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Encyclopedia > List of the monarchs of the Kingdom of England
For the various rulers of the kingdoms within England prior to its formal unification, during the Heptarchy, see Bretwalda. For a comprehensive list of English, Scottish, and British monarchs, see List of monarchs in the British Isles.
The Royal Arms of King Richard I, three golden lions on a red field was first used in 1198 and has became the heraldic representation of the Kingdom of England.
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The Royal Arms of King Richard I, three golden lions on a red field was first used in 1198 and has became the heraldic representation of the Kingdom of England.

The Monarch of England was the head of state of the Kingdom of England, which was unified as a state in a series of stages between the reigns of Alfred the Great of Wessex and his grandson Athelstan, from 878 to 927. The title King (or Queen) of England ceased to exist in 1707 when the Kingdom of England was merged with the Kingdom of Scotland to create the Kingdom of Great Britain. Queen Anne became the last Queen of England and the first Queen of Great Britain. Although technically incorrect, the title remained in popular use, and is often applied to Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom. A map showing the general locations of the Anglo-Saxon peoples around the year 600. ... Bretwalda is an Anglo-Saxon term, the first record of which comes from the late ninth-century Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. ... This is a list of the monarchs of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, that is, the monarchs on the thrones of some of the various kingdoms that have existed in the British Isles, namely: The Kingdom of England, from 871 (including Wales from the Act of... Image File history File links England-Richard-I-Arms. ... Image File history File links England-Richard-I-Arms. ... Richard I (September 8, 1157 – April 6, 1199) was King of England from 1189 to 1199. ... Queen Elizabeth II, is the Head of State of 16 countries including: the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Jamaica, New Zealand and the Bahamas, as well as crown colonies and overseas territories of the United Kingdom. ... The Flag of England The Kingdom of England was a kingdom located in Western Europe, in the southern part of the island of Great Britain. ... A state is a set of institutions that possess the authority to make the rules that govern a society, having internal and external sovereignty over a definite territory. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Map of the British Isles circa 802 Wessex was one of the seven major Anglo-Saxon kingdoms (the Heptarchy) that preceded the Kingdom of England. ... Athelstan or Æþelstan (c. ... Events The Danes force king Alfred the Great of Wessex to retreat to a fort in Athelney, Somerset. ... Events Hubaekje sacks the Silla capital of Gyeongju and places King Gyeongsun on the throne. ... Events January 1 - John V is crowned King of Portugal March 26 - The Acts of Union becomes law, making the separate Kingdoms of England and Scotland into one country, the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... Royal motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (Latin: No one provokes me with impunity) Capital Edinburgh Government Monarchy Head of State King of Scots Parliament Parliament of Scotland Currency Pound Scots This article is about the historical state called the Kingdom of Scotland (843-1707). ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right)1 Capital London Head of State King of Great Britain Head of Government Prime Minister Parliament House of Commons, House of Lords The Kingdom of Great Britain, also known as the United Kingdom of Great Britain (see below), was... Anne (6 February 1665 – 1 August 1714) became Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland on 8 March 1702. ... The British monarch or Sovereign is the monarch and head of state of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories, and is the source of all executive, judicial and (as the Queen-in-Parliament) legislative power. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of 16 sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally, though she is more directly involved with the United Kingdom, where the Royal Family resides, and the Monarchy is historically indigenous. ...

Contents

Titles

The standard title for all monarchs from Alfred until the time of King John was Rex Anglorum ("King of the English"). In addition, many of the pre-Norman kings assumed extra titles, as follows:

  • Alfred - Rex Angulsaxonum and Rex Anglorum et Saxonum
  • Athelstan - Rex Anglorum per omnipatrantis dexteram totius Bryttaniæ regni solio sublimatus
  • Edmund - Rex Britanniae and Rex Anglorum caeterarumque gentium gobernator et rector
  • Edred - Regis qui regimina regnorum Angulsaxna, Norþhymbra, Paganorum, Brettonumque
  • Edwy - Rex nutu Dei Angulsæxna et Northanhumbrorum imperator paganorum gubernator Breotonumque propugnator
  • Edgar - Totius Albionis finitimorumque regum basileus
  • Canute - Rex Anglorum totiusque Brittannice orbis gubernator et rector and Brytannie totius Anglorum monarchus

In the Norman period Rex Anglorum remained standard, with occasional use of Rex Anglie ("King of England"). Matilda styled herself Domina Anglorum ("Lady of the English"). From the time of King John onwards all other titles were eschewed in favour of Rex Anglie, or Regina Anglie ("Queen of England") if female. In 1604 James I, who had inherited the English throne the previous year, adopted the title (now usually rendered in English rather than Latin) King of Great Britain, which has been held, along with other titles, by all his successors to the present day[citation needed].


Monarchs of England

West Saxons

The following list starts with Alfred, King of Wessex from 871, whose defeat of the Danes in 878 paved the way for the creation of the Kingdom of England. Alfred proclaimed himself King of the English after liberating London from the Danes in 886. Map of the British Isles circa 802 Wessex was one of the seven major Anglo-Saxon kingdoms (the Heptarchy) that preceded the Kingdom of England. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This is a list of monarchs of Wessex until 924. ... Events Nine battles are fought between the Danes and Wessex. ... Events The Danes force king Alfred the Great of Wessex to retreat to a fort in Athelney, Somerset. ... The Flag of England The Kingdom of England was a kingdom located in Western Europe, in the southern part of the island of Great Britain. ... London (pronounced ) is the capital city of England and the United Kingdom. ... Events The Glagolitic alphabet, devised by Cyril and Methodius, missionairies from Constantinople, is adopted in the Bulgarian Empire. ...

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Events Edward the Elder becomes King of England. ... Edward the Elder or Eadweard I (c. ... Events King Athelstan of England succeeds to the throne. ... Ælfweard (died 2 August 924) was the second known son of Edward the Elder. ... Athelstan or Æþelstan (c. ... Events Vietnam became a tributary kingdom to China. ... Edmund I, or Edmund the Deed-Doer (Eadmund) (921–May 26, 946) was King of England from 939 until his death. ... Events Eadred I succeeds his brother as king of England End of the reign of Emperor Suzaku of Japan Emperor Murakami ascends the throne of Japan Births Deaths May 26 - King Edmund I of England Abu-Bakr Muhammad ben Yahya as-Suli Categories: 946 ... King Edred or Eadred (c. ... Events August 10 - Otto I the Great defeats Magyars in the Battle of Lechfeld Edwy becomes King of England. ... Edwy All-Fair or Eadwig (941? – October 1, 959) was the King of England from 955 until his death. ... Events October 1 - Edwy, king of England dies and is succeeded by his brother Edgar. ... King Edgar or Eadgar I ( 942 – July 8, 975) was the younger son of King Edmund I of England. ... Events Coronation of King Edward the Martyr Births Deaths July 8 Edgar of England Categories: 975 ... The white cliffs of Dover. ... King Edward the Martyr or Eadweard II (c. ... Events Badìa Fiorentina, an abbey in Italy, is founded by Willa, Margravine of Tuscany. ... Ethelred II or Æþelræd Unræd (c. ... Events Danish invasion of England under king Sweyn I. King Ethelred flees to Normandy, and Sweyn becomes king of England. ... Events February 14 - Pope Benedict VIII recognizes Henry of Bavaria as King of Germany July 29 - Battle of Kleidion: Basil II inflicts not only a decisive defeat on the Bulgarian army, but his subsequent savage treatment of 15,000 prisoners reportedly causes Tsar Samuil of Bulgaria to die of shock... Events George Tsul, ruler of Khazaria, is captured by a combined Byzantine- Rus force, which effectively ends Khazarias existence. ... Edmund II (c. ...

Danes

England came under the rule of Danish kings following the disastrous reign of Ethelred the Unready. Some, though not all, of these were also kings of Denmark.

Sweyn I, or Sweyn Forkbeard, (Danish: Svend Tveskæg, originally Tjugeskæg or Tyvskæg, Old Norse: Sveinn Tjúguskegg, Norwegian: Svein Tjugeskjegg), (??? – February 3, 1014), king of Denmark and England, a leading Viking warrior and the father of Canute the Great (Cnut I). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Events Harthacanute becomes king of Denmark. ... Harthacanute (sometimes Hardicanute, Hardecanute; Danish Hardeknud, Canute the Hardy) (1018/1019–June 8, 1042) was a King of Denmark (1035–1042) and England (1035–1037, 1040–1042). ... // Events Construction of the church of Saint Sophia Cathedral is started in Kyiv. ... Events March War of Independence of Western Xia occurred. ... Events April 18/April 19 - Emperor Michael V of the Byzantine Empire attempts to remain sole Emperor by sending his adoptive mother and co-ruler Zoe of Byzantium to a monastery. ... Harold I Harefoot (c. ...

West Saxons (restored)

Edward the Confessor or Eadweard III (c. ... Events January 6 - Harold II is crowned September 20 - Battle of Fulford September 25 - Battle of Stamford Bridge September 29 - William of Normandy lands in England at Pevensey. ... Harold Godwinson, or Harold II of England (c. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... Events Rutherglen becomes one of the first Royal Burghs in Scotland. ...

Normans

It was only after the Norman Conquest of 1066 that kings took regnal numbers in the French fashion, though the earlier custom of distinguishing monarchs by nicknames did not die out immediately. The Normans (adapted from the name Northmen or Norsemen) were a mixture of the indigenous population of Neustria and Danish or Norwegian Vikings who began to occupy the northern area of France now known as Normandy in the latter half of the 9th century. ... Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman conquest of England was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. ...

William of Normandy (French: Guillaume de Normandie; c. ... Events May 9 - The remains of Saint Nicholas were brought to Bari. ... William II (called Rufus, perhaps because of his red-faced appearance) (c. ... Events William II of England dies in a hunting accident - Henry I becomes King of England King Henry I proclaims the Charter of Liberties, one of the first examples of a constitution. ... King Henry I of England (c. ... Events January - Byland Abbey founded Stephen of Blois succeeds King Henry I. Empress Maud, daughter of Henry I and widow of Henry V opposed Stephen and claims the throne as her own Owain Gwynedd of Wales defeats the Normans at Crug Mawr. ... Stephen (1096 - October 25, 1154), the last Norman King of England, reigned from 1135 to 1154, when he was succeeded by his cousin (or, as the gossip of the time had it, his natural son) Henry II, the first of the Angevin or Plantagenet Kings. ... Events February 2 - Battle of Lincoln. ... Events King Stephen of England dies at Dover, and is succeeded by his adopted son Henry Plantagenet who becomes King Henry II of England, aged 21. ... Empress Matilda (February, 1101 – September 10, 1167) (Saxon form Maud or Maude) – was the daughter and dispossessed heir of King Henry I of England. ... Events Taira no Kiyomori becomes the first samurai to be appointed Daijo Daijin, chief minister of the government of Japan Peter of Blois becomes the tutor of William II of Sicily Absalon, archbishop of Denmark, leads the first Danish synod at Lund Absalon fortifies Copenhagen William Marshal, the greatest knight...

Plantagenets

The early Plantagenets ruled many territories in France, and did not regard England as their primary home until after most of their French possessions were lost by King John. This long-lived dynasty is usually divided into three houses. Angevin is the name applied to two distinct medieval dynasties which originated as counts (from 1360, dukes) of the western French province of Anjou (of which angevin is the adjectival form), but later came to rule far greater areas including England, Hungary and Poland (see Angevin Empire). ...


Angevins

(After the First Barons' War Prince Louis of France was proclaimed King of England in London in 1216, though he lost his earlier support from his English barons, and relinquished his claim in 1217.) Angevin is the name applied to two distinct medieval dynasties which originated as counts (from 1360, dukes) of the western French province of Anjou (of which angevin is the adjectival form), but later came to rule far greater areas including England, Hungary and Poland (see Angevin Empire). ... Henry II of England (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, and as King of England (1154–1189) and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland[citation needed], eastern Ireland, and western France. ... Events January 21 - Philip II of France and Richard I of England begin to assemble troops to wage the Third Crusade September 3- Richard I of England is crowned as king of England. ... Richard I (September 8, 1157 – April 6, 1199) was King of England from 1189 to 1199. ... Events John Lackland, becomes King of England Births Isobel of Huntingdon (d. ... John of England depicted in Cassells History of England (1902) John (French: Jean) (December 24, 1166/67–October 18/19, 1216) reigned as King of England from 1199 to 1216. ... Events Prince Louis of France, the future King Louis VIII, invades England in the First Barons War Henry III becomes King of England. ... Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was crowned King of England in 1216, despite being less than ten years of age. ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... Edward I (June 17, 1239 – July 7, 1307), popularly known as Longshanks because of his 6 foot 2 inch (1. ... Events July - The Knights Hospitaller begin their conquest of Rhodes. ... Edward II, (April 25, 1284 – September 21, 1327), of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307 until deposed in January, 1327. ... Events January 25 - Edward III becomes King of England. ... Edward III (13 November 1312 – 21 June 1377) was one of the most successful English kings of medieval times. ... // Events January 17 – Pope Gregory XI enters Rome. ... Richard II (January 6, 1367 – February 14, 1400) was the son of Edward the Black Prince, Prince of Wales, and Joan The Fair Maid of Kent. He was born at Bordeaux and became his fathers heir when his elder brother died in infancy. ... Events September 30 - Accession of Henry IV of England October 13 - Coronation of Henry IV of England November 1 - Accession of John VI, Duke of Brittany Births William Canynge, English merchant (approximate date; died 1474) Zara Yaqob, Emperor of Ethiopia (died 1468) Deaths January 4 - Nicolau Aymerich, Catalan theologian and... Events Henry IV quells baron rebellion and executes The Earls of Kent, Huntingdon and Salisbury for their attempt to have Richard II of England restored as King Jean Froissart writes the Chronicles Medici family becomes powerful in Florence, Italy Births December 25 - John Sutton, 1st Baron Dudley, Lord Lieutenant of... The First Barons War (1215–1217) was a civil war in England between the forces of a number of rebellious barons and King John. ... Louis VIII the Lion (French: Louis VIII le Lion) (September 5, 1187 – November 8, 1226) reigned as King of France from 1223 to 1226. ... London (pronounced ) is the capital city of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Lancastrians

The House of Lancaster is a dynasty of English kings. ... // Birth and life before accession - relationship with Richard II - exile - return and usurpation Henry IV (April 3, 1367 – March 20, 1413) was born at Bolingbroke Castle in Lincolnshire, hence the other name by which he was known, Henry of Bolingbroke. His father, John of Gaunt was the third and oldest... // Events March 20 - Henry V becomes King of England Project of Annals of Joseon Dynasty began. ... Henry V, (August 9 or September 16, 1387 – August 31, 1422), King of England (1413-1422), son of Henry IV by Mary de Bohun, was born at Monmouth, Wales, in August or September 1386 or 1387. ... Events January 10 - Battle of Nemecky Brod during the Hussite Wars. ... Henry VI (December 6, 1421 – May 21/22, 1471) was King of England from 1422 to 1461 (though with a Regent until 1437) and then from 1470 to 1471, and King of France from 1422 to 1453. ... Events February 2 - Battle of Mortimers Cross - Yorkist troops led by Edward, Duke of York defeat Lancastrians under Owen Tudor and his son Jasper Tudor, Earl of Pembroke in Wales. ... Events May 15 - Charles VIII of Sweden who had served three terms as King of Sweden dies. ... This article is about the year 1471, not the BT caller ID service accessible by dialling 1-4-7-1. ...

Yorkists

The House of York was a branch of the English royal House of Plantagenet, three of whom became English kings in the late 15th century. ... Edward IV (April 28, 1442 – April 9, 1483) was King of England from March 4, 1461 to April 9, 1483, with a break of a few months in the period 1470–1471. ... Events The São Tomé settlement is founded. ... Edward V (4 November 1470 – 1483?) was the King of England from 9 April 1483 until his deposition. ... Richard III (2 October 1452 – 22 August 1485) was King of England from 1483 until his death. ... // Events August 5-7 - First outbreak of sweating sickness in England begins August 22 - Battle of Bosworth Field is fought between the armies of King Richard III of England and rival claimant to the throne of England Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond. ...

Tudors

The Tudors were of partial Welsh ancestry, and in 1536 Wales was fully incorporated into the English state (having been under English control since 1284). The Tudor dynasty or House of Tudor (Welsh Twdwr) is a series of five monarchs of Welsh origin who ruled England from 1485 until 1603. ... Motto: (Welsh for Wales forever) Anthem: Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau Capital Cardiff Largest city Cardiff Official language(s) English, Welsh Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Rhodri Morgan AM Unification    - by Gruffudd ap Llywelyn 1056  Area    - Total 20,779 km² (3rd in... Events February 2 - Spaniard Pedro de Mendoza founds Buenos Aires, Argentina. ... // Events War and politics King Charles II of Naples is captured in a naval battle off Naples by Roger of Lauria, admiral to King Peter III of Aragon. ...

(Mary I's husband, Philip II of Spain, was styled "King of England" during their marriage. However, his powers were limited, and he is not generally included in the list of monarchs of England.) Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), was the founder and first patriarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... 1509 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the play, see Henry VIII (play). ... Events January 16 - Grand Duke Ivan IV of Muscovy becomes the first Tsar of Russia. ... Edward VI (12 October 1537 – 6 July 1553) became King of England and Ireland on 28 January 1547, at just nine years of age. ... // Events June 26 - Christs Hospital in London gets a Royal Charter July 6 - Edward VI of England dies July 10 - Lady Jane Grey is proclaimed Queen of England - for the next nine days July 18 - Lord Mayor of London proclaims Queen Mary as the rightful Queen - Lady Jane Grey... Lady Jane Grey (ca. ... Events January 5 - Great fire in Eindhoven, Netherlands. ... Mary Tudor is the name of both Mary I of England and her fathers sister, Mary Tudor (queen consort of France). ... Events January 7 - French troops led by Francis, Duke of Guise take Calais, the last continental possession of England July 13 - Battle of Gravelines: In France, Spanish forces led by Count Lamoral of Egmont defeat the French forces of Marshal Paul des Thermes at Gravelines. ... Elizabeth I (7 September 1533–24 March 1603) was Queen of England, Queen of France (in name only), and Queen of Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death. ... King James I of England/VII of Scotland, the first monarch to rule the Kingdoms of England and Scotland at the same time Events March - Samuel de Champlain, French explorer, sails to Canada March 24 - Elizabeth I of England dies and is succeeded by her cousin King James I of... Philip II of Spain Philip II, King of Portugal, King of Naples, King of Spain and Sicily, King Consort of England, Prince of Asturias (Spanish: Felipe II de Habsburgo; Portuguese: Filipe I) (May 21, 1527 – September 13, 1598) was the first official King of Spain from 1556 until 1598, king...


Stuarts

Following the death of Elizabeth I in 1603 without issue, the Scottish king, James VI, succeeded to the English throne as James I in what became known as the Union of the Crowns. In 1604 he adopted the title King of Great Britain, although the two kingdoms remained independent. The Coat of Arms of King James I, the first British monarch of the House of Stuart The House of Stuart or Stewart was a royal house of the Kingdom of Scotland, later of the Kingdom of England, and finally of the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... The Royal Coat of Arms of Scotland, as used before 1603 // The monarch of Scotland was the head of state of the Kingdom of Scotland. ... James VI and I King of England, Scotland and Ireland James VI of Scotland and I of England (Charles James) (19 June 1566–27 March 1625) was a King who ruled over England, Scotland and Ireland, and was the first Sovereign to reign in the three realms simultaneously. ... Events January 14 – Hampton Court conference with James I of England, the Anglican bishops and representatives of Puritans September 20 – Capture of Ostend by Spanish forces under Ambrosio Spinola after a three year siege. ...

James VI of Scotland/James I of England and Ireland (Charles James Stuart) (June 19, 1566 – March 27, 1625) was King of Scots, King of England, and King of Ireland and was the first to style himself King of Great Britain. ... Events March 27 - Prince Charles Stuart becomes King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland. ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, Scotland, and Ireland, from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... // Events January 30 - King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland is beheaded. ...

Commonwealth

There was no reigning monarch between the execution of Charles I in 1649 and the Restoration of Charles II in 1660. Despite this, Oliver Cromwell held monarchical powers 16531658 as Lord Protector, succeeded by his son, Richard Cromwell 1658–1659 (resigned, died 1712). Motto: PAX, QUÆRITUR, BELLO (English: Peace is obtained by war)1 Capital London Head of State none Parliament Rump Parliament (1649-53), Barebones Parliament (1653) The Commonwealth was the republican government which ruled first England and then the whole of Ireland, the colonies and other Crown possessions during the... King Charles II, the first monarch to rule after the English Restoration. ... // Events January 1 - Colonel George Monck with his regiment crosses from Scotland to England at the village of Coldstream and begins advance towards London in support of English Restoration. ... For the Monty Python song based on the historical figure, see Oliver Cromwell (song) Oliver Cromwell (April 25, 1599 – September 3, 1658) was an English military and political leader, considered by critics to be a dictator, best known for making England a republic and leading the Commonwealth of England. ... Events February 2 - New Amsterdam (later renamed New York City) is incorporated. ... Events January 13 - Edward Sexby, who had plotted against Oliver Cromwell, dies in Tower of London February 6 - Swedish troops of Charles X Gustav of Sweden cross The Great Belt (Storebælt) in Denmark over frozen sea May 1 - Publication of Hydriotaphia, Urn Burial and The Garden of Cyrus by... Lord Protector is a particular British English title for Heads of State, with two meanings (and full styles) at different periods of history. ... Richard Cromwell (October 4, 1626- July 12, 1712) was the third son of Oliver Cromwell, and was Lord Protector of England, Scotland and Ireland, for little over eight months, from September 3, 1658 until May 25, 1659. ... // Events May 25 - Richard Cromwell resigns as Lord Protector of England following the restoration of the Long Parliament, beginning a second brief period of the republican government called the Commonwealth. ... // Events Treaty of Aargau signed between Catholic and Protestants. ...


Stuarts (restored)

Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland from 30 January 1649 (de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. ... Events February 6 - James Stuart, Duke of York becomes King James II of England and Ireland and King James VII of Scotland. ... James II of England and VII of Scotland (14 October 1633–16 September 1701) became King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland on 6 February 1685. ... // Events A high-powered conspiracy of notables, the Immortal Seven, invite William and Mary to depose James II of England. ... Events January 18 - Frederick I becomes King of Prussia. ... William III of England (The Hague,14 November 1650 – Hampton Court, 8 March 1702; also known as William II of Scotland and William III of Orange) was a Dutch aristocrat and a Protestant Prince of Orange from his birth, Stadtholder of the United Netherlands from 28 June 1672, King of... Events Louis XIV of France passed the Code Noir, allowing the full use of slaves in the French colonies. ... Events March 8 - William III died; Princess Anne Stuart becomes Queen Anne of England, Scotland and Ireland. ... Mary II (30 April 1662–28 December 1694) reigned as Queen of England and Ireland from 13 February 1689, and as Queen of Scotland (as Mary II of Scotland) from 11 April 1689 until her death. ... Events Louis XIV of France passed the Code Noir, allowing the full use of slaves in the French colonies. ... Events February 6 - The colony Quilombo dos Palmares is destroyed. ... Anne (6 February 1665 – 1 August 1714) became Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland on 8 March 1702. ... Battle of Gangut, by Maurice Baquoi, 1724-27. ...

Monarchs of Great Britain and the United Kingdom

England and Scotland entered into legislative and governmental union under the Acts of Union 1707, though retained separate legal systems and other trappings of statehood. From this time on the titles King of England and Queen of England are technically incorrect (though still in wide usage). The Acts of Union were two Acts of Parliament passed in 1707 (taking effect on 1 May) by the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland. ...


Hanoverians

The House of Hanover (the Hanoverians) were a German royal dynasty of Lombard descent which succeeded the House of Stuart as kings of Great Britain in 1714. ... George I (Georg Ludwig) (28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727) was Elector of Hanover from 23 January 1698, and King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 1 August 1714, until his death. ... Battle of Gangut, by Maurice Baquoi, 1724-27. ... Events 1727 to 1800 - Lt. ... George II (George Augustus) (10 November 1683 – 25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ... 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... George III (George William Frederick) (4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... William IV (William Henry) (21 August 1765 – 20 June 1837) was King of the United Kingdom and of Hanover from 26 June 1830 until his death. ... | Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Hi my name is TOOD is it alright if i kiss your a** now For the Public House in EastEnders see The Queen Victoria. ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

Saxe-Coburg-Gotha

Saxe-Coburg-Gotha or Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (German: Sachsen-Coburg und Gotha) was once the name given to the two German duchies of Saxe-Coburg and Saxe-Gotha in Germany, in the present states of Bavaria and Thuringia, which were in personal union between 1826 and 1918. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward) (9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth Realms, and the Emperor of India. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ...

Windsors

The house name Windsor was adopted in 1917, during the First World War. It was changed from Saxe-Coburg-Gotha due to war-time anti-German sentiment. The House of Windsor, previously called the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, is the Royal House of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the other Commonwealth Realms. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Saxe-Coburg-Gotha or Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (German: Sachsen-Coburg und Gotha) was once the name given to the two German duchies of Saxe-Coburg and Saxe-Gotha in Germany, in the present states of Bavaria and Thuringia, which were in personal union between 1826 and 1918. ...

George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 - 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, as a result of his creating it from the British branch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David Windsor; later The Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from the death of his father, George V (1910–36... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George Windsor) (14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was the third British monarch using the name Windsor. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of 16 sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally, though she is more directly involved with the United Kingdom, where the Royal Family resides, and the Monarchy is historically indigenous. ...

See also

This article describes the British monarchy from the perspective of the United Kingdom. ... This is the English monarchs family tree, including kings of England from William the Conqueror to Elizabeth I. See also: British monarchs family tree - Other family trees - List of monarchs in the British Isles - Direct descent from William I to Elizabeth II // Normans and Plantagenets Plantagenets (continued), Houses of York... This is a list of the regnal numerals which may in time be used by future British monarchs. ... This is a list of the monarchs of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, that is, the monarchs on the thrones of some of the various kingdoms that have existed in the British Isles, namely: The Kingdom of England, from 871 (including Wales from the Act of... // Descendants of Queen Elizabeth II Prince William and Prince Harry of Wales are the sons of Prince Charles, the Prince of Wales and Diana, Princess of Wales. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Edgar the Atheling was proclaimed king following the death of Harold at Hastings. He submitted to William a few weeks later.
  2. ^ Matilda, claimed by some to be the rightful heir, was briefly proclaimed Lady of the English during a period of civil war.
  3. ^ Edward V, one of the Princes in the Tower, was kept a prisoner during his reign of little more than two months.
  4. ^ Jane (Lady Jane Grey) was proclaimed queen on the death of Edward VI; however, she was deposed after nine days and executed for unlawfully usurping the throne.

Combatants Normans, supported by Bretons, Flemings & French Anglo-Saxons Commanders William of Normandy, Odo of Bayeux Harold Godwinson† Strength 7,000-8,000 7,000-8,000 Casualties Unknown, thought to be around 2,000 killed and wounded Unknown, but significantly more than the Normans The Battle of Hastings was... The Princes in the Tower, Edward V of England (1470–1483?) and Richard of Shrewsbury, 1st Duke of York (1473–1483?), were the two young sons of Edward IV of England and Elizabeth Woodville who were declared illegitimate by the Act of Parliament known as Titulus Regius. ...

External links

  • English Monarchs
  • Archontology

 
 

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