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Encyclopedia > List of strange units of measurement

Strange and whimsical units are sometimes used by scientists, especially physicists and mathematicians, and other technically-minded people such as engineers and programmers, as bits of dry humor combined with putative practical convenience. See also List of humorous units of measurement. For a List of scientists, see: List of anthropologists List of astronomers List of biologists List of chemists List of computer scientists List of economists List of engineers List of geologists List of inventors List of mathematicians List of meteorologists List of physicists Scientist pairs List of scientist pairs See... Many famous physicists of the 20th and 21st century are found on the list of recipients of the Nobel Prize in physics. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Many comedians and humour writers have made use of, or invented out of whole cloth, units of measurement intended primarily for their humour value. ...

Contents

Systems of measurement

Most units of measurement are collected into various standards, such as the SI units (sometimes called the metre-kilogram-second system), the Imperial system (sometimes called the foot-pound-second system), as well as various older standards used in countries throughout the world. Some of these standards are strange in their own right.


MTS units

During the twentieth century, the Soviets and French briefly used a variant of the metric system where the base unit of mass was the tonne. This meant that a kilogram was a millitonne (mt). Conversely, some companies are using the megagram (Mg), to avoid confusion with long or short tons. The metre-tonne-second or mts system of units is a system of physical units introduced in the Soviet Union in 1933, but abolished in 1955. ... A tonne (symbol t), sometimes referred to as a metric tonne, is a measurement of weight. ... A tonne (also called metric ton) is a non-SI unit of mass, accepted for use with SI, defined as: 1 tonne = 103 kg (= 106 g). ...

See also: Mesures usuelles

Mesures usuelles (French for customary measurements) were a system of measurement introduced to act as compromise between metric system and traditional measurements. ...

FFF units

Most countries use Le Système International d’Unités (SI). In contrast, the Furlong/Firkin/Fortnight (FFF) system of units of measurement draws its attention by being conservative and off-beat at the same time. Cover of brochure The International System of Units. ...

Unit
of
Conventional Imperial unit
SI equivalence
furlong length 1/8 of a mile 201.168 m
firkin mass 9 Imperial gallons of water 40.91481 kg
fortnight time 14 days 1,209,600 s

One furlong per fortnight is very nearly 1 centimetre per minute (to within 1 part in 400). Indeed, if the inch were defined as 2.54 cm rather than 2.54 cm exactly, it would be 1 cm/min. Besides having the meaning of "any obscure unit", furlongs per fortnight have also served frequently in the classroom as an example on how to reduce a unit's fraction. The Fahrenheit is considered the unit of temperature under this system. The 5 furlong (1006 m) post on Epsom Downs A furlong is a measure of distance within Imperial units and U.S. customary units. ... A mile is a unit of length, usually used to measure distance, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, United States customary units and Norwegian/Swedish mil. ... The metre, or meter (U.S.), is a measure of length. ... A Firkin is an old English unit of volume. ... The gallon (abbreviation: gal) is an English unit of volume. ... Water is a tasteless, odourless substance that is essential to all known forms of life and is known as the universal solvent. ... The international prototype, made of platinum-iridium, which is kept at the BIPM under conditions specified by the 1st CGPM in 1889. ... A fortnight is a unit of time equal to two weeks: that is 14 days, or literally 14 nights. ... Look up second in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A recurring decimal is an expression representing a real number in the decimal numeral system, in which after some point the same sequence of digits repeats infinitely many times. ... Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ...


It is perhaps remotely notable that using the FFF system the speed of light may be expressed as being roughly 1.8 terafurlongs per fortnight. [1] [2] The speed of light in a vacuum is an important physical constant denoted by the letter c for constant or the Latin word celeritas meaning swiftness. It is the speed of all electromagnetic radiation in a vacuum, not just visible light. ...


SI-imperial hybrids

In the U.S., new mongrel units are sometimes formed by a combination of traditional units, still widely used, and metric units. Thus, "grams per fluid ounce" is a common unit used in sports nutrition, for example to express the concentration of carbohydrate in a beverage. In chemistry, concentration is the measure of how much of a given substance there is mixed with another substance. ...


A hybrid standard quantity used in mining is the assay ton (AT), which is as many milligrams as there are Troy ounces in an avoirdupois long ton. So to find how many ounces of gold are in a ton of rock, one measures the number of milligrams of gold in an assay ton of rock. The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...


There are also reports of engineers realizing the comfort of base ten SI prefixes, combining them with Imperial or U.S. customary units instead of making the full switch, for example the kiloyard (914.4 m). The kip or kilopound is regularly used in structural engineering. Similarly, the kilofoot is quite common in U.S. telecommunication engineering, as significant distances in cable route planning are usually given in thousands of feet. Instruments like optical time domain reflectometers usually have an option to display results in kft. In the United States, a kip is sometimes a unit of mass that equals 1,000 avoirdupois pounds (used to compute shipping charges), or more often a unit of force that equals 1,000 pounds force (used to measure engineering loads). ... It has been suggested that Structural engineer be merged into this article or section. ... Copy of the original phone of Graham Bell at the Musée des Arts et Métiers in Paris Telecommunication is the transmission of signals over a distance for the purpose of communication. ... In telecommunication, an optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR) is an optoelectronic instrument used to characterize an optical fiber. ...


Derived units

There are some obscure metric units: with arbitrary units and prefixes, you can express a common unit with an unfamiliar term. Among physicists there is the in-joke replacing common units with uncommon units, as in velocity: metres per second = hertz per dioptre (Hz/dpt). In this case, the reciprocal values of metre and seconddioptre and hertz, respectively — are used to contrive the same unit. An in joke is a joke whose humour is clear only to those people who are in a group that has some prior knowledge (not known by the whole population) that makes the joke humorous. ... The metre, or meter (U.S.), is a measure of length. ... Look up second in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A dioptre, or diopter, is a non-SI unit of measurement of the optical power of a lens or curved mirror, which is equal to the reciprocal of the focal length measured in metres (i. ... The hertz (symbol: Hz) is the SI unit of frequency. ...


Length

Length: attoparsec

Parsecs are used in astronomy to measure enormous interstellar distances. A parsec is approximately 3.26 light-years or about 3.085×1016 m. Combining it with the "atto" prefix yields attoparsec, a conveniently human-scaled unit of about 3.085 centimeters (about 1 7/32 inches) that has no obvious practical use but does have a proper SI symbol, apc. Stellar parallax motion The parsec (symbol pc) is a unit of length used in astronomy. ... A giant Hubble mosaic of the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant. ... A light-year, symbol ly, is the distance light travels in one year: exactly 9. ... The metre, or meter (U.S.), is a measure of length. ... Atto- (symbol a) is an SI prefix to a unit and means that it is 10-18 times this unit. ... cm redirects here, alternate uses: cm (disambiguation) A centimetre (symbol cm; American spelling: centimeter) is an SI unit of length. ...


Interestingly, 1 attoparsec/microfortnight is nearly 1 inch/second (the actual figure is about 1.0043 inches per second, or approximately 2.55 cm/s). See mathematical coincidences for a list of similar factoids. [1] Mid-19th century tool for converting between different standards of the inch An inch is an Imperial and U.S. customary unit of length. ... Look up second in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Mid-19th century tool for converting between different standards of the inch An inch is an Imperial and U.S. customary unit of length. ... Look up second in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Length: light-nanosecond

Beyond its more traditional use as a unit of time, the nanosecond (or light-nanosecond) was popularized as a unit of distance by Grace Hopper as the distance which a photon could travel in one billionth of a second (roughly 30 cm or one foot): "The speed of light is one foot per nanosecond." In her speaking engagements, she was well-known for passing out light-nanoseconds of wire to the audience, and contrasting it with light-microseconds (a coil of wire 1000 times as long) and light-picoseconds (ground black pepper). Over the course of her life, she had many motivations for this visual aid: including demonstrating the waste of sub-optimal programming, illustrating advances in computer speed, and simply giving young scientists and policy makers the ability to conceptualize the magnitude of very large and small numbers. [2] Grace Hopper Rear Admiral Grace Murray Hopper (December 9, 1906 – January 1, 1992) was an American computer scientist and naval officer. ... A centimetre (American spelling centimeter, symbol cm) is a unit of length that is equal to one hundredth of a metre, the current SI base unit of length. ... A foot (plural: feet) is any of several old units of distance or length, measuring around a quarter to a third of a meter. ... The speed of light in a vacuum is an important physical constant denoted by the letter c for constant or the Latin word celeritas meaning swiftness. It is the speed of all electromagnetic radiation in a vacuum, not just visible light. ... Binomial name Piper nigrum L. Black pepper (Piper nigrum) is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning. ...


Length: metric inch

The international inch is defined to be exactly 25.4 mm. However, this is approximated to 25 mm, to give a "metric inch". A metric foot, or moot, is a unit of length equal to 300 millimetres (30 cm). ...


A metric inch was used in some Soviet computers when building from American (pirated) blueprints. The resulting products would seem like their American models but components were not interchangeable. This article gives a list of Soviet computer systems. ...


Length: storeys (stories)

All buildings are made up of storeys (UK and Commonwealth) or stories (U.S.), also referred to as floors or levels. In the United States, each story is generally 8 to 10 feet (2.4 to 3 meters). The number of stories is used to express the height of a building or nonbuilding structure. For other uses, see Building (disambiguation). ... Nonbuilding structures, also referred to simply as structures, are those not designed for continuous human occupancy. ...


In Brazil, the stories are used mainly by the media as a proxy for 3 meters. It's normally employed in situations to express heights of buildings or elevations.


Length: double-decker bus

In Britain, newspapers and other media will frequently refer to heights in comparison to the length (8.4 metres) or height (4.4 metres) of a London Routemaster double-decker bus. In its abbreviated form (DDB), this unit is also used to describe the size of the hole left after large sewer collapses, as in "it left a four DDB hole".[citation needed] First London AEC Routemaster, RML 2473 (JJD 473D), on route 7 approaching Ladbroke Grove tube station in April 2002. ... A London AEC Routemaster, RML 2473 (JJD 473D), on route 7 approaching Ladbroke Grove tube station in April 2002. ...


Length: football field

In the United States, this refers to the length of an American football field, which has a playing area 100 yards (91.44 meters) long. This is often used by the American public media for the sizes of large buildings or parks: easily walkable but non-trivial distances. United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... A yard (abbreviation: yd) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... metre or meter, see meter (disambiguation) The metre is the basic unit of length in the International System of Units. ...


Length: cigarette

In rural areas of Greece the cigarette was sometimes used as a unit of distance: it would describe the distance someone could travel (on foot or by riding a donkey) in the time needed to smoke a cigarette. The "unit" first appeared around 1900, when cigarettes became popular in Greece, and was used until the 1960s, when automobiles began to displace donkeys and mules. Today, only some aged people in extremely remote villages might still use it. 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ...


Length: block

A city block (in most U.S. cities) is between 0.2 and 0.4 km. In Manhattan, the measurement "block" usually refers to a north-south block, which is 1/20 mi (0.08 km). Within a typical large U.S. city, it is only possible to travel along east-west or north-south streets - so a distance measured in blocks is the sum of the number of blocks east-west plus the number north-south (known to mathematicians as the Manhattan distance) rather than 'as the crow flies' where the distance would be the square root of the square of the east-west distance plus the square of the north-south distance, according to Pythagoras' theorem. Hence, distances measured in blocks are not precisely distances in the normal sense. City Blocks are a part of the fictional universe recounted in the Judge Dredd series that appears in the UK comic book 2000 AD. // Overview Also known as starscrapers or stratoscrapers (compare skyscraper), they are the most common form of mass-housing in Mega-City One, averaging a population of... The Borough of Manhattan, highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... Taxicab geometry, considered by Hermann Minkowski in the 19th century, is a form of geometry in which the usual metric of Euclidean geometry is replaced by a new metric in which the distance between two points is the sum of the (absolute) differences of their coordinates. ... There are thousands of proofs of the Pythagorean theorem. ... In mathematics, the Euclidean distance or Euclidean metric is the ordinary distance between the two points that one would measure with a ruler, which can be proven by repeated application of the Pythagorean theorem. ...


Length: tall buildings

In the UK, Nelson's Column is a common measure of height equal to 61.5 m. Used principally by British newspapers or reference books, it is useful in measuring the size of buildings or, occasionally, mountains. Lord Nelson at the top of the column that bears his name Nelsons Column is a monument in Trafalgar Square, London, England. ...


In the USA, buildings such as the Empire State Building (449 m), Sears Tower (519 m), and Seattle Space Needle (184 m) are used as comparative measurements of height. The Empire State Building is a 102-story contemporary Art Deco style skyscraper in New York City, declared by the American Society of Civil Engineers to be one of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World. ... The Sears Tower is a skyscraper in Chicago, Illinois, and the tallest building in the United States. ... Space Needle from Downtown Seattle. ...


In Canada (and occasionally elsewhere), the Toronto CN Tower (553 m) is used in a similar fashion. The CN Tower, at 553. ...


See also World's tallest structures. For many millennia the record holder for worlds tallest structure was clearly defined (see table below. ...


Length: farsee

Used primarily in rural areas, like the Appalachian region of the United States, while giving directions. It is roughly defined to be as far as one can see. For example, a person could travel two farsees by noting the top of a hill on the horizon, walking to that spot, and then noting the top of the next hill in the same direction, which would mark his destination. A variation of the word farsee that is understood to carry less prestige is farsaw.[citation needed]


Length: siriometer

The siriometer is a rarely used astronomical measure equal to one million Astronomical Units, i.e., one million times the average distance between the Sun and Earth. This distance is equal to about 15.8 light years, about twice the distance from Earth to the star Sirius. A siriometer is a unit of measurement equal to 1,000,000 Astronomical Units, or about 149,597,870,000,000,000 meters, or about 15. ... The astronomical unit (AU or au or a. ... A light-year or lightyear, symbol ly, is the distance light travels in vacuum in one Julian year. ... Sirius (α CMa / α Canis Majoris / Alpha Canis Majoris) is the brightest star in the night-time sky, with a visual apparent magnitude of −1. ...


Area

Area: nanoacre

A nanoacre is a unit (about 4 mm²; ≈ 2.01168 mm wide, ≈ 2.01168 mm long) of real estate on a VLSI chip. "The term gets its humor from the fact that VLSI nanoacres have costs in the same range as real acres in Silicon Valley once one figures in design and fabrication-setup costs."[3] Very-large-scale integration (VLSI) is the process of creating integrated circuits by combining thousands of transistor-based circuits into a single chip. ... Integrated circuit showing memory blocks, logic and input/output pads around the periphery A monolithic integrated circuit (also known as IC, microchip, silicon chip, computer chip or chip) is a miniaturized electronic circuit (consisting mainly of semiconductor devices, as well as passive components) that has been manufactured in the surface... An acre is an English unit of area, which is also frequently used in the United States and some Commonwealth countries. ... A view of downtown San Jose, the self-proclaimed Capital of Silicon Valley. ...


Area: are

As a part of the metric system, the French at first preferred the are, which is 100 m² (or a tenth of a strema), as base unit for areas; the square metre (m²) becomes a centiare (ca). Only the base unit and hectare (ha) saw a wider use and are still in use in some countries (primarily The Netherlands and Belgium), when using square metres is impractically small, and the square kilometre is too large. An are (symbol a) is a unit of area, equal to 100 square meters (10 m × 10 m), used for measuring land area. ... A strema (στρεμα, plural stremata) is a unit of area commonly used in Greece to measure land, being 1,000 square metres, or one-tenth of a hectare. ... A hectare (symbol ha) is a unit of area, equal to 10,000 square metres, commonly used for measuring land area. ...


Area: football field

In many countries, a football pitch (or football/soccer field) is used as a man-in-the-street unit of area. It is necessarily restricted to order-of-magnitude comparisons by the fact that football pitches are officially allowed to vary by a factor of 2.67 in area (between 4,050 and 10,800 m², i.e. roughly 0.5 to 1 hectare) although this factor drops to 2.01 in the case of pitches approved for international matches. A football field (or pitch) is the playing surface for a game of association football. ... An order of magnitude is the class of scale or magnitude of any amount, where each class contains values of a fixed ratio to the class preceding it. ... A hectare (symbol ha) is a unit of area, equal to 10,000 square metres, commonly used for measuring land area. ...


Area: Belgium/Wales/Rhode Island/Texas/Alaska/Washington D.C.

The area of a familiar country, state or city is often used as a unit of measure, especially in journalism. Journalism is a discipline of collecting, analyzing, verifying, and presenting news regarding current events, trends, issues and people. ...


Conservationists discussing the destruction of the Amazon Rainforest often use Belgium as an approximate measure of how much forest is being lost annually. The area of the country of Belgium is 30,528 km². In the United Kingdom, Wales, equal to 20,779 km², is used in phrases such as "an area the size of Wales" or "twice the area of Wales". River in the Brazilian Amazon Rainforest The Amazon Rainforest (in Portuguese, Floresta Amazônica or Amazônia — and in Spanish, Selva Amazónica) is a moist broadleaf forest in the Amazon Basin of South America. ... Motto: (Welsh for Wales forever) Anthem: Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau Capital Cardiff Largest city Cardiff Official language(s) Welsh, English Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of the UK Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Rhodri Morgan AM Unification    - by Gruffudd ap Llywelyn 1056  Area    - Total 20,779...


In the United States, the areas of Rhode Island (1,545 sq mi), Texas (268,601 sq mi, commonly used due to its historic "larger than life" reputation), and rarely Alaska (656,425 sq mi) are used in a similar fashion, Antarctica's Larsen B ice shelf was approximately the size of Rhode Island until it broke up in 2002. Due to the Rhode Island being a relatively small unit of measurement (and, perhaps, due to its area being 33% water), many comparisons to the size of Rhode Island are somewhat imprecise. [4] The U.S. Central Intelligence Agency uses Washington, D.C. as a comparison for city-sized objects. Official language(s) None Capital Providence Largest city Providence Area  Ranked 50th  - Total 1,214* sq mi (3,144* km²)  - Width 37 miles (60 km)  - Length 48 miles (77 km)  - % water 32. ... Official language(s) None See: Languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 268,581 sq mi (695,622 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) English Capital Juneau Largest city Anchorage Area  Ranked 1st  - Total 663,267 sq mi (1,717,855 km²)  - Width 808 miles (1,300 km)  - Length 1,479 miles (2,380 km)  - % water 13. ... Larsen A and Larsen B iceshelves marked in red The Larsen Ice Shelf () is a long, fringing ice shelf in the northwest part of the Weddell Sea, extending along the east coast of Antarctic Peninsula from Cape Longing to the area just southward of Hearst Island. ... The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an intelligence agency of the United States Government. ... Nickname: DC, The District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia. ...


In Finland, the region of Uusimaa (6,366 km²) is conveniently sized for area comparisons. Uusimaa (Nyland) is a region (maakunta / landskap) in Southern Finland. ...

See also: The size of Wales

The size of Wales is a phrase that has become legendary for its use by the British news media to enable size comparisons of large areas to be made; by quoting the size of unfamiliar areas in terms of a familiar area (for example, twice the size of Wales), the...

Cubic Volume

Cubic Volume: barn-megaparsec

This unit is similar in concept to the attoparsec, combining very large and small scales. A barn (b) is a unit of cross-sectional area used in nuclear physics, equal to 10-28 . The "physical cross-section area" of the nucleus of an atom is approximately 1 barn —a very small unit of area (itself humorously named after the proverbial "broad side of a barn"). When this is multiplied by the megaparsec (Mpc) —a very large unit of length— the result is a human-scaled unit of volume approximately equal to 2/3 of a teaspoon. A barn (symbol b) is a unit of area. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... Teaspoon and sugar A teaspoon is a small spoon that can hold about 5 milliliters of liquid. ...


Cubic Volume: board foot

A board foot is an old American unit of volume, used for wood. It is equivalent to 1 inch × 1 foot × 1 foot, or 144 cubic inches. However, in practice, it is defined differently for hardwood and softwood. It is also found in the unit of density pounds per board foot. The board foot is a specialized unit of volume for measuring lumber in the United States. ...


Cubic Volume: stère

The stère (st) is equal to a cubic metre (m³), so the litre (l), which is a cubic decimetre (dm³), becomes a millistère (mst). Motorcyclists are often confused if the cubic capacity of their engines are given in millilitres (mL) instead of cubic centimetres (cm³); on the contrary the same property for cars is usually given in litres (L), not cubic decimetres (dm³). At the next level, the kilolitre (kL) could replace the cubic metre (m³). The stère is traditionally used to measure a quantity of wood.


Cubic Volume: Olympic-sized swimming pool

For smaller volumes of liquid, one measure commonly used in the media in many countries is the Olympic-sized swimming pool. An Olympic-sized swimming pool holds a little over 250,000 litres, that is, 1/2,000,000 of a sydharb.


Cubic Volume: sydharb

A unit of volume used in Australia for water. One sydharb is the amount of water in Sydney Harbour: approximately 500 gigalitres. [5] Sydney Opera House and Harbour Bridge located on Port Jackson Port Jackson is the natural harbour of Sydney, Australia, also known as Sydney Harbour and is the largest natural harbour in the world. ...


Mass

Mass: grave

In 1793, the French term "grave" (from "gravity") was suggested as the base unit of mass for the metric system. In 1795, however, due in no small part to the French Revolution, the name "kilogram" was adopted instead. [6] Now, thanks to this historical quirk, we have a base unit that includes a prefix. 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... now. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


Time

Time: shake

In nuclear engineering and astrophysics contexts, the shake (from "two shakes of a lamb's tail") is used as a conveniently short period of time. 1 shake = 10 nanoseconds. [7] Albert Einsteins letter to President Roosevelt in 1939 about his concern, about (Nuclear chain reactions) Click for closeup of letter A nuclear chain reaction occurs when on average more than one nuclear reaction is caused by another nuclear reaction, thus leading to an exponential increase in the number of... A shake is an informal unit of time equal to 10 nanoseconds, or 10-8 seconds. ...


Time: nanocentury

Another derived time unit, reducing a rather large time span (century) by preceding it with a fractional prefix (nano). As Tom Duff at Bell Labs pointed out: "How many seconds are there in a year? If I tell you there are 3.156×107, you won't even try to remember it. On the other hand, who could forget that, to within half a percent, π seconds is a nanocentury." A century (From the Latin cent, one hundred) is one hundred consecutive years. ... Nano is a noun Name for an Apple Brand Ipod available in 2GB and 4GB memory sizes whose purpose is for storing and playing music. ... Thomas Douglas Selkirk Duff (b. ... Bell Laboratories (also known as Bell Labs and formerly known as AT&T Bell Laboratories and Bell Telephone Laboratories) was the main research and development arm of the United States Bell System. ... When a circles diameter is 1, its circumference is Ï€. The mathematical constant Ï€ is an irrational real number, approximately equal to 3. ...


One computer science professor used to characterize the standard length of his lectures (a little less than an hour) as a microcentury. (roughly 52.6 minutes, accounting for leap years).[citation needed] A lecture on linear algebra at the Helsinki University of Technology A lecture is an oral presentation intended to teach people about a particular subject, for example by a university or college teacher. ... The hour (symbol: h) is a unit of time. ... A leap year (or intercalary year) is a year containing an extra day, week or month in order to keep the calendar year synchronised with the astronomical or seasonal year. ...


Time: jiffy

In computing, the jiffy is the duration of one tick of the system timer interrupt. Typically, this time is 0.01 seconds, though in some earlier systems (such as the Commodore 8-bit machines) the jiffy was defined as 1/60 of a second, roughly equal to the vertical blanking interval on NTSC video hardware (and the frequency of AC electric power in North America). Originally, the word computing was synonymous with counting and calculating, and a science and technology that deals with the original sense of computing mathematical calculations. ... The term jiffy (or jiffie) is used in different applications for various different short periods of time, usually 1/60 of a second. ... Commodore is the commonly used name for Commodore International, a West Chester, Pennsylvania based electronics company which was a vital player in the home/personal computer field in the 1980s. ... 8-bit refers to the number of bits used in the data bus of a computer. ... NTSC is the analog television system in use in Canada, Japan, South Korea, the Philippines, the United States, and some other countries, mostly in the Americas (see map). ... City lights viewed in a motion blurred exposure. ... Transmission lines in Lund, Sweden Electric power, often known as power or electricity, involves the production and delivery of electrical energy in sufficient quantities to operate domestic appliances, office equipment, industrial machinery and provide sufficient energy for both domestic and commercial lighting, heating, cooking and industrial processes. ...


Time: microfortnight

One very convenient unit deduced from the FFF system is the millionth part of the fundamental timeunit of FFF, which equals 1.2096 seconds, and is a typical example of computer nerd humour. As the story goes, "The VMS operating system has a lot of tuning parameters that you can set with the SYSGEN utility, and one of these is TIMEPROMPTWAIT, the time the system will wait for an operator to set the correct date and time at boot if it realizes that the current value is bogus. This time is specified in microfortnights." A Lego RCX Computer is an example of an embedded computer used to control mechanical devices. ... Look up nerd in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up humour in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... OpenVMS[1] (Open Virtual Memory System or just VMS) is the name of a high-end computer server operating system that runs on the VAX[2] and Alpha[3] family of computers developed by Digital Equipment Corporation of Maynard, Massachusetts (DIGITAL was then purchased by Compaq, and is now owned... An operating system (OS) is a computer program that manages the hardware and software resources of a computer. ...


The joke is in having a rather large unit (fortnight) combined with a fractional SI prefix (micro) to counteract that. The practical purpose is to discourage setting such parameters without some thought. The unit was selected because the time is only approximately one second, being established by some near-infinite loops rather than a real clock unit (which isn't active at the time), and rather than field complaints about this being "not exactly a second", the unit was invented. Look up micro- in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Other conventional scales

Energy: jerk

In very high energy physics, particularly in the nuclear weapons and astrophysics communities, [8] the jerk is used as a conveniently large quantity of energy. 1 jerk = 1016 ergs = 109 joules = 1 gigajoule. This unit jerk is different from, and must not be confused with, the vector quantity jerk, which is defined as the first derivative of acceleration with respect to time. An erg is the unit of energy and mechanical work in the centimetre-gram-second (CGS) system of units, symbol erg. Its name is derived from the Greek word meaning work. The erg is a small unit, equal to a force of one dyne exerted for a distance of one... The joule (symbol: J) is the SI (metric) unit of energy, which is defined as the potential to do work. ... Look up gigajoule in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up jerk, jolt, surge, lurch in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Energy: foe

A foe is a unit of energy equal to 1044 joules that was coined by physicist Gerry Brown of SUNY-Stony Brook. To measure the staggeringly immense amount of energy produced by a supernova, specialists occasionally use the "foe", an acronym derived from the phrase [ten to the power] fifty-one ergs, or 1051 ergs. This unit of measure is convenient because a supernova typically releases about one foe of observable energy in a very short period of time (which can be measured in seconds). Foe is a unit of energy equal to 1044 joules. ... The joule (symbol J, also called newton metre, or coulomb volt) is the SI unit of energy and work. ... Multiwavelength X-ray image of the remnant of Keplers Supernova, SN 1604. ... For other uses see Erg (disambiguation) An erg is the unit of energy in the centimetre-gram-second (CGS) system of units, symbol erg. The erg is a quite small unit, equal to equal to one gram·centimetre2/second2. ...


Energy intensity: langley

The langley (symbol Ly) is used to measure solar radiation or insolation. It is equal to one thermochemical calorie per square centimetre (4.184×104 J/m²) and was named after Samuel Pierpont Langley. The langley (Ly) is an international unit used to measure solar radiation (or insolation). ... Samuel Pierpont Langley. ...


Kinematic viscosity: stokes

One of the few CGS units to see wider use, one stokes (symbol S or St) is a unit of kinematic viscosity, defined as 10-4 m²/s, ie. 1 cm²/s. This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The stokes is the cgs physical unit for kinematic viscosity. ... The pitch drop experiment at the University of Queensland. ...


Electromagnetic flux: jansky

In radio astronomy, the unit of electromagnetic flux is the jansky (symbol Jy), equivalent to 10−26 watts per square metre per hertz. It is named after the pioneering radio astronomer Karl Jansky. The brightest natural radio sources have flux densities of the order of one to one hundred jansky. Microwave image of 3C353 galaxy at 8. ... In radio astronomy, the flux unit or jansky (symbol Jy) is a non-SI unit of electromagnetic flux equivalent to 10−26 watts per square metre per hertz. ... Karl Guthe Jansky (October 22, 1905 – February 14, 1950), was the American physicist and radio engineer who in 1932 discovered that the Milky Way galaxy emanates radio waves; he did not follow up his discovery, but it marked the birth of radio astronomy. ...


Money

Money: cup of coffee

In Italy, the cost of an espresso is often used as a unit with which to measure a price in order to make it appear small: e.g., "For less than the cost of a cup of coffee a day, you can...". This usage has become less common due to rising prices at bars; however, it remains especially popular with charity organizations asking for donations. Other common units are the cost of a pizza and that of a can of Coca-Cola. Espresso brewing, with a dark reddish-brown foam, called crema. ... Tourists sit outside a bar in Chiang Mai, Thailand A Depression-era bar in Louisiana. ... A pepperoni pizza Pizza (IPA pronunciation: ) or Pizza Pie, is the name of an oven-baked, flat, usually round bread covered with tomato sauce with optional toppings. ... The wave shape (known as the dynamic ribbon device) present on all Coca-Cola cans throughout the world derives from the contour of the original Coca-Cola bottles. ...


In Denmark, charity organizations such as WWF and Unicef sell subscription memberships by advertising that it's "less than the cost of a pizza a month". WWF, the global environment conservation organization, was constituted and registered in 1961 pursuant to Sections 80 et seq. ... UNICEF Logo The United Nations Childrens Fund or UNICEF (Arabic: ; French: ; Spanish: ) was established by the United Nations General Assembly on December 11, 1946. ...


In the United States, the price of a cup of coffee is often used by various world relief fund organizations, e.g. "For less than the cost of a cup of coffee per day, you can feed a hungry orphan in (insert country here)" (again, Coke is also used).


In Greece coffee has been used along with water or a soda drink as monetary unit. When consumers started complaining about the rising prices of gasoline petrol station owners would point out that it cost less than water (about € 1 per liter in kiosks). Soda drinks have been used for comparison — e.g., "For less than the cost of a soda drink per day, you can have a (satellite TV, aircondition etc) in your home". Coffee is less popular because at € 3-4 per cup it is seen as expensive. Gasoline, also called petrol, is a petroleum-derived liquid mixture consisting primarily of hydrocarbons and enhanced with benzene or iso-octane to increase octane ratings, used as fuel in internal combustion engines. ...


Money: pint of beer

In the UK, the 'pint' (of beer) is used to denote trivial sums that are slightly too large to be forgotten about. Depending on the establishment, location and brand, a pint of beer in a reasonably-priced English pub costs between about £2 and £3. The unit is used (in a financial setting) mainly due to the repaying of trivial debts between friends via alcoholic purchase.[citation needed] Okey, Frist of all. ...


Money: case of beer

In the United States, a case is the common name used to refer to a 24-pack of beer. A case of cheap beer, such as Natural Light or Keystone Light, generally costs around 10 dollars ( 8.2). Seeing how beer is a staple among college students, it is understandable that the term "case" is used. For example, a college student might say, "My tuition this year cost me 1000 cases!"[citation needed] Okey, Frist of all. ... Natural Ice Natural Ice, also know as Natty Ice on ad posters, is a macro lager made by Anheuser-Busch introduced in the 1980s. ... Keystone Light is a type of light beer frequently used in college drinking games. ... Alternate uses: Dollar (disambiguation) The dollar is the name of the official currency in several countries, dependencies and other regions (see list below). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


Units for unconventional measurements

Formal scientific measurements of abstract quantities such as 'Beauty', 'Happiness' and 'Comfort' are sadly lacking and many humorists have stepped in to fill the void.


Uncertainty: microbit

The Finnish computer magazine MikroBitti once claimed to be named after the microbit, defined as one millionth of a bit. In the usual sense of a bit as a discrete entity being either 0 or 1, a fractional bit is not conceptually sound. However, in the sense of information entropy, a bit is a measure of uncertainty. Thus, although this term is never used in practice, a microbit indicates a very small amount of uncertainty. For example, the amount of information corresponding to the knowledge of whether a given second in the 1990s is a leap second is about 0.4 microbits.[citation needed] Computer magazines are about computers and related subjects, such as networking and the Internet. ... MikroBITTI is a Finnish computer magazine (founded in May 1984), published by Helsinki Media, aimed mainly for beginner to mid-level readers. ... A bit (binary digit) refers to a digit in the binary numeral system, which consists of base 2 digits (ie. ... Entropy of a Bernoulli trial as a function of success probability, often called the binary entropy function Entropy is a concept in thermodynamics (see thermodynamic entropy), statistical mechanics and information theory. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... A leap second is a one-second adjustment to civil time in order to keep it close to the mean solar time. ...


Original content for publication: pub-on

Part unit of measure and part entity-in-itself, the pub-on is the quantum of material submitted to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. Manuscripts barely containing enough new information to qualify as 'original research' are said to consist of a single pub-on, while far-reaching works with many new and interesting results and interpretations might contain many. Publishing papers consisting of only a few pub-ons may make an author's catalogue of papers longer, but will tend to swamp editor's desks and confound the system for other authors.[citation needed] This quantity is also commonly referred to as a least publishable unit (LPU). In physics, a quantum refers to an indivisible, and perhaps, elementary entity. ... Peer review (known as refereeing in some academic fields) is a process of subjecting an authors scholarly work or ideas to the scrutiny of others who are experts in the field. ...


Fame: warhol

This is a unit of fame or hype, derived from Andy Warhol's dictum "everyone will be world-famous for fifteen minutes" —it represents, naturally, fifteen minutes of fame. Some multiples are: Hype! is also the name of a documentary film about grunge music. ... Andy Warhol, photographed by Helmut Newton. ... In popular culture, 15 minutes of fame refers to a sudden state of celebrity that is believed unlikely to continue long enough to affect the new celebritys life for the better. ...

  • 1 kilowarhol — famous for 15,000 minutes, or 10.42 days. A sort of metric "nine day wonder".
  • 1 megawarhol — famous for 15 million minutes, or 28.5 years. The type of person your parents talk about all the time, but of whom you've never heard from anyone else.

First used by Cullen Murphy in 1999. [9] The International System of Units (symbol: SI) (for the French phrase Syst me International dUnit s) is the most widely used system of units. ... Cullen Murphy (b. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ...


Also used simply as meaning 15 minutes; as the Warhol worm, that could infect all vulnerable machines on the entire Internet in 15 minutes or less. A Warhol worm is an extremely rapidly propagating computer worm that spreads as fast as physically possible, infecting all vulnerable machines on the entire Internet in 15 minutes or less. ...


Bleeding: muta

Used to describe how much a professional wrestler bleeds during a match, compared to a New Japan Pro Wrestling match between The Great Muta and Hiroshi Hase on December 14, 1992 in which Muta bled in amounts previously unheard of.[10] The Muta is normally measured in tenths, ranging from 0.1 Muta to 1.0 Muta. Cactus Jack is usually said to have reached 1.0 Muta in the finals of the 1995 IWA King of the Deathmatch tournament, while more recently, Eddie Guerrero is thought to have reached 1.0 Muta in his match at the 2005 Great American Bash against JBL. Professional wrestling is generally any form of performance art in which pro-wrestlers receive payment for participating. ... In professional wrestling, juicing or color is the slang term for bleeding. ... New Japan Pro Wrestling (新日本プロレス, shin nihon puroresu) is a major professional wrestling federation in Japan, founded by Antonio Inoki in 1972. ... Keiji Mutoh (武藤敬司 Mutō Keiji born December 23, 1962) is a Japanese professional wrestler who gained international fame in the National Wrestling Alliance. ... Hiroshi/Hiro Hase was born on May 5, 1961 in Koyabe, Toyama, Japan. ... December 14 is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... Michael Francis Mick Foley Sr. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... International Wrestling Association of Japan, more commonly known as IWA Japan, is a Japanese professional wrestling promotion operating since 1994. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Eduardo Gory Guerrero Llanes (October 9, 1967 – November 13, 2005), better known by the ring name Eddie Guerrero, was an American professional wrestler. ...


Data storage capacities: encyclopedias, Bibles and The Library of Congress

When the compact disc began to be used as a data storage device, the CD-ROM, journalists had to compare the disc capacity (650 MB) to something everyone could imagine. Since many Western households have at least one Christian Bible, and the Bible is a comparatively long book, it was often chosen for this purpose. The King James Version of the Bible in uncompressed plain 8-bit text contains about 5 million characters, so a CD-ROM can store about 130 Bibles.[citation needed] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Many different consumer electronic devices can store data. ... The CD-ROM (an abbreviation for Compact Disc Read-Only Memory (ROM)) is a non-volatile optical data storage medium using the same physical format as audio compact discs, readable by a computer with a CD-ROM drive. ... A megabyte is a unit of information or computer storage equal to approximately one million bytes. ... The word Bible refers to the canonical collections of sacred writings of Judaism and Christianity. ... The King James Version of the Bible, or Authorized Version, first published in 1611, has had a profound impact on English literature. ...


The Encyclopædia Britannica is another common data size metric - it contains approximately 300 million characters, so two copies would fit comfortably onto a CD-ROM.[citation needed] The Encyclopædia Britannica is a general encyclopedia published by Encyclopædia Britannica Inc. ...


The term Library of Congress is sometimes used as a unit of measurement when discussing large amounts of data. It refers to the U.S. Library of Congress. One Library of Congress equals approximately 20 tebibytes of uncompressed textual data.[citation needed] The Great Hall interior. ... A tebibyte is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated TiB. 1 tebibyte = 240 bytes = 1,099,511,627,776 bytes The tebibyte is closely related to the terabyte, which can either be a synonym for tebibyte, or refer to 1012 bytes = 1,000,000,000,000 bytes...


Hence: 1 Library of Congress = 67,000 Britannicas and 1 Britannica = 60 bibles.


In most cases, diagrams and photographs are not included in the total - since these take considerably more space than text, this would be an important consideration for practical storage of large book collections. In practice, diagrams can often be expressed more compactly using vector graphics, and data compression software can pack more text into the available space. It is possible to compress English text to about 11% of its original size. Thus one might claim that the entire Library of Congress could be packed onto a single 2.2 terabyte storage unit - excluding the pictures. Example showing effect of vector graphics on ppm scale: (a) original vector-based illustration; (b) illustration magnified 8x as a vector image; (c) illustration magnified 8x as a raster image. ... In computer science and information theory, data compression or source coding is the process of encoding information using fewer bits (or other information-bearing units) than an unencoded representation would use through use of specific encoding schemes. ...

See also: Wikipedia:Size comparisons

Bandwidth: station wagon full of mag-tape

An observation made in the early days of Usenet that the highest bandwidth method of moving networknews across the country was "a station wagon full of mag-tape". The phrase is attributed to many people, including Karl Kleinpaste and Andrew Tanenbaum, and has been subject to countless variations of vehicle and media types (eg "a 747 full of DVDs" or "an intern with a box full of floppies"). To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Usenet is a distributed Internet discussion system that evolved from a general purpose UUCP network of the same name. ... Compact audio cassette Magnetic tape is a non-volatile storage medium consisting of a magnetic coating on a thin plastic strip. ... Dr. Andrew Stuart Andy Tanenbaum (born 1944) is a professor of Computer Science at Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam in the Netherlands. ... The Boeing 747, commonly called a Jumbo Jet, is among the most recognizable jet airliners and is the largest passenger airliner currently in service. ... DVD (sometimes called Digital Versatile Disc, or Digital Video Disc) is an optical disc storage media format that can be used for data storage, including movies with high video and sound quality. ... In North America, an intern is one who works in a temporary position with an emphasis on education rather than merely employment, making it similar in some respects to an apprenticeship. ... A floppy disk is a data storage device that is composed of a disk of thin, flexible (floppy) magnetic storage medium encased in a square or rectangular plastic shell. ...


As a measurement unit, this is used more as a method of comparison between network technologies than as an actual hard measurement of bandwidth. It also depends crucially on the distance of the communication, e.g. "An ethernet has more bandwidth than an intern with a cartload of CDs" is certainly true over large distances - but is unlikely to be the case for short range communication. This measure also overlooks any latency involved in transferring data between the transport medium and on-line storage, which may be considerable for tape. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Ethernet is a large and diverse family of frame-based computer networking technologies for local area networks (LANs). ... The CD-ROM (an abbreviation for Compact Disc Read-Only Memory (ROM)) is a non-volatile optical data storage medium using the same physical format as audio compact discs, readable by a computer with a CD-ROM drive. ... Latency is the time a message takes to traverse a system. ...

See also: Sneakernet

In a non-network environment, the floppy disk was once the primary means of transferring data between computers. ...

Laser power: Gillette

A unit described by Theodore Maiman as an early measure of laser output power. The measure was simply the number of razor blades through which the laser could burn a hole. This measurement was especially convenient as the first lasers were pulsed ruby lasers, making it otherwise difficult to measure the output power. Also, due to the relative uniformity of razor blades manufactured by The Gillette Company, it had some usefulness as a rough comparison.[citation needed] Theodore Maiman. ... A LASER (from the acronym of Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) is an optical source that emits photons in a coherent beam. ... The Gillette brand logo The Gillette Company (NYSE: G) was founded by King C. Gillette in 1901 as a safety razor manufacturer. ...


Thus, scientists would brag about having a "4 Gillette" laser versus their competitor's puny "2 Gillette" laser. (For the record, Ted Maiman claims that the first laser was a "2 Gillette" laser.)


Quantity of alcohol: unit of alcohol

In the UK, units of alcohol are used in the health industry and some pubs to measure the amount of alcohol consumed. One unit is approximately 10 cc of ethanol, or about 8 grammes. The recommended weekly intake is no more than 14 units for women, and 21 units for men. [3] [4] A glass of red wine contains about one unit of alcohol In the United Kingdom a system of units of alcohol is employed for an approximate measure of the amount of alcohol in different drinks. ...

See also: standard drink

Many countries around the world employ a system of Standard Drinks. A standard drink is fixed measure of pure beverage alcohol, but is usually expressed as a measure of beer, wine or spirits for simplicity . ...

Scalar: sagan

A whimsical unit of measure equaling at least 4,000,000,000. Based on the quote "billions of stars" used by Carl Sagan and popularized with the derivation "billions and billions of stars" by Johnny Carson. One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... Carl Edward Sagan (November 9, 1934 – December 20, 1996) was an American astronomer, astrobiologist, and highly successful science popularizer. ... For other people named John Carson, see John Carson (disambiguation). ...


Purchasing power parity: Big Mac index

The Big Mac Index compares the purchasing power parity of countries in terms of the cost a Big Mac hamburger. [5] McDonalds Big Mac purchased in Australia The Big Mac index is an informal way of measuring the purchasing power parity (PPP) between two currencies and provides a test of the extent to which market exchange rates result in goods costing the same in different countries. ... In economics, purchasing power parity (PPP) is the method of using the long-run equilibrium exchange rate of two currencies to equalize the currencies purchasing power. ... The Big Mac is a type of hamburger, a signature sandwich sold by the McDonalds chain of fast-food restaurants since 1968, made with two all beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun. ...


Garn

The Garn is NASA's unit of measure for symptoms resulting from space adaptation syndrome, the response of the human body to weightlessness in space.[citation needed] Space adaptation syndrome, or space sickness, is what astronauts go through during adaptation to zero gravity. ...


Computer program length: KLOC

A computer programming expression, the KLOC, pronounced kay-lok, standing for "Kilo-Lines of Code", i.e. "Thousand Lines of Code". The unit is used, especially by IBM managers, to express the amount of work required to develop a piece of software. Given that estimates of 20 lines of functional bug-free code per day per programmer were often used, it is apparent that 1 KLOC could take one programmer as long as 50 working days, or 10 working weeks. Short for thousands (kilo) of lines of code, KLOC is a software metric of the size of computer programs. ... Source lines of code (SLOC) is a software metric used to measure the amount of code in a software program. ... now. ...


Mache Unit

The Mache Unit, symbol ME (from the German "Mache-Einheit"), is a unit of activity used to gauge mineral springs. It is defined as the quantity of radon per litre which delivers one millionth of a röntgen (that is to say, ionises a sustained current of one StatAmpere, or 10−3 esu). This works out to about 1.3468 × 104 Bq/m³ (or 0.364 nCi/L). General Name, Symbol, Number radon, Rn, 86 Chemical series noble gases Group, Period, Block 18, 6, p Appearance colorless Atomic mass (222) g/mol Electron configuration [Xe] 4f14 5d10 6s2 6p6 Electrons per shell 2, 8, 18, 32, 18, 8 Physical properties Phase gas Density (0 °C, 101. ... The röntgen or roentgen (symbol R) is a unit of exposure to ionizing radiation (X or gamma rays), and is named after the German physicist Wilhelm Röntgen. ... Esu is an alternate spelling for the Yoruban god Eshu ESU is also an abbreviation for: East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania The English-Speaking Union Electrostatic unit, an alternate name for the statcoulomb Electrical Safety Upgrade Elite Strike Unit Emergency Service Unit Enormous State University Electrosurgical Unit, an alternate name...


Morgan

The morgan is a rarely-used unit related to the distance between genes on a chromosome. Only a daughter unit, the centimorgan, is commonly used. In humans, the morgan would be approximately 100 million base pairs long.[citation needed] This stylistic schematic diagram shows a gene in relation to the double helix structure of DNA and to a chromosome (right). ... Figure 1: A representation of a condensed eukaryotic chromosome, as seen during cell division. ... In genetics, a centimorgan (abbreviated cM) is a unit of recombinant frequency. ... Human beings are defined variously in biological, spiritual, and cultural terms, or in combinations thereof. ... In molecular biology, two nucleotides on opposite complementary DNA or RNA strands that are connected via hydrogen bonds are called a base pair (often abbreviated bp). ...


Nibble

A measure of quantity of data or information, the "nibble" (sometimes spelled "nybble") is equal to 4 bits, or one half of the common 8-bit byte. The nibble is used to describe the amount of memory used to store a digit of a number stored in packed decimal format (see nibble).[citation needed] A nibble (or less commonly, nybble) is the computing term for the aggregation of four bits, or half an octet (an octet being an 8-bit byte). ... Binary-coded decimal (BCD) is, after character encodings, the most common way of encoding decimal digits in computing and in electronic systems. ... A nibble (or less commonly, nybble) is the computing term for the aggregation of four bits, or half an octet (an octet being an 8-bit byte). ...


Nines

Numbers very close to, but below one are often expressed in nines (N - not to be confused with the unit newton), that is in the number of nines following the decimal separator in writing the number in question. For example, "three nines" or "3N" indicates 0.999 or 99.9%, "four nines five" or "4N5" is the expression for the number 0.99995 or 99.995%.[citation needed] In physics, the newton (symbol: N) is the SI unit of force, named after Sir Isaac Newton in recognition of his work on classical mechanics. ...


Typical areas of usage are:

  • the reliability of computer systems, that is the ratio of uptime to the sum of uptime and downtime. "Five nines" reliability in a continuously operated system means an average downtime of no more than approximately five minutes per year.
  • the purity of materials, such as gases and metals.

Reliability concerns quality or consistency. ... Uptime is a measure of the time a computer system has been up and running. ... Uptime is a measure of the time a computer system has been up and running. ... Downtime refers to the period of time that a machine or system (usually a computer server) is offline or not functioning, usually as a result of either system failure (such as a crash) or routine maintenance. ... Downtime refers to the period of time that a machine or system (usually a computer server) is offline or not functioning, usually as a result of either system failure (such as a crash) or routine maintenance. ... ... A gas is one of the four major phases of matter (after solid and liquid, and followed by plasma, that subsequently appear as a solid material is subjected to increasingly higher temperatures. ... Hot metal work from a blacksmith In chemistry, a metal (Greek: Metallon) is an element that readily forms positive ions (cations) and has metallic bonds. ...

Alcohol concentration: proof

Up to the 20th century, alcoholic spirits were assessed in the UK by mixing with gunpowder and testing the mixture to see if it would still burn; spirit that just passed the test was said to be at 100° proof. The UK now uses percentage alcohol by volume at 20°C, where spirit at 100° proof is approximately 57.15% ABV; the U.S. uses a proof number of twice the ABV at 60°F (15.5°C).[citation needed] Alcoholic proof is a measure of how much ethanol is in an alcoholic beverage, and is approximately twice the percentage of alcohol by volume (ABV, the unit that is commonly used presently). ... Alcohol by volume (ABV) is an indication of how much alcohol (expressed as a percentage) is included in an alcoholic beverage. ...


Audible frequency ratio: savart

An 18th century unit for measuring the frequency ratio of two sounds, it is equal to 1/300 of an octave, or 1/25 of a semitone. Still used in some programs, but considered too rough for most purposes. Cent is preferred. The cent is a logarithmic unit of measure used for musical intervals. ...


Pepper hotness: Scoville heat unit

The Scoville scale is a measure of the hotness of a chili pepper. It's the degree of dilution in sugar water of a specific chili pepper extract when a panel of 5 tasters can no longer detect its 'heat'. Blair's 16 Million Reserve is supposed to be the top of the scale, providing 1.6 × 107 SHU.[citation needed] The Scoville scale is a measure of the hotness of a chilli pepper. ... The chili pepper, chile pepper, or chilli pepper, or simply chilli, chili or chile, is the fruit of the plant Capsicum from the nightshade family, Solanaceae. ...


Sunshine unit

The Sunshine Unit, also known as the Strontium Unit (symbol S.U.) is a unit of biological contamination by radio-active substances (specifically Strontium-90). It is equal to one picocurie of Sr-90 per gram of body calcium. Since about 2% of the human body mass is calcium, and Sr-90 has a half-life of 28.78 years, releasing 6.697+2.282 MeV per disintegration, this works out to about 1.065 × 10-12 grays / second. The permissible body burden was established at 1000 S.U. General Name, Symbol, Number Strontium, Sr, 38 Series Alkaline earth metal Group, Period, Block 2 (IIA), 5, s Density, Hardness 2630 kg/m3, 1. ... The curie (symbol Ci) is a former unit of radioactivity, defined as 3. ... BIC pen cap, about 1 gram. ... General Name, Symbol, Number calcium, Ca, 20 Chemical series alkaline earth metals Group, Period, Block 2, 4, s Appearance silvery white Atomic mass 40. ... Half-Life For a quantity subject to exponential decay, the half-life is the time required for the quantity to fall to half of its initial value. ... An electronvolt (symbol: eV) is the amount of energy gained by a single unbound electron when it falls through an electrostatic potential difference of one volt. ... The gray (symbol: Gy) is the SI unit of absorbed dose. ...


Vodka index

The Vodka index is the relation between the price of a liter of standard vodka, and the mean price of a hardbound book in a particular country. While somewhat jocular, it is purported to evince how well literacy fares in a given country. Among its many proponents are included Al Alvarez and science fiction author Harry Harrison. Al Alvarez (1929-) is an English poet, writer and critic. ... At the 63rd World Science Fiction Convention in Glasgow, August 2005 Harry Harrison (born Henry Maxwell Dempsey, March 12, 1925 in Stamford, Connecticut) is an American science fiction author who has lived in many parts of the world including Mexico, England, Denmark and Italy. ...


Perceived loudness: phon

  • The unit of perceived loudness, phon, is sometimes also called as phone. This has led to puns such as One megaphone equals 1012 microphones.

Fig. ... It has been suggested that dajare be merged into this article or section. ... A megaphone, with a three-inch lighter to scale. ... // The word microphone (Greek mikros small and phone voice or sound) originally referred to a mechanical hearing aid for small sounds. ...

Beauty: millihelen

Helen of Troy is widely known as "the face that launched a thousand ships." Thus, 1 millihelen is the amount of beauty needed to launch a single ship.[citation needed]


Stupidity: cox

The cox index is a measure of the stupidity of a decision. It is a number between 0 and 1 where 0 is the least stupid and 1 is the most stupid.[citation needed]


References

  1. ^ c in furlongs per fortnight - Google Search. Retrieved on 2006-03-10.
  2. ^ FAQ for newsgroup UK.rec.sheds, version 2&3/7th (TXT) (2000). Retrieved on 2006-03-10.
  3. ^ The Jargon File - nanoacre. Retrieved on 2006-03-10.
  4. ^ Rhode Island as a Unit of Measure. Retrieved on 2006-03-10.
  5. ^ Australian Conventional Units of Measurement in Water (PDF). Australian Water Association. Retrieved on 2006-03-10.
  6. ^ The name "kilogram": a historical quirk. Bureau International des Poids et Mesures. Retrieved on 2006-03-10.
  7. ^ The Pathogenesis and Therapy of Combined Radiation Injury. Defense Threat Reduction Agency. Retrieved on 2006-11-12.
  8. ^ The Pathogenesis and Therapy of Combined Radiation Injury. Defense Threat Reduction Agency. Retrieved on 2006-11-06.
  9. ^ Murphy, Cullen (2 October 1997). Too Much of a Good Thing — How much hype is overhype?. Slate.com. Retrieved on 2006-03-10.
  10. ^ Online Onslaught Forums — Flair's mask. OnlineOnslaught.com (June 10, 2003). Retrieved on 2006-06-03.

2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (70th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (70th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (70th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (70th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (70th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (70th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 12 is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 49 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 55 days remaining. ... October 2 is the 275th day (276th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 90 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (70th in leap years). ... June 10 is the 161st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (162nd in leap years), with 204 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 3 is the 154th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (155th in leap years), with 211 days remaining. ...

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