FACTOID # 12: It's not the government they hate: Washington DC has the highest number of hate crimes per capita in the US.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > List of thinkers influenced by deconstruction

This is a list of notable thinkers that have been influenced by deconstruction. In contemporary philosophy and social sciences, the term deconstruction denotes a process by which the texts and languages of (particularly) Western philosophy appear to shift and complicate in meaning when read in light of the assumptions they suggest about and absences they reveal within themselves. ...

Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A

  • Gil Anidjar: Anidjar is Assistant Professor in the Department of Middle East and Asian Languages and Cultures at Columbia University. Anidjar wrote the introduction to Derrida's Acts of Religion and has stated that deconstruction influenced his book The Jew, the Arab: A History of the Enemy.[1]

B

Harold Bloom
Enlarge
Harold Bloom
  • Jack Balkin: Balkin is the Knight Professor of Constitutional Law and the First Amendment at Yale Law School and a renowned critical legal theorist. On his blog, Balkin said that deconstruction influenced his intellectual life.[2]
  • Geoffrey Bennington: Bennington is Asa Griggs Candler Professor of French and Professor of Comparative Literature, Emory University, as well as a member of the International College of Philosophy. He is a literary critic and philosopher, best known as an expert on deconstruction and the works of Jacques Derrida and Jean-François Lyotard. He has translated many of Derrida's works into English.[3] Bennington co-wrote the book Jacques Derrida with Derrida.[4]
  • Robert Bernasconi: Bernasconi is the Lillian and Morrie Moss Professor of Philosophy at the University of Memphis. Bernasconi has written extensively on Heidegger, and has also written on Gadamer, Levinas, and Arendt, among others, recently pursuing an interest in race and racism. He has acknowledged and discussed the enormous importance of Derrida's contribution to the study of Heidegger.[5]
  • Homi K. Bhabha: Bhabha is a postcolonial theorist, currently teaching at Harvard University, where he is the Anne F. Rothenberg Professor of English and American Literature and Language. Bhabha brings together the insights of deconstruction and psychoanalysis in his investigations of social subordination.[6]
  • Harold Bloom: Bloom is the Sterling Professor of the Humanities at Yale University and Berg Professor of English and American Literature at New York University. In 1979, Bloom contributed to the influential Deconstruction and Criticism,[7] a foundational text for the Yale School of deconstruction. Later, in a 1983 interview with Robert Moynihan, Bloom said, "What I think I have in common with the school of deconstruction is the mode of negative thinking or negative awareness, in the technical, philosophical sense of the negative, but which comes to me through negative theology...There is no escape, there is simply the given, and there is nothing that we can do."[8] In accordance, Slavoj Zizek has identified the mid-to-late 1980's as the period when Derrida's deconstruction shifted from a radical negative theology to a Kantian idealism.[9] In 1989, Bloom eschewed any identification with the Yale School's technical, methodological approach to literary criticism.[10] He stated that "there is no method except yourself"[11] and observed that deconstruction as a mode of thought is best understood as unique to Derrida. In a 2003 interview, Bloom recalled that in his past he found himself "fighting" deconstructionists.[12] In the same interview, he stated that the deconstructionists were his friends and that what interests him in language is the Absolute, a notion he shares with Yale School deconstructionists and the negative theology of kabbalists.[13]
  • Judith Butler: Butler is a prominent American post-structuralist philosopher and has contributed to the fields of feminism, queer theory, political philosophy and ethics. She is Maxine Elliot professor in the Departments of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Berkeley. Many of Butler's works have taken up deconstructive themes.[14]

Image File history File links Hamlet-bloom. ... Image File history File links Hamlet-bloom. ... Jack M. Balkin (born August 13, 1956 in Kansas City, Missouri) is the Knight Professor of Constitutional Law and the First Amendment at Yale Law School. ... Critical legal studies refers to a movement in legal thought that applied methods similar to those of critical theory (the Frankfurt School) to law. ... Geoffrey Bennington is Asa Griggs Candler Professor of French and Professor of Comparative Literature, Emory University, as well as a member of the International College of Philosophy. ... Robert Bernasconi is the Lillian and Morrie Moss Professor of Philosophy at the University of Memphis. ... This page is about the critical theorist, Homi K. Bhabha. ... Postcolonial theory is a literary theory or critical approach that deals with literature produced in countries that were once, or are now, colonies of other countries. ... In contemporary philosophy and social sciences, the term deconstruction denotes a process by which the texts and languages of (particularly) Western philosophy appear to shift and complicate in meaning when read in light of the assumptions they suggest about and absences they reveal within themselves. ... Psychoanalysis is a family of psychological theories and methods based on the pioneering work of Sigmund Freud. ... Harold Bloom, Literary Critic Dr. Harold Bloom (born July 11, 1930) is an American professor and prominent literary and cultural critic. ... Slavoj Žižek. ... Negative theology - also known as the Via Negativa (Latin for Negative Way) and Apophatic theology - is a theology that attempts to describe God by negation, to speak of God only in terms of what may not be said about God. ... Immanuel Kant Immanuel Kant (April 22, 1724 – February 12, 1804) was a Prussian philosopher, generally regarded as one of Europes most influential thinkers and the last major philosopher of the Enlightenment. ... The Yale school is a colloquial name for an influential group of literary critics, theorists, and philosophers, all influenced by deconstruction, who were together at Yale University in the 1970s. ... Jacques Derrida Jacques Derrida (July 15, 1930 – October 8, 2004) was an Algerian-born French literary critic and philosopher of Jewish descent, considered the first to develop deconstruction. Positioning Derridas thought Derrida had a significant effect on continental philosophy and on literary theory, particularly through his long-time... The Yale school is a colloquial name for an influential group of literary critics, theorists, and philosophers, all influenced by deconstruction, who were together at Yale University in the 1970s. ... Negative theology - also known as the Via Negativa (Latin for Negative Way) and Apophatic theology - is a theology that attempts to describe God by negation, to speak of God only in terms of what may not be said about God. ... This article is about traditional Kabbalah (Jewish mysticism). ... Image:J Butler. ...

C

  • John D. Caputo: Caputo is the Thomas J. Watson Professor of Humanities at Syracuse University the founder of weak theology. Much of Caputo's work focuses on hermeneutics, phenomenology, deconstruction, and theology.[15]
  • Stanley Cavell: Cavell is an American philosopher. He is the Walter M. Cabot Professor Emeritus of Aesthetics and the General Theory of Value at Harvard University. Cavell has written on Derrida's work.[16]
  • Hélène Cixous: Cixous is a professor, French feminist writer, poet, playwright, philosopher, literary critic and rhetorician.[17]
  • Drucilla Cornell: Cornell is a professor of political science, women's studies, and comparative literature at Rutgers University.[18]
  • Simon Critchley: Critchley teaches philosophy at the New School for Social Research. Critchley has written a number of books on Derrida, including The Ethics of Deconstruction: Derrida and Levinas[19] and Ethics-Politics-Subjectivity: Essays on Derrida, Levinas, and Contemporary French Thought.[20] Critchley has said that Derrida was a "brilliant reader" and that it is imperitive to follow his example.[21]
  • Jonathan Culler: Culler is Class of 1916 Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Cornell University. Culler has written a number of books about deconstruction.[22]

John D. Caputo John D. Caputo, American Continental philosopher. ... Weak theology -- in close association with deconstruction-and-religion -- is a school of thought within continental philosophical theology that has been heavily influenced by Jacques Derridas style of theorizing known as deconstruction. ... Stanley Cavell (born September 1, 1926) of Brookline, Massachusetts is an American philosopher. ... Image:Cixous. ... Simon Critchley is a British philosopher, working in Continental philosophy and related fields. ... Jonathan Culler (1944 - ) is an important figure of the structuralism movement. ...

D

Hamid Dabashi
Hamid Dabashi
Jacques Derrida
Jacques Derrida
  • Hamid Dabashi: Dabashi is an Iranian-born American intellectual historian, cultural and literary critic best known for his scholarship on Iran and Shi'a Islam. He is the Hagop Kevorkian Professor of Iranian Studies and Comparative Literature at Columbia University in New York, the oldest and most prestigious Chair in Iranian Studies.[23] In the essay "In the Absence of the Face," Dabashi uses deconstructive methods in his investigation of the Judeo-Islamic heritage.[24]
  • Samuel Delany: Delany is an award-winning American science fiction author. Delaney is widely known in the academic world as a literary critic. His essays and novels have been influenced by deconstruction.[25]
  • Jacques Derrida: Derrida was an Algerian-born French philosopher, known as the founder of deconstruction.[26][27]
  • Alexander García Düttmann: Düttmann is Professor of Philosophy and Visual Culture at Goldsmiths College, University of London. His work focuses on art, language, history, politics, and deconstruction.[28]

Image File history File links Dabashi. ... Image File history File links Dabashi. ... This work is copyrighted. ... This work is copyrighted. ... Hamid Dabashi (Persian: ‎ ​) is an Iranian-born American intellectual historian, cultural and literary critic best known for his scholarship on Iran and Shia Islam. ... Hagop Kevorkian was an Armenian connoisseur of art, originally from Kayseri who graduated from the American-funded Robert College in Istanbul and settled in New York in the late 19th century and helped America acquire a taste for Eastern artifacts. ... Comparative literature, colloquially abbreviated comp. ... Columbia University is a private university whose main campus lies in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of the Borough of Manhattan in New York City. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  Ranked 27th  - Total 54,520 sq mi (141,205 km²)  - Width 285 miles (455 km)  - Length 330 miles (530 km)  - % water 13. ... Samuel Ray Chip Delany, Jr. ... Jacques Derrida (July 15, 1930 – October 8, 2004) was an Algerian-born French philosopher, known as the founder of deconstruction. ...

E

F

  • Christopher Fynsk: Fynsk is a Professor in the School of Language and Literature at the University of Aberdeen. In his book, Heidegger: Thought and Historicity (1993, 2nd edn.), he acknowledges that "the influence of Jacques Derrida, Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe, and Jean-Luc Nancy on the pages that follow is far greater than I have been able to indicate."[29] He was also a participant in Lacoue-Labarthe and Nancy's Centre for Philosophical Research on the Political.[30]

G

  • Rodolphe Gasché: Gasché holds the Eugenio Donato Chair of Comparative Literature at the University of Buffalo, State University of New York. He is the author of numerous books, including the influential The Tain of the Mirror: Derrida and the Philosophy of Reflection (1986),[31] and Inventions of Difference: On Jacques Derrida (1994).[32]

H

  • Werner Hamacher: Hamacher holds the Emmanuel Levinas Chair at the European Graduate School, is Professor for General and Comparative Literature at the University of Frankfurt, and is Global Distinguished Professor at New York University.[33] Hamacher writes in the tradition of the Yale School of deconstruction and touches on topics including politics, literature, and philosophy.[34]
  • Michael Hardt: Hardt is an American literary theorist and political philosopher based at Duke University. Perhaps his most famous work is Empire, written with Antonio Negri. Hardt is a Derrida scholar whose work has been influenced by deconstruction.[35][36]
  • Geoffrey Hartman: Hartman is the Sterling Professor emeritus of English and Comparative Literature at Yale University. He was part of the Yale School of deconstruction and has written extensively using deconstructive concepts.[37]

Werner Hamacher (b. ... The European Graduate School (EGS) in Switzerland is a privately funded graduate school founded by the non-profit European Foundation of Interdisciplinary Studies. ... University of Frankfurt may refer to two (or three) German universities: the Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt am Main (Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main) in Frankfurt am Main the European University Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder) (Europa-Universität Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder)) in Frankfurt (Oder), or its historical predecessor... New York University (NYU) is a major research university in New York City. ... Michael Hardt is an American literary theorist and political philosopher based at Duke University. ... Antonio Negri (August 1, 1933- ) is a moral and political philosopher, and a former political inmate from Italy. ... Geoffrey H. Hartman (b. ...

I

  • Luce Irigaray: Irigaray is a French feminist and psychoanalytic and cultural theorist. She employs deconstructive concepts in advancing her message.[38]

Luce Irigaray (born 1930 Belgium) is a French feminist and psychoanalytic and cultural theorist. ...

J

Fredric Jameson
Enlarge
Fredric Jameson
  • Fredric Jameson: Jameson, a Marxist political and literary critic, is currently William A. Lane Professor of Comparative Literature and Romance Studies at Duke University. His work engages with the continental tradition of philosophy, including deconstruction.[39]
  • Barbara Johnson: Johnson is an American literary critic and translator. She is currently a Professor of English and Comparative Literature and the Frederic Wertham Professor of Law and Psychiatry in Society at Harvard University. She studied at Yale University while the Yale School of deconstruction was in ascendence. Much of her work has centered on social subordination, identity politics, literary theory, and deconstruction.[40]

Fredric Jameson (b. ... Continental philosophy is a term used in philosophy to designate one of two major traditions of modern Western philosophy. ... Barbara Johnson (b. ...

K

  • Peggy Kamuf: Kamuf is the Marion Frances Chevalier Professor of French and Professor of French and Comparative Literature at the University of Southern California. Kamuf’s principal research interests are in literary theory and contemporary French thought and literature. She has written extensively on the work of Jacques Derrida, Hélène Cixous, and Jean-Luc Nancy, and has also translated a number of their texts.[41]
  • Kojin Karatani: Kojin is a Japanese philosopher and literary critic associated with the Yale School of deconstruction. Karatani has interrogated the possibility of a de Manian deconstruction and engaged in a dialogue with Jacques Derrida on the occasion of the Second International Conference on Humanistic Discourse, organized by the University of Montreal. Derrida commented on Karatani's paper, 'Nationalism and Ecriture' with an emphasis on the interpretation of his own concept of écriture.[42]
  • Thomas Keenan: Keenan is Director of the Human Rights Project and Associate Professor of Comparative Literature at Bard College. He states in the introduction to Fables of Responsibility: Aberrations and Predicaments in Ethics and Politics (1997) that the book "locates itself within what has been called 'post-structuralism' or 'deconstruction,' but in a way that seeks to resist the easy division between the so-called 'literary' and 'political' wings of the work named with these slogans."[43]
  • Duncan Kennedy: Kennedy is the Carter Professor of General Jurisprudence at Harvard Law School and a renowned critical legal theorist. Kennedy has written more than a few articles investigating deconstructive concepts, including the article "A Semiotics of Critique."[44]
  • Sarah Kofman: Kofman was a French philosopher and author of many books, especially known for her works on Freud and Nietzsche. She was a student and colleague of Derrida, and after her death he wrote about Kofman and her work.[45]
  • Julia Kristeva: Kristeva is a Bulgarian-French philosopher, psychoanalyst, feminist, and novelist. Kristeva is a prolific writer who has employed deconstructive concepts in many of her books.[46]

Kojin Karatani (born 1941 in Amagasaki) is a Japanese philosopher. ... Jacques Derrida (July 15, 1930 – October 8, 2004) was an Algerian-born French philosopher, known as the founder of deconstruction. ... In contemporary philosophy and social sciences, the term deconstruction denotes a process by which the texts and languages of (particularly) Western philosophy appear to shift and complicate in meaning when read in light of the assumptions they suggest about and absences they reveal within themselves. ... Duncan Kennedy (*1942 in Washington, D.C.) is the Carter Professor of General Jurisprudence at Harvard Law School. ... Critical legal studies refers to a movement in legal thought that applied methods similar to those of critical theory (the Frankfurt School) to law. ... Sarah Kofman (September 14, 1934 - October 15, 1994) was a French philosopher, author of numerous books, particularly on Friedrich Nietzsche and Sigmund Freud. ... Julia Kristeva (Bulgarian: ) (born 24 June 1941) is a Bulgarian-French philosopher, psychoanalyst, feminist, and, most recently, novelist, who has lived in France since the mid-1960s. ...

L

Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe
Enlarge
Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe
  • Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe: Lacoue-Labarthe is a French philosopher, literary critic, and translator. Lacoue-Labarthe, like Jean-Luc Nancy, was a student and then colleague of Derrida. In addition to writing many books (including together), Lacoue-Labarthe and Nancy were co-directors of the short-lived Centre for Philosophical Research on the Political, which developed out of a 1980 colloquium devoted to the political questions arising from Derrida's work.[47] Lacoue-Labarthe's book, Typography: Mimesis, Philosophy, Politics (1989), contains an introduction by Derrida, "Desistance," consisting in a long discussion of Lacoue-Labarthe's work.[48]
  • Ernesto Laclau: Laclau is an Argentinian political theorist often described as post-Marxist. He is a professor at the University of Essex where he holds a chair in Political Theory and was for many years director of the doctoral Programme in Ideology and Discourse Analysis. He has lectured extensively in many universities in North America, Latin America, Western Europe, Australia and South Africa. Recently, he left The University at Buffalo and now teaches at Northwestern University. Laclau has stated that his writings take a deconstructive approach.[49]

Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe (born 1940) is a contemporary French philosopher, literary critic, and translator. ... Ernesto Laclau is a political theorist often described as post-marxist. ...

M

  • Paul de Man: De Man was a Belgian-born deconstructionist literary critic and theorist. As a member of the Yale School of deconstruction, de Man was instrumental in popularizing deconstruction as a form of literary criticism in the United States. De Man made extensive use of deconstructive concepts throughout his career.[50]
  • J. Hillis Miller: Miller is a Distinguished Professor of English at the University of California Irvine. He was part of the Yale School of deconstruction and has written extensively using deconstructive concepts.[51]
  • W.J.T. Mitchell: Mitchell is Gaylord Donnelley Distinguished Service professor of English and Art History at the University of Chicago. He is also the editor of Critical Inquiry, and contributes to the journal October. Mitchell co-authored a book about Derrida with Arnold I. Davidson entitled The Late Derrida.[52]
  • Chantal Mouffe: Mouffe holds a professorship at the University of Westminster in England. She writes primarily about political issues and employs deconstructive strategies in doing so.[53]

Paul de Man (December 6, 1919 – December 21, 1983) was a Belgian-born deconstructionist literary critic and theorist. ... J. Hillis Miller is an American deconstructive literary critic. ... W.J.T. Mitchell is a professor of English and art history at the University of Chicago. ... Chantal Mouffe (born 1943) is a Belgian political theorist. ...

N

Jean-Luc Nancy
Enlarge
Jean-Luc Nancy
  • Jean-Luc Nancy: Nancy is a French philosopher and author. Nancy, like Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe, was a student and then colleague of Derrida. In addition to writing many books (including together), Nancy and Lacoue-Labarthe were co-directors of the short-lived Centre for Philosophical Research on the Political, which developed out of a 1980 colloquium devoted to the political questions arising from Derrida's work.[54] Derrida's book, Le toucher, Jean-Luc Nancy (2000), is about Nancy's writing.[55]
  • Christopher Norris: Norris holds the title of Distinguished Research Professor in Philosophy at Cardiff University. Norris has been influenced by Derrida and the Yale School. Norris is known for arguing against relativism and in favor of a point of view he calls "deconstructive realism."[56]

Jean-Luc Nancy (born 26 July 1940) is a French philosopher. ... Christopher Norris is a British literary critic and theorist. ... The Yale school is a colloquial name for an influential group of literary critics, theorists, and philosophers, all influenced by deconstruction, who were together at Yale University in the 1970s. ...

O

P

  • Arkady Plotnitsky: Plotnitsky is Professor of English and Director of Theory and Cultural Studies Program at Purdue University. Plotnitsky has authored books and articles that engage with deconstruction and science.[57]

Q

R

  • Avital Ronell: Ronell is Professor and Chair of German and Professor of Comparative Literature, New York University, as well as a member of the faculty of the European Graduate School. To some, Avitall is affectionately known as the "black lady of deconstruction" and the "ivory-tower terrorist."[58] Her works apply vigorous deconstructive interpretations to current theories of technology, social hierarchies, ethics, and aesthetics, among other topics.[59]
  • Richard Rorty: Rorty is an American philosopher. He is currently an emeritus professor of comparative literature, and, by courtesy, philosophy at Stanford University. Having started his career writing in the analytic tradition of philosophy, Rorty's later works take up pragmatic and deconstructive themes.[60]

Avital Ronell is Professor and Chair of German and Professor of Comparative Literature, New York University, as well as a member of the faculty of the European Graduate School. ... Richard McKay Rorty (born October 4, 1931 in New York City) is an American philosopher. ... Analytic philosophy is the dominant philosophical movement in University philosophy departments in English-speaking countries and in Scandinavia, although one of its founders, Gottlob Frege, was German, and many of its leading proponents, such as Ludwig Wittgenstein, Rudolf Carnap, Kurt Gödel, Karl Popper, Hans Reichenbach, Herbert Feigl, Otto Neurath... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

S

Edward Said
Edward Said
Bernard Stiegler
Enlarge
Bernard Stiegler
  • Edward Said: Said was a well-known Palestinian-American literary theorist, critic, and outspoken political activist. He was a University Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University, and is regarded as a founding figure in postcolonialism.[61] Throughout his career, Said was concerned with the repression faced by Muslims in general and Palestinians in particular.[62] Although Said has never acknowledged that he was influenced by Derrida, in a 1976 interview he said that he shared many theoretical interests with the Yale School deconstructionists.[63] Said went on to qualify the assertion by expressing regret that the thinkers lacked concern with historical and political questions.[64] Later, Said described his work in the book Orientalism as an effort to deconstruct platitudes associated with so-called Western values in order to engender genuine human freedom.[65] In a 1986 interview, Derrida stated that he wished to see the withdrawal of Israeli troops from the occupied Palestinian territories but that the Israeli state's existence must be recognized by all.[66] To some, Derrida's stated position on Israel was inconsistent with his position on apartheid-era South Africa.[67] When Said was asked about Derrida's relative silence on the issue of Palestine in a 1998 interview, he apparently sidestepped the issue.[68]
  • John Sallis: Sallis is Frederick J. Adelmann Professor of Philosophy at Boston College. The work of Sallis and Derrida intertwines at many points, notably in their readings of the Platonic dialogue Timaeus.[69] An essay by Derrida about Sallis's work is included in Kenneth Maly (ed.), The Path of Archaic Thinking: Unfolding the Work of John Sallis (1995).[70]
  • Pierre Schlag: Schlag is the Byron R. White Professor at the University of Colorado Law School. Schlag is a critical legal theorist and has written about deconstruction and the law.[71]
  • James K.A. Smith: Smith is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Calvin College. Many of his works engage with Derrida's thought.[72]
  • Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak: Spivak currently teaches at Columbia University. Spivak, a notable advocate of postcolonialism, translated Derrida's Of Grammatology and has used deconstructive concepts in her books.[73]
  • Bernard Stiegler: Stiegler is a French philosopher and Director of the Department of Cultural Development at the Centre Georges-Pompidou. Stiegler's work owes a great debt to both Heidegger and Derrida, while nevertheless offering decisive critiques of each.[74]

Edward W. Said Photograph taken from a page at Electronic Intifada. ... Edward W. Said Photograph taken from a page at Electronic Intifada. ... Edward Wadie Said (1 November 1935, Jerusalem – 25 September 2003, New York City; Arabic: ‎) was a well-known Palestinian-American literary theorist and outspoken Palestinian activist. ... Post-colonialism refers to the intellectual field opened up by Edward Saids book Orientalism. ... The Yale school is a colloquial name for an influential group of literary critics, theorists, and philosophers, all influenced by deconstruction, who were together at Yale University in the 1970s. ... John Sallis (born 1938) is an American philosopher. ... Critical legal studies refers to a movement in legal thought that applied methods similar to those of critical theory (the Frankfurt School) to law. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak (born February 24, 1942) is a literary critic and theorist. ... Post-colonialism refers to the intellectual field opened up by Edward Saids book Orientalism. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...

T

  • Mark C. Taylor: Taylor is the Cluett Professor of Humanities at Williams College. He is among the first authors to connect deconstruction with religious thought and has authored many books using deconstructive concepts.[75] Taylor calls himself a "philosopher of culture"[76] and often writes in a mode known as deconstruction-and-religion or postmodern a/theology.

Mark C. Taylor (born 13 December 1945) is the Cluett Professor of Humanities at Williams College. ... Weak theology -- in close association with deconstruction-and-religion -- is a school of thought within continental philosophical theology that has been heavily influenced by Jacques Derridas style of theorizing known as deconstruction. ...

U

  • Gregory Ulmer: Ulmer is Professor of Electronic Languages and Cybermedia at the European Graduate School. Ulmer's work focuses on hypertext, electracy and cyberlanguage and is frequently associated with "emerAgency", "fetishturgy," "choragraphy" and "mystoriography." He is the author of Applied Grammatology: Post(e)-Pedagogy from Jacques Derrida to Joseph Beuys; Teletheory: Grammatology in the Age of Video; Heuretics: The Logic of Invention; Internet Invention: From Literacy to Electracy; and Electronic Monuments.[77]

Gregory L. Ulmer is a professor at the University of Florida (Gainesville), Department of English since 1985, and a Professor of Electronic Languages and Cybermedia at the European Graduate School (Saas-Fee, Switzerland), where he teaches an Intensive Summer Seminar. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... // Electracy is a neologism developed by theorist Gregory Ulmer to describe the kind of “literacy” or skill and facility necessary to exploit the full communicative potential of new electronic media such as video, hypertext, social software, and virtual reality worlds like Second Life. ...

V

  • Gerald Vizenor: Vizenor is currently Professor Emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley, and Professor of American Studies at the University of New Mexico. According to Louis Owens, Vizenor employed deconstructive strategies in his novel The Darkness in St. Louis Bearheart.[78] Vizenor has stated that his writing strategy involves deconstructing the subjugated position of Native Americans in dominant literary discourses.[79]

Gerald Vizenor (born 1934) is a Native American (Chippewa) writer. ... Native Americans is a term which has several different common meanings and scope, according to regional use and context. ...

W

  • Samuel Weber: Weber is the Paul de Man Chair at the European Graduate School and the Avalon Foundation Professor of Humanities at Northwestern University. He is known for his writings on deconstruction, literary theory, and psychoanalyis.[80]
  • David Wills: Wills is Professor of French and English and Chair of the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures at the State University of New York, Albany. His work is influenced by Derrida. He recently published Matchbook: Essays in Deconstruction (2005).[81]
  • Charles Winquist: Winquist was the Thomas J. Watson Professor of Religion at Syracuse University and a noted weak theologian. According to John D. Caputo, Winquist employed deconstructive strategies in his theological writings.[82]
  • David Wood: Wood is Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University. His work is influenced by Derrida, and he is the author of several books, including The Deconstruction of Time (1988)[83] and The Step Back: Ethics and Politics after Deconstruction (2005).[84]

Charles Winquist (1944 – April 4, 2002) was the Thomas J. Watson Professor of Religion at Syracuse University. ... Weak theology -- in close association with deconstruction-and-religion -- is a school of thought within continental philosophical theology that has been heavily influenced by Jacques Derridas style of theorizing known as deconstruction. ... John D. Caputo John D. Caputo, American Continental philosopher. ... David Wood (born 1946, Oxford) is professor of philosophy at Vanderbilt University. ...

X

Y

Z

See also

Continental philosophy is a term used in philosophy to designate one of two major traditions of modern Western philosophy. ... In contemporary philosophy and social sciences, the term deconstruction denotes a process by which the texts and languages of (particularly) Western philosophy appear to shift and complicate in meaning when read in light of the assumptions they suggest about and absences they reveal within themselves. ... Weak theology -- in close association with deconstruction-and-religion -- is a school of thought within continental philosophical theology that has been heavily influenced by Jacques Derridas style of theorizing known as deconstruction. ... Différance is a French homonym used in the context of deconstruction. ... Hermeneutics may be described as the development and study of theories of the interpretation and understanding of texts. ... The concept of the metaphysics of presence is a key component of deconstruction in Continental philosophy. ... Ontotheology means the ontology of God and/or the theology of being. ...

Notes

  1. ^ http://www.ciaonet.org/wps/ang02/
  2. ^ http://balkin.blogspot.com/2004/10/jacques-derrida.html
  3. ^ http://userwww.service.emory.edu/~gbennin/publicat.htm
  4. ^ (1993) Bennington, Geoffrey, et al. Jacques Derrida
  5. ^ (1993) Bernasconi, Robert, Heidegger in Question: The Art of Existing
  6. ^ http://www.artandculture.com/cgi-bin/WebObjects/ACLive.woa/wa/artist?id=994
  7. ^ (1979) Bloom, Harold, et al. Deconstruction and Criticism
  8. ^ http://prelectur.stanford.edu/lecturers/bloom/interviews.html
  9. ^ (2006) Zizek, Slavoj "A Plea for a Return to Differance (with a minor 'Pro Domo Sua')" Critical Inquiry 32 (2): 226-249
  10. ^ http://bostonreview.net/BR11.1/bloom.html
  11. ^ http://bostonreview.net/BR11.1/bloom.html
  12. ^ http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200307u/int2003-07-16
  13. ^ http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200307u/int2003-07-16
  14. ^ http://www.egs.edu/faculty/butler-articles.html
  15. ^ http://religion.syr.edu/caputo.html
  16. ^ http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~phildept/cavell.html
  17. ^ http://prelectur.stanford.edu/lecturers/cixous/index.html
  18. ^ http://polisci.rutgers.edu/FACULTY/BIOS/Cornell.html
  19. ^ (1990) Critchley, Simon The Ethics of Deconstruction: Derrida and Levinas
  20. ^ (1999) Critchley, Simon Ethics-Politics-Subjectivity: Essays on Derrida, Levinas, and Contemporary French Thought
  21. ^ http://muse.jhu.edu/demo/theory_and_event/v008/8.1critchley.html
  22. ^ http://sun3.lib.uci.edu/~scctr/hri/editing/culler.html
  23. ^ http://www.hamiddabashi.com
  24. ^ (2000) Dabashi, Hamid “In the Absence of the Face,” Social Research, Volume 67, Number 1. Spring 2000. pp. 127-185.
  25. ^ http://chronicle.com/free/v51/i09/09a00101.htm
  26. ^ Derrida's controversial, first-run New York Times obituary
  27. ^ Derrida's second-run New York Times obituary
  28. ^ http://www.goldsmiths.ac.uk/departments/visual-cultures/a-duttmann.php
  29. ^ (1993) Fynsk, Christopher, Heidegger: Thought and Historicity, p. 9
  30. ^ (1997) Fynsk, Christopher, "Contribution I" in Simon Sparks (ed.), Retreating the Political
  31. ^ (1986) Gasché, Rodolphe The Tain of the Mirror: Derrida and the Philosophy of Reflection
  32. ^ (1994) Gasché, Rodolphe Inventions of Difference: On Jacques Derrida
  33. ^ http://www.egs.edu/faculty/hamacher.html
  34. ^ http://www.egs.edu/faculty/hamacher.html
  35. ^ http://chronicle.com/free/v51/i09/09a00101.htm
  36. ^ http://observer.guardian.co.uk/global/story/0,10786,524215,00.html
  37. ^ http://sun3.lib.uci.edu/~scctr/Wellek/hartman/index.html
  38. ^ http://www.semiotexte.com/authors/irigaray.html
  39. ^ http://prelectur.stanford.edu/lecturers/jameson/
  40. ^ http://aaas.fas.harvard.edu/faculty/other_faculty/barbara_e_johnson.html
  41. ^ http://www.usc.edu/schools/college/faculty/faculty1003397.html
  42. ^ http://www.pum.umontreal.ca/revues/surfaces/vol5/derrida.html Jacques Derrida, Introduction to Kojin Karatani's "Nationalism and Ecriture"
  43. ^ (1997) Keenan, Thomas. Fables of Responsibility: Aberrations and Predicaments in Ethics and Politics, p. 2
  44. ^ http://duncankennedy.net/bibliography/chrono.html
  45. ^ (2001) Derrida, Jacques, "........" in The Work of Mourning
  46. ^ http://ms.cc.sunysb.edu/~hvolat/kristeva/kristeva.htm
  47. ^ (1997) Sparks, Simon (ed.), Retreating the Political
  48. ^ (1989) Lacoue-Labarthe, Philippe, Typography: Mimesis, Philosophy, Politics
  49. ^ http://culturemachine.tees.ac.uk/Cmach/Backissues/j004/Articles/laclau.htm
  50. ^ http://sun3.lib.uci.edu/~scctr/Wellek/deman/
  51. ^ http://sun3.lib.uci.edu/eyeghiay/Critical/Miller/reviews.html
  52. ^ http://www.amazon.com/Late-Derrida-W-J-Mitchell/dp/0226532577/sr=1-11/qid=1165377004/ref=sr_1_11/104-9446671-4347928?ie=UTF8&s=books
  53. ^ http://www.english.ilstu.edu/strickland/495/laclau2.html
  54. ^ (1997) Sparks, Simon (ed.), Retreating the Political
  55. ^ (2005) Derrida, Jacques, On Touching—Jean-Luc Nancy
  56. ^ http://cscs.umich.edu/~crshalizi/reviews/norris-against-relativism/
  57. ^ http://web.ics.purdue.edu/~plotnits/Documents/aplotnit_scholarship.pdf
  58. ^ http://www.egs.edu/faculty/ronell.html
  59. ^ http://www.egs.edu/faculty/ronell.html
  60. ^ http://www.stanford.edu/~rrorty/
  61. ^ (1990) Young, Robert. White Mythologies: Writing History and the West ISBN 0-415-05372-2.
  62. ^ http://www.npr.org/programs/atc/transcripts/2003/sep/030925.said.html
  63. ^ http://www.opendemocracy.net/faith/article_1516.jsp
  64. ^ http://www.opendemocracy.net/faith/article_1516.jsp
  65. ^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_njKVdFL6Kw
  66. ^ http://weekly.ahram.org.eg/2003/623/op33.htm
  67. ^ http://weekly.ahram.org.eg/2003/623/op33.htm
  68. ^ http://leb.net/~aljadid/InanExclusiveInterviewwithAlJadidEdwardSaidSpeaksonDemocracyIdentityWesternIntellectua.html
  69. ^ (1995) Derrida, Jacques, "Khora," in On the Name; (1999) Sallis, John, Chorology: On Beginning in Plato's Timaeus
  70. ^ (1995) Derrida, Jacques, "Tense," in Kenneth Maly (ed.), The Path of Archaic Thinking: Unfolding the Work of John Sallis
  71. ^ http://lawweb.colorado.edu/profiles/profile.jsp?id=49
  72. ^ http://www.calvin.edu/~jks4/
  73. ^ http://www.postcolonialweb.org/poldiscourse/spivak/spivak1.html
  74. ^ http://www.frontlist.com/booklist/840
  75. ^ http://www.markctaylor.com/books/index.html
  76. ^ http://frontwheeldrive.com/mark_c_taylor.html
  77. ^ http://www.egs.edu/faculty/gregoryulmer.html
  78. ^ (1994) Owens, Louis Other Destinies: Understanding the American Indian Novel 235, 231
  79. ^ http://ls.berkeley.edu/art-hum/framing/old/chapter3/vizenor.html
  80. ^ (1996) Weber, Samuel, Mass Mediauras: Form, Technics, Media
  81. ^ (2005) Wills, David, Matchbook: Essays in Deconstruction
  82. ^ http://personal-pages.lvc.edu/~robbins/surface.htm
  83. ^ (1988) Wood, David, The Deconstruction of Time
  84. ^ (2005) Wood, David, The Step Back: Ethics and Politics after Deconstruction

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m