ = before and ιστορία = history) is the period of human history prior to the advent of writing (which marks the beginning of recorded history). ... Orders Saurischia    Sauropodomorpha    Theropoda Ornithischia Dinosaurs are giant reptiles that dominated the terrestrial ecosystem for most of their 165-million year existence. ... The Lost World is a 1912 novel by Arthur Conan Doyle concerning an expedition to a plateau (native name is Tepuyes) in South America (Venezuela) where prehistoric animals (dinosaurs and other extinct creatures) still survive. ... // August - Warner Brothers debuts the first Vitaphone film, Don Juan. ... For other uses, see Don Juan (disambiguation). ... This article is about John Barrymore, Sr. ... Greta Garbo (September 18, 1905 – April 15, 1990) was a Swedish-born actress during Hollywoods silent film period and part of its Golden Age. ... Torrent is a 1926 silent American film directed by an uncredited Monta Bell based on a novel by Vicente Blasco Ibáñez. ... The Temptress is a 1926 American silent romantic drama film directed by Fred Niblo. ... Flesh and the Devil is a classic 1926 movie starring Greta Garbo and John Gilbert. ... Rudolph Valentino (May 6, 1895 – August 23, 1926) was an Italian actor, sex symbol, and early pop icon. ... Poster for The Son of the Sheik. The Son of the Sheik was a 1926 silent movie directed by George Fitzmaurice and starring Rudolph Valentino and Vilma Banky. ... UFA logo Universum Film AG, better known as Ufa or UFA, was the principal film studio in Germany, home of the German film industry during the Weimar Republic and through World War II, and a major force in world cinema during its brief existence from 1917 to 1945. ... F W Murnau Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau (December 28, 1888 - March 11, 1931) was one of the most influential directors of the silent film era. ... Faust is a classic silent film produced in 1926 by UFA, directed by F.W. Murnau, starring Gösta Ekman as Faust, Emil Jannings as Mephisto, Camilla Horn as Gretchen/Marguerite, Frida Richard as her mother, Wilhelm Dieterle as her brother and Yvette Guilbert as Marthe Schwerdtlein, her aunt. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Vsevolod Pudovkin Vsevolod Illarionovich Pudovkin (Russian Всеволод Илларионович Пудовкин) (February 16, 1893 - June 20, 1953) was a Russian film director who developed influential theories of montage. ... Mother was a 1996 movie starring Albert Brooks and Debbie Reynolds. ... See also: 1926 in film 1927 1928 in film 1920s in film years in film film // Events January 10 - The film Metropolis by Fritz Lang premieres. ... Al Jolson (May 26, 1886–October 23, 1950) was a highly acclaimed American singer, comedian and actor of Jewish heritage whose career lasted from 1911 until his death in 1950. ... The Jazz Singer (1927) is a U.S. movie musical and the first feature-length motion picture with talking sequences. ... Joseph Frank Buster Keaton (October 4, 1895 – February 1, 1966) was an Academy Award-winning American comic actor and filmmaker. ... The General is a 1927 silent comedy about a bumbling Confederate engineer (train driver) who pursues Union spies who steal his beloved locomotive, The General, which incidentally also carries his estranged girlfriend as well. ... Friedrich Christian Anton Fritz Lang (December 5, 1890 – August 2, 1976) was an Austrian-German-American film director, screenwriter and occasional film producer, one of the best known émigrés from Germanys school of Expressionism. ... Metropolis is a very early science fiction film that was produced in Germany during the brief years of the Weimar Republic. ... UFA logo Universum Film AG, better known as Ufa or UFA, was the principal film studio in Germany, home of the German film industry during the Weimar Republic and through World War II, and a major force in world cinema during its brief existence from 1917 to 1945. ... UFA logo Universum Film AG, better known as Ufa or UFA, was the principal film studio in Germany, home of the German film industry during the Weimar Republic and through World War II, and a major force in world cinema during its brief existence from 1917 to 1945. ... The Cinematograph Films Act of 1927 was an act of the United Kingdom Parliament designed to stimulate the declining British film industry. ... See also: 1927 in film 1928 1929 in film 1920s in film years in film film // Events Although some movies released in 1928 had sound, most were still silent. ... For other uses, see Cartoon (disambiguation). ... Dinner Time is a 1928 animated short subject produced and directed by Paul Terry and co-directed by John Foster. ... Steamboat Willie (1928) is an animated cartoon featuring Mickey Mouse released on November 18, 1928. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... The Lights of New York (1928) was the first ever feature film that had complete sound sychronization. ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... Logo celebrating Technicolors 90th Anniversary Technicolor is the trademark for a series of color film processes pioneered by Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation (a subsidiary of Technicolor, Inc. ... The Viking (1928) was the first sound feature film made in color. ... Sergei Mikhailovich Eisenstein (Russian: Сергей Михайлович Эйзенштейн) (January 23, 1898 – February 11, 1948) was a revolutionary Soviet Russian film director and film theorist noted in particular for his silent films Strike, Battleship Potemkin and Oktober. ... October: Ten Days That Shook The World (Russian: ; transliteration: ) is a Soviet silent film made in 1927 by Sergei Eisenstein, sometimes referred to simply as October in English. ... See also: 1928 in film 1929 1930 in film 1920s in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events The days of the silent film were numbered. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Wings is a 1927 silent movie about World War I fighter pilots produced and released by Paramount Pictures. ... ©A.M.P.A.S.® The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to artists working in the motion picture industry. ... Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans (aka Sunrise) is a 1927 American film directed by F.W. Murnau. ... The Academy Award for Unique and Artistic Production has also been known as Best Artistic Quality of Production. It was only awarded during the first year of the Oscars, and may be considered as a redundant variation of Best Picture. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí i Domènech, 1st Marquis of Púbol (May 11, 1904 – January 23, 1989), was a Spanish surrealist painter of Catalan descent born in Figueres, Catalonia (Spain). ... Un Chien Andalou (English: An Andalusian Dog) is a 16-minute[1] surrealist film made in France in 1928 by Spanish writer/directors Luis Buñuel and Salvador Dalí, and released in 1929 in Paris. ... Louise Brooks (14 November 1906 – 8 August 1985) was an American dancer, showgirl, and silent film actress. ... Georg Wilhelm Pabst (August 25, 1885 - May 29, 1967) was a film director. ... Pandoras Box (Die Büchse der Pandora) was a German silent film directed by G.W. Pabst and released in 1929. ... Color Fragment from Film. ... “WB” redirects here. ... Winnie Lightner and Albert Gran. ... Sergei Mikhailovich Eisenstein (Russian: Сергей Михайлович Эйзенштейн) (January 23, 1898 – February 11, 1948) was a revolutionary Soviet Russian film director and film theorist noted in particular for his silent films Strike, Battleship Potemkin and Oktober. ... The General Line aka Old and New (original title: Staroye i novoye) is a 1929 Soviet film directed by Sergei Eisenstein. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... For other uses, see Blackmail (disambiguation). ...

1930s

See also: 1930s in film The decade of the 1930s in film involved many significant films. ...

See also: 1929 in film 1930 1931 in film 1930s in film 1920s in film years in film film // Events Top grossing films The Indians Are Coming Madam Satan Der Blaue Engel Academy Awards Best Picture: All Quiet on the Western Front - Universal Studios Best Actress: Norma Shearer - The Divorcee... Kaleidoscopic Choreography from Footlight Parade, 1933 Busby Berkeley (November 29, 1895 – March 14, 1976), born William Berkeley Enos in Los Angeles, California, was a highly influential Hollywood movie director and musical choreographer. ... One of 12 Eddie Cantor caricatures by Frederick J. Garner for a 1933 Brown & Bigelow advertising card set. ... The Production Code (also known as the Hays Code) was a set of industry guidelines governing the production of American motion pictures. ... Marlene Dietrich IPA: ; (December 27, 1901 – May 6, 1992) was a German-born American actress, singer and entertainer. ... Josef von Sternberg (29 May 1894 – 22 December 1969) was an Austrian-American film director. ... Der Blaue Engel (English: The Blue Angel) is a film directed by Josef von Sternberg in 1930, and is one of the most famous films made by Marlene Dietrich. ... A sound film (or talkie) is a motion picture with synchronized sound, as opposed to a silent movie. ... “WB” redirects here. ... Looney Tunes opening title Looney Tunes is a Warner Brothers animated cartoon series which ran in many movie theatres from 1930 to 1969. ... This article is about the Warner Bros. ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... The Rogue Song is a 1930 musical romance film which tells the story of a Russian bandit who falls in love with a princess, but takes his revenge on her when her brother rapes and kills his sister. ... Logo celebrating Technicolors 90th Anniversary Technicolor is the trademark for a series of color film processes pioneered by Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation (a subsidiary of Technicolor, Inc. ... Logo celebrating Technicolors 90th Anniversary Technicolor is the trademark for a series of color film processes pioneered by Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation (a subsidiary of Technicolor, Inc. ... // Frankenstein, starring Boris Karloff Ingagi, starring Sir Hubert Winstead Mata Hari, starring Greta Garbo and Lionel Barrymore City Lights starring Charles Chaplin Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde starring Fredric March Best Picture: Cimarron - MGM Best Actor: Lionel Barrymore - A Free Soul Best Actor: Wallace Beery - The Champ Best Actor: Fredric... Laurel and Hardy, in a promotional still from their 1937 feature film Way Out West. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Friedrich Christian Anton Fritz Lang (December 5, 1890 – August 2, 1976) was an Austrian-German-American film director, screenwriter and occasional film producer, one of the best known émigrés from Germanys school of Expressionism. ... M is a 1931 German film directed by Fritz Lang and written by Lang and his wife Thea von Harbou. ... Peter Lorre (June 26, 1904 – March 23, 1964), born László Löwenstein, was an Hungarian[1] - Austrian - American actor frequently typecast as a sinister foreigner. ... Darryl Francis Zanuck (September 5, 1902–December 22, 1979) was a producer, writer, actor and director who played a major part in the Hollywood studio system as one of its longest survivors (the length of his career being rivalled only by that of Adolph Zukor). ... “WB” redirects here. ... Merrie Melodies end title Merrie Melodies is the name of a series of animated cartoons distributed by Warner Bros. ... Manoel Cândido Pinto de Oliveira is a Portuguese film director born in Oporto on December 12, 1908. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... José Leitão de Barros (Lisbon, 22 October 1896 — , 29 June 1967) was a Portuguese film director and playwright. ... A Severa is a Portuguese 1931 film, directed by Leitão de Barros, famous for being the first Portuguese sound film, a biopic of the fado singer Maria Severa Onofriana, known as A Severa, based on the novel by Júlio Dantas. ... See also: 1931 in film 1932 1933 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events Shirley Temples film career begins Disney released Flowers and Trees their first cartoon in three-strip Technicolor film. ... For the cocktail named after this person, see Shirley Temple cocktail. ... Katharine Houghton Hepburn (May 12, 1907 – June 29, 2003) was an American actress of film, television and stage. ... Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the Academy Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognize an actress who has delivered an outstanding performance while working within the film industry. ... George Dewey Cukor (July 7, 1899 – January 24, 1983) was an American film director. ... Katharine Hepburn and David Manners in A Bill of Divorcement A Bill of Divorcement was a British play written by Clemence Dane that debuted in 1921 in London. ... Betty Boop from the opening title sequence of the earliest entries in the Betty Boop Cartoons Betty Boop is an animated cartoon character appearing in the Talkartoon and Betty Boop series of films produced by Max Fleischer and released by Paramount Pictures. ... Cab Calloway and His Orchestra, from the opening credits of Max Fleischers Minnie the Moocher, which included a recording of the titular Calloway song. ... The Venice Film Festival ( ) is the oldest film festival in the world. ... See also: 1932 in film 1933 1934 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events British Film Institute founded. ... MAE-West is a major Internet peering point located in San Jose, California. ... Original promotional poster. ... She Done Him Wrong is a Pre-Code 1933 Paramount Pictures comedy/romance motion picture starring Mae West and Cary Grant. ... For the film of this name, see 42nd Street (film). ... Richard Ewing Dick Powell (November 14, 1904 – January 2, 1963) was an American singer, actor, producer, and director. ... Ruby Keeler, born Ethel Hilda Keeler, (August 25, 1909 – February 28, 1993), was an actress, singer, and dancer most famous for her on-screen coupling with Dick Powell in a string of successful early musicals at Warner Brothers. ... Ginger Rogers (Virginia Katherine McMath, July 16, 1911 – April 25, 1995) was an Academy Award-winning American film and stage actress and singer. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... Flowers and Trees was the first animated cartoon to be produced in the full-color three-strip Technicolor process. ... Logo celebrating Technicolors 90th Anniversary Technicolor is the trademark for a series of color film processes pioneered by Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation (a subsidiary of Technicolor, Inc. ... Hedy Lamarr (November 9, 1913 – January 19, 2000) was an Austrian/Jewish-American actress and communications technology innovator. ... Ecstasy (or Extáze in Czech) is an Austrian-Czech film made in 1933 by the Austro-Czech director Gustav Machatý. It stars Hedy Lamarr, credited under her original surname Kiesler, and Zvonimir Rogoz. ... Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska,[1] was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer and actor. ... Ginger Rogers (Virginia Katherine McMath, July 16, 1911 – April 25, 1995) was an Academy Award-winning American film and stage actress and singer. ... Flying Down to Rio is a musical film made by RKO and released on December 29, 1933. ... This is about the original movie and novel. ... Merian C. Cooper Merian Caldwell Cooper (October 24, 1893, Jacksonville, Florida, USA — April 21, 1973, San Diego, California, USA, died of cancer) was an American aviator, American Air Force and Polish Air Force officer, adventurer, director, screenwriter and producer. ... For other uses, see King Kong (disambiguation). ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Barbara Stanwyck (July 16, 1907 – January 20, 1990) was a four-time Academy Award-nominated, three-time Emmy Award-winning, and Golden Globe-winning American actress of film, stage, and screen. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the comedian siblings. ... Dinner at Eight is a 1932 Broadway play written George S. Kaufman and Edna Ferber. ... Dancing Lady is a 1933 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer musical comedy film starring Joan Crawford, Clark Gable and Franchot Tone, as well as Robert Benchley, Nelson Eddy, Fred Astaire, and Ted Healy and his Three Stooges. ... For other persons named Joan Crawford, see Joan Crawford (disambiguation). ... William Clark Gable (February 1, 1901 – November 16, 1960) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... Queen Christina can refer to: Christina of Sweden, a 17th century monarch Queen Christina, a 1933 film loosely based upon her life, starring Greta Garbo. ... Greta Garbo (September 18, 1905 – April 15, 1990) was a Swedish-born actress during Hollywoods silent film period and part of its Golden Age. ... For the Katie Melua song, see Mary Pickford (Used to Eat Roses). ... Secrets can mean several things: Secrets (album), an 1996 album by Toni Braxton Secrets (2004 album), a 2004 album by Allison Crowe Secrets (film), a 1933 film starring Mary Pickford Secrets (1992 film), a 1992 film starring Noah Taylor Secrets (band), a Virginia, United States fusion jazz band Secrets (novel... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... Darryl Francis Zanuck (September 5, 1902–December 22, 1979) was a producer, writer, actor and director who played a major part in the Hollywood studio system as one of its longest survivors (the length of his career being rivalled only by that of Adolph Zukor). ... The Private Life of Henry VIII is a 1933 film nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The British Film Institute (BFI) is a charitable organisation established by Royal Charter to encourage the development of the arts of film, television and the moving image throughout the United Kingdom, to promote their use as a record of contemporary life and manners, to promote education about film, television and... Comedy film is genre of film in which the main emphasis is on humor. ... A Canção de Lisboa (lit. ... For other uses, see Popeye (disambiguation). ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Mack Sennett (1880 - 1960) Mack Sennett (January 17, 1880 – November 5, 1960) was an innovator of slapstick comedy in film. ... Hulls Drive In Theatre, outside Lexington, Virginia A drive-in theater is a form of cinema structure consisting of a large screen, a projection booth, a concession stand and a large parking area for automobiles. ... See also: 1933 in film 1934 1935 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events January 26 - Samuel Goldwyn (of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer) finally purchased the film rights to The Wizard of Oz from Frank J. Baum for $40,000. ... It Happened One Night is a 1934 romantic comedy directed by Frank Capra, in which a pampered socialite (Claudette Colbert) tries to get out from under her fathers thumb, and falls in love with a roguish reporter (Clark Gable). ... This article is about the film director. ... William Clark Gable (February 1, 1901 – November 16, 1960) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... Claudette Colbert (September 13, 1903 – July 30, 1996) was an Academy Award-winning French-born American actress. ... Samuel Goldwyn (July 1882 (some sources say 17 August 1882, others 1879 [1]) – 31 January 1974) was an Academy Award and Golden Globe Award-winning producer, also a well-known Hollywood motion picture producer and founding contributor of several motion picture studios. ... The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a childrens novel written by L. Frank Baum and illustrated by W.W. Denslow. ... For the cocktail named after this person, see Shirley Temple cocktail. ... The Production Code (also known as the Hays Code) was a set of industry guidelines governing the production of American motion pictures. ... Tarzan and His Mate is a Tarzan film based on the character created by Edgar Rice Burroughs. ... Viva Villa! is a 1934 movie that was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. ... Black Cat can mean: Black cat, a symbol historically associated with witchcraft and evil. ... Boris Karloff (born William Henry Pratt) (November 23, 1887 – February 2, 1969) was an English actor who emigrated to Canada in the 1910s. ... Bela Lugosi as Dracula United States stamp. ... Cleopatra is a 1934 film retelling the story of Cleopatra VII of Egypt. ... The claim is made (under the heading Personal Life) that DeMille was in negotiations with MGM to direct Ben-Hur at the time of his death in January, 1959. ... Claudette Colbert (September 13, 1903 – July 30, 1996) was an Academy Award-winning French-born American actress. ... The Gay Divorcee is a 1934 film that was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. ... Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska,[1] was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer and actor. ... Ginger Rogers (Virginia Katherine McMath, July 16, 1911 – April 25, 1995) was an Academy Award-winning American film and stage actress and singer. ... LAtalante is a 1934 French film directed by Jean Vigo and starring Jean Dasté, Dita Parlo and Michel Simon. ... Jean Vigo (April 26, 1905 – October 5, 1934) was a short-lived French film director, who helped in the establishment of poetic realism in film in the 1930s and went on to be a posthumous influence on the French nouvelle vague of the late 1950s and early 1960s. ... Of Human Bondage (1915) is a novel by William Somerset Maugham. ... Leslie Howard (April 3, 1893 - June 1, 1943) was an English stage and Academy Award nominated film actor. ... This article is about the actress. ... The Scarlet Empress is a 1934 film directed by Josef von Sternberg and starring Marlene Dietrich as Catherine the Great. ... Josef von Sternberg (29 May 1894 – 22 December 1969) was an Austrian-American film director. ... Marlene Dietrich IPA: ; (December 27, 1901 – May 6, 1992) was a German-born American actress, singer and entertainer. ... The Thin Man (1934) is a hardboiled detective novel by Dashiell Hammett. ... William Horatio Powell (July 29, 1892 - March 5, 1984) was an American actor, noted for his sophisticated, cynical roles. ... Myrna Loy (August 2, 1905 – December 14, 1993) was an American motion picture actress. ... The Venice Film Festival ( ) is the oldest film festival in the world. ... See also: 1934 in film 1935 1936 in film 1930s in film years in film film Events Judy Garland signs a contract with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM). ... Duke Ellington wearing a top hat. ... Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska,[1] was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer and actor. ... Ginger Rogers (Virginia Katherine McMath, July 16, 1911 – April 25, 1995) was an Academy Award-winning American film and stage actress and singer. ... William Clark Gable (February 1, 1901 – November 16, 1960) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... For other uses, see Mutiny on the Bounty (disambiguation). ... Greta Garbo (September 18, 1905 – April 15, 1990) was a Swedish-born actress during Hollywoods silent film period and part of its Golden Age. ... Anna Karenina is a critically acclaimed 1935 drama film, directed by Clarence Brown. ... Triumph of the Will (German: Triumph des Willens) is a propaganda film by the German filmmaker Leni Riefenstahl. ... Helene Bertha Amalie Leni Riefenstahl (August 22, 1902 – September 8, 2003) was a German film director, dancer and actress, and widely noted for her aesthetics and advances in film technique. ... Logo celebrating Technicolors 90th Anniversary Technicolor is the trademark for a series of color film processes pioneered by Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation (a subsidiary of Technicolor, Inc. ... RKO could stand for: RKO Pictures The R.K.O. - finishing manoever (and initials) of WWE professional wrestler Randy Orton. ... Becky Sharp is the main character in the novel Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray, first published in 1847. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... Related articles FOX Television Network Fox Searchlight Pictures Fox Entertainment Group List of Hollywood movie studios List of movies Variant of current 20th Century Fox logo External links 20th Century Fox Movies official site Twentieth Century Fox is also the punning title of a song by The Doors on their... See also: 1935 in film 1936 1937 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events January 6 - first Porky Pig animated cartoon September 28 - The Marx Brothers Harpo Marx marries actress Susan Fleming Top grossing films in North America Red River Valley Academy Awards Best Picture: The Great... The April 18, 1906 San Francisco earthquake is the historical background for San Francisco, a 1936 movie romance film between Blackie Norton, a gambling hall tycoon, played by Clark Gable, and a promising but impoverished singer, from Colorado, Mary Blake, portrayed by singer Jeanette MacDonald. ... William Clark Gable (February 1, 1901 – November 16, 1960) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... Spencer Tracy (April 5, 1900 – June 10, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor who appeared in 74 films from 1930 to 1967. ... Jeanette MacDonald Jeanette MacDonald (June 18, 1903 – January 14, 1965) was a singer and actress best remembered for her musical films of the 1930s with Maurice Chevalier (Love Me Tonight, The Merry Widow) and Nelson Eddy (Naughty Marietta, Rose Marie, and Maytime). ... Rose Marie is an operetta with music by Rudolf Friml and Herbert Stothart, and a libretto by Otto Harbach and Oscar Hammerstein II. The work was first produced on Broadway on September 2, 1924, running for a very successful 557 performances. ... Nelson Eddy Nelson Ackerman Eddy (born June 29, 1901; died March 6, 1967) was an American singer who appeared in 19 musical films during the 1930s and 1940s, as well as in opera and on the concert stage, radio, television, and in nightclubs. ... Categories: Movie stubs | 1936 films | Drama films | Musical films | Biographical films | Best Picture Oscar | Best Actress Oscar (film) ... William Horatio Powell (July 29, 1892 - March 5, 1984) was an American actor, noted for his sophisticated, cynical roles. ... Myrna Loy (August 2, 1905 – December 14, 1993) was an American motion picture actress. ... Luise Rainer in The Great Ziegfeld (1936) Luise Rainer (born January 12, 1910 in either Düsseldorf, Germany or Vienna, Austria) is a two-time Academy Award-winning film actress. ... Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska,[1] was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer and actor. ... Ginger Rogers (Virginia Katherine McMath, July 16, 1911 – April 25, 1995) was an Academy Award-winning American film and stage actress and singer. ... Follow the Fleet (RKO) is a 1936 Hollywood musical comedy film with a nautical theme and stars Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, Randolph Scott, Harriet Hilliard, Lucille Ball, and Betty Grable, with music and lyrics by Irving Berlin. ... This article is about the film. ... Greta Garbo (September 18, 1905 – April 15, 1990) was a Swedish-born actress during Hollywoods silent film period and part of its Golden Age. ... Camille is an American 1936 drama film directed by George Cukor and produced by Irving Thalberg and Bernard H. Hyman, from a screenplay by James Hilton, Zoe Akins and Frances Marion. ... Porky Pig is an Academy Award-nominated animated cartoon character in the Warner Bros. ... Thelma Todd cigarette card Thelma Todd (July 29, 1905 – December 16, 1935) was a popular American actress of the late 1920s and early 1930s film. ... Patsy Kelly was an American film comedienne, who was born in Brooklyn, New York on January 12, 1910. ... Mickey Daniels was a regular on the Our Gang short series during the silent film era. ... Flash Gordon is a 1936 film serial which tells the story of three people from Earth who travel to the planet Mongo to fight the evil Emperor Ming the Merciless. ... Buster Crabbe Buster Crabbe (February 7, 1908 – April 23, 1983) was an American athlete turned actor, who starred in a number of popular serials in the 1930s and 1940s. ... See also: 1936 in film 1937 category:1937 films 1938 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events April 16 - Way Out West premieres in the US. May 7 - Shall We Dance premieres in the US. Top grossing films Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs Conquest Damaged Lives... Luise Rainer in The Great Ziegfeld (1936) Luise Rainer (born January 12, 1910 in either Düsseldorf, Germany or Vienna, Austria) is a two-time Academy Award-winning film actress. ... Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs is a 1937 animated feature, the first produced by Walt Disney. ... Conquest (also called Marie Walewska) is a 1937 film which tells the story of a Polish countess who becomes the mistress of Napoleon in order to influence his actions towards her homeland. ... Grand Illusion (1937) poster for American release, depicting actors Jean Gabin (as Lt. ... Jean Renoir Jean Renoir (September 15, 1894 – February 12, 1979), born in the Montmartre Quarter of Paris, France was a film director. ... Pépé le Moko is a 1937 film directed by Julien Duvivier and starring Jean Gabin. ... DVD cover showing stars Janet Gaynor and Fredric March. ... Janet Gaynor (October 6, 1906 – September 14, 1984) was an American actress who, in 1928, became the first winner of the Academy Award for Best Actress for her three most prominent films: Sunrise (1927), Seventh Heaven (1927), and Street Angel (1928). ... Fredric March (August 31, 1897 – April 14, 1975) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Barbara Stanwyck (July 16, 1907 – January 20, 1990) was a four-time Academy Award-nominated, three-time Emmy Award-winning, and Golden Globe-winning American actress of film, stage, and screen. ... The Awful Truth is a 1937 romantic comedy (also screwball comedy) film. ... Irene Dunne (December 20, 1898 - September 4, 1990) was a five-time Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer of the 1930s and 1940s. ... For the vocal coach, see Carrie Grant. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... See also: 1937 in film 1937 1939 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events January — MGM announces that Judy Garland would be cast in the role of Dorothy in the upcoming Wizard of Oz motion picture. ... Spencer Tracy (April 5, 1900 – June 10, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor who appeared in 74 films from 1930 to 1967. ... Boys Town is a 1938 film based on Father Flanagans work with a group of disadvantaged and dilinquent boys in a home that he founded and named Boys Town. ... This article is about the actress. ... Jezebel is a 1938 film that tells the story of a headstrong young Southern woman during the years prior to the American Civil War, and how her actions cost her the love of the man she truly loves. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Adventures of Robin Hood is an American film released in 1938 and directed by Michael Curtiz and William Keighley. ... Logo celebrating Technicolors 90th Anniversary Technicolor is the trademark for a series of color film processes pioneered by Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation (a subsidiary of Technicolor, Inc. ... Errol Leslie Thomson Flynn (June 20, 1909 – October 14, 1959) was an Australian film actor, most famous for his romantic swashbuckler roles in Hollywood films and his flamboyant lifestyle. ... Olivia Mary de Havilland (born July 1, 1916) is a two-time Academy Award winning actress in American motion pictures and is the last surviving principal cast member from Gone with the Wind. ... Sergei Mikhailovich Eisenstein (Russian: Сергей Михайлович Эйзенштейн) (January 23, 1898 – February 11, 1948) was a revolutionary Soviet Russian film director and film theorist noted in particular for his silent films Strike, Battleship Potemkin and Oktober. ... For other uses, see Alexander Nevsky (disambiguation). ... For the vocal coach, see Carrie Grant. ... Katharine Houghton Hepburn (May 12, 1907 – June 29, 2003) was an American actress of film, television and stage. ... Howard Winchester Hawks (May 30, 1896 – December 26, 1977) was an American film director, producer and writer of the classic Hollywood era. ... Bringing up Baby is a 1938 screwball comedy which tells the story of a scientist who winds up in various predicaments with a woman who has a unique sense of logic and a leopard named Baby. ... George Dewey Cukor (July 7, 1899 – January 24, 1983) was an American film director. ... Holiday is a 1938 remake of the 1930 film of the same name—a romantic comedy which tells the story of a playboy who is torn between his free-thinking lifestyle and the tradition of his wealthy fiancées family. ... Katharine Houghton Hepburn (May 12, 1907 – June 29, 2003) was an American actress of film, television and stage. ... Greta Garbo (September 18, 1905 – April 15, 1990) was a Swedish-born actress during Hollywoods silent film period and part of its Golden Age. ... For other persons named Joan Crawford, see Joan Crawford (disambiguation). ... Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska,[1] was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer and actor. ... Marlene Dietrich IPA: ; (December 27, 1901 – May 6, 1992) was a German-born American actress, singer and entertainer. ... MAE-West is a major Internet peering point located in San Jose, California. ... Helene Bertha Amalie Leni Riefenstahl (August 22, 1902 – September 8, 2003) was a German film director, dancer and actress, and widely noted for her aesthetics and advances in film technique. ... Olympia is a 1938 film by Leni Riefenstahl documenting the 1936 Summer Olympics. ... The year 1939 in film involved some significant events. ... ... Annus Mirabilis is a Latin expression which means miraculous year. ... William Clark Gable (February 1, 1901 – November 16, 1960) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... Vivien Leigh, Lady Olivier (November 5, 1913 – July 8, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award winning English actress. ... For the novel, see Gone with the Wind. ... For other uses, see Over the Rainbow (disambiguation). ... The Wizard of Oz (film) redirects here. ... For other persons named John Wayne, see John Wayne (disambiguation). ... Stagecoach is a 1939 western film, starring Claire Trevor and John Wayne in his breakthrough role. ... For other persons named James Stewart, see James Stewart (disambiguation). ... Mr. ... Greta Garbo (September 18, 1905 – April 15, 1990) was a Swedish-born actress during Hollywoods silent film period and part of its Golden Age. ... Ninotchka is a 1939 American film by Ernst Lubitsch, starring Greta Garbo and Melvyn Douglas. ... Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM, (IPA: ; 22 May 1907 – 11 July 1989) was an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA and four-time Emmy winning English actor, director, and producer. ... Merle Oberon (February 19, 1911 – November 23, 1979), born Estelle Merle OBrien Thompson, was an Academy Award-nominated Anglo-Indian film actress. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska,[1] was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer and actor. ... Ginger Rogers (Virginia Katherine McMath, July 16, 1911 – April 25, 1995) was an Academy Award-winning American film and stage actress and singer. ... The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle is a biographical musical comedy starring Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, Edna May Oliver and Walter Brennan. ... Jean Renoir Jean Renoir (September 15, 1894 – February 12, 1979), born in the Montmartre Quarter of Paris, France was a film director. ... The Rules of the Game (original French title: La règle du jeu) is a 1939 film directed by Jean Renoir about upper-class French society just before the start of World War II. The film was initially condemned for its satire on the French upper classes and was greeted... Edith Norma Shearer (August 10, 1902 (some sources indicate 1900) – June 12, 1983) was an Academy Award-winning Canadian-American actress. ... For other persons named Joan Crawford, see Joan Crawford (disambiguation). ... Rosalind Russell (June 4, 1907 – November 28, 1976) was a four-time Academy Award nominated and Tony Award winning American film and stage actress, perhaps best known for her role as a fast-talking newspaper reporter in the Howard Hawks screwball comedy His Girl Friday. ... Paulette Goddard (June 3, 1910 – April 23, 1990),[1] an Oscar-nominated American film and theatre actress. ... Joan Fontaine (born October 22, 1917) is an Academy Award-winning British American actress, who became an American citizen in April 1943. ... The Women is a 1939 comedy film directed by George Cukor. ... George Dewey Cukor (July 7, 1899 – January 24, 1983) was an American film director. ... This article is about the actress. ... DVD cover showing Bette Davis. ... The Cannes Film Festival (French: le Festival de Cannes), founded in 1939, is one of the worlds oldest, most influential and prestigious film festivals. ... The claim is made (under the heading Personal Life) that DeMille was in negotiations with MGM to direct Ben-Hur at the time of his death in January, 1959. ... Union Pacific is a 1939 film about the building of the railroad across the American West. ...

1940s

See also: 1940s in film Other Lists of Movies List of years in film in the 1940s 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 Decades in Film: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s List of movies See also Film, History of cinema Categories: 1940s ...

The year 1940 in film involved some significant events. ... Charles Chaplin redirects here. ... The Great Dictator is a film directed by and starring Charlie Chaplin. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Rebecca by Johannes Takanen, 1877. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... For other uses, see Pinocchio (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Tom and Jerry (disambiguation). ... Bugs Bunny is an animated rabbit/hare who appears in the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of animated films produced by Warner Bros. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... Fantasia is a 1940 motion picture, produced by Walt Disney and first released on November 13, 1940 in the United States. ... Fred Astaire and Eleanor Powell dance to Begin the Beguine in Broadway Melody of 1940. ... Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska,[1] was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer and actor. ... Eleanor Powell, left, in Broadway Melody of 1938. ... Boom Town (1940) was a Hollywood film starring Clark Gable, Spencer Tracy, Claudette Colbert, Hedy Lamarr, and Frank Morgan. ... His Girl Friday is a 1940 screwball comedy, a remake of the 1931 film The Front Page, itself an adaptation by Charles Lederer, Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur of their play of the same name. ... The Philadelphia Story is a 1940 romantic screwball comedy starring Jimmy Stewart, Katharine Hepburn and Cary Grant. ... The Shop Around the Corner (1940) is a romantic comedy film, directed by Ernst Lubitsch, and starring James Stewart and Margaret Sullavan. ... The year 1941 in film involved some significant events. ... Howard Winchester Hawks (May 30, 1896 – December 26, 1977) was an American film director, producer and writer of the classic Hollywood era. ... For the unsuccessful U.S. weapon system, see M247 Sergeant York. ... Alvin York, and his army registration card Alvin Cullum York (December 13, 1887 – September 2, 1964) was a United States soldier, famous as a World War I hero. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Abbott and Costello is the name of a legendary American comedy duo made up of Bud Abbott and Lou Costello. ... Buck Privates is the 1941 comedy/World War II film that turned Bud Abbott and Lou Costello into bonafide movie stars. ... For other persons named John Ford, see John Ford (disambiguation). ... How Green Was My Valley is 1941 film directed by John Ford and based on the Richard Llewellyn novel How Green Was My Valley. ... For the unsuccessful U.S. weapon system, see M247 Sergeant York. ... Gary Cooper (born Frank James Cooper May 7, 1901 – May 13, 1961) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film actor of English heritage. ... Suspicion (1941) is a film noir directed by Alfred Hitchcock starring Cary Grant and Joan Fontaine as a married couple. ... Joan Fontaine (born October 22, 1917) is an Academy Award-winning British American actress, who became an American citizen in April 1943. ... There have been several well-known people named Michael Powell or Mike Powell, including: Mike Powell (writer and filmmaker), creator of the movies Discretion and Chorus Mike Powell (athlete), world record holder in the long jump Michael Powell (director), a British film director of the The Red Shoes (film) Michael... The 49th parallel of north latitude forms part of the International Boundary between Canada and the United States from Manitoba to British Columbia on the Canadian side and from Minnesota to Washington on the U.S. side. ... In The Navy is a 1941 film starring the comedy team of Abbott and Costello. ... Bob Hope, KBE (May 29, 1903 – July 27, 2003), born Leslie Townes Hope, was an English-Born American entertainer who appeared in vaudeville, on Broadway, on radio and television, in movies, and in performing tours for U.S. Military personnel, well known for his good natured humor and career longevity. ... Caught in the Draft is a 1941 comedy/war film, directed by David Butler. ... Keep Em Flying is a 1941 film starring the comedy team of Abbott and Costello. ... George Orson Welles (May 6, 1915 – October 10, 1985) was an Academy Award-winning American director, writer, actor and producer for film, stage, radio and television. ... Citizen Kane is a 1941 classic American dramatic film, the first feature film directed by Orson Welles, who also co-authored the screenplay. ... John Marcellus Huston (August 5, 1906 – August 28, 1987) was an American film director and actor. ... The Maltese Falcon is a 1941 Warner Bros. ... Bogart redirects here. ... Barbara Stanwyck (July 16, 1907 – January 20, 1990) was a four-time Academy Award-nominated, three-time Emmy Award-winning, and Golden Globe-winning American actress of film, stage, and screen. ... Henry Jaynes Fonda (May 16, 1905 – August 12, 1982) was a highly acclaimed Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor, best known for his roles as plain-speaking idealists. ... The Lady Eve is a 1941 romantic screwball comedy film which tells the story of a couple who meet on a luxury liner. ... Disney may refer to: The Walt Disney Company and its divisions, including Walt Disney Pictures. ... Dumbo is a 1941 animated feature film produced by Walt Disney and first released on October 23, 1941 by RKO Radio Pictures. ... Woody Woodpecker, from the opening title sequence for the 1951 short Puny Express. ... See also: 1941 in film 1942 1943 in film 1940s in film years in film film // Events Carole Lombard is killed in a plane crash when returning from a War Bond tour. ... Mrs. ... William Wyler (July 1, 1902 – July 27, 1981) was a prolific, Oscar-winning motion picture director. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Yankee Doodle Dandy is a 1942 biographical film about George M. Cohan, starring James Cagney, Joan Leslie, Walter Huston, Richard Whorf, Irene Manning, George Tobias, Rosemary DeCamp and Jeanne Cagney. ... James Francis Cagney, Jr. ... In Which We Serve is a 1942 war film that tells the story of the British destroyer HMS Torrin, as told in flashbacks by the survivors as they cling to a life raft. ... Sir David Lean KBE (March 25, 1908 – April 16, 1991) was an Academy Award-winning English film director and producer, best remembered for big-screen epics such as Lawrence of Arabia, The Bridge on the River Kwai, Doctor Zhivago and A Passage to India. ... Bambi is a 1942 animated feature produced by Walt Disney and originally released to theatres by RKO Radio Pictures on August 13, 1942. ... This article is about the 1942 film. ... Bogart redirects here. ...   (pronounced in Swedish, but usually IPA: in English) (August 29, 1915 – August 29, 1982) was a three-time Academy Award, two-time Emmy Award, one-time BAFTA, honorary César Award, four-time Golden Globe, two-time David di Donatello, two-time Silver Ribbon, one-time NSFC, two-time NBR... George Orson Welles (May 6, 1915 – October 10, 1985) was an Academy Award-winning American director, writer, actor and producer for film, stage, radio and television. ... The Magnificent Ambersons is an American film released in 1942 and directed by Orson Welles, his second film. ... The Venice Film Festival ( ) is the oldest film festival in the world. ... The year 1943 in film involved some significant events. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... DVD cover for the film The Song of Bernadette is a 1943 film which tells the story of Saint Bernadette Soubirous, who, from February to July 1858 in Lourdes, France, reported eighteen visions of the Blessed Virgin Mary. ... For Whom the Bell Tolls is a 1943 film based on the famous novel by Ernest Hemingway. ... Gary Cooper (born Frank James Cooper May 7, 1901 – May 13, 1961) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film actor of English heritage. ...   (pronounced in Swedish, but usually IPA: in English) (August 29, 1915 – August 29, 1982) was a three-time Academy Award, two-time Emmy Award, one-time BAFTA, honorary César Award, four-time Golden Globe, two-time David di Donatello, two-time Silver Ribbon, one-time NSFC, two-time NBR... This Is the Army is a 1943 American motion picture produced by Hal B. Wallis and Jack L. Warner, and directed by Michael Curtiz. ... Stage Door Canteen is a 1943 film. ... This article is about the 1942 film. ... Michael Curtiz (December 24, 1886 - April 10, 1962) was an Academy Award-winning Hungarian-American film director. ... Lassie Come Home is a 1943 film which tells the story of a poor boys dog who, when sold to a rich nobleman, makes a difficult journey to return home to her original owner. ... This article is about the fictional collie dog character. ... Laurel and Hardy, in a promotional still from their 1937 feature film Way Out West. ... Chip and Dale emerging from a pile of peanuts, from Chip n Dale Rescue Rangers Chip n Dale are two fictional, animated chipmunks created by The Walt Disney Company. ... A standard Droopy opening title card from the early 1950s. ... Ossessione 1943 Ossessione (Luchino Visconti, 1943) is generally considered to be the first Neorealist film. ... // July 20 - Since You Went Away is released. ... Going My Way, a 1944 Academy Award winning film directed by Leo McCarey and starring Bing Crosby. ... Harry Lillis “Bing” Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American popular singer and Academy Award-winning actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Leo McCarey (October 3, 1898 - July 5, 1969) was a movie director, screenwriter and producer. ... A poster for the 1931 Our Gang comedy Love Business featuring depictions of (from left to right): Pete the Pup, Jackie Cooper, and Norman Chubby Chaney. ... Gaslight is a 1944 film, considered film noir, directed by George Cukor starring Ingrid Bergman and Charles Boyer. ...   (pronounced in Swedish, but usually IPA: in English) (August 29, 1915 – August 29, 1982) was a three-time Academy Award, two-time Emmy Award, one-time BAFTA, honorary César Award, four-time Golden Globe, two-time David di Donatello, two-time Silver Ribbon, one-time NSFC, two-time NBR... Meet Me in St. ... Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 - June 22, 1969) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ... The Ruptured Duck, which was the bomber depicted in the movie Nose-art of the Ruptured Duck Thirty Seconds over Tokyo is a 1944 film based on a 1943 book by Ted W. Lawson. ... Double Indemnity is a 1944 film noir. ... Fred MacMurray (August 30, 1908 – November 5, 1991) was an actor who appeared in over one hundred movies and a highly successful television series during a career that lasted from the 1930s to the 1970s. ... Barbara Stanwyck (July 16, 1907 – January 20, 1990) was a four-time Academy Award-nominated, three-time Emmy Award-winning, and Golden Globe-winning American actress of film, stage, and screen. ... Edward Goldenberg Robinson (born Emanuel Goldenberg, Yiddish: עמנואל גולדנברג; December 12, 1893 – January 26, 1973) was an American stage and film actor of Romanian origin. ... Laura, a 1944 film noir, tells the story of a police detective investigating a womans murder who falls in love with her portrait. ... Gene Tierney (November 19, 1920 – November 6, 1991) was an American film and stage actress. ... Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM, (IPA: ; 22 May 1907 – 11 July 1989) was an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA and four-time Emmy winning English actor, director, and producer. ... Henry V is a 1944 film adaptation of William Shakespeares play Henry V. The on-screen title is The Chronicle History of King Henry the Fift with His Battell Fought at Agincourt in France (the title of the 1600 quarto edition of the play). ... Ivan IV (August 25, 1530–March 18, 1584) was the first ruler of Russia to assume the title of tsar. ... Sergei Mikhailovich Eisenstein (Russian: Сергей Михайлович Эйзенштейн) (January 23, 1898–February 11, 1948) was a Russian director noted for his films Battleship Potemkin and Oktober, both based loosely on a true story and presented in a realistic fashion, causing an immeasurable influence on early documentary directors owing to his innovative... // Paramount Studios releases theatrical short cartoon titled The Friendly Ghost, featuring ghost named Casper With Rossellinis Roma Città aperta, Italian neorealist cinema begins. ... The Bells of St. ... Leo McCarey (October 3, 1898 - July 5, 1969) was a movie director, screenwriter and producer. ... Going My Way, a 1944 Academy Award winning film directed by Leo McCarey and starring Bing Crosby. ... Harry Lillis “Bing” Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American popular singer and Academy Award-winning actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ...   (pronounced in Swedish, but usually IPA: in English) (August 29, 1915 – August 29, 1982) was a three-time Academy Award, two-time Emmy Award, one-time BAFTA, honorary César Award, four-time Golden Globe, two-time David di Donatello, two-time Silver Ribbon, one-time NSFC, two-time NBR... Mom and Dad is a 1945 American film directed by William Beaudine and marketed by Kroger Babb. ... Howard W. Kroger Babb (December 30, 1906 - January 28, 1980) was an American film and television producer. ... Billy Wilder (June 22, 1906 – March 27, 2002) was an Austrian-born, Jewish-American journalist, screenwriter, film director, and producer whose career spanned more than 50 years and 60 films. ... Ray Milland (January 3, 1905 or 1907 – March 10, 1986) was an Oscar-winning Welsh actor and director who worked primarily in the United States. ... For other persons named Joan Crawford, see Joan Crawford (disambiguation). ... Mildred Pierce is an American film noir released in 1945 and directed by Michael Curtiz. ... Black Friday, October 5, 1945 Hollywood Black Friday is the name given, in the history of organized labor in the United States, to October 5, 1945. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Spellbound is a 1945 psychological thriller and mystery film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ... Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí i Domènech, 1st Marquis of Púbol (May 11, 1904 – January 23, 1989), was a Spanish surrealist painter of Catalan descent born in Figueres, Catalonia (Spain). ... Gregory Peck (April 5, 1916 – June 12, 2003) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ...   (pronounced in Swedish, but usually IPA: in English) (August 29, 1915 – August 29, 1982) was a three-time Academy Award, two-time Emmy Award, one-time BAFTA, honorary César Award, four-time Golden Globe, two-time David di Donatello, two-time Silver Ribbon, one-time NSFC, two-time NBR... Leave Her to Heaven is a 1945 20th Century Fox film noir motion picture starring Gene Tierney, Cornel Wilde, and Jeanne Crain, with Vincent Price, Darryl Hickman, and Chill Wills. ... Gene Tierney (November 19, 1920 – November 6, 1991) was an American film and stage actress. ... Sir David Lean KBE (March 25, 1908 – April 16, 1991) was an Academy Award-winning English film director and producer, best remembered for big-screen epics such as Lawrence of Arabia, The Bridge on the River Kwai, Doctor Zhivago and A Passage to India. ... This article is about the 1945 film. ... Brief Encounter is a 1945 British film about the mores of British suburban life, centering on a housewife for whom real love (as opposed to the polite arrangement of her marriage) was an unexpectedly violent thing. ... Rome, Open City (Italian: Roma, Città Aperta) is a 1945 Italian film, directed by Roberto Rossellini. ... National Velvet is a 1944 film based on the novel by Enid Bagnold, first published in 1935. ... For other persons named Elizabeth Taylor, see Elizabeth Taylor (disambiguation). ... Casper may mean: // Casper (name) Drew Casper, an award-winning Professor of Critical Studies in the School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California. ... See also: 1945 in film 1946 1947 in film 1940s in film years in film film // Events Top grossing films North America The Bells of St. ... This article is about the film director. ... For other uses, see Its a Wonderful Life (disambiguation). ... The Bells of St. ... Leave Her to Heaven is a 1945 20th Century Fox film noir motion picture starring Gene Tierney, Cornel Wilde, and Jeanne Crain, with Vincent Price, Darryl Hickman, and Chill Wills. ... The Best Years of Our Lives is a 1946 movie about three servicemen (an air force officer, an infantry sergeant, and an ordinary sailor) trying to piece their lives back together after coming back home from World War II. It is based on a novel by MacKinlay Kantor, Glory for... William Wyler (July 1, 1902 – July 27, 1981) was a prolific, Oscar-winning motion picture director. ... Fredric March (August 31, 1897 – April 14, 1975) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor. ... The Cannes Film Festival (French: le Festival de Cannes), founded in 1939, is one of the worlds oldest, most influential and prestigious film festivals. ... Jean Maurice Eugène Clément Cocteau (5 July 1889 – 11 October 1963) was a French poet, novelist, dramatist, designer, boxing manager and filmmaker. ... Beauty and the Beast (in French: La Belle et la Bête) is a French film, made in 1946, based on the fairy tale Beauty and the Beast. The film was directed by Jean Cocteau, and starred his gay lover Jean Marais as the Beast and Josette Day as Beauty. ... Jean Marais photo taken by Carl Van Vechten, 1947 Jean Marais, born Jean-Alfred Villain-Marais (December 11, 1913 - November 8, 1998) was a French actor, and the lover of Jean Cocteau. ... The Blue Dahlia (1946) is a film noir with an original screenplay by Raymond Chandler. ... The Big Sleep (1946) is the first film version of Raymond Chandlers 1939 novel of the same name. ... Bogart redirects here. ... Betty Joan Perske (born on September 16, 1924), better known as Lauren Bacall, is a Golden Globe– and Tony Award–winning, as well as Academy Award–nominated, American film and stage actress. ... Duel in the Sun is a 1946 Western film which tells the story of a half-Hispanic girl who goes to live with her Anglo relatives, becoming involved in prejudice and forbidden love. ... King Vidor King Wallis Vidor (February 8, 1894 – November 1, 1982) was an American film director. ... Gregory Peck (April 5, 1916 – June 12, 2003) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... Jennifer Jones (born as Phylis Lee Isley on March 2, 1919) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American actress. ... Joseph Cheshire Cotten (May 15, 1905–February 6, 1994) was an American stage and screen actor. ... Notorious is a 1946 thriller directed and produced by Alfred Hitchcock, and starring Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman as two people whose lives become intimately entangled during an espionage operation. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... For the vocal coach, see Carrie Grant. ...   (pronounced in Swedish, but usually IPA: in English) (August 29, 1915 – August 29, 1982) was a three-time Academy Award, two-time Emmy Award, one-time BAFTA, honorary César Award, four-time Golden Globe, two-time David di Donatello, two-time Silver Ribbon, one-time NSFC, two-time NBR... The Razors Edge is the first film version of W. Somerset Maughams 1944 novel. ... Tyrone Edmund Power, Jr. ... Gene Tierney (November 19, 1920 – November 6, 1991) was an American film and stage actress. ... The Postman Always Rings Twice is a 1946 film based on the 1934 novel by James M. Cain. ... Dorothy McGuire and Kent Smith in The Spiral Staircase The Spiral Staircase is a Hollywood thriller from 1946 directed by Robert Siodmak and starring Dorothy McGuire, Kent Smith, George Brent, Rhonda Fleming, Elsa Lanchester, and Ethel Barrymore. ... The year 1947 in film involved some significant events. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... The Hollywood Ten was a group of American screenwriters, actors, and directors, alleged members of the Communist Party, who were convicted of contempt of Congress during the height of the Red Scare. ... The Waldorf Statement was a two-page press release issued on November 25, 1947 by Eric Johnston, President of the Motion Picture Association of America, following a closed-door meeting by forty-eight motion picture company executives at New York Citys Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. ... Protestors opposing the jailing of the Hollywood Ten in 1950 (from the 1987 documentary Legacy of the Hollywood Blacklist). ... The Best Years of Our Lives is a 1946 movie about three servicemen (an air force officer, an infantry sergeant, and an ordinary sailor) trying to piece their lives back together after coming back home from World War II. It is based on a novel by MacKinlay Kantor, Glory for... Duel in the Sun is a 1946 Western film which tells the story of a half-Hispanic girl who goes to live with her Anglo relatives, becoming involved in prejudice and forbidden love. ... Elia Kazan, (Greek: Ηλίας Καζάν, IPA: ), (September 7, 1909 – September 28, 2003) was a Greek-American film and theatre director, film and theatrical producer, screenwriter, novelist and cofounder of the influential Actors Studio in New York in 1947. ... Gentlemans Agreement is a 1947 film about a journalist (played by Gregory Peck) who falsely represents himself as a Jew to research anti-semitism in the affluent community of Darien, Connecticut. ... This page is about the film. ... Miracle on 34th Street (also titled The Big Heart in the UK) is a 1947 film written by Valentine Davies, directed by George Seaton, and starring Maureen OHara, John Payne, and Edmund Gwenn. ... Quai des Orfèvres is a 1947 film directed by Henri-Georges Clouzot. ... The claim is made (under the heading Personal Life) that DeMille was in negotiations with MGM to direct Ben-Hur at the time of his death in January, 1959. ... Unconquered (1947) was produced and directed by Cecil B. DeMille and released by Paramount. ... The Actors Studio is a theatrical school and workshop located in the Old Labor Stage on 44th Street in New York City. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Oskar Fischinger (1900-1967) was an abstract animator, filmmaker, and painter. ... Motion Painting No. ... The Venice Film Festival ( ) is the oldest film festival in the world. ... Siréna is a 1947 Czechoslovakian film about striking miners. ... The year 1948 in film involved some significant events. ... Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM, (IPA: ; 22 May 1907 – 11 July 1989) was an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA and four-time Emmy winning English actor, director, and producer. ... Hamlet is a 1948 British film adaptation of William Shakespeares play Hamlet, directed by and starring Sir Laurence Olivier. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Venice Film Festival ( ) is the oldest film festival in the world. ... The Treasure of the Sierra Madre is John Hustons 1948 black and white adaptation of B. Travens eponymous 1927 novel The Treasure of the Sierra Madre , in which two American down-and-outers (Humphrey Bogart and Tim Holt) in 1920s Mexico hook up with an old-timer (Walter... Key Largo is a 1948 film starring Humphrey Bogart, Edward G. Robinson, Lauren Bacall, Claire Trevor, and Lionel Barrymore. ... Bogart redirects here. ... For the 1967 version, see Johnny Belinda (1967 film). ... Easter Parade is a 1948 musical film starring Fred Astaire and Judy Garland. ... The Pirate is a slang term for a supposed sex move performed during oral sex. ... Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 - June 22, 1969) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ... Red River is a 1948 western film which tells the story of the first cattle drive along the Chisolm Trail in the fictional framework of a cattle man who feuds with his adopted son over ownership of their cattle in the middle of a drive. ... For other persons named John Wayne, see John Wayne (disambiguation). ... Edward Montgomery Clift (October 17, 1920 - July 23, 1966) was an American Academy Award-nominated actor known by the stage name of Montgomery Clift. ... Helpmann, Shearer and Massine in The Red Shoes. ... Michael Latham Powell (September 30, 1905 – February 19, 1990) was a British film director, renowned for his partnership with Emeric Pressburger which produced a series of classic British films. ... Emeric Pressburger in Paris. ... Rope (1948) is an Alfred Hitchcock classic film notable for its single location covered in what appeared to be just a few continuous shots. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... For other persons named James Stewart, see James Stewart (disambiguation). ... Joan of Arc is a 1948 film. ...   (pronounced in Swedish, but usually IPA: in English) (August 29, 1915 – August 29, 1982) was a three-time Academy Award, two-time Emmy Award, one-time BAFTA, honorary César Award, four-time Golden Globe, two-time David di Donatello, two-time Silver Ribbon, one-time NSFC, two-time NBR... Vittorio De Sica (July 7, 1902–November 13, 1974) was an Italian neorealist director and actor. ... The Bicycle Thief redirects here. ... Edgar Kennedy (b. ... See also: 1948 in film 1949 1950 in film 1940s in film 1950s in film years in film film Events Top grossing films North America Adams Rib Jolson Sings Again Pinky I Was a Male War Bride, The Snake Pit, Joan of Arc Academy Awards Best Picture: All the... Robert Rossen (March 16, 1908 - February 18, 1966) was an American screenwriter, film director, and producer who was blacklisted by the Hollywood movie studio bosses in the 1950s. ... All the Kings Men is a 1949 film based on the Robert Penn Warren novel of the same name. ... Crawford in Black Angel William Broderick Crawford (born December 9, 1911; died April 26, 1986) was an American actor. ... Joseph Leo Mankiewicz (February 11, 1909 – February 5, 1993) was an American screenwriter, director and producer. ... (Left to right) Darnell, Sothern and Crain A Letter to Three Wives is a 1949 film which tells the story of a woman who mails a letter to three women, telling them she has left town with the husband of one of them. ... George Dewey Cukor (July 7, 1899 – January 24, 1983) was an American film director. ... Adams Rib is a 1949 film starring Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy and directed by George Cukor. ... Katharine Houghton Hepburn (May 12, 1907 – June 29, 2003) was an American actress of film, television and stage. ... Spencer Tracy (April 5, 1900 – June 10, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor who appeared in 74 films from 1930 to 1967. ... Sands of Iwo Jima is a 1949 war film which follows a group of Marines from training to the Battle of Iwo Jima during World War II. It stars John Wayne, John Agar, Adele Mara and Forrest Tucker. ... Allan Dwan (April 3, 1885 – December 21, 1981) was a pioneering Canadian-born American motion picture director, producer and screenwriter. ... The Heiress is a 1949 film which tells the story of two young people who want to marry despite the girls fathers objections. ... Olivia Mary de Havilland (born July 1, 1916) is a two-time Academy Award winning actress in American motion pictures and is the last surviving principal cast member from Gone with the Wind. ... Edward Montgomery Clift (October 17, 1920 - July 23, 1966) was an American Academy Award-nominated actor known by the stage name of Montgomery Clift. ... This article is about the film and novel. ... Gregory Peck (April 5, 1916 – June 12, 2003) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... Kind Hearts and Coronets is a 1949 British black comedy film produced by Ealing Studios. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska,[1] was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer and actor. ... Ginger Rogers (Virginia Katherine McMath, July 16, 1911 – April 25, 1995) was an Academy Award-winning American film and stage actress and singer. ... Jacques Tati as Monsieur Hulot. ... Jour de fete (aka Holiday, The Big Day) (1949) is a largely silent comedy from the French comic Jacques Tati. ... The Cannes Film Festival (French: le Festival de Cannes), founded in 1939, is one of the worlds oldest, most influential and prestigious film festivals. ... Sir Carol Reed (30 December 1906 – 25 April 1976) was an English film director, winner of an Academy Award for his film version of the musical, Oliver! (1968). ... This article is about film noir. ... The Venice Film Festival ( ) is the oldest film festival in the world. ... The Golden Lion (it: Leone dOro) is the name of the highest prize given to a film at the Biennale Venice Film Festival. ... Manon is a 1949 French film directed by Henri-Georges Clouzot. ... Henri-Georges Clouzot (November 20, 1907 - January 12, 1977) was a French film director, screenwriter and producer. ...

1950s

See also: 1950s in film The decade of the 1950s in film involved many significant films. ...

The year 1950 in film involved some significant events. ... Movie poster for Samson and Delilah Samson and Delilah is a 1949 film directed by Cecil B. DeMille, starring Victor Mature and Hedy Lamarr as the title characters. ... The claim is made (under the heading Personal Life) that DeMille was in negotiations with MGM to direct Ben-Hur at the time of his death in January, 1959. ... Victor Mature (29 January 1913 – 4 August 1999), an American film actor, was born in Louisville, Kentucky to a Tyrolean father, Marcellus George Mature, a cutler, and a Swiss-American mother, Clara Mature. ... Hedy Lamarr (November 9, 1913 – January 19, 2000) was an Austrian/Jewish-American actress and communications technology innovator. ... Joseph Leo Mankiewicz (February 11, 1909 – February 5, 1993) was an American screenwriter, director and producer. ... For other uses, see All About Eve (disambiguation). ... Judy Holliday (June 21, 1921–June 7, 1965) was an Academy- and Tony Award-winning American actress. ... For the 1950 film version, see Born Yesterday (1950 film) For the 1993 remake, see Born Yesterday (1993 film) Born Yesterday is a play written and first directed by Garson Kanin and adapted into a successful 1950 film. ... Sunset Boulevard (also known as Sunset Blvd. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Gloria Swanson (March 27, 1899 – April 4, 1983) was an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe-winning American Hollywood actress. ... Billy Wilder (June 22, 1906 – March 27, 2002) was an Austrian-born, Jewish-American journalist, screenwriter, film director, and producer whose career spanned more than 50 years and 60 films. ... Old logo from 1985-2006 Walt Disney Pictures refers to several different entities associated with The Walt Disney Company: Walt Disney Pictures, the film banner, was established as a designation in 1983, prior to which Disney films since the death of Walt Disney were released under the name of the... Cinderella is a 1950 animated feature produced by Walt Disney, and released to theaters on February 15, 1950 by RKO Radio Pictures. ... Laurel and Hardy Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy were the members of the most famous comedy duo in film history. ... Atoll K, released in 1950, was the final film Laurel and Hardy made as a team. ... Categories: Movie stubs | 1950 films | Science fiction films ... Orpheus (French: Orphée) is a 1950 French film directed by Jean Cocteau and starring Jean Marais. ... Jean Maurice Eugène Clément Cocteau (5 July 1889 – 11 October 1963) was a French poet, novelist, dramatist, designer, boxing manager and filmmaker. ... Jean Marais photo taken by Carl Van Vechten, 1947 Jean Marais, born Jean-Alfred Villain-Marais (December 11, 1913 - November 8, 1998) was a French actor, and the lover of Jean Cocteau. ...   (pronounced in Swedish, but usually IPA: in English) (August 29, 1915 – August 29, 1982) was a three-time Academy Award, two-time Emmy Award, one-time BAFTA, honorary César Award, four-time Golden Globe, two-time David di Donatello, two-time Silver Ribbon, one-time NSFC, two-time NBR... Sciara del fuoco For other uses see Stromboli (disambiguation) Stromboli is a small island in the Tyrrhenian Sea, off the north coast of Sicily, containing one of the three active volcanoes in Italy. ... Kurosawa redirects here. ... This page is about the 1950 film. ... Federico Fellini (January 20, 1920 – October 31, 1993) was one of the most influential and widely revered film-makers of the 20th century. ... Variety Lights (Italian: Luci del varietà) is a 1950 Italian film directed and produced by Federico Fellini. ... Alberto Lattuada (November 13, 1914 - July 3, 2005) was an Italian film director. ... See also: 1950 in film 1951 1952 in film 1950s in film 1940s in film years in film film Events Sweden - May Britt is scouted by Italian film-makers Carlo Ponti and Mario Soldati Top grossing films North America David and Bathsheba Show Boat tie The Great Caruso and An... The historical drama is a film genre in which stories are based more or less accurately upon historical events and famous persons. ... The epic film is a film genre typically featuring expensive production values, an emotionally moving music soundtrack, and dramatic themes. ... David and Bathsheba is a 1951 film about King David. ... The musical film is a film genre in which several songs sung by the characters are interwoven into the narrative. ... For films based on the musical, see Show Boat (film). ... For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ... An American in Paris is a 1951 musical film inspired by the 1928 classical composition by George Gershwin. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... George Stevens examining film from A Place in the Sun. ... A Place in the Sun is a 1951 film which tells the story of a working class young man who is entangled with two women, one who works in his wealthy uncles factory and the other the daughter of the same uncle. ... For other persons named Elizabeth Taylor, see Elizabeth Taylor (disambiguation). ... Edward Montgomery Clift (October 17, 1920 - July 23, 1966) was an American Academy Award-nominated actor known by the stage name of Montgomery Clift. ... John Marcellus Huston (August 5, 1906 – August 28, 1987) was an American film director and actor. ... The African Queen is a 1951 film made by Horizon Pictures and Romulus Films, and distributed by United Artists. ... Katharine Houghton Hepburn (May 12, 1907 – June 29, 2003) was an American actress of film, television and stage. ... Vivien Leigh, Lady Olivier (November 5, 1913 – July 8, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award winning English actress. ... Elia Kazan, (Greek: Ηλίας Καζάν, IPA: ), (September 7, 1909 – September 28, 2003) was a Greek-American film and theatre director, film and theatrical producer, screenwriter, novelist and cofounder of the influential Actors Studio in New York in 1947. ... A Streetcar Named Desire is an Academy Award-winning 1951 film adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play of the same name by Tennessee Williams. ... Marlon Brando, Jr. ... On the Riviera is a 1951 comedy musical film made by 20th Century Fox. ... Kaye entertaining U.S. troops at Sasebo, Japan, 25 Oct 1945 David Daniel Kaminsky, known as Danny Kaye (January 18, 1913 – March 3, 1987) was an American actor, singer and comedian. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Gene Tierney (November 19, 1920 – November 6, 1991) was an American film and stage actress. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Strangers on a Train is a thriller novel by Patricia Highsmith, author of The Talented Mr. ... Quo Vadis (the title is Latin, meaning Where are you going?), is a 1951 Biblical epic film that tells the story of a Roman soldier, returning from the wars, who falls in love with a Christian and becomes intrigued by her religion. ... There are many people known as Bob Taylor or Robert Taylor, including: Robert Taylor (developer) (born 1972-present), Owner of FlashExtensions. ... Deborah Kerr, CBE (September 30, 1921 – October 16, 2007) was a Golden Globe Award-winning Scottish actress who was also awarded an honorary Academy Award and BAFTA recognition. ... The Cannes Film Festival (French: le Festival de Cannes), founded in 1939, is one of the worlds oldest, most influential and prestigious film festivals. ... This page is about the 1950 film. ... Kurosawa redirects here. ... The Golden Lion (it: Leone dOro) is the name of the highest prize given to a film at the Biennale Venice Film Festival. ... The Berlin International Film Festival, also called the Berlinale, is one of the most important film festivals in Europe and the world. ... // Events February 20 - The film The African Queen opens (Capitol Theater in New York City). ... Cinerama is the trademarked name for a widescreen process which works by simultaneously projecting images from three synchronized 35 mm projectors onto a huge, deeply-curved screen, subtending 146° of arc, and for the corporation which was formed to market it. ... The claim is made (under the heading Personal Life) that DeMille was in negotiations with MGM to direct Ben-Hur at the time of his death in January, 1959. ... The Greatest Show on Earth is the slogan for the Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey Circus. ... Quo Vadis (the title is Latin, meaning Where are you going?), is a 1951 Biblical epic film that tells the story of a Roman soldier, returning from the wars, who falls in love with a Christian and becomes intrigued by her religion. ... The films Ivanhoe are based on the novel by Sir Walter Scott. ... There are many people known as Bob Taylor or Robert Taylor, including: Robert Taylor (developer) (born 1972-present), Owner of FlashExtensions. ... For other persons named Elizabeth Taylor, see Elizabeth Taylor (disambiguation). ... Joan Fontaine (born October 22, 1917) is an Academy Award-winning British American actress, who became an American citizen in April 1943. ... For the book, see: The Snows of Kilimanjaro (book). ... Gregory Peck (April 5, 1916 – June 12, 2003) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... Ava Lavinia Gardner (December 24, 1922 – January 25, 1990) was an Academy Award-nominated American actress. ... For other persons named Hayward, see Hayward (disambiguation). ... 5 Fingers is a 1951 film directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz. ... Joseph Leo Mankiewicz (February 11, 1909 – February 5, 1993) was an American screenwriter, director and producer. ... High Noon is a 1952 western film which tells the story of a town marshal who is forced to face a gang of killers by himself. ... For the Jamaican musician named Charlie Chaplin, see Charlie Chaplin (singer). ... Limelight is a 1952 film written, directed by and starring Charles Chaplin, co-starring Claire Bloom, with a guest appearance by Buster Keaton. ... George Orson Welles (May 6, 1915 – October 10, 1985) was an Academy Award-winning American director, writer, actor and producer for film, stage, radio and television. ... One of Welles more complicated shoots, Othello was filmed on and off over a period of three years. ... For other uses, see Singin in the Rain. ... The year 1953 in film involved some significant events. ... A cinema presenting The Robe The Robe is a 1953 Biblical epic film that tells the story of a Roman tribune who commands the unit that crucifies Jesus. ... A Fox logo used to promote the CinemaScope process. ... For other persons named Richard Burton, see Richard Burton (disambiguation). ... Robert Mitchum and Jean Simmons in Angel Face Jean Merilyn Simmons (born January 31, 1929 in Crouch Hill, London, England, United Kingdom) is a British actress. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... From Here to Eternity is a 1953 movie based on a James Jones novel in which characters work through ordinary bouts of intimidation and infidelity on a military base in the days preceding the attack on Pearl Harbor. ... Burt Lancaster (2 November 1913 – 20 October 1994) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor, noted for his athletic physique, distinct smile (which he called The Grin) and, later, his willingness to play roles that went against his initial tough guy image. ... Edward Montgomery Clift (October 17, 1920 - July 23, 1966) was an American Academy Award-nominated actor known by the stage name of Montgomery Clift. ... Deborah Kerr, CBE (September 30, 1921 – October 16, 2007) was a Golden Globe Award-winning Scottish actress who was also awarded an honorary Academy Award and BAFTA recognition. ... Main title caption from Dallas. ... Sinatra redirects here. ... Shane is a 1953 western film made by Paramount Pictures. ... Alan Walbridge Ladd (September 3, 1913 – January 29, 1964) was an American film actor. ... Jean Arthur (October 17, 1900 – June 19, 1991) was an Oscar-nominated American actress and a major film star of the 1930s and 1940s. ... Van Heflin (December 13, 1910 – July 23, 1971) was an Academy Award-winning American film and theater actor. ... Brandon De Wilde (April 9, 1942 – July 6, 1972) was an Academy Award-nominated American actor born into a theatrical family in Brooklyn. ... Jack Palance (February 18, 1919 - November 10, 2006) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... How to Marry a Millionaire is a 1953 film, directed by Jean Negulesco and starring Lauren Bacall, Marilyn Monroe, and Betty Grable as fortune hunters. ... Betty Joan Perske (born on September 16, 1924), better known as Lauren Bacall, is a Golden Globe– and Tony Award–winning, as well as Academy Award–nominated, American film and stage actress. ... Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson;[1] June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962), was a Golden Globe-winning[2] American actress, singer, model, Hollywood icon,[3] cultural icon, fashion icon,[4] pop icon, film executive and sex symbol. ... Betty Grable (December 18, 1916 – July 2, 1973) was an American dancer, singer, and actress. ... William Horatio Powell (July 29, 1892 - March 5, 1984) was an American actor, noted for his sophisticated, cynical roles. ... Peter Pan is the fourteenth animated feature in the Disney animated features canon. ... Disney redirects here. ... Hans Christian Andersen is a 1952 Hollywood musical film, with words and music by Frank Loesser. ... Kaye entertaining U.S. troops at Sasebo, Japan, 25 Oct 1945 David Daniel Kaminsky, known as Danny Kaye (January 18, 1913 – March 3, 1987) was an American actor, singer and comedian. ... Actor Farley Granger Farley Granger (born July 1, 1925) is an American actor. ... House of Wax is a 1953 American horror film starring Vincent Price. ... For 3D computer graphics and related software, see 3D computer graphics. ... Vincent Leonard Price Jr. ... Mogambo (Passion in Swahili) is a 1953 film directed by John Ford, featuring Clark Gable, Ava Gardner, and Grace Kelly. ... William Clark Gable (February 1, 1901 – November 16, 1960) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... For the Mika song, see Grace Kelly (song). ... Ava Lavinia Gardner (December 24, 1922 – January 25, 1990) was an Academy Award-nominated American actress. ... Gentlemen Prefer Blondes is a 1953 film adaptation of the 1949 stage musical, released by 20th Century Fox, directed by Howard Hawks and starring Jane Russell and Marilyn Monroe, with Charles Coburn, Elliott Reid, Tommy Noonan, Taylor Holmes, and Norma Varden in supporting roles. ... Jane Russell (born June 21, 1921) is an American actress and former sex symbol. ... Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson;[1] June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962), was a Golden Globe-winning[2] American actress, singer, model, Hollywood icon,[3] cultural icon, fashion icon,[4] pop icon, film executive and sex symbol. ... Audrey Hepburn (May 4, 1929) – January 20, 1993) was an Academy Award, Tony Award, Grammy Award, Emmy Award-winning film and stage actress, fashion icon, and humanitarian. ... Roman Holiday is a 1953 romantic comedy. ... Gregory Peck (April 5, 1916 – June 12, 2003) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... William Holden (April 17, 1918 – ca. ... Stalag 17 is a 1953 war film which tells the story of a group of American G.I.s held in a German World War II prisoner of war camp who come to believe one of their number is a traitor. ... For the Speedy Gonzales song, see Pat Boone. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The year 1954 in film involved some significant events. ... For other uses, see On the Waterfront (disambiguation). ... Elia Kazan, (Greek: Ηλίας Καζάν, IPA: ), (September 7, 1909 – September 28, 2003) was a Greek-American film and theatre director, film and theatrical producer, screenwriter, novelist and cofounder of the influential Actors Studio in New York in 1947. ... Marlon Brando, Jr. ... Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 - June 22, 1969) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ... James Neville Mason (May 15, 1909 – July 27, 1984) was a three-time Academy Award nominated English actor who attained stardom in both British and American films. ... A Star Is Born is a 1954 musical remake of the original 1937 film, directed by George Cukor and starring Judy Garland and James Mason. ... White Christmas is a 1954 movie starring Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye that featured the songs of Irving Berlin, including the titular White Christmas. ... Harry Lillis “Bing” Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American popular singer and Academy Award-winning actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Kaye entertaining U.S. troops at Sasebo, Japan, 25 Oct 1945 David Daniel Kaminsky, known as Danny Kaye (January 18, 1913 – March 3, 1987) was an American actor, singer and comedian. ... Rosemary Clooney (May 23, 1928 – June 29, 2002) was an American popular singer and actress. ... Vera-Ellen Westmeyer Rohe (February 16, 1921 - 30 August 1981) was an American actress and dancer known best by just her hyphenated first name. ... This is about the 1954 film. ... Bogart redirects here. ... José Vicente Ferrer de Otero y Cintron, known as José Ferrer (January 8, 1912-January 26, 1992), was an actor and director, born in Santurce, Puerto Rico. ... Van Johnson (born Charles Van Johnson on August 25, 1916, in Newport, Rhode Island) is an American film and television actor and dancer. ... Fred MacMurray (August 30, 1908 – November 5, 1991) was an actor who appeared in over one hundred movies and a highly successful television series during a career that lasted from the 1930s to the 1970s. ... Lee Marvin (February 19, 1924, New York City – August 29, 1987, Tucson, Arizona) was an American film actor. ... The Glenn Miller Story is a rather boring 1953 movie about a guy who always appeared as boring himself, except for the swinging music he arranged and conducted. ... Jimmy Stewart, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1934 James Maitland Stewart (May 20, 1908 – July 2, 1997) was an American film actor beloved for his persona as an average guy who faces adversity and tries to do the right thing, an image which was largely reflected in his own personality. ... June Allyson (October 7, 1917 – July 8, 2006) was an American film and television actress, popular in the 1940s and 1950s. ... The Egyptian is a 1954 epic film made in Cinemascope by 20th Century Fox, directed by Michael Curtiz and produced by Darryl F. Zanuck. ... A Fox logo used to promote the CinemaScope process. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... For the 1998 remake, see Rear Window (1998 film). ... For other persons named James Stewart, see James Stewart (disambiguation). ... For the Mika song, see Grace Kelly (song). ... Ṝ Thelma Ritter (February 14, 1902 – February 5, 1969) was a six time Academy Award-nominated American character actress of the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s. ... Actor Wendell Corey in a prisoner uniform from the 1956 film The Killer Is Loose Wendell Corey (March 20, 1914 – November 8, 1968) was an American actor. ... Raymond William Stacey Burr (May 21, 1917 – September 12, 1993) was an Emmy-nominated actor and vintner, perhaps best known for his roles in the television dramas Perry Mason and Ironside. ... This article is about the character itself. ... Gojira ), sometimes referred to as Godzilla in recent years, is a landmark 1954 Japanese science fiction film, produced and distributed by Toho Company Ltd. ...  20,000 Leagues Under the Sea is a 1954 film starring Kirk Douglas as Ned Land, James Mason as Captain Nemo, Paul Lukas as Professor Aronnax and Peter Lorre as Conseil. ... 3 Ring Circus was filmed from February 17 - March 31, 1954. ... Dean Martin (born Dino Paul Crocetti, June 7, 1917 – December 25, 1995) was an Italian-American singer, film actor, television personality, and comedian. ... For other persons named Jerry Lewis, see Jerry Lewis (disambiguation). ... Désirée is a 1954 historical film biography made by 20th Century Fox. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Dial M for Murder is a 1954 Warner Brothers film directed by Alfred Hitchcock starring Grace Kelly and Ray Milland as a married couple. ... For the Mika song, see Grace Kelly (song). ... The Country Girl is a 1915 silent film, starring Florence La Badie a 1954 film, which tells the story of a has-been singer/actor who is given one last chance to star in a musical, only to have his alcoholism hinder his chances. ... Seven Brides for Seven Brothers - Movie CD cover Seven Brides for Seven Brothers is a musical film released in 1954. ... Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson;[1] June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962), was a Golden Globe-winning[2] American actress, singer, model, Hollywood icon,[3] cultural icon, fashion icon,[4] pop icon, film executive and sex symbol. ... The movie River of No Return is a classic gem starring two of the silver screens greats stars Robert Mitchum and Marilyn Monroe. ... Sabrina is a 1954 film directed by Billy Wilder, adapted for the screen by Wilder, Samuel Taylor, and Ernest Lehman from Taylors play Sabrina Fair (in the UK, the movie has the title Sabrina Fair). ... Bogart redirects here. ... Audrey Hepburn (May 4, 1929) – January 20, 1993) was an Academy Award, Tony Award, Grammy Award, Emmy Award-winning film and stage actress, fashion icon, and humanitarian. ... William Holden (April 17, 1918 – ca. ... Federico Fellini (January 20, 1920 – October 31, 1993) was one of the most influential and widely revered film-makers of the 20th century. ... La Strada is a 1954 Italian motion picture produced by Dino De Laurentiis and Carlo Ponti and directed by Federico Fellini. ... The year 1955 in film involved some significant events. ... Lady and the Tramp is a 1955 animated feature film produced by Walt Disney, and originally released to theaters on June 16, 1955 by Buena Vista Distribution. ... ©A.M.P.A.S.® The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to artists working in the motion picture industry. ... For other uses, see Marty (disambiguation). ... Delbert Martin Mann, Jr. ... Ermes Effron Borgnino or better known as Ernest Borgnine (born January 24, 1917[1][2]) is a Golden Globe-, BAFTA- and Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Palme dOr The Palme dOr (Golden Palm) is the highest prize given to a film at the Cannes Film Festival. ... Anna Magnani (March 7, 1908 - September 26, 1973) was an Academy Award-winning Italian actress, with stage experience. ... The Rose Tattoo is a Tennessee Williams play. ... Rebel Without a Cause is a 1955 film directed by Nicholas Ray that tells the story of a rebellious teenager who comes to a new town, meets a girl, defies his parents, and faces the local high school bullies. ... East of Eden is a 1955 movie, directed by Elia Kazan, and based on the novel of the same name by John Steinbeck. ... For the film, see James Dean (film). ... Bad Day at Black Rock is a 1955 film which tells the story of a stranger who comes to a small town to give the father of a Japanese_American soldier the medals that his son won. ... Spencer Tracy (April 5, 1900 – June 10, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor who appeared in 74 films from 1930 to 1967. ... Guys and Dolls is a 1955 musical film made by the Samuel Goldwyn Company and released by MGM. It was directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz and produced by Samuel Goldwyn. ... Marlon Brando, Jr. ... Sinatra redirects here. ... The Night of the Hunter is a 1955 film noir, starring Robert Mitchum and Shelley Winters, and the only film Charles Laughton ever directed. ... DVD cover for the 1955 film, showing stars William Holden and Kim Novak Picnic is a 1955 Cinemascope color film which tells the story of an ex-college football star turned drifter who arrives in a small Kansas town on Labor Day and is drawn to a girl whos... William Holden (April 17, 1918 – ca. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Rififi is a 1955 black-and-white French heist movie. ... This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ... Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson;[1] June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962), was a Golden Globe-winning[2] American actress, singer, model, Hollywood icon,[3] cultural icon, fashion icon,[4] pop icon, film executive and sex symbol. ... Elisabeth in a riding habit, from Vanity Fair, 1884. ... Romy Schneider (September 23, 1938 – May 29, 1982) was a German-Austrian actress. ... Katharine Hepburn and Rossano Brazzi in Summertime Summertime is a 1955 film directed by David Lean starring Katharine Hepburn and Rossano Brazzi. ... Sir David Lean KBE (March 25, 1908 – April 16, 1991) was an Academy Award-winning English film director and producer, best remembered for big-screen epics such as Lawrence of Arabia, The Bridge on the River Kwai, Doctor Zhivago and A Passage to India. ... Katharine Houghton Hepburn (May 12, 1907 – June 29, 2003) was an American actress of film, television and stage. ... Rossano Brazzi (September 18, 1916 – December 24, 1994) was an Italian actor. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... To Catch a Thief is a 1955 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, starring Cary Grant, Grace Kelly, Jessie Royce Landis and John Williams. ... The Trouble with Harry is an American black comedy film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, which was released on October 3, 1955 in the United States. ... Republic Pictures Corporation (aka Republic Entertainment) is an independent film, television, and video distribution company that was originally a movie production-distribution corporation with studio facilities, best known for its specialization in quality B pictures, westerns and movie serials. ... DVD front cover for The Adventures of Captain Marvel, one of the most celebrated serials for both Republic Pictures and of the sound era in general. ... King of the Carnival (1955) is a Republic Movie serial. ... The Golden Lion (it: Leone dOro) is the name of the highest prize given to a film at the Biennale Venice Film Festival. ... Ordet (The Word) is a 1955 Danish film, directed by Carl Theodor Dreyer. ... Carl Theodor Dreyer (February 3, 1889 - March 20, 1968) was a Danish film director. ... The year 1956 in film involved some significant events. ... The Ten Commandments is a 1956 motion picture dramatizing the Biblical story of Moses, an Egyptian prince-turned deliverer of the Hebrew slaves. ... Charlton Heston (born October 4, 1924) is an US-american film actor, known for playing larger-than-life heroic roles such as Moses in The Ten Commandments, Colonel George Taylor in Planet of the Apes, and Judah Ben-Hur in Ben-Hur. ... Guys and Dolls is a 1955 musical film made by the Samuel Goldwyn Company and released by MGM. It was directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz and produced by Samuel Goldwyn. ... This article is about the 1956 film, for the musical on which the film was based, see The King and I The King and I is a 1956 musical film made by 20th Century Fox, directed by Walter Lang and produced by Charles Brackett and Darryl F. Zanuck. ... Yul Brynner (July 11, 1920[1] – October 10, 1985) was a Russian-born Broadway and Academy Award-winning Hollywood actor. ... Deborah Kerr, CBE (September 30, 1921 – October 16, 2007) was a Golden Globe Award-winning Scottish actress who was also awarded an honorary Academy Award and BAFTA recognition. ... Around the World in Eighty Days is a 1956 adventure film made by the Michael Todd Company and released by United Artists. ... George Stevens examining film from A Place in the Sun. ... Look up giant in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... For other persons named Elizabeth Taylor, see Elizabeth Taylor (disambiguation). ... For the film, see James Dean (film). ... High society can refer to: The upper class in a society, especially the socialites among them. ...   (pronounced in Swedish, but usually IPA: in English) (August 29, 1915 – August 29, 1982) was a three-time Academy Award, two-time Emmy Award, one-time BAFTA, honorary César Award, four-time Golden Globe, two-time David di Donatello, two-time Silver Ribbon, one-time NSFC, two-time NBR... Anastasia is a 1956 film which tells the true story of a young, confused woman in France after the Russian Revolution who, backed by the Russian emigre community, attempts to pass herself off as Anastasia Nicolaievna Romanova, the daughter of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia. ... Invasion of the Body Snatchers is a 1956 science fiction film. ... The Man Who Knew Too Much is a 1956 suspense film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, starring James Stewart and Doris Day. ... Moby Dick is a 1956 adaptation of Herman Melvilles novel Moby-Dick. ... The Searchers is a 1956 epic Western film directed by John Ford, which tells the story of Ethan Edwards, a bitter, middle-aged loner and Civil War veteran played by John Wayne, who spends years looking for his abducted niece. ... For other persons named John Wayne, see John Wayne (disambiguation). ... Douglas Sirk - Wikipedia /**/ @import /w/skins-1. ... Written on the Wind is a 1956 film with Robert Stack and Dorothy Malone. ... War and Peace is the first film version of the novel War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy. ... Audrey Hepburn (May 4, 1929) – January 20, 1993) was an Academy Award, Tony Award, Grammy Award, Emmy Award-winning film and stage actress, fashion icon, and humanitarian. ... Elvis redirects here. ... Love Me Tender is an American motion picture directed by Robert D. Webb, released by 20th Century Fox on November 15, 1956. ... Palme dOr The Palme dOr (Golden Palm) is the highest prize given to a film at the Cannes Film Festival. ... The Silent World (Le Monde du silence) is a French documentary film released in 1956, co-directed by the famed French oceanographer Jacques-Yves Cousteau and a young Louis Malle. ... Jacques-Yves Cousteau in 1976. ... Louis Malle (October 30, 1932 – November 23, 1995) was an Academy Award nominated French film director, working in both French and English. ... The Berlin International Film Festival, also called the Berlinale, is one of the most important film festivals in Europe and the world. ... Invitation to the Dance is a 1956 anthology film consisting of three distinct stories, all starring and directed by Gene Kelly. ... For the similarly-named American actress, see Jean Kelly. ... The year 1957 in film involved some significant events. ... The Ten Commandments is a 1956 motion picture dramatizing the Biblical story of Moses, an Egyptian prince-turned deliverer of the Hebrew slaves. ... Charlton Heston (born October 4, 1924) is an US-american film actor, known for playing larger-than-life heroic roles such as Moses in The Ten Commandments, Colonel George Taylor in Planet of the Apes, and Judah Ben-Hur in Ben-Hur. ... Around the World in Eighty Days is a 1956 adventure film made by the Michael Todd Company and released by United Artists. ... Look up giant in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Bridge on the River Kwai is an Academy Award-winning 1957 World War II war film based on the novel Le Pont de la Rivière Kwaï by French writer Pierre Boulle. ... Sir David Lean KBE (March 25, 1908 – April 16, 1991) was an Academy Award-winning English film director and producer, best remembered for big-screen epics such as Lawrence of Arabia, The Bridge on the River Kwai, Doctor Zhivago and A Passage to India. ... Sir Alec Guinness CH, CBE (2 April 1914 – 5 August 2000) was an Academy Award and Tony Award-winning English actor. ... Joanne Gignilliat Trimmier Woodward (born February 27, 1930) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, Emmy award winning American actress. ... The Three Faces of Eve is a 1957 book and film, loosely based on the true story of a woman (Chris Costner-Sizemore) who had dissociative identity disorder. ... Le Notte di Cabiria or Nights of Cabiria is a 1957 film directed by Federico Fellini. ... Federico Fellini (January 20, 1920 – October 31, 1993) was one of the most influential and widely revered film-makers of the 20th century. ... Friendly Persuasion is a 1956 film that stars Gary Cooper, Dorothy McGuire, Anthony Perkins, Richard Eyer, Robert Middleton and Phyllis Love. ... William Wyler (July 1, 1902 – July 27, 1981) was a prolific, Oscar-winning motion picture director. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Portrait of Sidney Lumet, May 7, 1939. ... Jailhouse Rock is an American motion picture directed by Richard Thorpe, released by MGM on November 8, 1957. ... Elvis redirects here. ... An Affair to Remember is a 1957 film, starring Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr. ... For the vocal coach, see Carrie Grant. ... Deborah Kerr, CBE (September 30, 1921 – October 16, 2007) was a Golden Globe Award-winning Scottish actress who was also awarded an honorary Academy Award and BAFTA recognition. ... For the Machine Head song, see A Farewell to Arms (song). ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Jennifer Jones (born as Phylis Lee Isley on March 2, 1919) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American actress. ... Funny Face (TV series). ... Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska,[1] was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer and actor. ... Audrey Hepburn (May 4, 1929) – January 20, 1993) was an Academy Award, Tony Award, Grammy Award, Emmy Award-winning film and stage actress, fashion icon, and humanitarian. ...   (IPA: in Swedish; usually IPA: in English) (July 14, 1918 – July 30, 2007) was a Swedish film, stage, and opera director. ... The Seventh Seal (Swedish: Det sjunde inseglet) is an existential 1957 Swedish film directed by Ingmar Bergman about the journey of a medieval knight (Max von Sydow) across a plague-ridden landscape. ... Wild Strawberries a 1957 film written and directed by Ingmar Bergman. ... The year 1958 in film involved some significant events. ... The Bridge on the River Kwai is an Academy Award-winning 1957 World War II war film based on the novel Le Pont de la Rivière Kwaï by French writer Pierre Boulle. ... Gigi is a 1945 novel by the French sentimental romance writer Colette about a wealthy cultured man of fashion who discovers that he is in love with a young Parisian girl who is being groomed for a career as a grande cocotte, and eventually marries her. ... Monsieur Hulot (actual film is in colour) Mon Oncle (My Uncle) is a 1958 film by Jacques Tati. ... Jacques Tati as Monsieur Hulot. ... DVD cover of the film The Cranes are Flying (Russian: Летят журавли, Letyat zhuravli) is arguably the greatest film to come out of World War II. It was directed by the Georgian-born Soviet director Mikhail Kalatozov in 1957 and starring Aleksey Batalov and Tatiana Samoilova. ... Wild Strawberries a 1957 film written and directed by Ingmar Bergman. ... Rickshaw Man is a 1958 Japanese film directed by Hiroshi Inagaki. ... Hiroshi Inagaki (30 December 1905 - 21 May 1980) is a Japanese filmmaker most known for the Academy Award winning Samurai Trilogy that he directed. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... For other uses of the word, see Vertigo. ... Rosalind Russell (June 4, 1907 – November 28, 1976) was a four-time Academy Award nominated and Tony Award winning American film and stage actress, perhaps best known for her role as a fast-talking newspaper reporter in the Howard Hawks screwball comedy His Girl Friday. ... Broadway poster Auntie Mame is a 1955 novel by Patrick Dennis that chronicles his madcap adventures growing up as the ward of his deceased fathers eccentric sister. ... Otto Ludwig Preminger (December 5, 1906 – April 23, 1986) was a film director. ... Film poster for Bonjour Tristesse, designed by Saul Bass. ... This is an article about the movie adaptation. ... Thomas Lanier Williams III (March 26, 1911 – February 25, 1983), better known as Tennessee Williams, was a major American playwright who received many of the top theatrical awards. ... This article is about the American actor and race team owner. ... For other persons named Elizabeth Taylor, see Elizabeth Taylor (disambiguation). ... The Defiant Ones is a 1958 film which tells about two escaped prisoners who are shackled together, one white and one black, who must co-operate in order to survive. ... For other persons named Tony Curtis, see Tony Curtis (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Sydney Tamiia Poitier. ... This article is about the 1958 film . ... George Orson Welles (May 6, 1915 – October 10, 1985) was an Academy Award-winning American director, writer, actor and producer for film, stage, radio and television. ... Touch of Evil (1958) is considered one of the last examples of film noir in the genres classic era (from the early 1940s until the late 1950s). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A low-key character created by Tex Avery at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in 1943--essentially the polar opposite of his other famous character, loud, whacky Screwy Squirrel. ... The Bowery Boys were a group of actors who made a series of films released by Monogram Pictures from 1946 through 1958. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... See also: 1958 in film 1959 1960 in film 1950s in film 1960s in film years in film film Events The Three Stooges make their 180th and last short film, Sappy Bullfighters. ... Ben-Hur is a 1959 epic film directed by William Wyler, and is the third version of Lew Wallaces novel, Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ (1880). ... Broadway poster Auntie Mame is a 1955 novel by Patrick Dennis that chronicles his madcap adventures growing up as the ward of his deceased fathers eccentric sister. ... Doris Mary Ann von Kappelhoff (born April 3, 1924)[1] is an American singer, actress, and animal welfare advocate known as Doris Day. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Tony Randall (February 26, 1920 – May 17, 2004) was an American comic actor. ... For the 1970s R & B record see Sylvia Pillow Talk is a 1959 romantic comedy film. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... North by Northwest (1959) is a comic thriller by Alfred Hitchcock produced at MGM. It was premiered in the San Sebastian International Film Festival. ... Some Like It Hot is a 1959 comedy film directed by Billy Wilder. ... Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson;[1] June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962), was a Golden Globe-winning[2] American actress, singer, model, Hollywood icon,[3] cultural icon, fashion icon,[4] pop icon, film executive and sex symbol. ... For other persons named Tony Curtis, see Tony Curtis (disambiguation). ... John Uhler Lemmon III (February 8, 1925 – June 27, 2001), better known as Jack Lemmon, was a two-time Academy Award and Cannes Award-winning American actor and comedian. ... Hiroshima Mon Amour, Alain Resnais acclaimed film, was released in the USA in 1960, and was called The Birth of a Nation of the French New Wave (nouvelle vague) by critic Leonard Maltin, because of its importance to the innovations of the movement. ... Sir Edward Burne-Jones painted The Sleeping Beauty. ... Joseph Leo Mankiewicz (February 11, 1909 – February 5, 1993) was an American screenwriter, director and producer. ... Suddenly, Last Summer is a 1959 drama film made by Columbia Pictures Corporation, based on the play of the same title by Tennessee Williams. ... Katharine Houghton Hepburn (May 12, 1907 – June 29, 2003) was an American actress of film, television and stage. ... Edward Montgomery Clift (October 17, 1920 - July 23, 1966) was an American Academy Award-nominated actor known by the stage name of Montgomery Clift. ... For other persons named Elizabeth Taylor, see Elizabeth Taylor (disambiguation). ... Black Orpheus (Orfeu Negro in Portuguese) is a 1959 film made in Brazil by French director Marcel Camus. ... The Three Stooges was an American comedy act in the 20th century. ...

1960s

See also: 1960s in film This list includes popular, acclaimed, and otherwise significant (for whatever reason) films of all countries from 1960 to 1969. ...

The year 1960 in film involved some significant events. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Psycho is a 1960 suspense/horror film directed by auteur Alfred Hitchcock from the screenplay by Joseph Stefano about a psychotic killer. ... The year 1961 in film involved some significant events. ... West Side Story is a 1961 film directed by Robert Wise and Jerome Robbins. ... // Events Dr. No launches the James Bond film series, the longest-running motion picture franchise of all time, running more than 40 years. ... Lawrence of Arabia is an award-winning 1962 film based on the life of T. E. Lawrence. ... To Kill a Mockingbird is a 1962 Academy Award winning film directed by Robert Mulligan and based on the novel of the same name by Harper Lee. ... The year 1963 in film involved some significant events. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... The Birds is a 1963 horror film by Alfred Hitchcock, loosely based on the short story The Birds by Daphne du Maurier. ... // Events January 29 - The film Dr. Strangelove is released. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... A Hard Days Night (1964) is a British comedy film originally released by United Artists, written by Alun Owen and starring The Beatles during the height of Beatlemania. ... The year 1965 in film involved some significant events. ... Rodgers and Hammersteins The Sound of Music is a 1965 film directed by Robert Wise and starring Julie Andrews in the lead role. ... The year 1966 in film involved some significant events. ... Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is a 1966 film adaptation of the play of the same name by Edward Albee. ... The year 1967 in film involved some significant events. ... For the novel of the same name, see The Graduate (novel). ... The year 1968 in film involved some significant events. ... Kubrick redirects here. ... The year 1969 in film involved some significant events. ... Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid is a 1969 Western film that tells the story of bank robber Butch Cassidy (played by Paul Newman) and his partner The Sundance Kid (played by Robert Redford). ...

1970s

See also: 1970s in film The decade of the 1970s in film involved many significant films. ...

// Events February 11 - The film The Magic Christian, starring Peter Sellers and Ringo Starr premieres in New York City. ... Patton (UK: Patton: Lust for Glory) is a 1970 epic biographical film which tells the story of General George S. Patton during World War II. It stars George C. Scott, Karl Malden, Michael Bates, and Karl Michael Vogler. ... MASH is a 1970 satirical American dark comedy film directed by Robert Altman and based on the novel MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors by Richard Hooker. ... See also: 1970 in film 1971 1972 in film 1970s in film years in film film // Events February 8 - Bob Dylans hour long documentary film, Eat the Document, premieres at New Yorks Academy of Music. ... The French Connection is a 1971 Hollywood crime film directed by William Friedkin. ... // Top grossing films The Godfather Fiddler on the Roof Diamonds Are Forever Whats Up, Doc?, starring Barbra Streisand and Ryan ONeal Dirty Harry The Last Picture Show A Clockwork Orange Cabaret, starring Liza Minnelli The Hospital Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex Academy Awards Best Picture... This article is about the 1972 film. ... // Events The Marx Brothers Zeppo Marx divorces his second wife, Barbara Blakely. ... This article is about the 1973 film involving con artists. ... The Exorcist is an Academy Award-winning 1973 American horror film, adapted from the 1971 novel of the same name by William Peter Blatty, dealing with the demonic possession of a young girl, and her mother’s desperate attempts to win back her daughter through an exorcism conducted by two... See also: 1973 in film 1974 1975 in film 1970s in film years in film film // Events February 7 - Blazing Saddles is released in USA May 1 - George Lucas creates the first draft of what would eventually become Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope. ... Alex Karras as Mongo in Blazing Saddles Blazing Saddles (1974) is a comedy directed by Mel Brooks and starring Cleavon Little and Gene Wilder, and released by Warner Brothers. ... The year 1975 in film involved some significant events. ... Steven Allan Spielberg KBE (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director, producer and screenwriter. ... Jaws is a 1975 thriller/horror film directed by Steven Spielberg, based on Peter Benchleys best-selling novel inspired by the Jersey Shore shark attacks of 1916. ... Blockbuster, as applied to film or theater, denotes a very popular and/or successful production. ... The year 1976 in film involved some significant events. ... For other uses, see Rocky (disambiguation). ... The year 1977 in film involved some significant events. ... Woody Allen (born Allen Stewart Konigsberg; December 1, 1935) is a three-time Academy Award-winning American film director, writer, actor, jazz musician, comedian and playwright. ... Annie Hall is a 1977 romantic comedy film directed by Woody Allen from a script he co-wrote with Marshall Brickman. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ... This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological... The Bee Gees: Maurice, Barry and Robin The Bee Gees were a British and Australian band, originally a pop singer-songwriter combination, reborn as funk and disco. ... Saturday Night Fever is a 1977 movie starring John Travolta as Tony Manero, a troubled Brooklyn youth whose weekend activities are dominated by visits to a Brooklyn discotheque. ... // Events February 1 - Bob Dylans film Renaldo and Clara, a documentary of the Rolling Thunder Revue tour premieres in Los Angeles, California March 1 - Charlie Chaplins coffin is stolen from a Swiss cemetery 3 months after burial March - Leigh Brackett completes the first draft for Star Wars Episode... National Lampoons Animal House is a 1978 comedy film in which a misfit group of fraternity boys take on the system at their college. ... Halloween (film) redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... J.R.R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings is a 1978 animated fantasy film directed by Ralph Bakshi. ... For the series of films, see Superman (film series). ... // Events March 5 - Production begins on Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back. ... Francis Ford Coppola (born April 7, 1939) is a five-time Academy Award winning American film director, producer, and screenwriter. ... Apocalypse Now is a 1979 Academy Award and Golden Globe winning American film set during the Vietnam War. ...

1980s

See also: 1980s in film The decade of the 1980s in film involved many significant films. ...

The year 1980 in film involved some significant events. ... Movie poster Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back is the sequel to the first released Star Wars movie, and the second film released in the original trilogy. ... Friday the 13th is a 1980 independent slasher film directed by Sean S. Cunningham and written by Victor Miller. ... Caddyshack is a 1980 U.S. comedy film directed by Harold Ramis and written by Brian Doyle-Murray, Ramis and Douglas Kenney. ... // January 19 - Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer acquires beleaguered concurrent United Artists. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ... Steven Allan Spielberg KBE (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director, producer and screenwriter. ... This article is about the film. ... // This is the year of film E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, which will become the highest grossing movie for almost 15 years (until Titanic), earning double or triple against any major film of the 1980s. ... Porkys is a comedy film about the escapades of teenagers at the fictional Angel Beach high school in Florida in 1954. ... // February 11 - The Rolling Stones concert film Lets Spend the Night Together opens in New York North Americas Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi Tootsie Trading Places, starring Dan Aykroyd and Eddie Murphy WarGames, starring Matthew Broderick and Ally Sheedy Superman III Flashdance Staying Alive Octopussy Mr. ... Movie poster Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi, is a science fiction film that debuted in 1983, and re-released with changes in 1997 and 2004. ... The Big Chill is a 1983 film that tells the story of several University of Michigan college friends who reunite after many years for the funeral of one of their friends who commits suicide. ... // Events The Walt Disney Company founds Touchstone Pictures to release movies with subject matter deemed inappropriate for the Disney name. ... This article is about the film. ... Ghostbusters logo ©1984 Columbia Studios Ghostbusters (sometimes written Ghost Busters) is a 1984 sci-fi comedy film about three parapsychologists who are fired from a New York City University, and start up their own business investigating and excising ghosts. ... Amadeus is a 1984 film directed by MiloÅ¡ Forman. ... The Neverending Story (German: ) is a fantasy novel by Michael Ende, first published in Germany in 1979. ... // 3 December - Roger Moore steps down from the role of James Bond after twelve years and seven films. ... Steven Allan Spielberg KBE (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director, producer and screenwriter. ... This article is about about the novel. ... This article is about the first film in the Back to the Future trilogy. ... // April 12 - Actor Morgan Mason marries The Go-Gos Belinda Carlisle Actor Arnold Schwarzenegger marries television journalist Maria Shriver. ... This page is about the movie Hoosiers. Hoosiers is also the nickname of Indiana University athletic teams; see Indiana Hoosiers. ... For other persons named David Lynch, see David Lynch (disambiguation). ... This article is about the David Lynch film. ... // May 9 - Actor Tom Cruise marries actress Mimi Rogers. ... Fatal Attraction is a 1987 thriller about a married man who has a weekend affair with a woman who refuses to allow it to end and who becomes obsessed with him. ... This article is about the novel. ... // Michael Jacksons first film was Moonwalker Rain Man, starring Dustin Hoffman and Tom Cruise Who Framed Roger Rabbit, starring Bob Hoskins Coming to America, starring Eddie Murphy Big, starring Tom Hanks Twins, starring Arnold Schwarzenegger and Danny DeVito Crocodile Dundee II Die Hard, starring Bruce Willis The Naked Gun... Rain Man is a 1988 film which tells the story of a selfish yuppie who discovers that his father has left all of his estate to the autistic brother he never knew he had. ... Dustin Lee Hoffman (born August 8, 1937) is a two-time Academy Award-winning, BAFTA-winning, and five-time Golden Globe-winning American method actor. ... Tom Cruise (born Thomas Cruise Mapother IV on July 3, 1962) is an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe Award-winning American actor and film producer. ... // Actress Kim Basinger and her brother Mick purchase Braselton, Georgia for $20 million. ... Batman DVD cover, 1997 release version Batman was released in U.S. theaters on June 23, 1989 by Warner Bros. ... Timothy Tim William Burton (born August 25, 1958) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-nominated American film director, writer and designer notable for the quirky and often dark atmosphere in his high-profile films. ... This article is about the film. ... Sir Thomas Sean Connery (born August 25, 1930) is an Academy Award-, Golden Globe-, and BAFTA Award-winning Scottish actor and producer who is perhaps best known as the first actor to portray James Bond in cinema, starring in seven Bond films. ... The Abyss is a 1989 science fiction film which was written and directed by James Cameron, starring Ed Harris, Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio, and Michael Biehn. ... For other persons named James Cameron, see James Cameron (disambiguation). ...

1990s

See also: 1990s in film Films made in the 1990s included: Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Above the Rim (1994) Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls (1995) Ace Ventura: Pet...

The year 1990 in film involved some significant events. ... Goodfellas (also spelled GoodFellas) is an Academy Award winning 1990 crime drama film directed by Martin Scorsese, based on the book Wiseguy by Nicholas Pileggi, the true story of mob informer Henry Hill. ... For the 2007 film, see TMNT (film). ... Dances with Wolves is a 1990 epic film which tells the story of a United States cavalry officer from the Civil War who travels into the Dakota Territory, near a Sioux tribe. ... The year 1991 in film involved some significant events. ... The Silence of the Lambs is a 1991 Academy Award-winning film directed by Jonathan Demme and starring Jodie Foster and Anthony Hopkins. ... Terminator 2: Judgment Day (commonly abbreviated T2) is a 1991 movie directed by James Cameron and starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, Linda Hamilton, and Robert Patrick. ... The year 1992 in film involved many significant films. ... This article is about the 1992 film. ... The year 1993 in film involved many significant films. ... This article is about the movie. ... Super Mario Bros. ... The year 1994 in film involved some significant events. ... For other uses, see Forrest Gump (disambiguation). ... Pulp Fiction is a 1994 film by director Quentin Tarantino, who cowrote the film with Roger Avary. ... Street Fighter is a 1994 action movie based on Capcoms popular fighting game series Street Fighter. ... The year 1995 in film involved some significant events. ... Mel Columcille Gerard Gibson, AO (born January 3, 1956) is an American-Australian actor, historian, Academy Award-winning director, producer and screenwriter. ... For the moshing term Braveheart, see Wall of death (moshing). ... The year 1996 in film involved some significant events. ... Fargo is a 1996 American crime-comedy-drama film written, directed and produced by the Coen Brothers. ... The English Patient is a 1996 film adaptation of the novel by Michael Ondaatje. ... Independence Day (also known by its promotional abbreviation ID4) is a 1996 Academy Award-winning science fiction film directed by Roland Emmerich. ... The Stupids is a 1996 comedy / adventure film directed by John Landis. ... The year 1997 in film involved some significant events. ... Mortal Kombat: Annihilation (1997) was directed by John R. Leonetti. ... Men in Black is a 1997 science fiction comedy action film directed by Barry Sonnenfeld, starring Tommy Lee Jones, Will Smith and Vincent DOnofrio. ... The year 1998 in film involved some significant events. ... Matthew Paige Matt Damon (born October 8, 1970) is an American screenwriter and actor. ... Paul Edward Valentine Giamatti (born June 6, 1967) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... Saving Private Ryan is a 1998 Academy Award-winning war film that is set during the D-Day invasion of Normandy in World War II and was directed by Steven Spielberg and written by Robert Rodat. ... This article is about the film studio. ... The Prince of Egypt is a 1998 Academy Award-winning American animated film, the first traditionally animated film produced and released by DreamWorks. ... Antz is a 1998 computer-animated film produced by DreamWorks. ... The year 1999 in film involved some significant events. ... Film poster for Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace is a 1999 film by George Lucas starring Liam Neeson, Ewan McGregor, Natalie Portman, and Jake Lloyd. ... This article is about the 1999 film. ... South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut is a 1999 motion picture based on the cartoon television series of South Park. ... Fight Club is a 1999 American feature film adaptation of the 1996 novel Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk, adapted by Jim Uhls and directed by David Fincher. ...

2000s

See also: 2000s in film The first decade of the 2000s in film involved many significant films. ...

The year 2000 in film involved some significant events. ... This article is about the 2000 film. ... X-Men is a 2000 superhero film based upon the fictional characters the X-Men. ... For the 1968 science-fiction film and novel, see 2001: A Space Odyssey The year 2001 in film involved some significant events. ... The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring is a film, released on Wednesday, December 19, 2001, directed by Peter Jackson with a runtime of 178 minutes (2 hours, 58 minutes). ... For other uses, see Shrek (disambiguation). ... Osmosis Jones (2001) is a part animated, part live action film whose title character is Osmosis Jones, an anthropomorphic white blood cell. ... A Beautiful Mind is a 2001 American biographical film about John Forbes Nash, the Nobel Laureate (Economics) mathematician. ... The year 2002 in film involved some significant events. ... This title can refer to either: The Two Towers (book), the second part of The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Spider-Man is a 2002 American superhero film based on the fictional Marvel Comics character Spider-Man. ... The year 2003 in film involved some significant events. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The year 2004 in film involved some significant events. ... For the 1989 movie starring Dolph Lundgren, see The Punisher (1989 film). ... Men in Black II (also known as MIIB) is a 2002 science fiction comedy action film starring Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones. ... This article is about the 2004 theatrical disaster film dealing with global warming. ... The year 2005 in film involved some significant events. ... For the video game based on the film, see Batman Begins (video game). ... King Kong is a 2005 remake of the 1933 King Kong film about a fictional giant ape called Kong. ... The Devils Rejects is a 2005 horror film written and directed by Rob Zombie. ... Domino is a 2005 Action film inspired by the story of Domino Harvey, the English daughter of stage and screen actor Laurence Harvey, who became a bounty hunter working in Los Angeles. ... Doom is a 2005 science fiction horror film adaptation of the popular Doom series of video games created by Id Software. ... Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith is the third episode of the Star Wars film series (but the sixth film to be produced), to be released on Thursday, May 19, 2005. ... The year 2006 in film involved some significant events. ... For the 1980s TV series, see Miami Vice. ... The Departed is an Academy Award winning 2006 crime thriller film directed by Martin Scorsese, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Matt Damon, Jack Nicholson and Mark Wahlberg. ... See No Evil is a 2006 horror film directed by Gregory Dark, written by Dan Madigan, produced by Joel Simon, and starring professional wrestler Kane (Glen Jacobs). ... Casino Royale (2006) is the twenty-first film in the James Bond series and the first to star Daniel Craig as MI6 agent James Bond. ... For the video game of the same name, see Superman Returns (video game). ... 2007 has been referred to, by film and media critics, as the year of the threequels, a nickname referring to both the 2004 summer movie season and several film franchises which premiered or had installments released in 2004, which appear again this year: Spider-Man 3, Shrek the Third, Ocean... For the 1986 animated film, see The Transformers: The Movie. ... 300 is a historically-inspired comic book limited series (later collected into a single hardcover volume) written and illustrated by Frank Miller with painted colors by Lynn Varley. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... 2008 in film is expected to feature another battle of the sequels, as many properties release new installments, including: Rambo, Harold & Kumar Escape from Guantanamo Bay, The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, Hellboy II: The Golden Army, Lost Boys: The Tribe... // LR: Limited release in select cities WR: Wide-release to theaters IMAX: Release to IMAX theaters Beverly Hills Cop IV The Hobbit Interstellar Magneto (film) Smooth Criminal : The Michael Jackson Story Temeraire Tales from Earthsea - December 18 LR - Buena Vista Distribution - Goro Miyazaki (director) The Lost Tomb: A Neopets Adventure...

2010s

  • 2010 - films scheduled to be released in 2010
  • 2011 - films scheduled to be released in 2011
  • 2012 - films scheduled to be released in 2012
  • 2013 - films scheduled to be released in 2013
  • 2014 - films scheduled to be released in 2014
  • 2015 - films scheduled to be released in 2015
  • 2016 - films scheduled to be released in 2016
  • 2017 - films scheduled to be released in 2017
  • 2018 - films scheduled to be released in 2018
  • 2019 - films scheduled to be released in 2019

This is a list of film-related events in 2010. ... This is a list of film-related events in 2011. ...

References

  • The Silent Cinema Reader edited by Lee Grieveson and Peter Kramer
  • Movies of the 30s, edited by Jürgen Müller, Taschen
  • The Magic of Méliès, documentary by Jacques Mény, special collector's edition DVD, Spain

Taschen is an art book publisher founded in 1980 by Benedikt Taschen in Cologne, Germany. ...

External links


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