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Encyclopedia > List of psychology topics
Psychology
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RESEARCH Ψ

Abnormal
Biological
Cognitive
Developmental
Emotion
Experimental
Evolutionary
Mathematical
Neuropsychology
Personality
Positive
Psychonomics
Psychophysics
Social
Transpersonal Psychology (from Greek: ψυχή, psukhē, spirit, soul; λόγος, logos, knowledge) is both an academic and applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes and behavior. ... Image File history File links Psi2. ... The history of psychology as a scholarly study of the mind and behavior dates, in Europe, back to the Late Middle Ages. ... Experimental psychology is an approach to psychology that treats it as one of the natural sciences, and therefore assumes that it is susceptible to the experimental method. ... Abnormal psychology is the scientific study of abnormal behavior in order to describe, predict, explain, and change abnormal patterns of functioning. ... Biological psychology, sometimes referred to as psychobiology or biopsychology, is a subfield of psychology. ... Cognitive Psychology is the school of psychology that examines internal mental processes such as problem solving, memory, and language. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... For other uses, see Emotion (disambiguation). ... Experimental psychology is an approach to psychology that treats it as one of the natural sciences, and therefore assumes that it is susceptible to the experimental method. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Mathematical Psychology is an approach to psychological research that is based on mathematical modeling of perceptual, cognitive and motor processes, and on the establishment of law-like rules that relate quantifiable stimulus characteristics with quantifiable behavior. ... Neuropsychology is a branch of psychology and neurology that aims to understand how the structure and function of the brain relate to specific psychological processes and overt behaviors. ... Personality psychology is a branch of psychology which studies personality and individual differences. ... Positive psychology is a relatively young branch of psychology that studies the strengths and virtues that enable individuals and communities to thrive. ... Psychonomics describes an approach to psychology that aims at discovering the laws (Greek: nomos) that govern the workings of the mind (Greek: psyche). The field is directly related to experimental psychology. ... Psychophysics is the branch of cognitive psychology dealing with the relationship between physical stimuli and their perception. ... Social psychology is the scientific study of how peoples thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by the actual, imagined, or implied presence of others (Allport, 1985). ... Transpersonal psychology is a school of psychology that studies the transpersonal, the transcendent or spiritual aspects of the human mind. ...

APPLIED Ψ

Clinical
Educational
Forensic
Health
Industrial/Org
Sport The basic premise of applied psychology is the use of psychological principles and theories to overcome practical problems in other fields, such as business management, product design, ergonomics, nutrition, law and clinical medicine. ... The Greek letter Psi is often used as a symbol of psychology. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Industrial and organizational psychology (also known as I/O psychology, work psychology, work and organizational psychology, W-O psychology, occupational psychology, personnel psychology or talent assessment) concerns the application of psychological theories, research methods, and intervention strategies to workplace issues. ...

LISTS

Publications
Topics
Therapies This is a list of important publications in psychology, organized by field. ... This is an alphabetical List of Psychotherapies. ...

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This page aims to list all topics related to psychology. This is so that those interested in the subject can monitor changes to the pages by clicking on Related changes in the sidebar. It is also to see the gaps in Wikipedia's coverage of the subject, via redlinks. See also the Lists of psychology topics. Psychology (from Greek: ψυχή, psukhē, spirit, soul; λόγος, logos, knowledge) is both an academic and applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes and behavior. ... List of basic psychology topics List of psychology topics DSM-IV Codes (alphabetical) DSM-IV Codes List of autism-related topics List of Clinical Psychologists List of cognitive biases List of cognitive science topics List of cognitive scientists List of controversial games List of creative thought processes List of credentials...


The list is not necessarily complete or up to date - if you see an article that should be here but isn't (or one that shouldn't be here but is), please do update the page accordingly.

Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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16 Personality Factors - 5-Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) - 16 PF is the standard abbreviation for the 16 Personality Factors multivariately-derived by psychologist Raymond Cattell. ... 5-Hydroxytryptophan or 5-HTP is a naturally-occurring amino acid, a precursor to the neurotransmitter serotonin and an intermediate in tryptophan metabolism. ...


A

A-not-B error  - A. H. Almaas - Aaron Rosanoff - Aaron T. Beck - Abductive reasoning - Abnormal psychology - Abnormality - Abraham Harold Maslow - Abraham Kaplan - Abraham Maslow - Abram Hoffer - Abreaction - Absolute refractory period - Abstinence - Abstraction - Abstract thinking - Abulia - Abuse - Abuse, substance - Academic procrastination - Academic skills disorders - Acceptance and Commitment Therapy - Accommodation - Accreditation - Acculturation - Accurate empathic understanding - Acerophobia - Acetylcholine - Acetylcholinesterase - Acoustics - Acquaintance rape - Acquisitiveness - Acrophobia - ACT-R - Acting - Acting out - Action potential - Action research - Action Science - Active intellect - Active learning - Activity theory - Actualization - Adam teasing - Adaptation - Adaption - Adaptive - Addiction - Addison's disease - ADHD - Adjustment - Adjustment disorder - Adolescence - Adolescent psychology - Adolf Meyer - Adrafinil (Olmifon) - Adrenal glands - Adrenaline - Adrenergic - Adultism - Advance directive - Affect - Affect - Affectional bond - Affectional orientation - Affective disorder - Affective flattening - Affective forecasting - Affective reaction - Affective science - Affirming the consequent - Afterburn - Afterimage - Age regression - Ageism - Aggressive - Aging - Aging and memory - Agitated depression - Agitation - Agnosia - Agonist - Agoraphobia - AIDS - AIDS dementia complex - Akathisia - Akinesia - Al-Anon - Alateen - Albert Bandura - Albert Einstein's brain - Albert Ellis - Alcohol - Alcohol abuse - Alcohol amnestic disorder - Alcohol dependence - Alcoholics Anonymous - Alcoholism - Alexander Mitscherlich - Alexander Romanovich Luria - Alexander Sutherland Neill - Alexia - Alexithymia - Alfons Vansteenwegen - Alfred Adler - Alfred Binet - Alfred Kinsey - Algophobia - Alice Miller - Alienation - Alienist - Alkaloid - Allied health professional - Allophilia - Alogia - Alogia - Alpha rhythm - Alternative hypothesis - Alternative medicine - Altered state of consciousness - Altruism - Alzheimer’s disease - Amariah Brigham - Ambiguous - Ambivalence - Ambroise-Auguste Liébeault - Amenorrhea - Amentia - American Journal of Psychiatry - American Law Institute guidelines - American Psychiatric Association - American Psychological Association - American Psychologist - Amines - Amino acids - Amnesia - Amniocentesis - Amok - Amos Tversky - Amphetamines - Amygdala - Amyloid - Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis - Anachronistic displacement - Anaclitic - Anal retentiveness - Anal stage - Analgesia - Analogy - Analysand - Analysis of variance - Analyst - Analytic Psychology - Analytical psychodrama - Analytical psychology - Anamnesis - Anchor - Anchoring - Androgyny - Androphobia - Anesthesia - Angina pectoris - Anhedonia - Anima - Animal hoarding - Animus - Aniracetam - Anna Freud - Anne Treisman - Anomie - Anorexia nervosa - Anorgasmia - Anosmia - ANOVA - Anoxia - Antabuse - Antagonist - Anterograde amnesia - Anthropic bias - Anthropology - Anti-social behaviour - Anti-social behaviour - Anticathexis - Anticipation - Antidepressant drugs - Antilocution - Antipathy - Antipsychotic drugs - Antisocial behavior - Anxiety - Anxiety disorders - Anxiety neurosis - Anxiety state - Anxiogenic - Anxiolytics - AP Psychology - Apathy - Aphanisis - Aphasia - Aphonia - Aphrodisiac - Apnea - Apoplexy - Apotemnophobia - Apparent motion - Apperception - Applied behavior analysis - Applied psychology - Approach-avoidance conflict - Apraxia - Aptitude test - Aquaphobia - ARC - Archetypal psychology - Archetype - Aristotle - Arnold Mindell - Arousal - Arteriosclerosis - Arthur Janov - Articulatory loop - Artificial Creativity - Artificial demand - Artificial intelligence - Artisan - Asgeir R. Helgason - Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) - Asian psychology - Asperger's syndrome - Assertive - Assessment - Assimilation - Association - Associative memory - Asthma - Astraphobia - Asylums - Ataxia - Athabasca University Centre for Psychology - Atkinson-Shiffrin theory - Attachment - Attachment disorder - Attention - Attention span - Attitude - Attribution - Attribution theory - Attributional bias - Atypical depression - Audience effect - Audit - Aura - Aurophobia - Aušra Augustinavičiūtė - Australasian Experimental Psychology Society - Australian Psychological Society - Authenticity - Authoritarian personality - Authority figure - Autism - Autism diagnostic observational schedule - Autistic disorder - Autistic fantasy - Autistic pride - Autoassassinophilia - Autodidacticism - Autoeroticism - Autokinetic phenomenon - Automatic thought - Automatism - Autonomic nervous system - Availability heuristic - Aversion therapy - Aversives - Avoidance learning - Avoidant personality - Avoidant personality disorder - Avolition - Awake - Awareness Axon - A-not-B error was a term coined by Jean Piaget, referring to a particular error made by young children during substage 4 of their sensorimotor stage. ... A. H. Almaas is the pen name of A. Hameed Ali, an author who writes about a mystical approach to psychology and therapy which he calls the Diamond Approach. ... [* (The following is just a brief recent compendium of Rosanoffs segments acording to his theory personality, as extracted from a current temperament and aptitude test {as the original is now dificult to obtain}): N: Conventional/Self-controlled/Self-directed M: Active/Alert/Outgoing/Sociable H: Materialistic/Shrewd/Hard-headed/Entrepreneurial... Aaron Temkin Beck (born July 18, 1921) is an American psychiatrist and a professor emeritus at the department of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania. ... It has been suggested that Abductive validation be merged into this article or section. ... Abnormal psychology is the scientific study of abnormal behavior in order to describe, predict, explain, and change abnormal patterns of functioning. ... Abnormality is a subjectively defined characteristic, assigned to those with rare or dysfunctional conditions. ... Abraham Maslow (April 1, 1908 – June 8, 1970) was a psychologist. ... Abraham Kaplan (June 11, 1918 - June 19, 1993) was an American philosopher. ... Abraham (Harold) Maslow (April 1, 1908 – June 8, 1970) was an American psychologist. ... Abram Hoffer (b. ... Abreaction is a psychoanalytical term for reliving an experience in order to purge it of its emotional excesses; a type of catharsis. ... Schematic of an electrophysiological recording of an action potential showing the various phases which occur as the wave passes a point on a cell membrane. ... Abstinence is a voluntary restraint from indulging a desire or appetite for certain bodily activities that are widely experienced as giving pleasure. ... abstraction in general. ... abstraction in general. ... Aboulia or Abulia, in neurology, refers to a lack of will or initiative. ... Abuser redirects here. ... Also see Alcoholism and Drug addiction. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Procrastination. ... Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, ACT (pronounced act not ay see tee), is a branch of cognitive-behavioral therapy, an empirically based psychological intervention, hat uses acceptance and mindfulness strategies, together with commitment and behavior change strategies, to increase psychological flexibility. ... Accommodation is a theological principle linked to divine revelation within the Christian church. ... Look up accreditation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Pocahontas, in England, as Mrs John Rolfe, 1616: engraving after Simon Van de Passe Acculturation is the obtainment of culture by an individual or a group of people. ... The English suffix -phobia is used to describe fear or hatred (the latter is often ignored) of a particular thing or subject. ... The chemical compound acetylcholine, often abbreviated as ACh, was the first neurotransmitter to be identified. ... In biochemistry, cholinesterase is a term which refers to one of the two enzymes (EC 3. ... Acoustics is a branch of physics and is the study of sound (mechanical waves in gases, liquids, and solids). ... For the domesticated crop plant called rape, see rapeseed. ... Acquisitiveness is a phrenological faculty. ... View through the glass floor of the CN Tower in Toronto, Canada. ... ACT-R (pronounced act-ARE: Adaptive Control of Thought--Rational) is a cognitive architecture mainly developed by John R. Anderson at Carnegie Mellon University. ... Acting is the work of an actor or actress, which is a person in theatre, television, film, or any other storytelling medium who tells the story by portraying a character and, usually, speaking or singing the written text or play. ... Acting out is a psychological term meaning to perform an action to express (often unconscious) emotional conflicts. ... A. A schematic view of an idealized action potential illustrates its various phases as the action potential passes a point on a cell membrane. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Action Science Chris Argyris’ Action Science begins with the study of how human beings design their actions in difficult situations. ... Active intellect is a term used in both psychology and philosophy. ... Active learning, as the name suggests, is a type of instruction which some teachers employ to involve pupils during the learning process. ... Activity theory (AT) is a Soviet psychological meta-theory, paradigm, or framework, with its roots in behaviourism. ... This is the counterpart to the concept of Eve teasing, wherein individual or a group of females impose sexual harassment on a male. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The eye is an adaptation. ... In psychology, a behavior or trait is adaptive when it helps an individual adjust and function well within their environment. ... For other uses, see addicted. ... Addisons disease (also known as chronic adrenal insufficiency, hypocortisolism or hypocorticism) is a rare endocrine disorder in which the adrenal gland produces insufficient amounts of steroid hormones (glucocorticoids and often mineralocorticoids). ... DISCLAIMER Please remember that Wikipedia is offered for informational use only. ... Adjustment (from late Latin ad-juxtare, derived from juxta, near, but early confounded with a supposed derivation from Justus, right), regulating, adapting or settling; in commercial law, the settlement of a loss incurred at sea on insured goods. ... In psychology, adjustment disorder refers to a psychological disturbance that develops in response to a stressor. ... “Adolescent” redirects here. ... Stylized Portrait Of an adolescent girl Adolescent Psychology addresses the specific issues of adolescents. ... Adolf Meyer could refer to several individuals: Adolf Meyer, 1866-1950 Swiss-born US psychiatrist Adolf Meyer, 1881-1921 German architect This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Adrafinil chemical structure Adrafinil is a mild central nervous system stimulant drug used to relieve excessive sleepiness and inattention in elderly patients. ... In mammals, the adrenal glands are the triangle-shaped endocrine glands that sit atop the kidneys. ... Epinephrine (INN) or adrenaline (BAN) is a hormone and a neurotransmitter. ... An adrenergic is a drug, or other substance, which has effects similar to, or the same as, epinephrine (adrenaline). ... Adultism is a predisposition towards adults, which some see as biased against children, youth, and all young people who arent addressed or viewed as adults. ... A Living Will, also called Will to Live, Advance Health Directive, or Advance Health Care Directive, is a specific type of power of attorney or health care proxy or advance directive. ... In psychology, affect is the scientific term used to describe a subjects externally displayed mood. ... Look up affect in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In psychology, the term affectional bond is a type of attachment behavior one individual has for another individual, typically a mother for her child, in which the two partners tend to remain in proximity to one another. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The affective spectrum is a grouping of related psychiatric and medical disorders which may accompany bipolar, unipolar, and schizoaffective disorders at statistically higher rates than would normally be expected. ... Blunted affect is the scientific term describing a lack of emotional reactivity on the part of an individual. ... Affective forecasting is the forecasting of ones affect (emotional state) in the future. ... Affective science is the scientific study of emotion. ... Affirming the consequent is a logical fallacy in the form of a hypothetical proposition. ... Eric Berne, the founding father of transactional analysis, coined the term afterburn to indicate the effect an atypical past event continues to exert on a persons daily schedule, activities and mental state even after it is over. ... An afterimage is an optical illusion that occurs after looking away from a direct gaze at an image. ... Age regression is a popular theme in transformation fiction involving the physical reduction in age by a character. ... Look up ageism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Aggression is defined as The act of initiating hostilities or invasion. ... Ageing or aging is the process of getting older. ... One of the key concerns of older adults is experiencing memory loss, especially as it is one of the hallmark symptoms of Alzheimers Disease. ... In the context of mental illness, a mixed state (also known as dysphoric mania, agitated depression, or a mixed episode) is a condition during which symptoms of mania and depression occur simultaneously (e. ... Agitation may have the following special meanings Agitation, an emotional state Agitation, putting into motion (by shaking or stirring) Agitation, a term from the lexicon of Communists: political activities aimed at urging people to do something This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that... Agnosia (a-gnosis, non-knowledge) is a loss of ability to recognize objects, persons, sounds, shapes or smells while the specific sense is not defective nor is there any significant memory loss. ... Agonists An agonist is a substance that binds to a receptor and triggers a response in the cell. ... Agoraphobia is an anxiety disorder which primarily consists of the fear of experiencing a difficult or embarrassing situation from which the sufferer cannot escape. ... Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS or Aids) is a collection of symptoms and infections resulting from the specific damage to the immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). ... AIDS dementia complex (ADC; also known as HIV dementia, HIV encephalopathy and HIV-associated dementia) has become a common neurological disorder associated with HIV infection and AIDS. It is is a metabolic encephalopathy induced by HIV infection and fueled by immune activation of brain macrophages and microglia. ... Akathisia (or acathisia) is an often extremely unpleasant subjective sensation of inner restlessness that manifests itself with an inability to sit still or remain motionless, hence the origin of its name: Greek a (without) + kathesis (sitting). ... Akinesia is the inability to initiate movement, due to problems with selecting and activating motor programs in the brain. ... Al-Anon Family Groups is a twelve-step program for relatives and friends of alcoholics. ... Al-Anon Family Groups is a twelve-step program for relatives and friends of alcoholics. ... Albert Bandura (born 4 20 1925 in Mundare, Canada), a Ball Licker, is best known for his work on nut sack and on self-efficacy. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Korsakoffs syndrome (Korsakoffs psychosis, amnesic-confabulatory syndrome), is a degenerative brain disorder caused by the lack of thiamine (vitamin B1) in the brain. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Logo for AA Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is an informal society for recovering alcoholics. ... Alcoholism is the consumption of, or preoccupation with, alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the drinkers normal personal, family, social, or work life, and may lead to physical or mental harm. ... Alexander Mitscherlich (b. ... Alexander Romanovich Luria (July 16, 1902-1977) was a famous Russian neuropsychologist. ... ... The word Alexia has more than one meaning: Alexia, or word blindness, is an acquired type of sensory aphasia where trauma to the brain causes a patient to lose the ability to read. ... Alexithymia (pronounced: ) from the Greek words λεξις and θυμος, literally without words for emotions) was a term coined by Peter Sifneos in 1973[1][2] to describe people who appeared to have deficiencies in understanding, processing, or describing their emotions. ... Alfons Vansteenwegen Alfons Vansteenwegen PhD (* July 6, 1941 in Leuven, Belgium) is one of the Flemmish leading theoreticians and therapists in Communication Theory and important inspirator in the field of couple therapy and general psychotherapy. ... Alfred Adler (February 7, 1870 – May 28, 1937) was an Austrian medical doctor and psychologist, founder of the school of individual psychology. ... Alfred Binet Alfred Binet (July 8, 1857 – October 18, 1911), French psychologist and inventor of the first usable intelligence test, the basis of todays IQ test. ... Alfred Charles Kinsey (June 23, 1894 – August 25, 1956), was an American biologist and professor of entomology and zoology who in 1947 founded the Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction at Indiana University, now called the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction. ... Algophobia is a phobia of pain - an abnormal and persistent fear of pain that is far more powerful than that of a normal person. ... Alice Miller (born 1923) is a psychologist noted for her work on child abuse and its effects upon society as well as the lives of individuals. ... Look up alienation, alienate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Alienist was a somewhat derogatory and now obselete term for a psychiatrist or psychologist. ... Chemical structure of ephedrine, a phenethylamine alkaloid An alkaloid is, strictly speaking, a naturally occurring amine produced by a plant,[1] but amines produced by animals and fungi are also called alkaloids. ... The Allied health professions are those clinical health professions distinct from the medical profession and nursing profession. ... Allophilia, or positive intergroup attitudes, is derived from Greek words meaning liking or love of the other. ... In psychology, alogia, or poverty of speech, is a general lack of additional, unprompted content seen in normal speech. ... In psychology, alogia, or poverty of speech, is a general lack of additional, unprompted content seen in normal speech. ... For the 3D platform video game, see Alpha Waves. ... In statistics, the Alternative Hypothesis is the hypothesis proposed to explain a statistically significant difference between results, that is if the Null Hypothesis has been rejected. ... Alternative medicine is defined as any of various systems of healing or treating disease (as chiropractic, homeopathy, or faith healing) not included in the traditional medical curricula taught in the United States and Britain.[1] Complementary medicine is defined as any of the practices (as acupuncture) of alternative medicine accepted... An altered state of consciousness is any state which is significantly different from a normative waking beta wave state. ... For the ethical doctrine, see Altruism (ethics). ... Alzheimers disease (AD) or primary dementia of Alzheimers type is an incurable, degenerative neuropsychiatric disease which results in a pervasive loss of first mental, then physical functioning due to the deterioration of brain tissue. ... Amariah Brigham, M.D. (From Images from the History of Medicine, National Library of Medicine. ... - Emo Philips A word, phrase, sentence, or other communication is called ambiguous if it can be reasonably interpreted in more than one way. ... Look up ambivalence in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Dr. Ambroise-Auguste Liébeault (1823-1904) is the founder of the famous Nancy School and the father of modern hypnotherapy. ... Amenorrhoea (BE) or amenorrhea (AmE) is the absence of a menstrual period in a woman of reproductive age. ... kkdkd ... Due to the epidemic of medical errors, readers are cautioned to be aware that the American Psychiatric Association isnt immune to this. ... The American Psychological Association (APA) is a professional organization representing psychology in the US. It has around 150,000 members and an annual budget of around $70m. ... The American Psychologist is the official journal of the American Psychological Association. ... Ammonia Amines are organic compounds containing nitrogen as the key atom in the amine functional group. ... In chemistry, an amino acid is any molecule that contains both amino and carboxylic acid functional groups. ... For other uses, see Amnesia (disambiguation). ... Amniocentesis, or an Amniotic Fluid Test (AFT), is a medical procedure used for prenatal diagnosis, in which a small amount of amniotic fluid is extracted from the amnion around a developing fetus. ... Media:Example. ... Amos Tversky (March 16, 1937 - June 2, 1996) was a pioneer of cognitive science, a longtime collaborator of Daniel Kahneman, and a key figure in the discovery of systematic human cognitive bias and handling of risk. ... Amphetamine is a synthetic drug originally developed (and still used) as an appetite suppressant. ... Look up Amygdala in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Amyloid (disambiguation). ... Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, sometimes called Lou Gehrigs Disease, Maladie de Charcot or motor neurone disease) is a progressive, fatal, neurodegenerative disease caused by the degeneration of motor neurons, the nerve cells in the central nervous system that control voluntary muscle movement. ... Anachronistic displacement is a psychological condition referring to an obsessive or dysfunctional belief or claim that a person belongs or should properly exist in another time period, and are thus unable to deal with ordinary factors in the everyday world. ... Sexual fetishism is the attribution of attractive sexual qualities to non-living objects as an overwhelming alternative to the sexuality of a man or a woman, or as an enhancing element to a relationship. ... The term anal retentive (or anally retentive) is one of a variety of examples of Freudian terminology which have found their way into common usage with a slight shift in the original meaning. ... The Anal Stage in psychology is the term used by Sigmund Freud to describe the development during the second year of life, in which an childs pleasure and conflict centers are in the anal area. ... For other uses of painkiller, see painkiller (disambiguation) An analgesic (colloquially known as painkiller) is any member of the diverse group of drugs used to relieve pain. ... Analogy is both the cognitive process of transferring information from a particular subject (the analogue or source) to another particular subject (the target), and a linguistic expression corresponding to such a process. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... In statistics, analysis of variance (ANOVA) is a collection of statistical models and their associated procedures which compare means by splitting the overall observed variance into different parts. ... A fairly broad term for a person or tool with a primary function of information analysis, generally with a more limited, practical and short term set of goals than a researcher. ... Analytical psychology is part of the Jungian psychology movement started by Carl Jung and his followers. ... Analytical psychodrama is a therapy based on role-playing, the obsevation of unconscious mental activities, and the using of tranfer. ... Analytical psychology is part of the Jungian psychology movement started by Carl Jung and his followers. ... Anamnesis (Greek: αναμνησις = recollection, reminiscence) is a term used in medicine, philosophy, psychoanalysis, and religion. ... A stocked ships anchor. ... Anchoring or focalism is a term used in psychology to describe the common human tendency to rely too heavily, or anchor, on one trait or piece of information when making decisions. ... For other uses, see Androgyny (disambiguation). ... Androphobia is fear of men that sometimes can cause skin rashes and allergic reactions. ... Anesthesia or anaesthesia (see spelling differences) has traditionally meant the condition of having the perception of pain and other sensations blocked. ... In psychology, anhedonia is a patients inability to experience pleasure from normally pleasurable life events such as eating, exercise, and social/sexual interactions. ... Look up anima in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Animal hoarding is a human behaviour that involves the keeping of higher than typical numbers of animals as pets without having the ability to properly house or care for them, while at the same time denying this inability [1]. Along with other compulsive hoarding behaviours, it is linked in the... Animus is considered to be that natural and primitive part of the minds activity and processes remaining after dispensing with persona, which is the mask displayed in interactions with others and which has been shaped by socialization. ... Aniracetam (Draganon®, Sarpul®, Ampamet®) is a nootropic drug of the racetam family. ... Anna Freud (December 3, 1895 - October 9, 1982) was the sixth and last child of Sigmund and Martha Freud. ... Anne Treisman is a psychologist, working currently at Princeton University, Department of Psychology. ... Anomie, in contemporary English, means a condition or malaise in individuals, characterized by an absence or diminution of standards or values. ... For the symphonic black metal band, see Anorexia Nervosa (band) For other uses, see Anorexia Anorexia nervosa is a psychiatric diagnosis that describes an eating disorder characterized by low body weight and body image distortion with an obsessive fear of gaining weight. ... Anorgasmia (also known as Retarded Ejaculation in males) is a form of sexual dysfunction, sometimes classified as a psychiatric disorder, where the patient cannot achieve orgasm, even with adequate stimulation. ... Anosmia is the lack of olfaction, or a loss of the ability to smell. ... In statistics, analysis of variance (ANOVA) is a collection of statistical models and their associated procedures which compare means by splitting the overall observed variance into different parts. ... Asphyxia is a condition of severely deficient supply of oxygen to the body. ... Disulfiram is a drug used to support the treatment of chronic alcoholism by producing an acute sensitivity to alcohol). ... An ... Anterograde amnesia is a form of amnesia, or memory loss, where new events are not transferred to long-term memory. ... Anthropic bias is the bias arising when your evidence is biased by observation selection effects, according to philosopher Nick Bostrom. ... Anthropology (from Greek: ἀνθρωπος, anthropos, human being; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study of humanity. ... Anti-social behaviour (which can be spelled with or without the hyphen) is often seen as public behaviour that lacks judgement and consideration for others and may cause them or their property damage. ... Anti-social behaviour (which can be spelled with or without the hyphen) is often seen as public behaviour that lacks judgement and consideration for others and may cause them or their property damage. ... Anticathexis is the energy derived from the Superego to run the ego, according to Freud. ... Anticipation is an emotion involving pleasure (and sometimes anxiety) in considering some expected or longed-for good event, or irritation at having to wait. ... A recent form of antidepressant medication - Prozac Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, Venlafaxine An antidepressant, in the most common usage, is a medication taken to alleviate clinical depression or dysthymia (milder depression). ... Antilocution is a term defined by psychologist Gordon Allport in his book the Nature of Prejudice. ... In the field of astrology antipathy is the conflict in the natal horoscopes of two people who feel an aversion to each other. ... The term antipsychotic is applied to a group of drugs used to treat psychosis. ... millyfan ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Anxiety disorder is a blanket term covering several different forms of fear, phobia and nervous condition, that come on suddenly and prevent pursuing normal daily routines including: general anxiety disorder social anxiety, sometimes known as social phobia or social anxiety disorder (SAD) specific phobias agoraphobia claustrophobia panic disorder separation anxiety... Anxiety disorder is a blanket term covering several different forms of abnormal, pathological anxiety, fears, phobias and nervous conditions that may come on suddenly or gradually over a period of several years, and may impair or prevent the pursuing of normal daily routines. ... Anxiety disorder is a blanket term covering several different forms of abnormal, pathological anxiety, fears, phobias and nervous conditions that are described as an irrational or illogical worry that is not based on fact. ... An anxiogenic substance is one that causes anxiety. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This article relates to the AP test. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Aphanisis is the psychological condition of being unable to enjoy sex. ... Look up aphasia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Aphasia is a loss or impairment of the ability to produce or comprehend language, due to brain damage. ... An aphrodisiac is an agent which is used to increase sexual desire [1]. The name comes from the Greek goddess of Sensuality Aphrodite. ... Apnea (British spelling - apnoea) (Greek απνοια, from α-, privative, πνεειν, to breathe) is a technical term for suspension of external breathing. ... Apoplexy is an old-fashioned medical term, generally used interchangeably with cerebrovascular accident (CVA or stroke) but having other meanings as well. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Apparent motion is used in at least two senses. ... Apperception is the cognitive process by which a newly experienced sensation is related to past experiences to form an understood situation. ... Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) is a systematic process of studying and modifying observable behavior through a manipulation of the environment. ... The basic premise of applied psychology is the use of psychological principles and theories to overcome practical problems in other fields, such as business management, product design, ergonomics, nutrition, law and clinical medicine. ... Approach-avoidance conflict refers to the tension experienced by people when they are simultaneously attracted to and repulsed by the same goal. ... Apraxia is a neurological disorder characterized by loss of the ability to execute or carry out learned (familiar) movements, despite having the desire and the physical ability to perform the movements. ... In education, certification, counselling, and many other fields, a test or exam (short for examination) is a tool or technique intended to measure students expression of knowledge, skills and/or abilities. ... Aquaphobia is a kind of specific phobia, an abnormal and persistent fear of water. ... ARC may refer to: // American Record Company, a United States record label American Reprographics Company, the largest reprographics company in the United States ARC International, a computer processor designer Airlines Reporting Corporation, a company which handles administrative functions for airlines Advanced Recon Commando, part of the elite special forces of... Archetypal psychology was developed by James Hillman in the second half of the 20th century. ... For other uses, see Archetype (disambiguation). ... Aristotle (Greek: AristotélÄ“s) (384 BC – 322 BC) was a Greek philosopher, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. ... Arnold Mindell is a Swiss psychotherapist, writer and the founder of Process Oriented Psychology . ... Arousal is a physiological and psychological state of being awake. ... // Introduction Arteriosclerosis means the hardening of the arteries in Greek. ... Dr. Arthur Janov (born August 21, 1924) is an American psychologist and psychotherapist, and the creator of Primal Therapy. ... The phonological loop, also called the phonetic loop or the articulatory loop, is the part of working memory that rehearses verbal information. ... Artificial Creativity is a branch of Artificial Intelligence based on trying to make computers creative or on trying to understand human creativity by doing research in making computers creative. ... Artificial demand constitues demand for something that in the abscence of exposure to the vehicle of creating demand, would not exist. ... Garry Kasparov playing against Deep Blue, the first machine to win a chess game against a reigning world champion. ... The Artisan Temperament is one of the Four Temperaments defined by David Keirsey Artisans correlate with the SP Myers-Briggs types. ... Asgeir R. Helgason is an Icelandic scientist working as an Associate Professor in Psychology at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden. ... Binomial name Withania somnifera L. Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera), also known as Indian ginseng, Winter cherry, Ajagandha, Kanaje Hindi and Samm Al Ferakh, is a plant in Solanaceae or nightshade family. ... ... Asperger described his patients as little professors. Aspergers syndrome (AS, or the more common shorthand Aspergers), is characterized as one of the five pervasive developmental disorders, and is commonly referred to as a form of high functioning autism. ... Assertiveness is a skill taught by many personal development experts and psychotherapists and the subject of many popular self-help books. ... It has been suggested that Course evaluation be merged into this article or section. ... Assimilation (from Latin assimilatio; to render similar) may refer to more than one article: Assimilation (linguistics), a linguistic process by which a sound becomes similar to an adjacent sound. ... In psychology and marketing, two concepts or stimuli are associated when the experience of one leads to the effects of another, due to repeated pairing. ... Associative memory may refer to: a type of computer memory; see Content-addressable memory. ... Astraphobia, also known as Brontophobia, Keraunophobia, or Tonitrophobia, is a fear of thunder and lightning. ... The term asylum can mean: a psychiatric hospital political asylum a 1985 album named Asylum by KISS a sociology book by Erving Goffman studying total institutions A band from Preston, http://www. ... For other uses, see Ataxia (disambiguation). ... The Athabasca University Centre for Psychology offers programs leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree with majors in psychology, a cerificiate in Career Development, or even a diploma in Inclusive Education, of three and four-year lengths. ... Atkinson-Shiffrin theory is a psychological theory proposed in 1968. ... Look up Attachment in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Attachment disorder is a broad term intended to describe disorders of mood, behavior, and social relationships arising from a failure to form normal attachments to primary care giving figures in early childhood. ... It has been suggested that Neural mechanisms behind shifts of attention be merged into this article or section. ... Attention span is the amount of time a person can concentrate on a single activity. ... Attitude is a hypothetical construct that represents an individuals like or dislike for an item. ... In copyright law, attribution is the requirement to acknowledge or credit the author of a work which is used or appears in another work. ... Attribution theory is a social psychology theory developed by Fritz Heider, Harold Kelley, Edward E. Jones, and Lee Ross. ... Attributional biases are cognitive biases which affect attribution -- the way we determine who or what was responsible for an event or action. ... Atypical Depression (AD) is a subtype of Dysthymia and Major Depression characterized by mood reactivity — being able to experience improved mood in response to positive events. ... The audience effect is the impact that a passive audience has on a subject performing a task. ... The most general definition of an audit is an evaluation of a person, organization, system, process, project or product. ... Look up aura in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The English suffix -phobia is used to describe fear or hatred (the latter is often ignored) of a particular thing or subject. ... AuÅ¡ra AugustinavičiÅ«tÄ— (born April 4, 1927 - died August 19, 2005) Lithuanian psychologist, author of numerous scientific theories and discoveries, the founder of Socionics. ... The Australasian Experimental Psychology Society was incorporated in Western Australia in 1997 as a learned society for experimental psychologists. ... The Australian Psychological Society (APS) is a professional association set up to represent psychologists in Australia. ... Authenticity in psychology refers to psychological concept in which the individual derives gratification and positive emotions from exercising signature strengths. ... The concept of authoritarian personality denotes a number of qualities, which according to the theories of Theodor Adorno predict ones potential for fascist and antidemocratic leanings and behaviors. ... In politics, authority generally refers to the ability to make laws, independent of the power to enforce them, or the ability to permit something. ... Autism is a brain development disorder characterized by impairments in social interaction and communication, and restricted and repetitive behavior, all exhibited before a child is three years old. ... The Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) is a standardized protocol created in 1989 for assessing social and communicative behavior associated with autism. ... Autism is considered a neurodevelopmental disorder that manifests itself in marked problems with social relatedness, communication, interest, and behavior. ... Autistic pride is about shifting ones outlook from a scientific, reductionistic, pathologizing orientation to one that sees the innate potential in all human phenotypic expressions and celebrating the diversity various neurological types express. ... Look up autoassassinophilia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Autodidacticism (also autodidactism) is self-education or self-directed learning. ... Autoeroticism is the practice of fulfilling ones own sexual needs without a partner. ... Thought or thinking is a mental process which allows beings to model the world, and so to deal with it effectively according to their goals, plans, ends and desires. ... Automatism is the practice or theory of the spontaneous production of words (speech or writing), drawing, painting or other creative production, or behavior in general, without conscious self-control or self-censorship. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The availability heuristic is a rule of thumb, heuristic, or cognitive bias, where people base their prediction of an outcome on the vividness and emotional impact rather than on actual probablity. ... Aversion therapy is a form of psychiatric or psychological treatment in which the patient is exposed to a stimulus while simultaneously being subjected to some form of discomfort. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Operant conditioning is the use of consequences to modify the occurrence and form of behavior. ... Avoidant personality disorder (sometimes abbreviated APD or AvPD) is a personality disorder characterised by a pervasive pattern of social inhibition, feelings of inadequacy, and extreme sensitivity to negative evaluation. ... Avoidant personality disorder (APD or AvPD) [1] or Anxious personality disorder (APD) [2], is a personality disorder characterized by a pervasive pattern of social inhibition, feelings of inadequacy, extreme sensitivity to negative evaluation and avoidance of social interaction. ... In psychology, avolition is a general lack of desire, motivation, and persistence. ... Being awake is a metabolic state which is marked by catabolic processes and which is characterized by consciousness, the opposite of sleep, an anabolic process. ... In biological psychology, awareness describes a human or animals perception and cognitive reaction to a condition or event. ... An axon or nerve fiber, is a long, slender projection of a nerve cell, or neuron, that conducts electrical impulses away from the neurons cell body or soma. ...


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B. F. Skinner - Bacillophobia - Backward conditioning - Bacopa monnieri (Brahmi) - Bad object - Bambi Effect - Baragnosis - Barbiturates - Barnes Akathisia Scale - Barnes maze - Baruch Spinoza - Basal ganglia - Base motive - Baseline - Basic benefits - Basic trust - Basilar membrane - Bathophobia - Battered child - BEAM - Beck's cognitive triad - Behavior - Behavior change - Behavior genetics - Behavior modification - Behavior modification facility - Behavior rehearsal - Behavior therapy - Behavioral assessment - Behavioral engineering - Behavioral imprinting - Behavioral medicine - Behavioral neurology - Behavioral neuroscience - Behavioral observation - Behavioral pediatrics - Behavioral psychology - Behavioral sciences - Behavioral theories of depression - Behaviorism - Behaviour therapy - Behavioural despair test - Belief - Belief system - Bell-Shaped curve - Bell Adjustment Inventory - Bell and pad - Belongingness - Benjamin Beit-Hallahmi - Benjamin Libet - Benjamin Zablocki - Bennington study - Benzodiazipines - Bereavement - Berlin School - Bestiality - Beta-blocker - Beta-endorphin - Beta rhythm - Beyond the Pleasure Principle - Bias disorder - Bibb Latane - Bibliomania - Bicameralism - Bilateral ECT - Binge-eating disorder - Binge drinking - Binge eating - Binocular cues - Biochemistry - Biodata - Bioenergetic analysis - Bioenergetics - Biofeedback - Biogenic amine hypothesis - Biogenic amines - Biological approach - Biological paradigm - Biological psychiatry - Biological psychology - Biological rhythms - Bipolar disorder - Bipolar I Disorder - Bipolar II Disorder - Bipolar self - Birth trauma - Bisexuality - Bitterness - Blackout - Blacky test - Blind spot - Blind study - Block design test - Blocking (speech) - Blood-brain barrier - Blood-injection-injury type phobias - Blood level - Blunted affect - Boanthropy - Board-certified psychiatrist - Bodies Underwear problems - Body dysmorphic disorder - Body image - Body language - Body Psychotherapy - Boldness - Bondage - Bonding - Borderline - Borderline intellectual functioning - Borderline personality disorder - Borromean clinic - Bouma - Bradykinesia - Brain - Brain disorders - Brain electrical activity mapping - Brain imaging - Brain injury - Brain metabolism - Brain stem - Brain syndrome - Brain wave - Brainstorming - Brainwashing - Breathing-related sleep disorder - Breathwork - Brenda Milner - Brief depressive disorder - Brief psychotherapy - Brief reactive psychosis - Brief therapy - Brightness - Briquet's syndrome - British Association for Cognitive and Behavioural Psychotherapies - British Journal of Social Psychology - British Psychological Society - Broca’s aphasia - Bruxism - Bulimia nervosa - Burn Syndrome - Burnout - Buspirone - Butyrophenones - Bystander effect Burrhus Frederic Fred Skinner (March 20, 1904 – August 18, 1990), Ph. ... From Greek -phobia, fear of. ... In classical conditioning, backward conditioning occurs when a conditioned stimulus immediately follows an unconditioned stimulus. ... Binomial name Bacopa monnieri L. Pennell Water Hyssop (Bacopa monnieri) is a perennial, creeping herb, also known as brahmi (note. ... The Bambi Effect is an informal name used primarily by hunters and trappers for the emotional impact of the harvesting of animals which the public considers adorable, regardless of what the opponents consider are environmental and economic realities. ... Baragnosis is an inability to accurately judge weight differences. ... Barbiturates are drugs that acts as central nervous system (CNS) depressants, and by virtue of this they produce a wide spectrum of effects, from mild sedation to anesthesia. ... The complete reference to this article is: T. R. E. Barnes, A Rating Scale for Drug-Induced Akathisia, British Journal of Psychiatry, vol 154, pp. ... The Barnes maze is used to measure spatial learning and memory. ... Baruch de Spinoza (‎, Portuguese: , Latin: ) (November 24, 1632 – February 21, 1677) was a Dutch philosopher of Portuguese Jewish origin. ... The basal ganglia (or basal nuclei) are a group of nuclei in the brain interconnected with the cerebral cortex, thalamus and brainstem. ... Often interpreted as relational to Sigmund Freuds psychoanalytic theory and unconscious or subconscious motive theories, base motives have value in understanding action. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Cross section of the cochlea. ... “Domestic disturbance” redirects here. ... Beam may refer to: Look up beam in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A triad of types of negative thought present in depression proposed by Beck in 1976. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Behavior change is a declared objective of many health interventions. ... Behavioural genetics (behavioral genetics) is the field of biology that studies the role of genetics in animal behaviour. ... This article is about the behaviorist technique. ... A behavior modification facility is a private, residential educational institution to which parents send adolescents perceived as displaying asocial behavior in an attempt to alter their conduct. ... Cognitive therapy or cognitive behavior therapy is a kind of psychotherapy used to treat depression, anxiety disorders, phobias, and other forms of mental disorder. ... Behavioral engineering is intended to identify issues associated with the interface of technology and the human operators in a system and to generate recommended design practices that consider the strengths and limitations of the human operators. ... This article is about the psychological term. ... Behavioral medicine is an interdisciplinary field of medicine concerned with the development and integration of psychosocial, behavioral and biomedical knowledge relevant to health and illness. ... Behavioral neurology is a subspecialty of neurology that studies the neurological basis of behavior, memory, and cognition, the impact of neurological damage and disease upon these functions, and the treatment thereof. ... Behavioral neuroscience approach. ... Behaviorism (or behaviourism) is an approach to psychology based on the proposition that behavior is interesting and worthy of scientific research. ... Behavioural sciences (or Behavioral science) is a term that encompasses all the disciplines that explores the behaviour and strategies within and between organisms in the natural world. ... Behaviorism (also called learning perspective) is a philosophy of psychology based on the proposition that all things which organisms do — including acting, thinking and feeling—can and should be regarded as behaviors. ... Behaviour therapy is a form of psychotherapy used to treat depression, anxiety disorders, phobias, and other forms of psychopathology. ... The behavioural despair test (also called the Porsolt test or forced swimming test) is a test used to measure the effect of antidepressant drugs on the behaviour of laboratory animals (typically rats or mice). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This article is currently under construction. ... Benjamin Beit-Hallahmi is a professor of psychology at the University of Haifa, Israel. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Benjamin Zablocki (b. ... Sad redirects here; for the three letter acronym, see SAD. Suffering is any unwanted condition and the corresponding negative emotion. ... The Berlin School of experimental psychology was headed by Carl Stumpf (a pupil of Franz Brentano and Rudolf Hermann Lotze), who became professor at the University of Berlin where he founded the Berlin laboratory of experimental psychology (in 1893). ... Look up Bestiality in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Beta blockers (sometimes written as β-blockers) are a class of drugs used for various indications, but particularly for the management of cardiac arrhythmias and cardioprotection after myocardial infarction. ... For other uses, see Endorphin (disambiguation). ... Beta waves Beta wave, or beta rhythm, is the term used to designate the frequency range of brain activity above 12 Hz (12 transitions or cycles per second). ... Beyond the Pleasure Principle Published in 1920, Beyond the Pleasure Principle marked a turning point for Freud, and a major modification of his previous theoretical approach. ... Bias disorder, also known as extreme bias disorder, is a mental condition not yet fully accepted by the mental health/science community. ... Bibb Latane (born 1937) is a United States social psychologist. ... Bibliomania is the obsessive purchase or collecting of books to the point where social relations or health are damaged. ... Book cover of the recent 2000 edition of The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind, which includes a depiction of Tukulti-Ninurta I pointing (with his right forefinger) at the empty throne of his god. ... Drinking too much alcohol may qualify as binge drinking if it leads to at least two days of inebriation and the drinker neglects usual responsibilities The British Medical Association states that there is no consensus on the definition of binge drinking. ... Binge eating is a pattern of disordered eating which consists of episodes of uncontrollable overeating. ... Biochemistry is the study of the chemical processes and transformations in living organisms. ... Within personnel selection, biographical data, or biodata is a method used to select candidates to fill jobs based on their previous work history, work preferences, work habits, and other background characteristics and interests. ... Bioenergetic Analysis is a body-oriented psychotherapy based on the expression of feelings and the re-establishment of energy flow in the body. ... Biological thermodynamics (Greek: bios = life and logikos = reason + Greek: thermos = heat and dynamics = power) is the study of energy transformation in the biological sciences. ... Biofeedback mechanism. ... A biogenic amine is a biogenic substance with an amine group. ... Biological psychiatry, or biopsychiatry is an approach to psychiatry that aims to understand mental disorder in terms of the biological function of the nervous system. ... Biological psychology, sometimes referred to as psychobiology or biopsychology, is a subfield of psychology. ... Chronobiology is a field of science that examines periodic (cyclic) phenomena in living organisms. ... For other uses, see Bipolar. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Pre- and perinatal psychology is the study of the psychological implications of the earliest experiences of the individual, before (prenatal) and during (perinatal) childbirth. ... “Bisexual” redirects here. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... A blackout is a phenomenon caused by the intake of alcohol in which long term memory creation is impaired. ... Blind spot can refer to: In ophthalmology, Scotoma, an obscuration of the visual field Optic disc, also known as the anatomical blind spot, the specific region of the retina where the optic nerve and blood vessels pass through to connect to the back of the eye Blind spot (vision), also... Block Design is a subtest on many intelligence tests that tests visospatial and motor skills. ... The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a membranic structure that acts primarily to protect the brain from chemicals in the blood, while still allowing essential metabolic function. ... Blunted affect is the scientific term describing a lack of emotional reactivity on the part of an individual. ... Boanthropy is a mental disorder where the victim believes he or she is an ox. ... Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a mental disorder that involves a disturbed body image. ... Body image is a persons perception of his or her own physical appearance. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Body Psychotherapy (a. ... Boldness is an opposite of shyness. ... Look up bondage in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The term human bond -- or, more generally, human bonding -- refers to the process or formation of a close personal relationship, as between a parent and child, especially through frequent or constant association. ... Look up borderline in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Borderline Personality Disorder (DSM-IV Personality Disorders 301. ... The Borromean clinic is a model of psychoanalytic practice advanced in the late work of Jacques Lacan. ... The term bouma (pronounced bowma) is sometimes used in the work of cognitive psychology to mean the shape of a cluster of letters, often a whole word. ... In medicine (neurology), bradykinesia denotes slow movement (etymology: brady = slow, kinesia = movement). ... For other uses, see Brain (disambiguation). ... Mental disorder or Mental illness is a term used to refer psychological pattern that occurs in an individual and is usually associated with distress or disability that is not expected as part of normal development or culture. ... Brain imaging is a fairly recent discipline within medicine and neuroscience. ... Brain damage or brain injury is the destruction or degeneration of brain cells. ... The brain stem is the lower part of the brain, adjoining and structurally continuous with the spinal cord. ... Electroencephalography is the neurophysiologic exploration of the electrical activity of the brain by the application of electrodes to the scalp. ... Look up brainstorming in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Brainwashing (also known as thought reform or re-education) consists of any systematic effort aimed at instilling certain attitudes and beliefs in a person against his/her will, usually beliefs in conflict with the persons prior beliefs and knowledge. ... Breathwork usually refers to deliberate hyperventilation, when used within psychotherapy or meditation. ... Dr. Brenda Milner CC (born 15 July 1918, Manchester England) has contributed extensively to the research literature on various topics in the field of clinical neuropsychology. ... Solution focused brief therapy (SFBT) (often referred to as simply solution focused therapy or brief therapy) is a type of talking therapy that is based upon social constructionist philosophy. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Brief therapy, sometimes also known as strategic therapy, is an umbrella term for a type of approach to psychotherapy. ... Brightness is an attribute of visual perception in which a source appears to emit a given amount of light. ... The British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies (BABCP) was founded in 1972 as a multi-disciplinary interest group for people involved in the practice and theory of behaviour therapy. ... British Journal of Social Psychology is a journal published by the British Psychological Society (BPS). ... The British Psychological Society (BPS) is the representative body for psychologists and psychology in the United Kingdom. ... Bruxism (from the Greek βρυγμός (brugmós), gnashing of teeth] is the grinding of the teeth, typically accompanied by the clenching of the jaw. ... Bulimia nervosa, commonly known as bulimia, is an eating disorder. ... For other senses of this word, see paranoia (disambiguation). ... Burnout is a psychologica term for the experience of long-term exhaustion and diminished interest [depersonalization] or cynicism), usually in the work context. ... Buspirone (brand-names Ansial, Ansiced, Anxiron, Axoren, Bespar, BuSpar, Buspimen, Buspinol, Buspisal, Narol, Spitomin) is an anxiolytic agent and a serotonin receptor agonist belonging to the azaspirodecanedione class of compounds. ... Butyrophenones are a class of pharmaceutical drugs used to treat various pyschiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. ... The bystander effect (also known as bystander apathy) is a psychological phenomenon where persons are less likely to intervene in an emergency situation when others are present than when they are alone. ...


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C. Lloyd Morgan - Cabin fever - Caffeine - Calcium channel blockers - Calculation - California Psychological poop!!!! 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Bondy - Cushing's syndrome - CVA - Cybernetics - Cyberpsychology Cyclopean image - Cyclothymic disorder - C. Lloyd Morgan (Conwy Lloyd Morgan) (6 February 1852 - 6 March 1936) was a British psychologist. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Caffeine is a xanthine alkaloid compound that acts as a stimulant in humans. ... Calcium channel blockers are a class of drugs with effects on the muscle of the heart and the muscles of the rest of the body. ... A calculation is a deliberate process for transforming one or more inputs into one or more results. ... The California School of Professional Psychology (CSPP), now a school of Alliant International University, was founded in 1969 as an endeavor of the California Psychological Association. ... The Canadian Psychological Association is the primary organization representing psychologists throughout Canada. ... Binomial name Linnaeus Subspecies L. subsp. ... A psychological theory which suggests that people feel emotions first, and then act upon them. ... In statistics, canonical correlation analysis, introduced by Harold Hotelling, is a way of making sense of cross-covariance matrices. ... A poll tax, head tax, or capitation is a tax of a uniform, fixed amount per individual (as opposed to a percentage of income). ... Care perspective In psychology, the care perspective focuses on people in terms of their connectedness with others, interpesonal communication, relationships with others, and concern for others. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. ... Caregiver may refer to: A voluntary caregiver An assisted living situation A nursing home A hospice care situation Category: ... Carl Iver Hovland (1912-1961) was a psychologist working primarily at Yale University and the US Army during World War II who studied attitude change and persuasion. ... “Jung” redirects here. ... Carl Ransom Rogers (January 8, 1902 – February 4, 1987) was an influential American psychologist, who, along with Abraham Maslow, was the founder of the humanist approach to psychology. ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... Acetyl-L-carnitine is an acetylated form of L-carnitine, which is far superior to normal L-carnitine in terms of bioavailability. ... Carol Tavris is an American social psychologist and author. ... Case management is a collaborative process of assessment, planning, facilitation and advocacy for options and services to meet an individuals health needs through communication and available resources to promote quality cost-effective outcomes. ... Case studies involve a particular method of research. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Castration (also referred as: gelding, neutering, orchiectomy, orchidectomy, and oophorectomy) is any action, surgical, chemical, or otherwise, by which a male loses the functions of the testes or a female loses the functions of the ovaries. ... Castration anxiety is an idea put forth by Sigmund Freud in his writings on the Oedipus complex; it posits a deep-seated fear or anxiety in boys and men said to originate during the genital stage of sexual development. ... CAT apparatus in a hospital Computed axial tomography (CAT), computer-assisted tomography, computed tomography, CT, or body section roentgenography is the process of using digital processing to generate a three-dimensional image of the internals of an object from a large series of two-dimensional X-ray images taken around... Catalepsy is a condition characterized most often by rigidity of the extremities and by decreased sensitivity to pain. ... Cataplexy is a medical condition which often affects people who have narcolepsy, a disorder whose principal signs are EDS (Excessive Daytime Sleepiness), sleep attacks, and disturbed nighttime sleep. ... This is a page about catatonic state. ... Catatonic excitement is state of constant agitation and excitability. ... A catatonic stupor is a motionless or apathetic state in which one remains oblivious to external stimuli. ... Catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) (EC 2. ... Catecholamines are chemical compounds derived from the amino acid tyrosine that act as hormones or neurotransmitters. ... For Wikipedias categorization projects, see Wikipedia:Categorization. ... Catharsis is the Greek Katharsis word meaning purification or cleansing derived from the ancient Greek gerund καθαίρειν transliterated as kathairein to purify, purge, and adjective katharos pure or clean (ancient and modern Greek: καθαρός). // The term in drama refers to a sudden emotional breakdown or climax that constitutes overwhelming feelings of great... Catherine Mandeville Snow, (c. ... Cathexis is the libidos charge of energy. ... Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSDS) — also known as complex regional pain syndrome (CPRS)— is a chronic condition characterized by severe burning pain, pathological changes in bone and skin, excessive sweating, tissue swelling, and extreme sensitivity to touch. ... The cell body or soma is a structure in a neuron consisting of the main part of the cell and containing the nucleus. ... Center for Evolutionary Psychology (CEP) is a research center co-founded and co-directed by John Tooby and Leda Cosmides and is affiliated to the University of California, Santa Barbara. ... A diagram showing the CNS: 1. ... In statistics, central tendency is an average of a set of measurements, the word average being variously construed as mean, median, or other measure of location, depending on the context. ... Centration is the tendency to focus on one aspect of a situation and neglect others. ... Categories: Medicine stubs | Nootropics ... A headache (cephalgia in medical terminology) is a condition of pain in the head; sometimes neck or upper back pain may also be interpreted as a headache. ... Waxy flexibility is a psychomotor symptom of catatonic schizophrenia which leads to a decreased response to stimuli and a tendency to remain in an immobile posture. ... The cerebellum (Latin: little brain) is a region of the brain that plays an important role in the integration of sensory perception and motor output. ... Brain contusion, a form of traumatic brain injury, is a bruise of the brain tissue. ... Location of the cerebral cortex Slice of the cerebral cortex, ca. ... The human brain as viewed from above, showing the cerebral hemispheres. ... A cerebral hemorrhage is a bleed into the substance of the cerebrum. ... A thrombus or blood clot is the final product of blood coagulation, through the aggregation of platelets and the activation of the humoral coagulation system. ... A stroke or cerebrovascular accident (CVA) occurs when the blood supply to a part of the brain is suddenly interrupted by occlusion (an ischemic stroke- approximately 90% of strokes), by hemorrhage (a hemorrhagic stroke - less than 10% of strokes) or other causes. ... Cerebrovascular disease is damage to the blood vessels in the brain, resulting in a stroke. ... For other articles about other subjects named brain see brain (disambiguation). ... Chaining is an instructional procedure used in Behavioral Psychology. ... A character orientation is the direction of the libidinous or passionate strivings of a man which makes it possible to describe his character structure uniformly. ... Charles Kirk Clarke (1857 - 20 January 1924) was a psychiatrist who was influential in Canadian politics. ... Charles Osgood For the American psychologist see Charles E. Osgood. ... Charles Edward Spearman (September 10, 1863 - September 7, 1945) was an English psychologist known for work in statistics, as a pioneer of factor analysis, and for Spearmans rank correlation coefficient. ... The English suffix -phobia is used to describe fear or hatred (the latter is often ignored) of a particular thing or subject. ... Physical dependence refers to a state resulting from habitual use of a drug, where negative physical withdrawal symptoms result from abrupt discontinuation. ... Chemical imbalance is a term used, particularly but not exclusively in medicine, to describe a situation where different chemical substances required for correct functioning of a system are not present in the required or correct proportions. ... Chemotherapy is the use of chemical substances to treat disease. ... The child archetype is portrayed in literature in various ways. ... Child abuse is the physical, sexual, or emotional maltreatment or neglect of children by parents, guardians, or others. ... Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) is a name for NHS-provided services for children in the mental health arena in the UK. In the UK there are 4 Tiers in CAMHS. Tier 4 is specialist services for young people who require admission into hospital. ... A branch of psychiatry that specialises in work with children, teenagers, and their families. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Baby talk, motherese, or child-directed speech (CDS) is a nonstandard form of speech used by adults, particularly mothers, in talking to children. ... Child sexual abuse is an umbrella term describing criminal and civil offenses in which an adult engages in sexual activity with a minor or exploits a minor for the purpose of sexual gratification. ... Childhood disintegrative disorder (CDD), also known as Hellers syndrome and disintegrative psychosis, is a rare condition characterized by late onset (>3 years of age) of developmental delays in language, social function, and motor skills. ... The Chinese Classification and Diagnostic Criteria of Mental Disorders (CCDCMD), published by the Chinese Psychiatric Association, is the handbook used most often in diagnosing mental disorders in China. ... Chlorpromazine was the first antipsychotic drug, used during the 1950s and 1960s. ... Choice consists of the mental process of thinking involved with the process of judging the merits of multiple options and selecting one of them for action. ... Choline is an organic compound, classified as an essential nutrient and usually grouped within the Vitamin B complex. ... A synapse is cholinergic if it uses acetylcholine as its neurotransmitter. ... The choroid, also known as the choroidea or choroid coat, is the vascular layer of the eye lying between the retina and the sclera. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Messianic complex. ... General Name, symbol, number chromium, Cr, 24 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 6, 4, d Appearance silvery metallic Standard atomic weight 51. ... Chromosome 21 is one of the 23 pairs of chromosomes in humans. ... This article is about the biological chromosome. ... Look up chronic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Chronobiology is a field of science that examines periodic (cyclic) phenomena in living organisms. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Age disparity in sexual relationships. ... Chunky is a method of frame buffer organization in computer graphics. ... In cognitive psychology and mnemonics, chunking refers to a strategy for making more efficient use of short-term memory by recoding information. ... The English suffix -phobia is used to describe fear or hatred (the latter is often ignored) of a particular thing or subject. ... The Cinderella Complex is described as an unconscious desire to be taken care of by others, based primarily on a fear of being independent. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Circadian rhythm sleep disorders are a family of sleep disorders affecting the timing of sleep. ... The Circadian rhythm is a name given to the internal body clock that regulates the (roughly) 24 hour cycle of biological processes in animals and plants. ... Involuntary commitment is the practice of using legal means or forms as part of a mental health law to commit a person to a mental hospital, insane asylum or psychiatric ward without their informed consent, against their will or over their protests. ... In psychology and psychiatry, clanging or clang association refers to a form of speech pattern where thinking is driven by word sounds. ... In psychology and psychiatry, clanging is a form of speech pattern where thinking is driven by word sounds. ... Clarity is the property of being clear or transparent. ... Clark Leonard Hull (1884-1952) was an influential American psychologist and behaviorist who sought to explain learning and motivation by scientific laws of behavior. ... Classical Adlerian psychology is a values-based, fully-integrated, theory of personality, model of psychopathology, philosophy of living, strategy for preventative education, and technique of psychotherapy. ... Classical Adlerian individual psychotherapy, brief therapy, couple therapy, and family therapy follow parallel paths. ... It has been suggested that eye blink conditioning be merged into this article or section. ... An attribute-value system is a basic knowledge representation framework comprising a table with columns designating attributes (also known as properties, predicates, features, or dimensions, depending on the context) and rows designating objects (also known as entities, instances, or exemplars). Each table cell therefore designates the value of a particular... Claustrophobia is an anxiety disorder that involves the fear of enclosed or confined spaces. ... Client-Centered Therapy or Person-Centered Therapy, now considered a founding work in the humanistic school of psychotherapies, began formally with Carl Ransom Rogers (born January 8, 1902 in Oak Park, Illinois, died February 4, 1987), broadly considered the most influenctial US psychotherapist in the short history of this field. ... Client-Centered Therapy or Person-Centered Therapy, now considered a founding work in the humanistic school of psychotherapies, began formally with Carl Ransom Rogers (born January 8, 1902 in Oak Park, Illinois, died February 4, 1987), broadly considered the most influenctial US psychotherapist in the short history of this field. ... Menopause (also known as the Change of life or climacteric) is a stage of the human female reproductive cycle that occurs as the ovaries stop producing estrogen, causing the reproductive system to gradually shut down. ... Clinical psychology is the application of psychology to mental illness or mental health problems. ... The Greek letter Psi is often used as a symbol of psychology. ... Clinician is a term used generically to describe a wide range of medical professionals See Doctor, Medicine Category: ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The clitoris (Greek ) is a sexual organ that is present in biologically female mammals. ... Clonidine is a direct-acting adrenergic agonist prescribed historically as an anti-hypertensive agent. ... In psychology, closure may refer to the state of experiencing an emotional conclusion to a difficult life event, such as the breakdown of a close interpersonal relationship or the death of loved one. ... Clozapine (sold as Clozaril®, Leponex®, Fazaclo®) was the first of the atypical antipsychotics to be developed. ... Clyde Hamilton Coombs (July 22, 1912 - February 4, 1988) was an American psychologist specialized in the field of mathematical psychology. ... CME can refer to any of the following; Caitie Mae Experience Canadian Military Engineers Central European Media Enterprises Center for Music Education, Bangalore Chicago Mercantile Exchange Chief Mechanical Engineer Christian Methodist Episcopal Church Ciudad del Carmen International Airport in Ciudad del Carmen, Mexico Common Malware Enumeration ([1]) Continuing medical education... Cocaine is a crystalline tropane alkaloid that is obtained from the leaves of the coca plant. ... The cochlea is the auditory portion of the inner ear. ... Codependence (or codependency) is a psychological condition in which someone exhibits too much, and often inappropriate, caring for other peoples struggles. ... In statistics, the coefficient of determination R2 is the proportion of variability in a data set that is accounted for by a statistical model. ... Coenzyme Q (CoQ), also known as ubiquinone or ubiquinol, is a biologically active quinone with an isoprenoid side chain, related in structure to vitamin K and vitamin E. // History Coenzyme Q was first discovered in 1957 by professor F. L. Crane and colleagues at the University of Wisconsin Enzyme Institute. ... For the several U.S. counties named Coffee, see Coffee County. ... An argument is cogent if and only if the truth of the arguments premises would render the truth of the conclusion probable (i. ... The COGIATI (COmbined Gender Identity And Transsexuality Inventory) is an objective test developed by webcomic author Jennifer Diane Reitz, a transsexual woman who designed it specifically for the uncertain pre-transitional Male-to-Female gender dysphoric. Reitz claims the test was developed using three existing tests: the Bem Sex Role... Look up Cognition in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Cognitive therapy or cognitive behavior therapy is a kind of psychotherapy used to treat depression, anxiety disorders, phobias, and other forms of psychological disorder. ... Cognitive The scientific study of how people obtain, retrieve, store and manipulate information. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Cognitive therapy or cognitive behavior therapy is a kind of psychotherapy used to treat depression, anxiety disorders, phobias, and other forms of psychological disorder. ... A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a psychotherapy based on modifying cognitions, assumptions, beliefs and behaviors, with the aim of influencing disturbed emotions. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Cognitive closure refers to the possibility or belief that the human mind is closed to some facts--that there are things human beings are simply not able to know, not because there is not enough time to figure them out, but because the human mind does not have the capacity... Cognitive development procesess and theories Cognitive development refers to ...how a person perceives, thinks, and gains an understanding of his or her world through the interaction and influence of genetic and learned factors (Straughan, 1999) Jean Piaget was a psychologist who believed there are stages of cognitive development that each... Cognitive dimensions are design principles for notations & programming language design, described by researcher Thomas R.G. Green. ... Cognitive dissonance is a psychological term which describes the uncomfortable tension that may result from having two conflicting thoughts at the same time, or from engaging in behavior that conflicts with ones beliefs. ... Cognitive therapy and its variants traditionally identify ten cognitive distortions that maintain negative thinking and help to maintain negative emotions. ... The cognitive elite of a society, according to some social science researchers, are those having higher intelligence levels and thus better prospects for success in life. ... Cognitive Interventions are a set of techniques and therapies practiced in counseling. ... Cognitive Load is a term (used in psychology and other fields of study) that refers to the level of effort associated with problem solving, thinking and reasoning (including perception, memory, language, etc. ... Cognitive Maps, Mental Maps, Mind Maps, Cognitive Models, or mental models are a type of mental processing, or cognition, composed of a series of psychological transformations by which an individual can acquire, code, store, recall, and decode information about the relative locations and attributes of phenomena in their everyday or... == ISABEL IS COOL AND SHE LOVES COGNITIVE NEUROPSYCHOLOGY!!!!!!!!! == Cognitive neuropsychology is a branch of neuropsychology that aims to understand how the structure and function of the brain relates to specific psychological processes. ... Cognitive Psychology is the school of psychology that examines internal mental processes such as problem solving, memory, and language. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... The cognitive revolution is a name for an intellectual movement in the 1950s that combined new thinking in psychology, anthropology and linguistics with the nascent fields of computer science and neuroscience. ... Cognitive science is usually defined as the scientific study either of mind or of intelligence (e. ... A cognitive shift (not to be confused with cognitive-shifting, a general therapy/meditation term) is a psychological phenomenon most often experienced by individuals using psychedelic drugs, or suffering from mental disorders such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder (also known as manic-depressive syndrome). ... Cognitive slippage is a symptom of several psychiatric diseases and mental disorders associated with cognition and formal thought disorders. ... Cognitive space uses the analogy of location in two, three or higher dimensional space to describe and categorize the thoughts, memories and ideas. ... Cognitive specialization refers to the theory that learning certain skills inhibits the ability to learn related but dissimilar skills. ... Cognitive style is a term used in cognitive psychology to describe the way individuals think, perceive and remember information, or their preferred approach to using such information to solve problems. ... Cognitive tests are assessments of the cognitive capabilities of living entities. ... This article is about Becks Cognitive Therapy. ... In psychology, cognitivism is a theoretical approach to understanding the mind, which argues that mental function can be understood by quantitative, positivist and scientific methods, and that such functions can be described as information processing models. ... A pair of lions copulating in the Maasai Mara, Kenya. ... Colic may refer to: Baby colic – a condition, usually in infants, characterized by incessant crying. ... The French social theorist Émile Durkheim (1858-1917) used the term collective consciousness in his The Rules of Sociological Method (1895), Suicide (1897), and The Elementary Forms of Religious Life (1912). ... The term collective identity is a sense of belonging to a group (the collective) that is so strong that a person who identifies with the group will dedicate his or her life to the group over individual identity: he or she will defend the views of the group and assume... Collective unconscious is a term of analytical psychology originally coined by Carl Jung. ... Headline text COLOR AGNOSIA http://nanonline. ... Color psychology is a field of study devoted to analyzing the effect of color on human behavior and feeling, distinct from phototherapy (the use of ultraviolet light to cure infantile jaundice). ... In medicine, a coma (from the Greek koma, meaning deep sleep) is a profound state of unconsciousness. ... ... Combative psychology is the study of psychological factors that affect an individual in a combat situation, as well as methods of martial arts and self-defense teaching and practice to maximize preparation for such situations. ... Look up commitment in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see Common sense (disambiguation). ... Communication is a process that allows organisms to exchange information by several methods. ... A communication disorder is a disease or condition that partially or totally prevents human communication. ... Communication sciences refers to the schools of scientific research of human communication. ... A generic term for any kind of professional counseling that occurs outside a hospital setting. ... Community Psychology makes use of the perspectives of Psychology to address issues of communities, the relationships within them, and peoples attitudes about them. ... In medicine and in psychiatry, comorbidity is either The presence of one or more disorders (or diseases) in addition to a primary disease or disorder; or The effect of such additional disorders or diseases. ... Comparative psychology, taken in its most usual, broad sense, refers to the study of the behavior and mental life of animals other than human beings. ... Compensation has several different meanings as indicated below. ... Compersion is a term used by practitioners of polyamory to describe the experience of taking pleasure when ones partner is with another person. ... In psychology a complex is generally an important group of unconscious associations, or a strong unconscious impulse lying behind an individuals otherwise mysterious condition: the detail varies widely from theory to theory. ... A complex is a whole that comprehends a number of parts, especially one with interconnected or mutually related parts. ... Complex Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (C-PTSD), also known as complex trauma and disorders of extreme stress not otherwise specified (DESNOS), is a clinically-recognized condition that results from exposure to prolonged interpersonal trauma such as physical abuse, sexual abuse, domestic violence, torture, and war. ... See Compulsion (disambiguation) ... Compulsive skin picking (CSP) is a nervous disorder characterized by the repeated urge to pick at ones own skin, often to the extent that damage is caused. ... The computational theory of mind is the view that the human mind is best conceived as an information processing system very similar to or identical with a digital computer. ... It has been suggested that Synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy, X-ray tomography be merged into this article or section. ... Computer skills refer to ones ability to utilize the software (and sometimes hardware) of a computer. ... CAT apparatus in a hospital Computed axial tomography (CAT), computer-assisted tomography, computed tomography, CT, or body section roentgenography is the process of using digital processing to generate a three-dimensional image of the internals of an object from a large series of two-dimensional X-ray images taken around... Along with cognition and affect, conation is one of three aspects of mind. ... For other uses, see Concept (disambiguation). ... Concept mapping is a technique for visualizing the relationships between different concepts. ... Concept testing is the process of using quantitative methods and qualitative methods to evaluate consumer response to a product idea prior to the introduction of a product to the market. ... Conceptual Blending is a theory of cognition[1]. According to the Theory of Conceptual Blending, elements and vital relations from diverse scenarios are blended in a subconscious process. ... Look up Concordance on Wiktionary, the free dictionary see Concordance system for usage in politics. ... This article is about the philosophical term . ... The concrete operational stage is the third of four stages of cognitive development in Piagets theory. ... Concurrent validity is demonstrated where a test correlates well with a measure that has previously been validated. ... Concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI), is the most common and least serious type of traumatic brain injury. ... For other uses, see Condensation (disambiguation). ... Classical conditioning (also Pavlovian conditioning or respondent conditioning) is a type of associative learning. ... It has been suggested that eye blink conditioning be merged into this article or section. ... When unconditioned stimuli is repeatedly or strongly paired with neutral stimuli the neutral stimuli becomes conditioned stimuli, for instance after being stung the sight or sound of a bee may produce a negative sensation in the organism. ... Classical conditioning (also Pavlovian conditioning or respondent conditioning) is a type of associative learning. ... Conditioning is a psychological term for what Ivan Pavlov described as the learning of conditional behavior. ... Operant conditioning is the use of consequences to modify the occurrence and form of behavior. ... In psychiatry, conduct disorder is a pattern of repetitive behavior where the rights of others or the social norms are violated. ... A cone is a basic geometrical shape: see cone (geometry). ... Look up confabulation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up confabulation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Confidence is trust or faith that a person or thing is capable. ... In this diagram, the bars represent observation means and the red lines represent the confidence intervals surrounding them. ... Confidentiality has been defined by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as ensuring that information is accessible only to those authorized to have access and is one of the cornerstones of Information security. ... It has been suggested that Myside bias be merged into this article or section. ... In political terms, conflict refers to an ongoing state of hostility between two or more groups of people. ... he This article is about the psychological concept of conformity. ... A lurking variable (confounding factor or variable, or simply a confound or confounder) is an extraneous variable in a statistical or research model that should but has not been controlled for. ... Confrontation is a tactical tabletop fantasy wargame in which the combatants are represented by metal figures in 28-30mm scale. ... Look up Confusion in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Confusion can have the following meanings: Unclarity or puzzlement, e. ... A congenital disorder is a medical condition or defect that is present at or before birth (for example, congenital heart disease). ... In mathematics, a conjecture is a mathematical statement which appears likely to be true, but has not been formally proven to be true under the rules of mathematical logic. ... Conjoint analysis, also called multi-attribute compositional models, is a statistical technique that originated in mathematical psychology. ... Connectionism is an approach in the fields of artificial intelligence, cognitive science, neuroscience, psychology and philosophy of mind. ... François Chifflart (1825-1901), La Conscience (daprès Victor Hugo) Conscience is an ability or faculty or sense that leads to feelings of remorse when we do things that go against our moral values, or which informs our moral judgment before performing such an action. ... Conscientiousness is the trait of being painstaking and careful, or the quality of being in accord with the dictates of ones conscience. ... Consciousness is a quality of the mind generally regarded to comprise qualities such as subjectivity, self-awareness, sentience, sapience, and the ability to perceive the relationship between oneself and ones environment. ... Consciousness is a quality of the mind generally regarded to comprise qualities such as subjectivity, self-awareness, sentience, sapience, and the ability to perceive the relationship between oneself and ones environment. ... An ability in logical thinking according to the psychologist, Piaget who developed four stages in cognitive development. ... Consolidation is the act of merging many things into one. ... In mathematics and the mathematical sciences, a constant is a fixed, but possibly unspecified, value. ... Construction on the North Bytown Bridge in Ottawa, Canada. ... In social science and psychometrics, construct validity refers to whether a scale measures the unobservable social construct (such as fluid intelligence) that it purports to measure. ... In psychology and sociology, the contact hypothesis is a way to create harmony among groups that are experiencing conflict. ... Content theory explains why human needs change with time. ... In psychometrics, content validity (also known as logical validity) refers to the extent to which a measure represents all facets of a given social concept. ... In psychometrics, content validity (also known as logical validity) refers to the extent to which a measure represents all facets of a given social concept. ... In philosophy and logic, contingency is the status of facts that are not logically necessary. ... Continuing medical education (CME) is a form of continuing professional development (CPD) that consists of educational activities which serve to maintain, develop, or increase the knowledge, skills, and professional performance and relationships that a medical practitioner uses to provide services for patients, the public, or the profession [1]. The content... In operant conditioning, reinforcement is any change in an organisms surroundings that: occurs regularly when the organism behaves in a given way (that is, is contingent on a specific response), is contiguous with the behaviour (associated in time and space), and is associated with an increase in the probability... In computer science and mathematics, a variable (IPA pronunciation: ) (sometimes called a pronumeral) is a symbolic representation denoting a quantity or expression. ... A contract is a legally binding exchange of promises or agreement between parties that the law will enforce. ... Contrast sensitivity is the ability to discern between luminosities of different levels in a static image. ... In psychology-related slang, control freak is a derogatory term for a person who attempts to impose excessive predictability and direction on others or on events, often associated with insecurity or a lack of trust. ... From Latin ex- + -periri (akin to periculum attempt). ... In engineering and mathematics, control theory deals with the behavior of dynamical systems. ... In the absence of a more specific context, convergence denotes the approach toward a definite value, as time goes on; or to a definite point, a common view or opinion, or toward a fixed or equilibrium state. ... Convergent and divergent production are the two types of human response to a set problem that were identified by J. P. Guilford. ... In general, conversion is the transformation of one thing into another. ... // Definition Conversion Disorder is a DSM-IV diagnosis which describes neurological symptoms such as weakness, sensory disturbance and attacks that look like epilepsy but which can not be attributed to a known neurological disease. ... This article is about the medical condition. ... Cooperative Inquiry Cooperative Inquiry was first proposed by John Heron in 1971 and later expanded with Peter Reason. ... Gross motor coordination addresses the gross motor skills: walking, running, climbing, jumping, crawling, lifting ones head, sitting up, etc. ... ... In psychology, coping is the process of managing taxing circumstances, expending effort to solve personal and interpersonal problems, and seeking to master, minimize, reduce or tolerate stress or conflict. ... Coprophagia is the consumption of feces, from the Greek copros (feces) and phagein (eat). ... Look up coprophilia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Core process psychotherapy is a psychotherapy that practices a Buddhist awareness as the centre of a healing relationship between client and therapist. ... The cornea is the transparent front part of the eye that covers the iris, pupil, and anterior chamber, providing most of an eyes optical power [1]. Together with the lens, the cornea refracts light and, as a result, helps the eye to focus. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article refers to the psychological condition. ... The corpus callosum is a structure of the mammalian brain in the longitudal fissure that connects the left and right cerebral hemispheres. ... Positive linear correlations between 1000 pairs of numbers. ... In probability theory and statistics, correlation, also called correlation coefficient, is a numeric measure of the strength of linear relationship between two random variables. ... Look up cortex in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Cortisone (IPA:ˈkôrtəˌsōn) is a steroid hormone. ... Coulrophobia is a mental condition concerning the fear of clowns. ... The word counseling or counselling comes from the Middle English counseil, from Old French conseil, from Latin cōnsilium; akin to cōnsulere, to take counsel, consult. ... Psychology (from Greek: ψυχή, psukhÄ“, spirit, soul; λόγος, logos, knowledge) is both an academic and applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes and behavior. ... Unlike clinical psychology, counseling psychology is generally a joint-venture of both psychology departments and departments of education. ... Unlike clinical psychology, counseling psychology is generally a joint-venture of both psychology departments and departments of education. ... ). Signaling, in economic terms, is putting money on the table just to prove that you can. ... Plot Spoiler warning: Kim invites Abby, a friend from high school, and her husband Adam, who is a therapist, over for dinner. ... In Medicine, a course of medication is a period of continuous treatment with a drug, sometimes with variable dosage. ... Look up Crack in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Creatine is a nitrogenous organic acid that naturally occurs in vertebrates and helps to supply energy to muscle and nerve cells. ... Creative Problem Solving begins when knowledge and simply thinking about a problem fails. ... Creative writing is a term used to distinguish certain imaginative or different types of writing from technical writing. ... Creativity techniques are heuristic methods to facilitate creativity in a person or a group of people. ... Look up Creativity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Cretinism (most likely from the Latin Christiānum, Christian) is a condition of severely stunted physical and mental growth due to untreated congenital deficiency of thyroid hormones (hypothyroidism). ... Cri du chat syndrome (French for Cry or call of the cat), also called deletion 5p syndrome,5p minus or Le Jeune’s syndrome, is a rare genetic disorder due to a missing portion of chromosome 5. ... Criminal psychology is the study of the wills, thoughts, intentions and reactions of criminals. ... A crisis (plural: crises) is a turning point or decisive moment in events. ... khjdgljdlfkjgl ldfjglkdj glkjdflkgjdflkgjdfkgj ldkjldjf glkdj glkdjglk dlkjglkdfj ldkjldkj gldk jlkdj ... Introduction In general, a critical period is a limited time in which an event can occur, usually to result in some kind of transformation. ... The Critical Psychiatry Network grew out of Bradford Group of psychiatrists who first first met in Bradford, UK in January 1999. ... Critical psychology is both a critique of mainstream psychology and an attempt to apply psychology in more progressive ways (based, for example, on Marxist or feminist analyses) and contexts than have thus far been the case. ... In the humanities and social sciences, critical theory has two quite different meanings with different origins and histories, one originating in social theory and the other in literary criticism. ... are you kiddin ? i was lookin for it for hours ... In differential topology, a critical value of a differentiable map between differentiable manifolds is the image of a critical point. ... Cross-sectional studies form a class of research methods that involve observation of some subset of a population of items all at the same time. ... Dendritic cells can take up self antigens from other cells and cross-present them to autoreactive T cells. ... Cross-sectional studies (also known as Cross-sectional analysis) form a class of research methods that involve observation of some subset of a population of items all at the same time, in which, groups can be compared at different ages with respect of independent variables, such as, IQ, memory. ... Crowd psychology is a branch of social psychology. ... Cryptomnesia, or concealed recollection, is the name for a theoretical phenomenon involving suppressed or forgotten memories. ... In psychometric psychology, fluid and crystallized intelligence (abbreviated gF and gC, respectively) are factors of general intelligence identified by Raymond Cattell (1971). ... Cue-dependent forgetting is a failure to recall a memory due to missing associated stimuli or cues. ... This article does not discuss cult in its original sense of religious practice; for that usage see Cult (religious practice). ... Cultivation theory, developed by Professor George Gerbner, dean of the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania, derived from several large-scale research projects concerned with the effects of television programming (particularly violent programming) on the attitudes and behaviors of the American public (Miller, 2005, p. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Cultural dimensions are the mostly psychological dimensions, or value constructs, which can be used to describe a specific culture. ... Cultural identity is the (feeling of) identity of a group or culture, or of an individual as far as he is influenced by his belonging to a group or culture. ... Cultural psychology is a field of psychology which assumes the idea that culture and mind are inseparable, thus there are no universal laws for how the mind works and that psychological theories grounded in one culture are likely to be limited in applicability when applied to a different culture. ... Cultural relativism is the principle that an individual humans beliefs and activities are interpreted in terms of his or her own culture. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Watercolour painting depicting cunnilingus by Achille Devéria Cunnilingus is the act of performing oral sex, using the mouth, lips, and tongue to stimulate the female genitals. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Curt Werner Bondy (April 3, 1894, Hamburg - January 17, 1972) was a German psychologist, social educator. ... The term CVA can be: Cape Volunteer Artillery (CVA) Carrabassett Valley Academy, a ski and snowboard Academy based in Carrabassett Valley, ME the medical abbreviation for a cerebrovascular accident, also known as a stroke; can also stand for costovertebral angle attack aircraft carriers (CVA), United States Navys hull classification... Cybernetics is the study of feedback and derived concepts such as communication and control in living organisms, machines and organisations. ... Cyberpsychology The developing field of cyberpsychology encompasses all psychological phenomena that are associated with or impacted by emerging technology. ... Cyclopean image is a single image created by the brain by combining two images received from the two eyes. ... Cyclothymia is a mild mood disorder which is sometimes seen as more of a personality trait than an illness. ...


D

D - Da Costa’s syndrome - Dangerousness to others - Dangerousness to self - Daniel Batson - Daniel Dennett - Daniel Goleman - Daniel Kahneman - Daniel Schacter - Daryl Bem - David Burns - David Hume - David McClelland - David Rumelhart - David Wechsler - Day hospital - Day residue - Daydream - Dead inside - Death instinct - Decay - Decay theory - Decision-matrix method - Decision - Decision making - Decision theory - Declarative learning - Declarative memory - Decompensation - Deconstruction therapy - Deductive reasoning - Deep trance identification - Defect theorist - Defense mechanism - Defenses - Deficit - Deficit schizophrenia - Degradation - Degrees of freedom - Deindividuation - Deinstitutionalization - Delay of reward gradient - Delay reduction hypothesis - Delayed sleep phase - Delirium - Delirium tremens - Delusion - Delusion and Dream in Jensen's Gradiva - Delusion of reference - Delusional depression - Delusional disorder - Delusional jealousy - Delusions - Delusions of control - Delusions of grandeur - Delusions of persecution - Demand - Demand characteristics - Dementia - Dementia praecox - Dementia, senile - Dementia, vascular - Demographic variable - Demography - Demonology - Dendrite - Dendrites - Denial - Dennis Fox - Dental phobia - Deoxyribonucleic acid - Dependability - Dependence - Dependence, substance - Dependency need - Dependency needs - Dependent personality - Dependent personality disorder - Dependent variable - Depersonalization - Depersonalization disorder - Depression - Depression with psychotic features - Depressive disorders - Depressive Disorder Not Otherwise Specified - Depressive personality disorder - Depressive position - Depressive realism - Deprivation, emotional - Deprivation, sensory - Depth psychology - Derealization - Dereflection - Dereistic - Derek Edwards - Descriptive psychiatry - Descriptive responsibility - Descriptive statistics - Desensitization - Desibels - Design thinking - Designated patient - Designer drugs - Desire - Destrudo - Desynchronized sleep rhythm - Detachment - Detection theory - Deterioration effect - Determinism - Deterrence - Desexification - Devaluation - Developmental disorder - Developmental lines - Developmental profile - Developmental psychology - Developmental stage - Developmental theories - Developmental theorist - Deviation iQ score - Deviation, sexual - Diagnosis - Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental disorders - Diagnostic related group - Dialectical behavior therapy - Dialogical self - Diasthesis-stress paradigm - Diasthesis - Diathesis-stress model - Dichotic listening - Dichotic listening - Diencephalon - Dietrich Doerner - Difference threshold - Differential diagnosis - Differential effects - Differential psychology - Differentiation - Dimensional classification - Dimitri Uznadze - Diogenes syndrome - Diplopia - Dipsomania - Directionality problem - Directive counseling - Disability, psychiatric - Disappointment - Discipline - Disconnection syndrome - Discrimination - Discriminative stimulus - Discursive psychology - Disease - Disease model - Disillusionment - Disinhibition - Disintegration anxiety - Disintegrative disorder - Disorder of written expression - Disorganized schizophrenia - Disorganized speech - Disorientation - Disowned Selves - Displacement - Dispositional attribute - Dispositionist - Disputation - Disruptive behavior disorder - Dissociation - Dissociative amnesia - Dissociative disorder, brief reactive - Dissociative disorders - Dissociative fugue - Dissociative identity disorder - Distancing language - Distinctiveness - Distractibility - Distressed personality type - Distributed cognition - Distributed practice - Distributive analysis and synthesis - Disulfiram - Divergent thinking - Divorce mediation - Dizygotic twins - DMAE - DNA - Doctor of Psychology - Doctrine of formal discipline - Domain knowledge - Domestic discipline - Dominance - Dominant gene - Dominique de Quervain - Donal Carlston - Donald Norman - Donald O. Hebb - Donald Woods Winnicott - Door-in-the-face technique - Dopamine - Dopamine hypothesis - Dorothea Lynde Dix - Dorothy Lewis - Double-bind theory - Double-blind experiment - Double-blind procedure - Double bind - Double blind study - Double deficit - Double depression - Double personality - Douglas Hofstadter - Down syndrome - Dramatic-emotional personality disorders - Dream - Dream analysis - Dream anxiety disorder - Dream dictionary - Dream journal - Dream sign - Dream transference - Dreamscape - DRG based payments - Drive - Drive Theory - Drug-induced parkinsonism - Drug abuse - Drug addicts - Drug dependence - Drug holiday - Drug interaction - Drug levels - Drug therapy - Drug tolerance - Drugs - DSM - Dual-coding theory - Dual addiction - Dual diagnosis - Dualism - Dummy - Dump job - Duplicity theory - Dura mater - Durham decision - Dyad - Dynamic psychiatry - Dynamic psychology - Dynamic theory - Dynamicism - Dynamics - Dysarthria - Dyscalculia - Dysfunction - Dysfunctional assumptions - Dysfunctional family - Dysgraphia - Dyskinesia - Dyslexia - Dysmnesia - Dysmnesic syndrome - Dyspareunia - Dysphagia - Dysphasia - Dysphonia - Dysphoria - Dysphoric disorder, late luteal phase - Dyssocial behavior - Dyssomnias - Dysthymic disorder - Dystonia, acute, neuroleptic-induced - Déjà vu - C. Daniel Batson (b. ... Daniel Clement Dennett (b. ... Daniel Goleman (born March 7, 1946) is an internationally renouned author, psychologist, science journalist and corporate consultant. ... Daniel Kahneman Daniel Kahneman (born March 5, 1934 in Tel Aviv, in the then British Mandate of Palestine, now in Israel), is a key pioneer and theorist of behavioral finance, which integrates economics and cognitive science to explain seemingly irrational risk management behavior in human beings. ... Daniel Schacter is Professor of Psychology at Harvard University. ... Daryl J. Bem is a noted social psychologist at Cornell University, USA, and the originator of the self-perception theory of attitude change. ... David D. Burns, M.D., is the author of Feeling Good - The New Mood Therapy, The Feeling Good Handbook, Ten Days to Self-Esteem and other popular works on cognitive therapy. ... David Hume (April 26, 1711 – August 25, 1776)[1] was a Scottish philosopher, economist, and historian. ... David McClelland (1917-1998). ... David E. Rumelhart (born 1942, Wessington Springs) has made many contributions to the formal analysis of human cognition, working primarily within the frameworks of mathematical psychology, symbolic artificial intelligence, and parallel distributed processing. ... David Wechsler (January 12, 1896, Lespedi, Romania - May 2, 1981, New York, New York) was a leading Romanian-American psychologist. ... A daydream is a fantasy that a person has while awake, often about spontaneous and fanciful thoughts not connected to the persons immediate situation. ... Clinical depression (also called major depressive disorder, or unipolar depression when compared to bipolar disorder) is a state of intense sadness, melancholia or despair that has advanced to the point of being disruptive to an individuals social functioning and/or activities of daily living. ... Deathwish redirects here. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... The Decay theory states that when something new is learned, a neuro-chemical memory trace is formed, but over time this trace tends to disintegrate. ... The decision-matrix method, also Pugh method, is a quantitative technique used to rank the multi-dimensional options of an option set. ... Look up decision in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Decision making is the cognitive process of selecting a course of action from among multiple alternatives. ... Decision theory is an interdisciplinary area of study, related to and of interest to practitioners in mathematics, statistics, economics, philosophy, management and psychology. ... Declarative learning is acquiring information that one can speak about. ... It has been suggested that Explicit_memory be merged into this article or section. ... Decompensation is the functional deterioration of a previously working structure or system. ... Deconstruction therapy was developed by the British underground philosopher Michael Swann. ... Deductive reasoning is the kind of reasoning where the conclusion is necessitated by previously known premises. ... Deep trance identification is a process where a profound hypnotic trance is induced, and, within that, a person is led to recollect everything they have ever known or seen of a person and steps into that person to experience and identify with their world completely. ... In psychoanalytic theory, a defence mechanism is an unconscious way to protect ones personality from unpleasant thoughts which may otherwise cause anxiety. ... A budget deficit occurs when an entity (often a government) spends more money than it takes in. ... Look up degradation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The phrase degrees of freedom is used in three different branches of science: in physics and physical chemistry, in mechanical and aerospace engineering, and in statistics. ... Deindividuation refers to the phenomenon of relinquishing ones sense of identity. ... Deinstitutionalisation is the practice of moving people (especially those with developmental disability) from mental institutions into community-based or family-based environments. ... In classical conditioning (learning), the Delay-Reduction Hypothesis states that certain discriminative stimuli (DS) are more effective as conditioned reinforcers (CR) if they signal a decrease in time to a positive reinforcer or an increase in time to an aversive stimulus or punishment. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... This article is about the mental state and medical condition. ... For the beer, see Delirium Tremens (beer). ... A delusion is commonly defined as a fixed false belief and is used in everyday language to describe a belief that is either false, fanciful or derived from deception. ... Delusion and Dream in Jensens Gradiva (1907) is an essay by Sigmund Freud that analyzes the novel Gradiva by Jensen from a psychoanalytical point of view. ... Delusional disorder is a psychiatric diagnosis denoting a psychotic mental illness that involves holding one or more non-bizarre delusions in the absence of any other significant psychopathology (signs or symptoms of mental illness). ... Delusional jealousy or Othello syndrome is a psychiatric disorder in which a person holds a delusional belief that their spouse or sexual partner is being unfaithful. ... A delusion is commonly defined as a false belief, and is used in everyday language to describe a belief that is either false, fanciful or derived from deception. ... Delusions Of Grandeur is a progressive metal band, formed originally by Matt Dawson and Adam Ferree during their senior year of high school. ... In Lacanian psychoanalysis, a demand results when a lack in the Real is phrased into the Symbolic medium of language. ... In research, and particularly psychology, demand characteristics refers to a an experimental artifact where participants form an interpretation of the experiments purpose and subconsciously change their behavior accordingly. ... For other uses, see Dementia (disambiguation). ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Map of countries by population Population growth showing projections for later this century Demography is the statistical study of human populations. ... Demonology is the systematic study of demons or beliefs about demons. ... Dendrites (from Greek dendron, “tree”) are the branched projections of a neuron that act to conduct the electrical stimulation received from other neural cells to the cell body, or soma, of the neuron from which the dendrites project. ... In biology, a dendrite is a slender, typically branched projection of a nerve cell, or neuron, which conducts the electrical stimulation received from other cells to the body or soma of the cell from which it projects. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Dental phobia is a fear, or phobia, traditionally defined as an irrational and exaggerated fear of dentists and dental procedures. ... DNA replication Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is a nucleic acid which carries genetic instructions for the biological development of all cellular forms of life and many viruses. ... In computer science, dependability is defined as [1] Dependability includes the following attributes of a computing system [2]: Availability: readiness for correct service; Reliability: continuity of correct service; Safety: absence of catastrophic consequences on the user(s) and the environment; Security: the concurrent existence of (a) availability for authorized users... Dependency has a number of meanings: In project management, a dependency is a link amongst a projects terminal elements. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Dependent personality disorder (DPD), formerly known as asthenic personality disorder, is a personality disorder that is characterized by a pervasive psychological dependence on other people. ... In experimental design, a dependent variable (also known as response variable, responding variable or regressand) is a factor whose values in different treatment conditions are compared. ... Depersonalization is an alteration in the perception or experience of the self so that one feels detached from, and as if one is an outside observer of, ones mental processes or body. ... Depersonalization Disorder (DD) is a dissociative disorder in which sufferers are affected by persistent feelings of depersonalization. ... Clinical depression (also called major depressive disorder, or unipolar depression when compared to bipolar disorder) is a state of intense sadness, melancholia or despair that has advanced to the point of being disruptive to an individuals social functioning and/or activities of daily living. ... Depressive Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (DD-NOS) is designated by the code 311 in the DSM-IV for depressive disorders that are impairing but do not fit any the officially specified diagnoses. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Depressive realism is the proposition that people with depression have a more accurate view of reality. ... Sensory deprivation is the deliberate reduction or removal of stimuli from one or more of the senses. ... Depth psychology is a broad term that refers to any psychological approach examining the depth (the hidden or deeper parts) of human experience. ... Derealization (DR) is an alteration in the perception or experience of the external world so that it seems strange or unreal. ... In this Glossary of Psychiatric Terms, mostly Greek, secondly French and German and some English terms, as used in psychiatric literature, were defined. ... Derek Edwards is a professor of psychology at the Discourse and Rhetoric Group at the University of Loughborough. ... Descriptive psychiatry is that which is based on the study of observable symptoms and behavioral phenomena rather than underlying psychodynamic processes, in contrast with dynamic psychiatry which is based on the study of emotional processes, their origins, and the mental mechanisms underlying them. ... Descriptive statistics are used to describe the basic features of the data in a study. ... Desensitization is a method to reduce or eliminate an organisms negative reaction to a substance or stimulus. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... In social psychology, the designated patient is a person socially constructed as mentally ill, regardless of the existence of real and measurable symptoms. ... Designer drug is a term to used to describe psychoactive drugs which are created (or marketed, if they had already existed) to get around existing drug laws by modifying their molecular structures to varying degrees. ... In Lacanian psychoanalysis, the term desire designates the impossible relation that a subject has with objet petit a. ... Destrudo is the energy of the destructive impulse. ... A detachment is a military unit that is a permanent separate unit smaller than a company, such as a Medical Detachment. ... Detection theory, or signal detection theory, is a means to quantify the ability to discern between signal and noise. ... Determinism is the philosophical proposition that every event, including human cognition and behavior, decision and action, is causally determined by an unbroken chain of prior occurrences. ... Deterrence ALOHA!! is a means of controlling a persons behavior through negative motivational influences, namely fear of punishment. ... Devaluation is a reduction in the value of a currency with respect to other monetary units. ... Developmental disorders are disorders that occur at some stage in a childs development, often retarding the development. ... Developmental lines Definition: In her developmental theory, Anna Freud uses the metaphor of developmental lines to stress the continuous and cumulative character of childhood development. ... developmental profile The developmental profile is a standardized psychodynamic diagnostic instrument for assessing clinically relevant personality characteristics. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... In Developmental psychology, a stage is a distinct phase in an individuals development. ... In general, a diagnosis (plural diagnoses) has two distinct dictionary definitions. ... Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is a psychosocial treatment developed by Marsha M. Linehan specifically to treat Borderline Personality Disorder. ... The term dialogical self refers to the minds ability to imagine the different positions of participants in an argument or conversation and to carry on an internal dialogue. ... The Diathesis-stress model is a psychological theory that explains behavior as both a result of biological and genetic factors (nature), and life experiences (nurture). This theory is often used to describe the pronunciation of mental disorders, like schizophrenia, that are produced by the interaction of a vulnerable hereditary predisposition... Dichotic Listening is a procedure used commonly in investigating selective attention in the auditory domain. ... Dichotic Listening is a procedure used commonly in investigating selective attention in the auditory domain. ... The diencephalon is the region of the brain that includes the epithalamus, thalamus, and hypothalamus. ... Prof. ... In psychophysics, a just noticeable difference, customarily abbreviated with lowercase letters as jnd, is the smallest difference in a specified modality of sensory input that is detectable by a human being. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Differential psychology is concerned with the study of individual differences in humans. ... Differentiation can mean the following: In biology: cellular differentiation; evolutionary differentiation; In mathematics: see: derivative In cosmogony: planetary differentiation Differentiation (geology); Differentiation (logic); Differentiation (marketing). ... Dimitri Uznadze (December 2, 1886 - October 9, 1950) was a famous Georgian psychologist, philosopher and public benefactor, founder of the Georgian scientific school of Psychology, co-founder of the Tbilisi State University (TSU), Academician and co-founder of the Georgian Academy of Sciences (GAS), Meritorious Science Worker of Georgia, Dr... Diogenes syndrome is a behavioral disorder characterized by extreme self-neglect. ... Diplopia, commonly known as double vision, is the perception of two images from a single object. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Discipline (disambiguation). ... This article is about discrimination in the social science context. ... Discursive psychology is a school of psychology developed in the 1990s by Jonathan Potter and Derek Edwards at Loughborough University. ... This article is about the medical term. ... 1. ... Childhood disintegrative disorder (CDD), also known as Hellers syndrome and disintegrative psychosis, is a rare condition characterized by late onset (>3 years of age) of developmental delays in language, social function, and motor skills. ... Disorder of written expression is a childhood condition characterized by poor writing skills. ... Disorganized schizophrenia is a subtype of schizophrenia as defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. ... Orientation is a function of the mind involving awareness of three dimensions: (1) time, (2) place and (3) person. ... Disowned Selves are the inner selves that we long ago learned to repress and deny due to familial and social conditioning. ... In psychology, the term displacement is an unconscious defence mechanism, whereby the mind redirects emotion from a dangerous object to a safe object. ... Dispositionist is a term in psychology used to describe those that believe peoples actions are conditioned by the situation they find themselves in rather than some internal moral character. ... In the scholastic system of education of the middle ages, disputations (in Latin: disputationes, singular: disputatio) offered a formalized method of debate designed to uncover and establish truths in theology and in other sciences. ... Dissociation is a state of acute mental decompensation in which certain thoughts, emotions, sensations, and/or memories are compartmentalized because they are too overwhelming for the conscious mind to integrate. ... Amnesia is a condition in which memory is disturbed. ... Dissociative disorders are defined as conditions that involve disruptions or breakdowns of memory, awareness, identity and/or perception. ... In psychology, a fugue state (also known as a psychogenic fugue or dissociative fugue) is a state of mind where a person experiences a dissociative break in identity and attempts to run away from some perceived threat, usually something abstract such as the persons identity. ... Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID), as defined by the American Psychiatric Associations Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR), is a mental condition whereby a single individual evidences two or more distinct identities or personalities, each with its own pattern of perceiving and interacting with the environment. ... Distancing language is phrasing used by a person to distance themselves from his statement. ... Distressed Personality Type or Type D individuals, suppress powerful negative emotions as a means of coping with stressful events or situations. ... History Distributed cognition is a school of psychology developed in the 1990s by Edwin Hutchins. ... Disulfiram is a drug used to support the treatment of chronic alcoholism by producing an acute sensitivity to alcohol. ... Divergent thinking is a thought process or method, which is usually applied with the goal to generate ideas. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Twin. ... DMAE (dimethylaminoethanol, deanol), chemically 2-(dimethylamino)ethanol, (CH3)2NCH2CH2OH, is chemical compound related to choline. ... The structure of part of a DNA double helix Deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, is a nucleic acid molecule that contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms. ... The Doctor of Psychology (Psy. ... In computing, domain knowledge is the knowledge and skills that software programs encode. ... Domestic discipline (DD) is the practice of interspousal discipline with an emphasis on spanking as a punishment. ... For the meaning of the word dominance in genetics, please see Dominance relationship Dominance in the context of biology and anthropology is the state of having high social status relative to other individuals, who react submissively to dominant individuals. ... In genetics, the term dominant gene refers to the allele that causes a phenotype that is seen in a heterozygous genotype. ... Professor Dominique de Quervain is a research professor in the psychiatry department at the University of Zurich. ... Donald A. Norman is a professor emeritus of cognitive science at University of California, San Diego and a Professor of Computer Science at Northwestern University, but nowadays works mostly with cognitive science in the domain of usability engineering. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Donald Woods Winnicott (1896 - January 28, 1971) was a pediatrician and psychoanalyst. ... The door in the face (DITF) technique is a persuasion method. ... Dopamine is a phenethylamine naturally produced by the human body. ... Dorothea Dix Dorothea Lynde Dix (April 4, 1802–July 17, 1887) (not to be confused with the journalist Dorothy Dix) was a tireless social activist who, from the early 1840s to well after the American Civil War, drew on the most advanced 19th century ideas about psychiatric treatment to... Dr. Dorothy Lewis is a psychiatrist specializing in the study of serial killers. ... The double blind method is an important part of the scientific method, used to prevent research outcomes from being influenced by either the placebo effect or the observer bias. ... For the communication paradox, see double bind. ... Double bind is a communicative situation where a person receives different or contradictory messages. ... Double-blind - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... The ability to read is believed to depend on two skills. ... Dysthymia, or dysthymic disorder, is a form of the mood disorder of depression characterised by a lack of enjoyment/pleasure in life that continues for at least six months. ... Douglas Richard Hofstadter (born February 15, 1945) is an American academic. ... For other uses, see Dream (disambiguation). ... Dreaming is the subjective experience of imaginary images, sounds/voices, thoughts or sensations during sleep, usually involuntarily. ... A dream dictionary is a tool made for interpreting images in a dream. ... A dream journal is a journal in which one writes down his or her dream experiences. ... A dream sign is a commonly occurring theme found within a persons dreams. ... Dream transference is the name for a paranormal event where two people either dream the same thing, appear together in their dreams and communicate, or each has the others dream. ... A Dreamscape is the faux-reality world that exists within a dream. ... Look up Drive in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Drive Theory was first suggested by Robert Zajonc in 1965 as an explanation of the audience effect. ... Drug abuse has a wide range of definitions related to taking a psychoactive drug or performance enhancing drug for a non-therapeutic or non-medical effect. ... Drug addiction, or dependency is the compulsive use of drugs, to the point where the user has no effective choice but to continue use. ... Drug addiction, or dependency is the compulsive use of drugs, to the point where the user has no effective choice but to continue use. ... A drug holiday, sometimes referred to as a structured treatment interruption (STI) is the intentional discontinuation of a medication, usually for a short period of time. ... A drug interaction is a situation in which a substance affects the activity of a drug, i. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Drug tolerance occurs when a subjects reaction to a drug (such as a painkiller or intoxicant) decreases so that larger doses are required to achieve the same effect. ... Many drugs are provided in tablet form. ... As a three-letter acronym or abbreviation DSM or dsm can mean several things: // DSM (company), an international chemicals company based in the Netherlands Dependency Structure Matrix Deputy Stage Manager Design Structure Matrix The IATA airport code for Des Moines International Airport in Des Moines, Iowa, United States and issometimes... Dual-coding theories are general theories of cognition that provide a unifying framework for literacy, for reading. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up Dummy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In American police slang (and influenced by it), a dump job is an act of avoiding unwanted responsibility. ... The dura mater (from the Latin hard mother), or pachymeninx, is the tough and inflexible outermost of the three layers of the meninges surrounding the brain. ... Etymology: Late Latin dyad-, dyas, from Greek, from dyo The word dyad has a number of uses: A dyad (general) pair, consisting of two parts. ... Dynamic psychiatry is that which is based on the study of emotional processes, their origins, and the mental mechanisms underlying them, rather than observable behavioral phenomena, in contrast with descriptive psychiatry which is based on the study of observable symptoms and behavioral phenomena rather than underlying psychodynamic processes. ... Dynamicism, also termed the dynamic hypothesis or the dynamic hypothesis in cognitive science or dynamic cognition, is a new approach in cognitive science exemplified by the work of philosopher Tim van Gelder. ... Sigmund Freud - the central founder of psychodynamics Psychodynamics is the application of the principles of thermodynamics to psychology. ... Look up dysarthria in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... A dysfunctional family is a family in which conflict, misbehavior and even abuse on the part of individual members of the family occur continually, leading other members to accommodate such actions. ... Dysgraphia (or agraphia) is a deficiency in the ability to write, regardless of the ability to read, not due to intellectual impairment. ... Dyskinesia refers to an impairment of voluntary movement. ... This article is about developmental dyslexia. ... Dyspareunia is painful sexual intercourse, due to medical or psychological causes. ... Dysphagia () is a medical term defined as difficulty swallowing. ... Dysphasia is a speech disorder in which there is an impairment of speech and of comprehension of speech. ... Lisp may mean: Lisp programming language Lisp (speech) This is a disambiguation page — a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... Look up dysphoria in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Dyssomnias are a broad classification of sleeping disorder that make it difficult to get to sleep, or to stay sleeping. ... Dysthymia, or dysthymic disorder, is a form of the mood disorder of depression characterised by a lack of enjoyment/pleasure in life that continues for at least six months. ... For other uses, see Déjà vu (disambiguation). ...


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Echolalia is the repetition or echoing of verbal utterances made by another person. ... Etymology: Greek echo (repetition) and praxia (action). Echopraxia is the involuntary repetition or imitation of the observed movements of another. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Ecological psychology (EP) is term claimed by a number of schools of psychology. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... ... Ecopsychology connects psychology and ecology in a new scientific paradigm. ... ecstasy and religious ecstasy MDMA, most commonly known today by the street name ecstasy, is a synthetic entactogen of the phenethylamine family whose primary effect is to stimulate the brain to rapidly secrete large amounts of serotonin, causing a general sense of openness, empathy, energy, euphoria, and well-being. ... ECT may be an abbreviation for Electroconvulsive therapy European Centre for Theoretical Studies in Nuclear Physics and Related Areas, in Trento, Italy, www. ... Ectomorphic is one of the three classic somatotypes or body types created by William Sheldon. ... Educational organization has multiple meanings according to the field and setting in which it is being applied. ... Educational psychology is the study of how humans learn in educational settings, the effectiveness of educational interventions, the psychology of teaching, and the social psychology of schools as organizations. ... Edward Chace Tolman (1886 - 1959) was an American psychologist. ... Edward de Bono (born May 19, 1933) is a Maltese psychologist and physician. ... See also: statistician Edward Jones Edward E. Jones (1927-1993) was an influential social psychologist who worked at Duke University for most of his career, then moving to Princeton University in 1977. ... Edward Lee Thorndike (August 31, 1874 - August 9, 1949) was an American psychologist whose work on animal behaviour and the learning process led to the theory of connectionism. ... Edward B. Titchener (1876-1927) was an Englishman and a student of Wilhelm Wundt before becoming a professor of psychology at Cornell University. ... The Edwards Personal Preference Schedule (EPPS) is a forced choice, objective, non-projective personality inventory, derived from the theory of H. A. Murray, which measures the rating of individuals in fifteen normal needs or motives. ... Edwin Bissell Holt (August 21, 1873–January 25, 1946), was a professor of philosophy and psychology at Harvard from 1901–1918. ... Edwin Hutchins is a professor of cognitive science at the University of California, San Diego. ... EEG can mean: Electroencephalography - the method and science of recording and interpreting traces of brain electrical activity as recorded from the skull surface or the device used to record such traces Emperor Entertainment Group - A Hong Kong entertainment company. ... Silva Mind Control, subsequently marketed as the Silva Method, comprises a self-help system that purportedly shapes beliefs to further personal success. ... Effectiveness means the capability of producing an effect. ... Efficacy is the ability to produce a desired amount of a desired effect. ... Look up efficiency in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Egodystonic is a medical term referring to behaviors, e. ... Egosyntonic is a medical term referring to behaviors, values, feelings, which are in harmony with or acceptable to the needs and goals of the ego, or consistent with ones ideal self-image. ... eGO is a company that builds electric motor scooters which are becoming popular for urban transportation and vacation use. ... In Freudian psychology, the ego ideal (or ideal ego) is an image of the perfect self towards which the ego should aspire. ... Ego psychology is a school of psychoanalysis that originated in Freuds ego-id-superego model. ... The concept of ego reduction occurs in several contexts. ... In his theory of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud sought to explain how the unconscious mind operates by proposing that it has a particular structure. ... Egocentrism is the practice of regarding oneself and ones own opinions or interests as most important. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Egodystonic is a medical term referring to behaviors, e. ... This article or section may be confusing or unclear for some readers, and should be edited to rectify this. ... Egosyntonic is a medical term referring to behaviors, values, feelings, which are in harmony with or acceptable to the needs and goals of the ego, or consistent with ones ideal self-image. ... Eidetic memory, photographic memory, or total recall, is the ability to recall images, sounds, or objects in memory with extreme accuracy and in seemingly abundant volume. ... Semen or ejaculate is the fluid discharged from the penis during ejaculation, usually at the time of orgasm. ... This article is about male ejaculation. ... The Elaboration Likelihood Model of persuasion (ELM; proposed by Petty & Cacioppo, 1981, 1986) is a model of how attitudes are formed and changed (see also attitude change). ... Eleanor Rosch is a professor of psychology at The University of California, Berkeley. ... Selective mutism is a condition in which what is often anxiety or excessive shyness causes a person to refuse to speak in certain situations, even though having the capability to. ... The Electra complex is an ambiguous psychiatric concept which attempts to explain the maturation of the human female. ... “QRS” redirects here. ... Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), also known as electroshock, is a controversial psychiatric treatment in which seizures are induced with electricity. ... Electroencephalography is the neurophysiologic exploration of the electrical activity of the brain by the application of electrodes to the scalp. ... Electromyography (EMG) is a medical technique for measuring muscle response to nervous stimulation. ... Electroconvulsive therapy, also known as electroshock or ECT, is a controversial type of psychiatric shock therapy involving the induction of an artificial seizure in a patient by passing electricity through the brain. ... Electro-stimulation can be performed in the context of: Cranial electrotherapy stimulation Skeletomuscular electrostimulation animal husbandry as part of the artificial insemination process Erotic electrostimulation - a form of BDSM Categories: Disambiguation | Stub ... Eliminativists argue that our modern belief in the existence of mental phenomena is analogous to our ancient belief in obsolete theories such as the geocentric model of the universe. ... Elizabeth Gould is professor of psychology at Princeton University. ... Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, M.D. (July 8, 1926 - August 24, 2004) was a psychiatrist and the author of the groundbreaking book On Death and Dying, where she first discussed what is now known as the Kübler-Ross model. ... Elizabeth F. Loftus (born October 16, 1944 in Los Angeles, CA) is a psychologist who works on human memory and how it can be changed by facts, ideas, suggestions and other forms of post-event information. ... Ellen J. Langer is professor of psychology at Harvard University, who has studied the illusion of control, decision making, aging and mindfulness theory. ... Elliot Aronson Elliot Aronson is an eminent American psychologist, best known for his Jigsaw Classroom experiments, cognitive dissonance research, and bestselling Social Psychology textbooks. ... To elope, most literally, merely means to run away. ... Embodied psychology is a school of psychology which stresses embodiment. ... Embodied psychology is a school of psychology which stresses embodiment. ... The EMDR Institute was founded to develop the work of Francine Shapiro in Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy. ... A termite cathedral mound produced by a termite colony: a classic example of emergence in nature. ... Emetophobia is an excessive or irrational fear of vomiting or of being around others who are vomiting. ... EMG can refer to: electromyography, the recording of the extracellular field potentials produced by muscles E-Mail Games EMG, Inc. ... Emil Kraepelin (February 15, 1856–October 7, 1926) was a German psychiatrist who attempted to create a synthesis of the hundreds of mental disorders classified by the 19th century, grouping diseases together based on classification of common patterns of symptoms, rather than by simple similarity of major symptoms in the... For other uses, see Emotion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Emotion (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Emotion can have a powerful impact on memory. ... Ones emotional age is the age of an individual, expressed in terms of the chronological age of an average normal individual showing the same degree of emotional maturity. ... Emotional contagion is the tendency to express and feel emotions that are similar to and influenced by those of others. ... Emotional dissonance is a feeling experienced when one is forced to fake an emotion. ... Emotional dysregulation (or affect dysregulation) is a term used in the mental health community to refer to an emotional response that is not well modulated. ... In psychology, an emotional expression is a representation of emotions. ... Emotional Intelligence (EI), often measured as an Emotional Intelligence Quotient (EQ), describes an ability, capacity, or skill to perceive, assess, and manage the emotions of ones self, of others, and of groups. ... Emotional isolation – is a term used to describe a state of isolation where the individual is emotionally isolated, but may have a well functioning social life. ... Emotional reasoning is a cognitive error whereby a person who is nervous or anxious resorts to emotional reactions to determine a course of action. ... The terms empathogen and entactogen are different terms used to describe one class of hallucinogens that function as serotonin releasers; most of these are phenethylamines. ... Not to be confused with Pity, Sympathy, or Compassion. ... An empathy gap is a cognitive bias in which a person does not empathize or predict correctly how he/she will feel in the future, i. ... Empirical method is generally meant as the collection of a large amount of data on which to base a theory or derive a conclusion in science. ... In philosophy generally, empiricism is a theory of knowledge emphasizing the role of experience in the formation of ideas, while discounting the notion of innate ideas. ... For other uses, see Emptiness (disambiguation). ... Encephalitis is an acute inflammation of the brain, commonly caused by a viral infection. ... Encephalitis lethargica (EL) is an atypical form of encephalitis. ... Encephalopathy literally means disease of the brain. ... In psychology, and the cognitive sciences more generally, enactivism is a theoretical approach to understanding the mind. ... Encoding in the memory refers to how the information is stored. ... Look up encoding in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Encopresis is involuntary fecal soiling in children who have usually already been toilet trained. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Endel Tulving (born May 26, 1927) is a Canadian neuroscientist, born in Estonia, whose speciality is episodic memory. ... In epidemiology, an infection is said to be endemic in a population when that infection is maintained in the population without the need for external inputs. ... Endocrinology is a branch of medicine dealing with disorders of the endocrine system and its specific secretions called hormones. ... An endocrine gland is one of a set of internal organs involved in the secretion of hormones into the blood. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Endocrinology is a branch of medicine dealing with disorders of the endocrine system and its specific secretions called hormones. ... Look up Endogenous in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Endomorph, endomorphic, and endomorphism can refer to: A somatotype, or animal body-type, that contains high body fat, and that experiences difficulties losing weight Endomorphism can also refer to a mathematical concept: In category theory, something pertaining to or related by an endomorphism Category: ... Runners high redirects here. ... Endorphins are endogenous opioid biochemical compounds. ... An energumen (from Greek energoumenos, possessed) is a frantic and hysterical person, who commonly shows a strength superior to what he/she should have. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... An enfant terrible, from the French meaning terrible child, is one whose startlingly unconventional behavior, work, or thought embarrasses or disturbs others. ... ENFJ (Extroverted Intuitive Feeling Judging) is one of the sixteen personality types from personality type systems based on C.G. Jung, of which the best-known are the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), Keirsey Temperament Sorter and Socionics. ... An Engram is a term for the (hypothesized) means by which memory traces are biologically stored as physical or biochemical change in the brain (and other neural tissue) in response to external stimuli. ... Endorphins are endogenous opioid biochemical compounds. ... Entitlement is the guarantee for access to benefits because of rights, or by agreement through law. ... For the Socionics facsimile of this type, see Logical Intuitive Extrovert. ... Entomophobia ( also known as Insectophobia ) is the abnormal fear of insects and similar arthropods, and even other bugs, such as worms. ... Bedwetting (or enuresis) is involuntary urination while asleep in bed. ... Environmental psychology is an interdisciplinary field focused on the interplay between humans and their surroundings. ... Ribbon diagram of the enzyme TIM, surrounded by the space-filling model of the protein. ... Epidemiology is the study of factors affecting the health and illness of populations, and serves as the foundation and logic of interventions made in the interest of public health and preventive medicine. ... In geology, epigenesis means changes in the mineral composition of a rock because of outside influences, e. ... Epigenetic Robotics is an interdiciplinary research area with the goal of understanding biological systems by the integration between neuroscience, developmental psychology and engineering sciences. ... “Adrenaline” redirects here. ... “Adrenaline” redirects here. ... This article is about a feeling, for other meanings see epiphany (disambiguation). ... Episodic memory, or autobiographical memory, a sub-category of declarative memory, is the recollection of events. ... It has been suggested that Meta-epistemology be merged into this article or section. ... EQ can mean: Education Quotient, a measure of education quality Elfquest, a long-running comic by Wendy and Richard Pini emotional quotient (psychology): quotient between the emotional age and the chronological age that meaures emotional intelligence (how well a person understands emotions); the most famous test used to determine the... Equity theory. ... Erectile dysfunction (ED) or impotence is a sexual dysfunction characterized by the inability to develop or maintain an erection of the penis. ... Ergasiophobia refers to an abnormal and persistent fear of work or functioning, or a surgeons fear of operating. ... Ergoloid mesylates (Brand names: Hydergine, Gerimal, Niloric) (Chemical name: Dihydroergotoxine mesylate) are dihydrogenated ergot alkaloids used to combat decreased mental function as a result of senility or multiple small strokes. ... Ergonomics (or human factors) is the application of scientific information concerning humans to the design of objects, systems and environment for human use (definition adopted by the International Ergonomics Association in 2007). ... Eric Berne (May 10, 1910 – July 15, 1970) was a Canadian-born psychiatrist best known as the creator of transactional analysis and the author of Games People Play. ... Eric Heinz Lenneberg (1921 - 1975) was a linguist who pioneered ideas on language acquisition and cognitive psychology more generally about innateness. ... Erich Fromm Erich Pinchas Fromm (March 23, 1900 – March 18, 1980) was an internationally renowned Jewish-German-American social psychologist, psychoanalyst, and humanistic philosopher. ... Erich Neumann (1905- November 5, 1960) was a psychologist, writer, and one of Carl Jungs most gifted students. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Erik Homburger Erikson (June 15, 1902 - May 12, 1994) was a developmental psychologist and psychoanalyst known for his theory on social development of human beings, and for coining the phrase identity crisis. Bibliography Major works: Childhood and Society (1950) Young Man Luther. ... Erlendur Haraldsson is a Professor emeritus Faculty of social science at the University of Iceland who, despite having retired from his former post at the University of Iceland, continues to be an active academic. ... Ernest Jones (1879-1958) was arguably the best-known follower of Sigmund Freud. ... Ernst Angel (11 August 1894, Vienna, Austria - 10 January 1986, [[Newark, New Jersey) was an Austrian born poet, theatre and film critic, screen play author, film director and publisher who later became a psychologist. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Eros ( érōs) is passionate love, with sensual desire and longing. ... Eros ( érōs) is passionate love, with sensual desire and longing. ... Eroticism is an aesthetic focused on sexual desire, especially the feelings of anticipation of sexual activity. ... Erotomania is a rare disorder in which a person holds a delusional belief that another person, usually of a higher social status, is in love with them. ... Erotophobia is the fear of marriage and romantic relationships. ... The word error has different meanings in different domains. ... Look up mistake in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Erving Goffman Erving Goffman (June 11, 1922 – November 19, 1982), was a sociologist and writer. ... To blush is to display a marked redness of ones face; the term is seldom applied except when the redness is construed as a result of embarrassment, shame, or modesty. ... Escalation is the phenomenon of something getting worse step by step, for example a quarrel, or, notably, military presence and nuclear armament during the Cold War. ... Escalation of commitment is the phenomenon where people increase their investment in a decision despite new evidence suggesting that the decision was probably wrong. ... The Center for Applications of Psychological Type is a non-profit organization co-founded by Isabel Myers in 1975 for MBTI development, research and training. ... Essential hypertension is a subtype of arterial hypertension in which no one specific etiology can be isolated as the cause of increased blood pressure. ... Estimation is approximate or uncertain calculation of a result, often based on approximate, uncertain, incomplete, or noisy inputs. ... Estimation is the calculated approximation of a result which is usable even if input data may be incomplete, uncertain, or noisy. ... ESTJ (Extroverted Sensing Thinking Judging) is one of the sixteen personality types from personality type systems based on C.G. Jung, of which the best-known are the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), Keirsey Temperament Sorter and Socionics. ... ESTP (Extroverted Sensing Thinking Perceiving) is one of the sixteen personality types from personality type systems based on C.G. Jung, of which the best-known are the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), Keirsey Temperament Sorter and Socionics. ... Estriol. ... For other uses, see ETA (disambiguation). ... Ethical persuasion is a human beings internal ability to treat others with respect, understanding, caring, and fairness in order to truly understand themselves. ... Evolutionary psychology studies how our behavior evolved. ... Ethnocentrism is the tendency to look at the world primarily from the perspective of ones own culture. ... Ethnology (from the Greek ethnos, meaning people) is the branch of anthropology that compares and analyses the origins, distribution, technology, religion, language, and social structure of the racial or national divisions of humanity. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the medical term. ... Eugene Bleuler (b. ... Eugenics is the self-direction of human evolution: Logo from the Second International Congress of Eugenics, 1921, depicting it as a tree which unites a variety of different fields. ... Euphoria (Greek ) is a medically recognized emotional state related to happiness. ... Euthymia is a word used for indicating a normal non-depressed, reasonably positive mood. ... Evaluation is the systematic determination of merit, worth, and significance of something or someone. ... The Evaporating Cloud is one of the five Thinking processes in the theory of constraints initially developed by Eliyahu M. Goldratt to enable the focused improvement of any system (especially business system). ... An event-related potential (ERP) is any stereotyped electrophysiological response to an internal or external stimulus. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Evolutionary developmental psychology, (or EDP), is the application of the basic principles of Darwinian evolution, particularly natural selection, to explain contemporary human development. ... Evolutionary educational psychology is the study of the relation between inherent folk knowledge and abilities and accompanying inferential and attributional biases as these influence academic learning in evolutionarily novel cultural contexts, such as schools and the industrial workplace. ... The evolutionary principle is a largely psychological doctrine formulated by anthropologist Claude Levi-Strauss that roughly states that when a certain species is removed from the habitat which it evolved in, or that that habitat changes significantly within a brief period, that said species will develop abberant and maladaptive behavior. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... During the 1950s and 1960s, William H. Masters and Virginia E. Johnson conducted many important studies within the field of human sexuality. ... The practice of being exclusive; mentality characterized by the disregard for opinions and ideas other than ones own. ... The executive system is a theorised cognitive system in psychology that controls and manages other cognitive processes. ... In neuropsychology and cognitive psychology, the mental capacity to control and planfully apply ones own mental skills. ... The executive system is a theorised cognitive system in psychology that controls and manages other cognitive processes. ... Exertion is a concept describing the use of physical or perceived energy. ... An exhibitionist exposing himself at a soccer game. ... Existential psychotherapy is partly based on the existential belief that human beings are alone in the world. ... Exogenous (or exogeneous) (from the Greek words exo and gen, meaning outside and production) refers to an action or object coming from outside a system. ... Saint Francis exorcised demons in Arezzo, fresco of Giotto Exorcism (from Late Latin exorcismus, from Greek exorkizein - to adjure, correctly pronounced exercism) is the practice of evicting demons or other evil spiritual entities from a person or place which they are believed to have possessed (taken control of). ... In the scientific method, an experiment (Latin: ex- periri, of (or from) trying) is a set of observations performed in the context of solving a particular problem or question, to support or falsify a hypothesis or research concerning phenomena. ... In the scientific method, an experiment (Latin: ex-+-periri, of (or from) trying), is a set of actions and observations, performed in the context of solving a particular problem or question, to support or falsify a hypothesis or research concerning phenomena. ... Learned helplessness is a psychological condition in which a human being or an animal has learned to believe that a situation is helpless. ... Experimental psychology is an approach to psychology that treats it as one of the natural sciences, and therefore assumes that it is susceptible to the experimental method. ... The Experimental Psychology Society (EPS) is an academic society which facilitates research into experimental psychology and communication between experimental psychologists. ... An explanation is a statement which points to causes, context, and consequences of some object, process, state of affairs, etc. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Declarative_memory. ... Exposure and Response prevention is the current treatment method available from behavioral psychologists in the treatment of a variety of anxiety disorders. ... Expressed emotion (EE), a qualitative measure of the amount of emotion displayed, typically in the family setting, usually by a family or group. ... Expressive aphasia, known as Brocas aphasia in clinical neuropsychology and agrammatic aphasia in cognitive neuropsychology, is an aphasia caused by damage to Brocas area in the brain. ... Expressive language disorder (DSM 315. ... The locus of control is a concept in psychology, originally developed by Julian Rotter. ... External validity is a term used in scientific research. ... The Dodo, shown here in a 1651 illustration by Jan Savery, is an often-cited[1] example of modern extinction. ... Nontraumatic epidural hematoma in a young woman. ... In human anatomy, the extrapyramidal system is a neural network located in the brain that is part of the motor system involved in the coordination of movement. ... In human anatomy, the extrapyramidal system is a neural network located in the brain that is part of the motor system involved in the coordination of movement. ... The text below is generated by a template, which has been proposed for deletion. ... The terms Introvert and Extrovert (originally spelled Extravert by Carl Jung, who invented the terms) are referred to as attitudes and show how a person orients and receives their energy. ... It has been suggested that Eye tracker be merged into this article or section. ... The Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, or E.P.Q., measures the three traits described in the personality theory of Hans Eysenck. ...


F

F-scale - F65 - Face perception - Face validity - Facial expression - Facilitating environment - Factitious disorders - Factor analysis - Factorial ANOVA - Faculty psychology - Failure to thrive - Faith healing - Fallacies of definition - Fallacy - False awakening - Falsifiability - Familiar - Family history study - Family interaction method - Family method - Family systems approach - Family systems therapy - Family therapy - Fantasy - Fantasy - Fast mapping - FDA - Fear-drive - Fear-response - Fear - Aviophobia (Aviophobia)  - Aviophobia - Fear of performance - Feature integration theory - Fechner color - Feeblemindedness - Feedback - Feedback loop - Feeding disorder of infancy or early childhood - Fellatio - Female orgasmic disorder - Female sexual arousal disorder - Female sexual desire disorder - Femaleness - Feminine - Feral children - Feral man - Fetal alcohol syndrome - Fetish - Fetishism - Fetishism, transvestic - Field restriction - Field trial - Fight-or-flight response - Figure-ground - Firebugs - Fired - First-rank symptoms - Fis phenomenon - Fixation - Fixed-ratio schedule - Fixed interval schedule - Fixed ratio schedule - Flagellation - Flashback - Flashback - Flashbulb memory - Flat affect - Flexibilitas, cerea - Flight of ideas - FLO - Flooding - Flow - Flowerpot technique - Fluid intelligence - Focal psychotherapy - Folie à deux - Folk psychology - Follow-up examination - Follow-up study - Food and Drug Administration - Fooled by Randomness - Foolishness - Foot-in-the-door technique - Forced-choice item - Forcible rape - Forensic psychiatry - Forensic psychology - Forgiveness - Formal operational stage - Formal thought disorder - Formally organized group - Formication - Formicophilia - Foucault Tribunal on the State of Psychiatry - Foundations of Cyclopean Perception - Four discourses - Four stages of competence - Fovea - Fragile X syndrome - Fragmentation - FRAME:S - Frame of reference - Framing - Framing - Francine Shapiro - Francis Galton - Franz Alexander - Free-floating anxiety - Free-running sleep - Free association - Free association - Freebase - Freiherr von Richard Krafft-Ebing - Frequency distribution - Frequency effect - Frequency theory - Friedhart Klix - Friedrich Mauz - Frigidity - Fritz Heider - Fritz Perls - Frontal lobe - Frontloading - Frotteurism - Frozen watchfulness - Frugality - Frustration-Aggression hypothesis - Frustration - Fugue - Fulfillment - Functional - Functional autonomy - Functional disorder - Functional encopresis - Functional enuresis - Enuresis, functional - Functional psychosis - Functional social support - Functionalism - Fundamental attribution error - Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation - Fursonas - The F-scale, or Fascism scale, is a psychological measure of authoritarian tendencies. ... F65, pronounced eff-sixty-five or eff-six-five, is an occasionally used term to describe a person, who suffers from a paraphilia or disorder of sexual preference. ... Face perception is the process by which the brain and mind understand and interpret the face, particularly the human face. ... In psychometrics, content validity (also known as face validity or logical validity) refers to the extent to which a measure represents all facets of a given social concept. ... Photographs from the 1862 book Mécanisme de la Physionomie Humaine by Guillaume Duchenne. ... A factitious disorder or FD is a mental disorder where the ill individuals symptoms are either self-induced or falsified by the patient. ... Factor analysis is a statistical data reduction technique used to explain variability among observed random variables in terms of fewer unobserved random variables called factors. ... In statistics, analysis of variance (ANOVA) is a collection of statistical models, and their associated procedures, in which the observed variance is partitioned into components due to different explanatory variables. ... Faculty psychology is a view of the mind as having seperare modules or faculties assigned to various mental tasks. ... Failure to thrive is a medical term which denotes poor weight gain and physical growth failure over an extended period of time in infancy. ... Faith healing, also called divine healing or spiritual healing, is the use of spiritual means in treating disease, It is purportedly a supernatural manifestation that brings healing and deliverance from all kinds of diseases whether organic, functional, or psychological. ... Fallacies of definition refer to the various ways in which definitions can fail to have merit. ... Look up fallacy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A false awakening is an event in which someone dreams they have awakened from sleep. ... Falsifiability (or refutability or testability) is the logical possibility that an assertion can be shown false by an observation or a physical experiment. ... In witchcraft, a familiar spirit, commonly called familiar (from Middle English familiar, related to family) is a spirit who obeys a witch, conjurer, etc. ... Family therapy (or family systems therapy) is a branch of psychotherapy that treats family problems. ... Family therapy, also referred to as couple and family therapy and family systems therapy, and earlier generally referred to as marriage therapy, is a branch of psychotherapy that works with families and couples in intimate relationships to nurture change and development. ... See fantasy for an account of the literary genre involving the development of common or popular fantasies. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... In cognitive psychology, fast mapping is a mental process whereby a new concept can be learned (or a new hypothesis formed) based only on a single exposure to a given unit of information. ... The United States Food and Drug Administration is the government agency responsible for regulating food, dietary supplements, drugs, cosmetics, medical devices, biologics and blood products in the United States. ... Fear is an emotional response to impending danger, that is tied to anxiety. ... For other uses, see Fear of flying (disambiguation). ... Fear of flying is an irrational fear of air travel. ... Performance anxiety may refer to one of the following Stage fright, a fear of performing in public - however theres some difference between the two. ... The feature integration theory, developed by Treisman and Gelade since the early 1980s has been one of the most influential models of human visual attention until recent years. ... Fechner color is an illusion of color seen when looking at certain rapidly changing or moving black-and-white patterns. ... “Half-wit” redirects here. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Feedback loop. ... In cybernetics and control theory, feedback is a process whereby some proportion or in general, function, of the output signal of a system is passed (fed back) to the input. ... Fellatio is oral sex performed upon the male human penis. ... Female sexual arousal disorder is the condition of decreased, insufficient, or absent lubrication in females during sex, even despite normal sexual arousal. ... Look up Sex in Wiktionary, the free dictionary This article is about biological sexes — male, female, etc. ... Look up feminine in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A feral child is a child who has lived isolated from human contact starting from a very young age. ... Fetal alcohol syndrome or FAS is a disorder of permanent birth defects that occurs in the offspring of women who drink alcohol during pregnancy. ... Sexual fetishism is the attribution of attractive sexual qualities to non-living objects as an overwhelming alternative to the sexuality of a man or a woman, or as an enhancing element to a relationship. ... A fetish (from French fétiche; from Portuguese feitiço; from Latin facticius, artificial and facere, to make) is an object believed to have supernatural powers, or in particular a man-made object that has power over others. ... A Spaniel Field Trial A field trial is a highly competitive event at which hunting dogs usually compete against one another. ... The fight-or-flight response, also called the acute stress response, was first described by Walter Cannon in 1929. ... In visual perception, figure-ground refers to humans ability to separate elements based upon contrast. ... A Firebug is a type of arsonist who receives sexual gratification or excitement from burning down buildings. ... An individual can face termination of employment, or job loss, for one of many reasons. ... The fis phenomenon is a phenomenon of child language acquisition that demonstrates that perception of phonemes occurs earlier than the ability of the child to produce those phonemes. ... Look up Fixation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Whipping on a post Flagellation is the act of whipping (Latin flagellum, whip) the human body. ... A flashback is a psychological phenomenon in which an individual has a sudden, usually vivid, recollection of a past experience. ... In literature, film, television and other media, a flashback (also called analepsis) is an interjected scene that takes the narrative back in time from the current point the story has reached. ... A flashbulb memory is a memory laid down in great detail during a highly personally significant event. ... Blunted affect is the scientific term describing a lack of emotional reactivity on the part of an individual. ... FLO is a methodology of marital reconstruction and enhancement that was created by Elizabeth Mack in 2002. ... Flooding is a psychotherapeutic technique used to help patients heal their traumatic memories. ... Flow is the mental state of operation in which the person is fully immersed in what he or she is doing, characterized by a feeling of energized focus, full involvement, and success in the process of the activity. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... In psychometrics, fluid and crystallized intelligence (abbreviated gf and gc respectively) are factors of intelligence test scores originally described by Raymond Cattell. ... Folie à deux (literally, a madness shared by two) is a rare psychiatric syndrome in which a symptom of psychosis (particularly a paranoid or delusional belief) is transmitted from one individual to another. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... hi “FDA” redirects here. ... Fooled by Randomness: The Hidden Role of Chance in Life and in the Markets is a book written by Nassim Nicholas Taleb, a philosopher of randomness about the fallibility of human knowledge. ... Look up Foolishness in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Foot-in-the-door technique is a persuasion method. ... This article is about a form of sexual assault. ... Forensic psychiatry is a subspeciality of psychiatry. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Forgiveness it is the mental, emotional and/or spiritual process of ceasing to feel resentment or anger against another person for a perceived offence, difference or mistake, or ceasing to demand punishment or restitution[[:Template:American Psychological Association. ... The Formal Operational stage is the fourth and final of the stages of cognitive development of Piagets theory. ... In psychiatry, thought disorder or formal thought disorder is a term used to describe a symptom of psychotic mental illness. ... Formication is a tactile hallucination that insects or snakes are crawling over or under the skin. ... The specific practice of gaining sexual pleasure from ants and ant bites. ... The 1998 Focuault Tribunal on the State of Psychiatry, which took place in Berlin in the Volksbuehne Theatre is well documented on the Internet. ... Foundations of Cyclopean Perception (ISBN 0-226-41527-9) is a book by Bela Julesz, published in 1971. ... The French psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan argued that there were four fundamental types of discourse. ... In psychology, the four stages of competence relate to the psychological states involved in the process of progressing from incompetence to competence in a skill. ... The fovea, a part of the eye, is a spot located in the center of the macula. ... Fragile X syndrome is a syndrome of X-linked mental retardation. ... Fragmentation is a term that occurs in several fields and describes a process of something breaking or being divided into pieces (fragments). ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... In media studies, sociology and psychology, framing is a process of selective control over the individuals perception of the meanings attributed to words or phrases. ... The term framing can have several possible meanings: framing (telecommunication), where it relates to synchronization framing (economics), where it relates to rational choice theory framing (World Wide Web), where it relates to the use of multiple panes within a web page framing (communication theory), where it relates to the contextual... Francine Shapiro is an American psychologist who developed EMDR therapy. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Franz Alexander, (1891–1964) was a graduate of the Berlin Psychoanalytic born in Budapest. ... Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is an anxiety disorder that is characterized by excessive, uncontrollable and often irrational worry about everyday things, which is disproportionate to the actual source of worry. ... Free-running sleep is sleep that is not artificially regulated. ... Free association (Psychodynamic theory) is a technique used in psychology, devised by Sigmund Freud. ... A Free Association is an association which meets certain mostly negative criteria. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In statistics, a frequency distribution is a list of the values that a variable takes in a sample. ... Friedrich Mauz (1900 - 1979) German psychiatrist who was involved with the Nazi T-4 Euthanasia Program. ... Inhibited sexual desire (ISD), sometimes called frigidity, sexual aversion, Sexual apathy or Hypoactive sexual desire, refers to a low level of sexual desire and interest manifested by a failure to initiate or be responsive to a partners initiation of sexual activity. ... Fritz Heider (1896-1988) was a German social psychologist, responsible for developing the so-called P-O-X theory and the attribution theory in 1958. ... Friedrich (Frederick) Salomon Perls (July 8 1893, Berlin - March 14, 1970, Chicago), better known as Fritz Perls, was a noted German-born psychiatrist and psychotherapist of Jewish descent. ... The frontal lobe is an area in the brain of vertebrates. ... It has been suggested that Chikan (body contact) be merged into this article or section. ... Frugality (also known as thrift or thriftiness), often confused with cheapness or miserliness, is a traditional value, life style, or belief system, in which individuals practice both restraint in the acquiring of and resourceful use of economic goods and services in order to achieve lasting and more fulfilling goals. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In music, a fugue (IPA: ) is a type of contrapuntal composition or technique of composition for a fixed number of parts, normally referred to as voices, irrespective of whether the work is vocal or instrumental. ... Look up Fulfillment in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Generally, functional refers to something with and able to fulfill its purpose or function. ... In the social sciences, specifically sociology and sociocultural anthropology, functionalism (also called functional analysis) is a sociological paradigm that originally attempted to explain social institutions as collective means to fill individual biological needs. ... In attribution theory, the fundamental attribution error (also known as correspondence bias or overattribution effect and frequently confused with the actor-observer bias) is the tendency for people to over-emphasize dispositional, or personality-based, explanations for behaviors observed in others while under-emphasizing the role and power of situational... Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation (FIRO) is a theory of interpersonal relations, introduced by William Schutz in 1958. ... A Fursona is much like a Persona, except the characters are of the Anthropomorphic type (or Furry). ...


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g - G. Stanley Hall - GABA - Gabriel Tarde - GAD - Galvanic skin response - Galvanometer - Gambling, pathological - Game theory - Gamma-Amino butyric acid - Ganser's syndrome - Ganser syndrome - Ganzer syndrome - Garden variety mental deficiency - Gary Wells - Gatekeeper - Gateway drugs - Gay - Gay liberation - Gaze heuristic - Gender identity - Gender identity disorder - Gender narcissism - Gender role - Gender typing - Gene - General adaptation syndrome - General medical condition - General paralysis - Generalization - Generalized anxiety disorder - Genes - Genetic counseling - Genetic endowment - Genetic marker - Genetic viewpoint - Genetics - Genie - Genital phase - Genital stage - Genius - Genophobia - Genotropism - Genotype - Genuineness - Geon - Geophagy - George A. Miller - George Herbert Mead - George Kelly - George Romanes - George Savage - Geriatric psychiatry - Geriatrics - Germ theory - Germaphobia - Gerontology - Geschwind-Galaburda Hypothesis - Gestalt - Gestalt effect - Gestalt psychology - Gestalt Theoretical Psychotherapy - Gestalt therapy - Gestation period - Gilles de la Tourette syndrome - Gina Cerminara - Glans - Glial cells - Global aphasia - Global assumptions - Globus hystericus - Glossolalia - Glossophobia - Glove anesthesia - Gnosology - God helmet - Gonads - Gordon Allport - Gordon Claridge - Grand mal epilepsy - Grandiose delusion - Grandiose self - Grandiosity - Graphic organizers - Gratification - Gratitude - Grave disability - Graves' disease - Gray matter - Graz School - Greed and fear - Gregariousness - Grief - Grimace - Grounding - Group-serving bias - Group attribution error - Group Dynamics - Group dynamics - Group formation - Group home - Group polarization - Group practice - Group psychological abuse - Group psychotherapy - Group structure - Group synergy - Group test - Group therapy - Group think - Grouped frequency distribution - Group (sociology)Groups - Groupthink - Guided mastery techniques - Guilt - Guilty but mentally ill - Gustation - Gustav Kafka - Gustav Le Bon - Gymnophobia - Gyrus - This article is about the general intelligence factor. ... Granville Stanley Hall, circa 1910. ... Gaba may refer to: Gabâ or gabaa (Philippines), the concept of negative karma of the Cebuano people GABA, the gamma-amino-butyric acid neurotransmitter GABA receptor, in biology, receptors with GABA as their endogenous ligand Gaba 1 to 1, an English conversational school in Japan Marianne Gaba, a US model... Gabriel Tarde (March 12, 1843 in Dordogne, France – May 13, 1904 in Paris) French sociologist and social psychologist who conceived sociology as based on small psychological interactions among individuals (much as if it were chemistry), the fundamental forces being imitation and innovation. ... Gad can refer to: Gad (see Gad Guard), a metallic cube artifact that figures prominantly in the anime Gad Guard Gad (Bible character), the sixth son of Jacob as related in Genesis 29 - 30 Tribe of Gad, one of the Hebrew tribes founded by Gad GAD as a three-letter... Galvanic skin response (or GSR), also known as electrodermal response (EDR) or psychogalvanic reflex (PGR), is a method of measuring the electrical resistance of the skin and interpreting it as an image of activity in certain parts of the body. ... It has been suggested that Tangent galvanometer be merged into this article or section. ... Game theory is often described as a branch of applied mathematics and economics that studies situations where multiple players make decisions in an attempt to maximize their returns. ... Ganser syndrome is a rare dissociative disorder previously classified as a factitious disorder. ... Ganser syndrome is a psychiatric disorder characterised by approximate answers to questions. ... Ganser syndrome is a rare dissociative disorder previously classified as a factitious disorder. ... Literally, a Gatekeeper is a person who guards or monitors passage through a gate. ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... Gay Liberation (or Gay Lib) is the name used to describe the radical lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered movement of the late 1960s and early to mid 1970s in North America, Western Europe, and Australia and New Zealand. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Gender identity disorder, as identified by psychologists and physicians, is a condition in which a person has been assigned one gender, usually on the basis of their sex at birth (compare intersex disorders), but identifies as belonging to another gender, and feels significant discomfort or being unable to deal with... Gender narcissism is a relatively new concept, so far only being mentioned as seminal work by Dr. Gerald Schoenwolf, with reference to both males and females, and Michael Mesner, with reference to men. ... A bagpiper in Scottish military clan-uniform. ... For a non-technical introduction to the topic, see Introduction to Genetics. ... Stress (roughly the opposite of relaxation) is a medical term for a wide range of strong external stimuli, both physiological and psychological, which can cause a physiological response called the general adaptation syndrome, first described in 1936 by Hans Selye in the journal Nature. ... Paralysis is the complete loss of muscle function for one or more muscle groups. ... For the term in the context of mathematical logic, see Generalization (logic). ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... This stylistic schematic diagram shows a gene in relation to the double helix structure of DNA and to a chromosome (right). ... Genetic counseling is the process by which patients or relatives, at risk of an inherited disorder, are advised of the consequences and nature of the disorder, the probability of developing or transmitting it, and the options open to them in management and family planning in order to prevent, avoid or... A genetic marker is a known DNA sequences (e. ... This article is about the general scientific term. ... Genie Susan M. Wiley. ... The genital stage is a stage of child development in one of the theories postulated by Sigmund Freud and elaborated by his followers. ... A genius is a person of great intelligence. ... Genophobia (also known as coitophobia) is the fear of sexual intercourse. ... Genotropism is a theory of Léopold Szondis that instinct is biological and genetic in origin. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Geons are simple 3-dimensional forms such as spheres, cubes, cylinders, cones or wedges. ... Geophagy is a practice of eating earthy substances such as clay, chalk, and laundry starch, often to augment a mineral-deficient diet. ... George A. Miller (born February 3 1920) is a famous professor of psychology at Princeton University, whose most famous work was The Magical Number Seven, Plus or Minus Two: Some Limits on our Capacity for Processing Information, which was published in 1956 in In the linguistics community, Miller is well... George Herbert Mead (February 27, 1863 – April 26, 1931) was an American philosopher, sociologist and psychologist, primarily affiliated with the University of Chicago, where he was one of several distinguished pragmatists. ... George Kelly (April 28, 1905-March 6, 1966) was an American psychologist, therapist and educator. ... A 19th century naturalist, George John Romanes (May 19, 1848 - May 23, 1894), coined the term, and laid the foundation of, comparative psychology, and postulated a similarity of cognitive processes and mechanisms between humans and animals. ... Sir George H Savage (1842-1921) Physician-Superintendent of the Bethlem Royal Hospital, President of the Medico-Psychological Association of Great Britain, joint editor of Journal of Mental Science, author of Insanity and Allied Neuroses(1884), knighted in 1912. ... Geriatrics is the branch of medicine that focuses on health promotion and the prevention and treatment of disease and disability in later life. ... The germ theory of disease states that many diseases are caused by microorganisms, and that microorganisms grow by reproduction, rather than being spontaneously generated. ... Germaphobia is a term used to describe a pathological fear of germs. ... Gerontology is the study of aging. ... The Geschwind-Galaburda hypothesis was proposed by Norman Geschwind and Albert Galaburda to explain sex differences in cognitive abilities by relating them to lateralization of cerebral functions. ... Look up gestalt in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Gestalt effects in psychology of cognition refer to the form-forming capability of our senses. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Gestalt Theoretical Psychotherapy is a method of psychotherapy based strictly on Gestalt psychology. ... Gestalt Therapy is a psychotherapy which focuses on here-and-now experience and personal responsibility. ... The Gestation period in a viviparous animal refers to the length of its pregnancy. ... Tourettes links here. ... Gina Cerminara is one of the renowned authors in the field of Spirituality and Reincarnation. ... glans Well known Street Art artist from Copenhagen, Denmark. ... Neuroglia of the brain shown by Golgis method. ... Categories: Wikipedia cleanup | Stub | Aphasia ... Globus pharyngis (also known as globus sensation, globus or, somewhat outdatedly, globus hystericus; commonly referred to as having a lump in ones throat) is the persistent sensation of having phlegm or some other sort of obstruction in the throat when there is none. ... Tongues redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Gnosology may be considered in the context of cognitive psychology to be a study of gnosis; or an attempt to objectively access the experience of anothers firsthand knowledge. ... The term God Helmet refers to a controversial experimental apparatus in neurotheology. ... A sex organ, or primary sexual characteristic, narrowly defined, is any of those parts of the body (which are not always bodily organs according to the strict definition) which are involved in sexual reproduction and constitute the reproductive system in an complex organism; namely: Male: penis (notably the glans penis... Gordon Willard Allport (November 11, 1897 - October 9, 1967) was an American psychologist. ... Psychologist currently Emeritus Professor at Oxford University. ... Look up megalomania in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Graphic organizers are visual representations of knowledge, concepts or ideas. ... Gratification is the positive emotional response (happiness) to a fulfillment of desire. ... “Thanks” redirects here. ... Graves-Basedow disease is a form of thyroiditis, an autoimmune disorder that stimulates the thyroid gland, being the most common cause of hyperthyroidism (overactivity of the thyroid). ... Grey matter (or gray matter) is a major component of the central nervous system, consisting of nerve cell bodies, glial cells (astroglia and oligodendrocytes), capillaries, and short nerve cell extensions/processes (axons and dendrites). ... The Graz School of experimental psychology and object-theory was headed by Alexius Meinong, who was professor and Chair of Philosophy at the University of Graz where he founded the Graz psychological institute (in 1894). ... Greed and fear are supposed, together with imitation, to be the three main motivators of stock markets and business behavior, and one of the cause of bull markets, bear markets and business cycles. ... It has been suggested that Anticipatory Grief be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about the character named Grimace. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Group-serving bias is identical to self-serving bias except that it takes place between groups rather than individuals, under which group members make dispositional attributions for their groups successes and situational attributions for group failures, and vice versa for outsider groups. ... The group attribution error is a group-serving, attributional bias identical to the fundamental attribution error except that it occurs between members of different groups rather than different individuals. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. ... The term group dynamics implies that individual behaviours may differ depending on individuals current or prospective connections to a sociological group. ... A Group home is a structure designed or converted to serve as a non-secure home for persons who share a common characteristic. ... Group polarization effects have been demonstrated to exaggerate the inclinations of group members after a discussion. ... Group psychological abuse refers to groups where methods of psychological abuse are frequently or systematically used on their members. ... Group therapy is a form of psychotherapy during which one or several therapists treat a small group of clients together as a group. ... Symbiotic intelligence is the capacity of a group to behave more intelligently than its individual members. ... Group therapy is a form of psychotherapy during which one or several therapists treat a small group of clients together as a group. ... Groupthink is a term coined by psychologist Irving Janis in 1972 to describe one process by which a group can make bad or irrational decisions. ... Groupthink is a type of thought exhibited by group members who try to minimize conflict and reach consensus without critically testing, analyzing, and evaluating ideas. ... “Guilty” redirects here. ... Criminally insane refers to a legal standard in most countries, where the motive for murder or greivous bodily harm is insanity. ... Taste is one of the most common and fundamental of the senses in life on Earth. ... Gustav Kafka (July 23, 1883, Vienna - February 12, 1953, Veitshöchheim bei Würzburg) was an Austrian philosopher, psychologist. ... Gustave Le Bon (May 7, 1841 - December 13, 1931) was a French social psychologist. ... Gymnophobia is an irrational, abnormal and persistent fear or anxiety about being seen naked, and/or about seeing others naked, even when it is socially acceptable. ... Grays FIG. 726– Lateral surface of left cerebral hemisphere, viewed from the side. ...


H

Habit (psychology) - Habit disorder - Habituation - Hadley Cantril - Hair pulling - Hakomi - Hal Stone - Halfway house - Hallucination - Hallucinogen - Hallucinogen use disorders - Hallucinosis - Halo effect - Hamilton Depression Rating Scale - Hans-Jürgen Walter - Hans Eysenck - Hans Selye - Harold Alexander Abramson - Harold Kelley - Harpaxophilia - Harry F. Harlow - Harry Stack Sullivan - Hashish - Havelock Ellis - Hawthorne effect - Headshrinker - Healing temple - Health and Human Services - Health care proxy - Health maintenance organization - Health psychology - Hebephrenic schizophrenia - Hedonism - Heffter Research Institute - Heinz Heckhausen - Heinz Kohut - Heinz Werner - Heliophobia - Helmuth Ehrhardt - Helplessness - Hemophilia - Hemophobia - Henry Tajfel - Herb Goldberg - Herbert Simon - Heredity - Hermann Ebbinghaus - Hermann Rorschach - Hermaphrodite - Hero Complex - Heroin - Heroin antagonists - Heroin substitutes - Herpetophobia - Heterogenicity - Heterosexual - Heterosexuality - Heterozygous - Heuristics - Heuristic#Psychology - HEW - Hexakosioihexekontahexaphobia - Hidden observer - Hierarchy of needs - High-risk behavior - High-risk method - High IQ society - Highway hypnosis - Hindbrain - Hippocampus - Historical thinking - History - History of psychology - Histrionic - Histrionic personality - HIV dementia - HIV meningitis - Holding environment - Holism - Holistic approach - Holland Codes - Homeodynamic principle - Homeostasis - Homophobia - Homosexual panic - Homosexuality - Homosexuality, ego-dystonic - Homovanillic acid - Homozygous - Hormone - Host - Hostile media effect - Hostility - Hotline - How the Mind Works - Howard Becker - Howard Gardner - Hue - Hugo Munsterberg - Human behavior - Human brain - Human computer interaction - Human engineer - Human givens - Human nature - Human self-reflection - Self-reflection - Humanism - Humanistic psychology - Humanistic theory - Humanistic therapy - Humiliation - Hunger pangs - Huntington's chorea - Huntington's disease - Huperzine A - Hussein Olad - Hwa-Byung - Hyalophagia - Hyde event - Hydrophobia - Hydrotherapy - Hyperactivity - Hyperactivity disorder - Hyperacusis - Hypergraphia - Hypergyny - Hyperkinesis - Hyperkinetic disorder - Hypermasculinity - Hyperprosexia - Hyperreflexia - Hypersomnia - Hypertension - Hypertensive crisis - Hyperthymesia - Hyperventilation - Hypesthesia - Hypnagogic - Hypnopompic - Hypnosis - Hypnotherapy - Hypnotic - Hypnotic use disorder - Hypnotist - Hypoactive sexual desire disorder - Hypochondriacal reaction - Hypochondriasis - Hypoglycemia - Hypomania - Hypomanic episode - Hypophysis - Hypothalamus - Hypothesis - Hypoventilation, central aveolar - Hysterical neurosis - Hysterical personality - Hysterics - This page is under construction. ... In psychology, habituation is an example of non-associative learning in which there is a progressive diminution of behavioral response probability with repetition of a stimulus. ... Trichotillomania in a young woman Trichotillomania (TTM) is an impulse control disorder characterised by the repeated urge to pull out scalp hair, eyelashes, eyebrows or other body hair. ... Hakomi therapy is a form of depth psychology developed by Ron Kurtz. ... Drs. ... A halfway house is a term for a drug rehabilitation center or sex offender center where drug users or sex offenders respectively are allowed to move more freely than in a correctional center but are still monitored by staff and/or law enforcement. ... A hallucination is a sensory perception experienced in the absence of an external stimulus, as distinct from an illusion, which is a misperception of an external stimulus. ... Hallucinogenic drug - drugs that can alter sensory perceptions. ... A hallucination is a sensory perception experienced in the absence of an external stimulus, as distinct from an illusion, which is a misperception of an external stimulus. ... The halo effect refers to a cognitive bias whereby the perception of a particular trait is influenced by the perception of the former traits in a sequence of interpretations. ... The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale is a 21-question multiple choice questionnaire which doctors may use to rate the severity of a patients depression. ... Hans-Jürgen P. Walter (* March 25, 1944 in Weidenhausen, Germany) is a German psychologist and psychotherapist known as the main founder of Gestalt Theoretical Psychotherapy. ... Hans Eysenck Hans Jürgen Eysenck (March 4, 1916 - September 4, 1997) was an eminent psychologist, most remembered for his work on intelligence and personality, though he worked in a wide range of areas. ... Hans Hugo Bruno Selye, CC (Selye János, 1907 - 1982), was a Canadian endocrinologist of Austrian-Hungarian origin. ... Harold Alexander Abramson (1899–1980) was a significant U.S. psychiatrist. ... Harold Kelley (1921-2003) was an American social psychologist. ... Harry Frederick Harlow (October 31, 1905–December 6, 1981) was an American psychologist best known for his maternal-deprivation and social isolation experiments on rhesus monkeys, which demonstrated the importance of care-giving and companionship in the early stages of primate development. ... Herbert Harry Stack Sullivan (February 21, 1892, Norwich, New York - January 14, 1949, Paris, France) was an American psychiatrist whose work in psychoanalysis was based on direct and verifiable observation (versus the more abstract conceptions of the unconscious mind favored by Sigmund Freud and his disciples). ... Confiscated hashish. ... Henry Havelock Ellis (February 2, 1859 - July 8, 1939), known as Havelock Ellis, was a British doctor, sexual psychologist and social reformer. ... The Hawthorne effect refers to a phenomenon of observing workers behavior or their performance and changing it temporarily. ... Head shrinker can mean: A song by Oasis A maker of shrunken heads A slang word for a psychiatrist or psychotherapist. ... A healing temple is a religious temple devoted towards Faith healing. ... The United States Department of Health and Human Services, often abbreviated HHS, is a Cabinet department of the United States government with the goal of protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services. ... A health care proxy is a legal document used in the United States that allows an agent to make health care decisions in the event that the primary individual is incapable of executing such decisions. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Health psychology is a relatively new field which is evolving and developing as one of main areas of applied psychology. ... Disorganized schizophrenia is a subtype of schizophrenia as defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. ... This article does not cite any sources. ... The Heffter Research Institute was founded in 1993 to support and promote investigation into the medical uses of psychedelic hallucinogens. ... Best known for his development of Self Psychology, a school of thought within psychodynamic/psychoanalytic theory, psychiatrist Heinz Kohuts contributions transformed the modern practice of analytic and dynamic treatment approaches. ... The English suffix -phobia is used to describe fear or hatred (the latter is often ignored) of a particular thing or subject. ... Helmuth Ehrhardt German psychiatrist. ... Haemophilia or hemophilia is the name of any of several hereditary genetic illnesses that impair the bodys ability to control bleeding. ... The English suffix -phobia is used to describe fear or hatred (the latter is often ignored) of a particular thing or subject. ... Dr. Herb Goldberg, author of the new book What Men Still Dont Know About Women, Relationships, and Love, previously authored The Hazards of Being Male: Surviving the Myth of Masculine Privilege (1975), related to the formative mens movement. ... Herbert Alexander Simon (June 15, 1916 – February 9, 2001) was an American political scientist whose research ranged across the fields of cognitive psychology, computer science, public administration, economics, management, and philosophy of science and a professor, most notably, at Carnegie Mellon University. ... Heredity (the adjective is hereditary) is the transfer of characteristics from parent to offspring through their genes, or the transfer of a title, style or social status through the social convention known as inheritance (for example, a Hereditary Title may be passed down according to relevant customs and/or laws). ... Hermann Ebbinghaus (1850–1909) was a German psychologist who pioneered experimental study of memory, and discovered the forgetting curve and the learning curve. ... Hermann Rorschach Hermann Rorschach (8 November 1884 Zurich - 2 April 1922 Herisau) was a Swiss Freudian psychiatrist, best known for developing the projective test known as the Rorschach Inkblot Test. ... The 1st-century BC sculpture The Reclining Hermaphrodite, in the Museo Nazionale Romano, Palazzo Massimo Alle Terme in Rome A hermaphrodite is an organism that possesses both male and female sex organs during its life. ... The Hero Complex is an inherent desire to help others. ... For other uses, see Heroin (disambiguation). ... Herpetophobia is the phobia of reptiles or other crawly things. ... Heterosexuality is a sexual orientation characterized by esthetic attraction, romantic love or sexual desire exclusively for members of the opposite sex or gender, contrasted with homosexuality and distinguished from bisexuality and asexuality. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Heterozygote cells are diploid or polyploid and have different alleles at a locus (position) on homologous chromosomes. ... Look up Heuristic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Heuristic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The United States Department of Health, Education and Welfare (also known as HEW) was a cabinet level department of the United States government from 1953 until 1979. ... Hexakosioihexekontahexaphobia (literally, fear of the number six-hundred and sixty-six) is the fear that originates in the Biblical verse Revelation 13:18 which indicates that the number 666 is the Number of the Beast, linked to Satan or the Anti-Christ. ... Maslows hierarchy of needs is a theory in psychology that Abraham Maslow proposed in his 1943 paper A Theory of Human Motivation, which he subsequently extended. ... A high IQ society is an organization that limits membership to people who are within a certain high percentile of Intelligence quotient (IQ) test results, theoretically representing the most intelligent people in the world. ... Highway hypnosis is a mental state in which the person can drive an automobile great distances, responding to external events in the expected manner, with no recollection of having consciously done so. ... Hindbrain has been used to describe several structures found in the brains of vertebrates. ... The hippocampus is structurally located inside the medial temporal lobe of the brain. ... Historical thinking is defined by many education resources as a set of reasoning skills that students of history should learn as a result of studying history. ... HIStory - Past, Present and Future, Book I is a double-disc album (one half greatest hits, one half studio album) by American musician Michael Jackson released in June of 1995 by the Epic Records division of Sony BMG. The first disc, (HIStory Begins) contains fifteen hit singles from the past... The history of psychology as a scholarly study of the mind and behavior dates, in Europe, back to the Late Middle Ages. ... In psychiatry, histrionic personality disorder (HPD) is a personality disorder which involves a pattern of excessive emotional expression and attention-seeking, including an excessive need for approval and inappropriate seductiveness, that usually begins in early adulthood. ... In psychiatry, histrionic personality disorder (HPD) is a personality disorder which involves a pattern of excessive emotional expression and attention-seeking, including an excessive need for approval and inappropriate seductiveness, that usually begins in early adulthood. ... AIDS dementia complex (ADC; also known as HIV dementia, HIV encephalopathy and HIV-associated dementia) has become a common neurological disorder associated with HIV infection and AIDS. It is a metabolic encephalopathy induced by HIV infection and fueled by immune activation of brain macrophages and microglia. ... Whole redirects here. ... The approach taken in the practice of holistic medicine. ... The Holland hexagon Holland Codes are career types created by psychologist John L. Holland [1], [2], [3], [4]. Holland mapped these types into a hexagon which he then broke down into the RIASEC job environments : Realistic - practical, physical, hands-on, tool-oriented Investigative - analytical, intellectual, scientific Artistic - creative, original, independent... Nathan Ackermans term homeodynamic principle refers to his observations, in the course of family therapy, that families have a basic dynamic, and following an interruption to that dynamic (for example, an intervention by a therapist), the previous family patterns tend to re-emerge, i. ... Homeostasis is the property of either an open system or a closed system,[1] especially a living organism, to regulate its internal environment to maintain a stable, constant condition. ... A protest by The Westboro Baptist Church; a group identified by the Anti-Defamation League as virulently homophobic. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into gay panic defense. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... Homovanillic acid (HOC6H3(OCH3)CH2COOH; synonyms: 3-Methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid; HVA; 4-Hydroxy-3-methoxy-benzeneacetic acid; 4-Hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylacetic acid; ) is a major catecholamine metabolite. ... Homozygote cells are diploid or polyploid and have the same alleles at a locus (position) on homologous chromosomes. ... Norepinephrine A hormone (from Greek όρμή - to set in motion) is a chemical messenger from one cell (or group of cells) to another. ... The hostile media effect, sometimes called the hostile media phenomenon, refers to the theory that ideological partisans often think that media coverage is biased against their particular interests in an issue. ... Anger is a term for the emotional aspect of aggression, as a basic aspect of the stress response in animals whereby a perceived aggravating stimulus provokes a counterresponse which is likewise aggravating and threatening of violence. ... In telecommunication, a hotline (also called an automatic signaling service or off-hook service) is a point-to-point communications link in which a call is automatically directed to the preselected destination without any additional action by the user when the end instrument goes off-hook. ... How the Mind Works is a book by American cognitive scientist Steven Pinker, published in 1996. ... Howard Becker can refer to: Howard Paul Becker (1899-1960), U.S. sociologist Howard Saul Becker (born 1928), U.S. sociologist This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... It has been suggested that Naturalist Intelligence be merged into this article or section. ... An image with the hues cyclically shifted The hues in the image of this Painted Bunting are cyclically rotated with time. ... Hugo Münsterberg (1863 - 1916) was a U.S. (German-born, in Danzig) psychologist. ... Human behavior is the collection of activities performed by human beings and influenced by culture, attitudes, emotions, values, ethics, authority, rapport, hypnosis, persuasion, coercion and/or genetics. ... The human brain controls the central nervous system (CNS), by way of the cranial nerves and spinal cord, the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and regulates virtually all human activity. ... Human-computer interaction (HCI) is the study of interaction between people (users) and computers. ... Human givens psychotherapy or simply Human givens is a way of treating depression which emerged from research into sleep and especially the rapid eye movements of dream sleep. ... For other uses, see Human nature (disambiguation). ... The Thinker by Auguste Rodin: An artists impression of Homo sapiens Human self-reflection is the basis of philosophy and is present from the earliest historical records. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... See also the specific life stance known as Humanism For the Renaissance liberal arts movement, see Renaissance humanism Humanism is a broad category of ethical philosophies that affirm the dignity and worth of all people, based on the ability to determine right and wrong by appeal to universal human qualities... Humanistic psychology is a school of psychology that emerged in the 1950s in reaction to both behaviorism and psychoanalysis. ... Etymology: Late Latin humiliatus, past participle of humiliare, from Latin humilis low. ... This article is about the physical sensation. ... Huntingtons disease or Huntingtons chorea is an inherited disorder characterized by abnormal body movements called chorea, and loss of memory. ... Huperzine A, is a naturally occurring sesquiterpene alkaloid found in the extracts of the firmoss Huperzia serrata. ... Hwabyung (화병,火病), literally fire illness, is a mental disorder which is said to be peculiar to Koreans, typically elderly women. ... Hyalophagia, or hyalophagy, is the eating of glass. ... A Hyde event is an unknown autonomic response to mental stress conditions where little voluntary or involuntary physical activity is involved or restricted by physical or social environments. ... Bold text Hydrophobis is: Hydrophobia, a set of symptoms of the later stages of a rabies infection, in which the victim has difficulty swallowing, shows panic when presented with liquids to drink, and cannot quench his or her thirst. ... Hydrotherapy, formerly called hydropathy, is probably the oldest form of medical treatment. ... Hyperactivity can be described as a state in which a person is abnormally easily excitable and exuberant. ... DISCLAIMER Please remember that Wikipedia is offered for informational use only. ... Hyperacusis is a health condition characterized by an over-sensitivity to all or certain frequencies of sound (a collapsed tolerance to normal environmental sound). ... Hypergraphia is an overwhelming urge to write. ... In social science, hypergyny refers to the phenomenon in which women tend to marry men that are of slightly higher social status. ... Hyperkinesis is a state of overactive restlesness in children. ... Hypermasculinity is a psychological term for the exaggeration of male stereotypical behaviour, such as an emphasis on strength, aggression, body hair, odour and virility. ... Aprosexia, Hyperprosexia, and Paraprosexia are closely related medical and neuro-psychiatric phenomena associated with attention and concentration. ... Hyperreflexia is defined as overactive or overresponsive reflexes. ... Hypersomnia, also known as excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), is excessive amount of sleepiness. ... For other forms of hypertension, see Hypertension (disambiguation). ... A hypertensive emergency is severe hypertension with acute impairment of an organ system (especially the central nervous system, cardiovascular system and/or the renal system) and the possibility of irreversible organ-damage. ... Hyperthymesia or hyperthymestic syndrome is a condition where the affected individual has a superior ability to recall memories. ... In medicine, hyperventilation (or hyperpnea) is the state of breathing faster or deeper (hyper) than necessary, and thereby reducing the carbon dioxide concentration of the blood below normal. ... Hypnagogia (also spelled hypnogogia) are the experiences a person can go through in the hypnagogic (or hypnogogic) state, the period of falling asleep. ... ... Professor Charcot was well-known for showing, during his lessons at the Salpêtrière hospital, hysterical woman patients – here, his favorite patient, Blanche (Marie) Wittman, supported by Joseph BabiÅ„ski. ... : Hypnotherapy is therapy that is undertaken with a subject in hypnosis. ... Hypnotic drugs are a class of drugs that induce sleep, used in the treatment of severe insomnia. ... Hypnosis, as defined by the American Psychological Association Division of Psychological Hypnosis, is a procedure during which a health professional or researcher suggests that a client, patient, or experimental participant experience changes in sensations, perceptions, thoughts, or behavior. ... dhdhdhdhdf ... Hypochondria (sometimes hypochondriasis) is the unfounded belief that one is suffering from a serious illness. ... Hypoglycemia (hypoglycaemia in British English) is a medical term referring to a pathologic state produced by a lower than normal level of glucose (sugar) in the blood. ... Hypomania is a mood state characterized by persistent and pervasive elated or irritable mood, and thoughts and behaviors that are consistent with such a mood state. ... Located at the base of the skull, the pituitary gland is protected by a bony structure called the sella turcica. ... The hypothalamus links the nervous system to the endocrine system via the pituitary gland (hypophysis). ... Look up Hypothesis in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...


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Iatrogenic illness - IB Psychology SL - ICD-10 - ICD-9 - Id - Idea - Ideal self - Idealization - Idealized parental imago - Idealizing transference - Ideas bank - Ideas of reference - Ideation - Idebenone - Identification - Identity crisis - Identity disorder, dissociative - Identity disorder, gender - Identity problem - Ideographic approach - Ideomotor effect - Idiographic context - Idiopathic - Idiot savant - Idiothetic - Idée fixe - Ilities - Illusion - Illusion - Image schema - Image streaming - Imagery - Imagination - Imago - Imipramine - Imitation - Imitation - Immediate memory - Immunocompetence - Implementation intention - Implicit repetition - Implosion - Impotence - Impotence, ejaculatory - Impotence, erectile - Impregnation fetish - Imprinting - Imprinting - Impulse - Impulse control disorders - In absentia - In vivo - Inappropriate affect - Inappropriate affect - Incentive - Incentive salience - Incest - Incest taboo - Incidence - Incoherence - Incompetency - Incompetent to stand trial - Incorporation - Incremental reading - Independent samples - Independent variable - Index case - Indigenous worker - Indirect realism - Individual analytical psychodrama - Individual differences psychology - Individual psychology - Individual tests - Individual variables - Individuation - Indoleamines - Indoles - Induced factitious symptoms - Induced psychotic disorder - Inductive reasoning - Industrial psychiatry - Industrial psychology - Infancy, childhood, and adolescence disorders - Infant psychiatry - Infantile autism - Infantilism - Infantophilia - Infectious disease - Inference - Inferential statistics - Inferiority complex - Infibulation - Informally organized group - Information - Informed consent - Infradian rhythms - Inhalant - Inhalant use disorders - Inhalants - Inheritance of intelligence - Inhibited male orgasm - Inhibited orgasm - Inhibition - Innate - Innate ideas - Inner child - Innocence - Inositol - Inputs, internal activities, and outputs - Inquiry - Insane - Insanity - Insanity defense - Insanity Defense Reform Act - Insecurity - Insight - Insight therapy - Insomnia - Instinct - Institute for Collaborative Engagement - Institute of Transpersonal Psychology - Institutionalization - Instrumental conditioning - Insulin coma treatment - Insulin therapy - Intake - Integral psychology - Integration - Integrative complexity - Intellectualization - Intelligence - Intelligence amplification - Intelligence quotient - Intelligence test - Intentionality - Interaction effects - Interdisciplinary approach - Interference theory - Intergender - Intergroup relations - Interictal behavior syndrome - Intermittent explosive disorder - Internal capsule - Internal consistency - Internal locus of control - Internal reliability - Internal validity - Internalized oppression - International Association of Analytical Psychologists - International Center for the Study of Psychiatry and Psychology - International Center for the Study of Psychiatry and Psychology - International Classification of Diseases - International Society for Comparative Psychology - International Transpersonal Association - Internship - Interpersonal and social rhythm therapy - Interpersonal psychoanalysis - Interpersonal psychotherapy - Interpersonal skills - Interpretation - Interquartile range - Interrater reliability - Interstimulus interval - Intertwingularity - Interval estimation - Interval scale - Intervention - Interview - Intimacy - Intimate relationship - Intoxication - Intragroup relations - Intrapsychic - Intrapsychic conflict - Intravenous - Intrinsic motivation - Introjection - Intromission - Introspection - Introversion - Intuition - Involutional melancholia - Involutional psychosis - IQ - Irene Pepperberg - Irrational anger - Irresistible impulse - Irresistible impulse rule - Irvin Yalom - Irving Janis - ISFJ - ISFP - Isolation - Isotype - ISTJ - ISTP - ITP - Ivan Pavlov - See also: Psychology The International Baccalaureate Psychology Standard Level Examination (IB Psychology SL) is a Group 3 subject test administered by the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO) to test students knowledge of the various perspectives of psychology. ... The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (commonly known by the abbreviation ICD) is a detailed description of known diseases and injuries. ... The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (commonly known by the abbreviation ICD) is a detailed description of known diseases and injuries. ... Look up ID, Id, id in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... IDEA may refer to: Electronic Directory of the European Institutions IDEA League Improvement and Development Agency Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Indian Distance Education Association Integrated Data Environments Australia Intelligent Database Environment for Advanced Applications IntelliJ IDEA - a Java IDE Interactive Database for Energy-efficient Architecture International IDEA (International Institute... // Idealization is the process by which scientific models assume facts about the phenomenon being modeled that are certainly false. ... An ideas bank is a website where people post, exchange, discuss, and polish new ideas. ... Ideas of reference or delusions of reference involve a person having a belief or perception that irrelevant, unrelated or innocuous things in the world are referring to them directly or have special personal significance. ... Ideation is the process of forming and relating ideas. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Erik Erikson, the psychologist who coined the term identity crisis, believes that the identity crisis is the most important conflict human beings encounter when they go through eight developmental stages in life. ... The ideomotor effect is a psychological phenomenon wherein a subject makes motions unconsciously (i. ... Idiopathic means arising spontaneously or from an obscure or unknown cause. ... An autistic savant (formerly called idiot savant) is a person who expresses extraordinary mental abilities, often in the fields of numerical calculation (not to be confused with mathematics) (see also mental calculator), art, or music but usually set within the context of autism or mental retardation. ... Idiothetic literally means self-proposition (greek derivation), and is used in navigation models (e. ... A leitmotif (also spelled leitmotiv) is a recurring musical theme, associated within a particular piece of music with a particular person, place or idea. ... Within systems engineering, -ilities are aspects or non-functional requirements. ... An illusion is a distortion of a sensory perception, revealing how the brain normally organizes and interprets sensory stimulation. ... An illusion is a distortion of a sensory perception, revealing how the brain normally organizes and interprets sensory stimulation. ... Image schema is a recurring structure of, or within, our cognitive processes, which establishes patterns of understanding and reasoning. ... It is claimed that Image Streaming is a technique that facilitates access to the deep subconscious by accessing the constantly arising stream of visual images that we have. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Imagination is accepted as the innate ability and process to invent partial or complete personal realms within the mind from elements derived from sense perceptions of the shared world. ... The imago is the last stage of development of an insect, after the last ecdysis of an incomplete metamorphosis, or after emergence from pupation where the metamorphosis is complete. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Imitation is an advanced animal behaviour whereby an individual observes anothers behaviour and replicates it itself. ... Imitation is an advanced animal behaviour whereby an individual observes anothers behaviour and replicates it itself. ... Immunocompetence is the ability of the body to produce a normal immune response (i. ... The psychologist Peter Gollwitzer has developed the implementation hypothesis for better goal attainment. ... In learning, implicit repetition is unintentional repetition. ... Implosion can refer to: Implosion (mechanical process) Building implosion Implosion (novel) by D. F. Jones Category: ... Impotence or, more clinically, erectile dysfunction is the inability to develop or maintain an erection of the penis for satisfactory sexual intercourse regardless of the capability of ejaculation. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Imprinting is the term used in psychology and ethology to describe any kind of phase-sensitive learning (learning occurring at a particular age or a particular life stage) that is rapid and apparently independent of the consequences of behavior. ... Imprinting has different meanings in: Genetics: see imprinting (genetics) Psychology and ethology: see imprinting (psychology) In addition, the term imprint is used in publishing. ... In classical mechanics, the impulse of a constant force is the product of the force and the time during which it acts. ... For in absentia medical care, see Health care delivery. ... In vivo (Latin for (with)in the living). ... For the record label, see Incentive Records. ... Incentive salience occurs when stimuli associated with drug-taking behavior become reinforcing themselves. ... Incest is sexual activity between two persons related by close kinship. ... The incest taboo refers to the prohibition, both formal and unstated, against incest in many societies. ... In optics one considers angles of incidence. ... Look up coherence in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Incorporation is: In business, incorporation is the creation of a corporation. ... Incremental reading is a newly proposed learning technique in which the student studies a substantial load of material subdivided into articles and its extracts. ... In an experimental design, the independent variable (argument of a function, also called a predictor variable) is the variable that is manipulated or selected by the experimenter to determine its relationship to an observed phenomenon (the dependent variable). ... The index case or patient zero is the initial patient in the population sample of an epidemiological investigation. ... Indirect Realism is the view in cognitive psychology that perception functions via internal representations of external reality. ... Individual analytical psychodrama is a therapy based on role-playing and the observation of the unconscious mind. ... Individual differences psychology studies the ways in which individual people differ in their behavior. ... The term individual psychology can be used to refer to what is more commonly known as differential psychology or the psychology of individual differences. ... Individuation comprises the processes whereby the undifferentiated becomes or develops individual characteristics, or the opposite process, by which components of an individual are integrated into a more indivisible whole. ... In biochemistry, indoleamines are substituted indole compounds that contain an amino group. ... Indole is an aromatic heterocyclic organic compound. ... Aristotle appears first to establish the mental behaviour of induction as a category of reasoning. ... Industrial psychology is the psychology that deals with the workplace, focusing on both the workers and the organizations that employ them. ... Autism is a brain development disorder characterized by impairments in social interaction and communication, and restricted and repetitive behavior, all exhibited before a child is three years old. ... Paraphilic infantilism is the desire to wear diapers and be treated as a helpless infant. ... Infantophilia or nepiophilia (From Greek nepion, infant + -philia) is the primary sexual attraction of adults to very small children (defined by various studies as 0–4). ... This false-colored electron micrograph shows a malaria sporozoite migrating through the midgut epithelia. ... Inference is the act or process of deriving a conclusion based solely on what one already knows. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with statistical inference. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Infibulation, in its modern use of the word, is the practice of surgical closure of the female labia majora by sewing them together to seal off the female genitalia, leaving only a small hole for the passage of urine and menstrual blood. ... The ASCII codes for the word Wikipedia represented in binary, the numeral system most commonly used for encoding computer information. ... Informed consent is a legal condition whereby a person can be said to have given consent based upon an appreciation and understanding of the facts and implications of an action. ... // A soda bottle after being filled with blue paint for the means of solvent abuse in Townsville, Australia. ... Inhalants are a chemically diverse group of psychoactive substances composed of organic solvents and volatile substances commonly found in more than 1000 common household products, such as glues, hair spray, air fresheners, gasoline, lighter fluid, and paint. ... The subject of the inheritance of intelligence is the genetics of mental abilities. ... Anorgasmia (often related to delayed ejaculation in males) is a form of sexual dysfunction (see also sexual function), sometimes classified as a psychiatric disorder, in which the patient cannot achieve orgasm, even with adequate stimulation. ... Social Inhibition is what keeps humans from involving in potentially objectionable actions and/or expressions in a social setting. ... Look up innate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Innate ideas are ideas that one is born with, and thus suggestive of genetic possibilies. ... {{Album infobox | Name = Inner Child| Type = Album | Artist = Shanice | Cover = Shaniceinnerchild. ... Innocence is a term that describes the lack of guilt of an individual, with respect to a crime. ... Inositol, (of which the most prominent naturally-occurring form is myo-inositol, cis-1,2,3,5-trans-4,6-cyclohexanehexol), is a carbocyclic polyol that plays an important role as the structural basis for a number of secondary messengers in eukaryotic cells, including inositol phosphates, phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidylinositol... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Inmates at Bedlam Asylum, as portrayed by William Hogarth Insanity, or madness, is a semi-permanent, severe mental disorder typically stemming from a form of mental illness. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... In a criminal trial, the insanity defenses are possible defenses by excuse, via which defendants may argue that they should not be held criminally liable for breaking the law, as they were mentally ill at the time of their allegedly criminal actions. ... Insecurity is either danger, i. ... Look up Insight in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the sleeping disorder. ... For other uses, see Instinct (disambiguation). ... The Institute for Collaborative Engagement is an American based internationally focused think-tank formed around the year 2000. ... The Institute of Transpersonal Psychology is a private, non-sectarian graduate school accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. ... Institutionalization is a term used to describe both the treatment of, and damage caused to, vulnerable human beings by the oppressive or corrupt application of inflexible systems of social, medical, or legal controls by publicly owned or not-for-profit organisations originally created for beneficial purposes and intents. ... Operant conditioning, so named by psychologist B. F. Skinner, is the modification of behavior (the actions of animals) brought about by the consequences that follow upon the occurrence of the behavior. ... An intake is an air intake for an engine. ... Integral Psychology is a book by philosopher Ken Wilber in which he applies his integral model of consciousness to the psychological realm. ... Look up integration in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A research psychology measure designed to quantify the complexity of written texts based on dimensions of integration and differentiation. ... Intellectualization is a defense mechanism where reasoning is used to block confrontation with an unconscious conflict and its associated emotional stress. ... Intelligence is the mental capacity to reason, plan, solve problems, think abstractly, comprehend ideas and language, and learn. ... Intelligence amplification (IA) (also referred to as cognitive augmentation and machine augmented intelligence) refers to the effective use of information technology in augmenting human intelligence. ... “IQ” redirects here. ... ... Intentionality, originally a concept from scholastic philosophy, was reintroduced in contemporary philosophy by the philosopher and psychologist Franz Brentano in his work Psychologie vom Empirischen Standpunkte. ... Do you always feel like you are forgetting something? This may be due to the constant stimulation that exists in our world today. ... Look up Intergender in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... // Intermittent explosive disorder (IED) is a behavioral disorder characterized by extreme expressions of anger, often to the point of uncontrollable rage, that are disproportionate to the situation at hand. ... The internal capsule is an area of white matter in the brain that separates the caudate nucleus and the thalamus from the lenticular nucleus. ... Internal consistency, in gaming, refers to the consistency of the physical and social rules that affect online computer role-playing games. ... The locus of control is a concept in psychology, originally developed by Julian Rotter. ... Internal validity is a term pertaining to scientific research that signifies the extent to which the conditions within a research design were conducive to drawing the conclusions the researcher was interested in drawing. ... In sociology and psychology, internalized oppression is the manner in which an oppressed group comes to use against itself the methods of the oppressor. ... The International Association of Analytical Psychologists (IAAP) is the international association of those who practice analytical psychology, which is to say, psychology in the tradition of Carl Jung. ... The International Center for the Study of Psychiatry and Psychology (ICSPP) is a nonprofit (503c) research and educational network whose focus is the critical study of the mental health professions and their consumer markets. ... The International Center for the Study of Psychiatry and Psychology (ICSPP) is a nonprofit (503c) research and educational network whose focus is the critical study of the mental health professions and their consumer markets. ... The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (commonly known by the abbreviation ICD) is a detailed description of known diseases and injuries. ... The International Society for Comparative Psychology was founded in 1980 and held its first meeting in 1983. ... For information about a medical intern, see the article on Medical residency. ... Interpersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy, developed by University of Pittsburgh researchers, is based on the idea that disruptions in daily routines and problems in interpersonal relationships can cause recurrence of the manic and depressive episodes that characterize bipolar disorder [1]. References Two-Year Outcomes for Interpersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy... Interpersonal psychoanalysis is based on the theories of Harry Stack Sullivan, an American psychiatrist who believed that the details of patients interpersonal interactions with others provided insight into the causes and cures of mental disorder. ... Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) is a time-limited psychotherapy that was developed in the 1970s and 80s as an outpatient treatment for adults who were diagnosed with moderate or severe non-delusional depression. ... Interpersonal skills refer to mental and communicative algorithms applied during social communications and interactions in order to reach certain effects or results. ... Interpretation, or interpreting, is an activity that consists of establishing, either simultaneously or consecutively, oral or gestural communications between two or more speakers who are not speaking (or signing) the same language. ... In descriptive statistics, the interquartile range (IQR), also called the midspread and middle fifty is the range between the third and first quartiles and is a measure of statistical dispersion. ... Time between two or more stimuli. ... Intertwingularity is a term coined by Ted Nelson to express the complexity of interrelations in human knowledge. ... In statistics, interval estimation is the use of sample data to calculate an interval of possible (or probable) values of an unknown population parameter. ... The level of measurement of a variable in mathematics and statistics is a classification that was proposed in order to describe the nature of information contained within numbers assigned to objects and, therefore, within the variable. ... An intervention is an orchestrated attempt by one, or often many, people (usually family and friends) to get someone to seek professional help with an addiction or some kind of traumatic event or crisis. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Definition Intimacy is complex in that its meaning varies from relationship to relationship, and within a given relationship over time. ... An intimate relationship is a particularly close interpersonal relationship. ... ... Intrapsychic is a psychological term referring to internal psychological processes of the individual. ... An intravenous drip in a hospital Intravenous therapy or IV therapy is the administration of liquid substances directly into a vein. ... Intrinsic motivation is evident when people engage in an activity for its own sake, without some obvious external incentive present. ... Introjection is a psychological process where the subject replicates in itself behaviors, attributes or other fragments of the surrounding world, especially of other subjects. ... Sexual penetration (as opposed to outercourse) typically involves the insertion of the penis into a bodily orifice. ... This article is about the psychological process of introspecting. ... The terms Introvert and Extrovert (spelled Extravert by Carl Jung), were originally employed by Sigmund Freud and given significant amplification later by Jung. ... Intuition is an unconscious form of knowledge. ... Involutional melancholia or involutional depression is a traditional name for a psychiatric disorder affecting mainly elderly or late middle aged people, usually accompanied with paranoia. ... IQ redirects here; for other uses of that term, see IQ (disambiguation). ... Dr. Irene Pepperberg (born April 1, 1949, Brooklyn, New York) is a scientist noted for her studies in animal cognition, particularly in relation to parrots. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Anger. ... In jurisprudence, irresistible impulse is a defense by excuse, in this case some sort of insanity, in which the defendant argues that they should not be held criminally liable for actions which broke the law, because they couldnt control their actions. ... Image:Yalom. ... Irving L. Janis (1918-1990) was a research psychologist at Yale University and a professor emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley most famous for his theory of groupthink which described the systematic errors made by groups when taking collective decisions. ... The Center for Applications of Psychological Type is a non-profit organization co-founded by Isabel Myers in 1975 for MBTI development, research and training. ... ISFP (Introverted Sensing Feeling Perceiving) is one of the sixteen personality types from personality type systems based on C.G. Jung, of which the best-known are the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), Keirsey Temperament Sorter and Socionics. ... Look up isolation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In graphic design and sociology, Isotype (possibly an acronym for International System of Typographic Picture Education) is a system of pictograms designed by the Austrian educator and philosopher Otto Neurath and the illustrator Gerd Arntz to communicate information in a simple, non-linguistic way. ... The Center for Applications of Psychological Type is a non-profit organization co-founded by Isabel Myers in 1975 for MBTI development, research and training. ... ISTP (Introverted Sensing Thinking Perceiving) is one of the sixteen personality types from personality type systems based on C.G. Jung, of which the best-known are the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), Keirsey Temperament Sorter and Socionics. ... ITP can refer to: Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, a blood disorder. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


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J. F. Lehmann - J. J. Gibson - J. P. Guilford - Jacksonian epilepsy - Jacob L. Moreno - Jacques Hassoun - Jacques Lacan - Jacques Mehler - James Cattell - James McClelland - James "Jim" Olds - James W. Fowler - James W. Prescott - Jay Haley - Jealousy delusion - Jean-Martin Charcot - Jean Berko Gleason - Jean Piaget - Jenkins activity survey - Jerome Bruner - Jerome H. Jaffe - Jüri Allik - Job satisfaction - Johari window - John B. Watson - John Bradshaw - John Darley - John Dewey - John F. Murray - John Gabrieli - John Henryism - John Rowan(Psychologist) - John Shotter - John Tooby - John William Atkinson - Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations - Jonathan Potter - Joseph E. LeDoux - José Szapocznik - Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology - Journal of Health Psychology - Journal of Psychohistory - Joyce Brothers - Judgement - Judy Kegl Julian Jaynes - Julian Rotter - Julius Kuhl - Jungian psychology - Just noticeable difference - Julius Friedrich Lehmann (born 1864 in Zurich; died 1934) was a publisher of medical literature and right-wing tracts in Munich. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Joy Paul Guilford (1897–1988) was a US psychologist, best remembered for his study of human intelligence. ... Dr. Jacob (Jakob) Levy Moreno (18 May 1889 - 14 May 1974) was a leading psychiatrist, theorist and educator. ... Jacques Hassoun (1936-1999) was a French psychologist and proponent of the ideas of Jacques Lacan. ... Jacques-Marie-Émile Lacan (French IPA: ) (April 13, 1901 – September 9, 1981) was a French psychoanalyst, psychiatrist, and doctor. ... Born in Barcelona (Spain) in 1936, Jacques Mehler is an influential cognitive psychologist. ... James McKeen Cattell (May 25, 1860-January 20, 1944), American psychologist, was the first professor of psychology in the United States. ... James L. (Jay) McClelland (born December 1, 1948) is a Professor of Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience at Carnegie Mellon University. ... BaronLarf 01:40, May 12, 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... James W. Prescott is a developmental psychologist, whose research focused on the origins of violence, particularly as it relates to a lack of mother-child bonding. ... Jay Douglas Haley, ((July 19, 1923 - February 13, 2007)[1] was one of the more influential psychotherapists of the 20th century [2] He was one of the founding figures of brief and family therapy and one of the more accomplished teachers, supervisors, and authors in these disciplines. ... Categories: People stubs | French physicians | 1825 births | 1893 deaths | History of medicine ... Jean Berko Gleason is a Boston University psycholinguist best known for having created the Wug Test. ... Jean Piaget [] (August 9, 1896 – September 16, 1980) was a Swiss philosopher, natural scientist and developmental psychologist, well known for his work studying children, his theory of cognitive development and for his epistemologic view called genetic epistemology. He created in 1955 the International Centre for Genetic Epistemology in Geneva and... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Jerome S. Bruner (b. ... Dr Jerome H. Jaffe is a psychiatrist who was Drug Policy Director in the Nixon Administration. ... Jüri Allik Jüri Allik (born on March 3, 1949 in Tallinn, Estonia), is an eminent Estonian psychologist. ... Job satisfaction describes how content an individual is with his or her job. ... An empty Johari window. ... John Broadus Watson (January 9, 1878–September 25, 1958) was an American psychologist who established the psychological school of behaviorism, after doing research on animal behavior. ... John Elliot Bradshaw (born June 29, 1933 in Houston, Texas) is an American educator, theologian, and author best known for his PBS television programs on topics such as addiction, recovery, and spirituality and in particular, the championing of his wounded inner child theory within the context of the dysfunctional family. ... John Darley (b. ... John Dewey (October 20, 1859 – June 1, 1952) was an American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer, whose thoughts and ideas have been greatly influential in the United States and around the world. ... Dr. John F. Murray is a clinical and sport performance psychologist who first introduced the concept of scoring the mental side of a sport in developing the MPI or Mental Performance Index for American football. ... John Gabrieli carried out research with the famous H.M., who was a globally amnesic patient as a result of epileptic surgery. ... John Henryism, based on the African American folk hero John Henry, is recognized as a style of strong coping behaviors used . ... John Rowan is an author counselor, psychotherapist and clinical supervisor who practices Primal integration in England. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... John William Atkinson, also known as Jack Atkinson, (December 1923 - October 27, 2003) was an American psychologist who pioneered the scientific study of human motivation, achievement and behavior. ... The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) is a US based non-profit organization formed in 1951 with a mission to maintain and elevate the standards of healthcare delivery through evaluation and accreditation of healthcare organizations. ... Jonathan Potter is Professor of Discourse Analysis at the Loughborough University. ... Joseph E. LeDoux, a neuroscientist, is the Henry and Lucy Moses Professor of Science, and Professor of Neuroscience and Psychology at New York University. ... José Szapocznik, Ph. ... The Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology provides a forum for the presentation of conceptual, methodological, policy, and research studies involved in the application of behavioral science research in developmental and life span psychology. ... The Journal of Health Psychology is an interdisciplinary, international journal edited by David Marks, Professor of Psychology at City University, London, UK // Aims and Scope Recent years have seen a dramatic international growth of research, debate and teaching in health psychology, with scholars throughout the social sciences, medicine and health... The Journal of Psychohistory is a scientific journal in the field of psychohistory published by the Institute for Psychohistory. ... Joyce Brothers Joyce Brothers, PhD (maiden name Joyce Diane Bauer, born October 20, 1928) is a psychologist and advice columnist, publishing a daily syndicated newspaper column since 1960. ... Judgment or judgement implies a balanced weighing up of evidence preparatory to making a decision. ... Judy Shepard-Kegl recieved her PH.D. in linguistics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1985, has worked and written extensively within her field and is best known for her work and multiple academic publishings on the Nicaraguan Sign Language (or ISN, Idioma de Señas de Nicaragua or... Julian Jaynes Julian Jaynes (February 27, 1920 - November 21, 1997) was an American psychologist, best known for his book The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind (1976), in which he argues that ancient peoples were not conscious as we consider the term today, and that the... Jungian psychology refers to a school of psychology originating in the ideas of Swiss psychologist Carl Jung and advanced by many other thinkers who followed in his tradition. ... In psychophysics, a just noticeable difference, customarily abbreviated with lowercase letters as jnd, is the smallest difference in a specified modality of sensory input that is detectable by a human being or other animal. ...


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K-line - Karen Horney - Karl Lashley - Karl Menninger - Kay Redfield Jamison - Ken Wilber - Kenneth Gergen - Kent Norman - Kharkov School of Psychology - Kinesics - Kinesthesis - Klein-Levin syndrome - Kleptomania - Klinefelter's syndrome - Klismaphilia - Klüver-Bucy syndrome - Kübler-Ross model - Knowledge - Knowledge management - Knowledge of results - Kohlberg's stages of moral development Konrad Lorenz - Koro - Korsakoff's psychosis - Korsakoff's syndrome - Kosmikophobia - Kurt Koffka - Kurt Lewin - Kurtosis - Definition First described in Marvin Minskys essay K-lines: A Theory of Memory, published on April 1980 by Cognitive Science, a K-line -or Knowledge-line- is defined as a mental agent which represents an association of a group of other mental agents found active when a subject solves... Karen Horney Karen Horney [horn-eye], born Danielsen (September 16, 1885, – December 4, 1952) was a German Freudian psychoanalyst of Norwegian and Dutch descent. ... Karl S. Lashley (1890-1958) was an American behaviorist well-remembered for his influential contributions to the study of learning and memory. ... Karl Menninger (1893-1990) was an American Psychiatrist and a member of the famous Menninger family of psychiatrists who founded the Menninger Foundation and the Menninger Clinic in Topeka, Kansas. ... Kay Redfield Jamison (born October 14, 1946) is an American psychologist and science writer who is an expert on bipolar disorder. ... Ken Wilber Kenneth Earl Wilber Jr. ... Kenneth J. Gergen is a notable American psychologist and professor at Swarthmore College. ... Kent L. Norman Kent Norman (born March 8, 1947) is an American Cognitive Psychologist. ... Kharkov School of Psychology (Харьковская психологическая школа) is a tradition of developmental psychological research conducted in the paradigm of Lev Vygotskys sociocultural theory of mind and Leontievs psychological activity theory. ... Non-verbal behaviour related to movement, either of any part of the body or the body as a whole. ... Proprioception (from Latin proprius, meaning ones own and perception) is the sense of the position of parts of the body, relative to other neighbouring parts of the body. ... Kleptomania (Greek: κλέπτειν, kleptein, to steal, μανία, mania) is an inability or great difficulty in resisting impulses of stealing. ... Not to be confused with XYY syndrome or XXX syndrome. ... Klismaphilia (sometimes spelled Klysmaphilia) is the paraphilia of deriving sexual pleasure from enemas. ... Klüver-Bucy syndrome is a behavioral disorder that occurs when both the right and left medial temporal lobes of the brain malfunction. ... The Kübler-Ross model describes, in five discrete stages, the process by which people deal with grief and tragedy. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Knowledge Management (KM) comprises a range of practices used by organisations to identify, create, represent, and distribute knowledge for reuse, awareness and learning. ... Kohlbergs stages of moral development are planes of moral adequacy conceived by Lawrence Kohlberg to explain the development of moral reasoning. ... Lorenz being followed by his imprinted geese Konrad Zacharias Lorenz (November 7, 1903 in Vienna – February 27, 1989 in Vienna) was an Austrian zoologist, animal psychologist, and ornithologist. ... KORO is a Spanish-language television station in Corpus Christi, Texas, broadcasting locally on channel 28 as an affiliate of Univisión. ... Korsakoffs syndrome (aka Korsakoffs psychosis, amnesic-confabulatory syndrome), is a continuum of Wernickes encephalopathy, though a recognised episode of Wernickes is not always obvious. ... Korsakoffs syndrome (Korsakoffs psychosis, amnesic-confabulatory syndrome), is a degenerative brain disorder caused by the lack of thiamine (vitamin B1) in the brain. ... Kosmikophobia is the fear of cosmic phenomena, such as black holes or nebulas A cosmic phenomenon called a nebula. ... Kurt Koffka (Berlin, March 18, 1886 - 1941) was a Gestalt psychologist. ... Kurt Zadek Lewin (September 9, 1890 – February 12, 1947) was a German psychologist and one of the pioneers of social psychology. ... The far red light has no effect on the average speed of the gravitropic reaction in wheat coleoptiles, but it changes kurtosis from platykurtic to leptokurtic (-0. ...


L

L-dopa - L. L. Thurstone - La belle indifference - Labeling theory - Labile - Lability - Lability of affect - Laboratory for Automation Psychology - Laceration - Lacrimation - Lactic acid - Lacunar amnesia - Lalophobia - Landolt ring - Language - Language acquisition device - poverty of stimulus - Language disorder - Language module - Lapsus - Lapsus linguae - Large Group Awareness Training - Large-group communication - Latah - Late luteal phase dysphoric disorder - Latency - Latency period - Latency stage - Latent content - Latent learning - Lateral thinking - Latitude of acceptance - Latitude of rejection - Laura Carstensen - Lauren Alloy - Law of effect - Lawrence Kohlberg - Lawrence W. Barsalou - Leaderless group - Leadership - Learned helplessness - Learned helplessness deficits - Learned helplessness theory - Learning - Learning curve - Learning disabilities - Learning disability - Learning disorders - Learning organization - Learning paradigm - Learning theory - Least restrictive paradigm - Lecithin - Leda Cosmides - Lee Cronbach - Lee Ross - Legal psychology - Legitimate power - Lemon Balm (Melissa Officinalis) - Leon Festinger - Leon Pierce Clark - Leonard Jason - Lesbian - Lesion - Leslie Zebrowitz - Leta Hollingworth - Lethality scale - Lethologica - Lev Vygotsky - Level of aspiration - Levels-of-processing effect - Lewis Terman - Liaison nursing - Liaison psychiatry - Liberation by Oppression: A Comparative Study of Slavery and Psychiatry - Liberation psychology - Libido - Library of Congress Classification:Class B - Philosophy - Liev S. Vygotski - Life-span development psychology - Life Change Unit score - Life line - Life stress - Lifespring - Lifetime prevalence - Lifetime prevalence rates - Light therapy - Ligyrophobia - Limbic system - Linda Papadopoulos - Linguistics - Linkage analysis - Linking pin model - Lipoic acid - Lisa Feldman Barrett - List of cognitive biases - List of credentials in psychology - List of geniuses - List of psychologists - List of psychology disciplines - List of psychology journals - List of psychology organizations - List of psychology topics - List of publications in psychology - List of scientific journals in psychology - Lithium - Lithium carbonate - Living will - Lloyd deMause - Lüscher color test - Lobotomy - Locus coeruleus - Locus of control - Logorrhea - Logotherapy - Logovisual technology - Loner - Long-term memory - Long-term potentiation - Long term memory - Longitudinal studies - Longitudinal study - Looking glass self - Loose associations - Loosening of associations - Loss aversion Loss of control - Loudness - Lovaas technique - Love styles - Lovemap - Low frustration tolerance - Lower confidence limit - LSD - Lubrication-swelling response - Lucid dream - Lucio Bini - Lumbar puncture - Luria-Nebraska test - M'Naghten Rule - // Therapeutic use L-DOPA is used to replace dopamine lost in Parkinsons disease because dopamine itself cannot cross the blood-brain barrierwhere its precursor can. ... Louis Leon Thurstone (29 May 1887–29 September 1955) was a psychometrician most notable for his contributions to factor analysis with regard to psychological tests. ... It has been suggested that Labelling be merged into this article or section. ... Lability is constantly undergoing change or something that is likely to undergo change. ... Lability is constantly undergoing change or something that is likely to undergo change. ... The Laboratory for Automation Psychology (LAP) (also Laboratory for Automation Psychology and Decision Processes or LAPDP) was founded in 1983 by Kent Norman and Nancy Anderson as an affiliate of the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory (HCIL) at the University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies (UMIACS). ... Definition A cut is an injury that results in a break or opening in the skin. ... Tears trickling down the cheeks Lacrimation is the bodys process of producing tears, which are a liquid to clean and lubricate the eyes. ... For the production of milk by mammals, see Lactation. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... The irrational fear of speaking or of trying to speak is called lalophobia, from the Greek lalein, to speak. ... Landolt C optotypes in various sizes and orientations A Landolt C, also known as a Landolt ring or Landolt broken ring, is an optotype, i. ... The Language Acquisition Device (LAD) is a postulated organ of the brain that is supposed to function as a congenital device for learning symbolic language (ie. ... Language Acquisition: A Journal of Developmental Linguistics Language acquisition is the process by which the language capability develops in a human. ... Speech disorders, or speech impediments as they are also called, are a type of communication disorders where normal speech is disrupted. ... Language module refers to a hypothesized structure in the human brain that some linguists claim contains innate capacities for language. ... Involuntary mistake made while writing or speaking. ... A Freudian slip, or parapraxis, is an error in speech, memory or physical action that is believed to be caused by the unconscious mind. ... Large Group Awareness Training or LGAT is a term popularized in the American Psychological Associations 1986 draft DIMPAC report and also by Margaret Singer in her 1996 book Cults in our Midst to describe intense commercial trainings by non-psychologists which from the outside may resemble group therapy. ... Large group communication is a general description for organizational communication as a communication context describing large numbers of individuals who are members of a group. ... Latah is a condition of hyperstartling found in southeast Asia that is commonly considered a culture-bound syndrome. ... Child sexuality refers to sexual feelings, behavior and development in children. ... Incubation period, also called the latent period or latency period, is the time elapsed between exposure to a pathogenic organism, or chemical or radiation, and when symptoms and signs are first apparent. ... Latent learning occurs when knowledge has been acquired at a certain date, but is not demonstrated until a later date when the knowledge is required. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The law of effect is a principle of psychology described by Edward Thorndike in 1898. ... Lawrence Kohlberg (October 25, 1927 – January 19, 1987) was an American psychologist. ... Lawrence W. Barsalou, born on November 3, 1951 in San Diego (California/USA), is a psychologist and a cognitive scientist. ... The word leadership can refer to: The process of leading. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Learning is the acquisition and development of memories and behaviors, including skills, knowledge, understanding, values, and wisdom. ... The learning curve refers to a relationship between the duration of learning or experience and the resulting progress. ... In broad terms, the phrase learning disability covers any of a range of conditions that affect a persons ability to learn new information. ... In the United States and Canada, the term learning disability (LD) is used to refer to a range of neurological conditions that affect one or more of the ways that a person takes in, stores, or uses information. ... In the United States and Canada, the term learning disability is used to refer to psychological and neurological conditions that affect a persons communicative capacities and potential to be taught effectively. ... Peter Senge defined a learning organization as human beings cooperating in dynamical systems (as defined in systemics) that are in a state of continuous adaptation and improvement. ... In education and psychology, learning theories help us understand the process of learning. ... Phosphatidylcholine, a phospholipid in lecithin. ... Leda Cosmides Leda Cosmides, (born May 7, 1957 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American psychologist, who, together with anthropologist husband John Tooby, helped pioneer the field of evolutionary psychology. ... Lee J. Cronbach (1916 - 2001) was an American educational psychologist who made significant contributions to psychological testing and measurement. ... Lee D. Ross is a professor of social psychology at Stanford University, who has studied attribution theory, attributional biases, decision making and conflict resolution. ... Legal psychology involves the application of empirical psychological research to legal institutions and people who come into contact with the law. ... Binomial name Melissa officinalis Linnaeus Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis), not to be confused with bee balm, Monarda species, is a perennial herb in the mint family Lamiaceae, native to southern Europe and the Mediterranean region. ... Leon Festinger Leon Festinger (May 8, 1919 – February 11, 1989) was a social psychologist from New York City who became famous for his Theory of Cognitive Dissonance (Festinger, 1957). ... Leon Pierce Clark (sometimes L. Pierce Clark) (1870-1933) was an American psychiatrist and psychoanalyst. ... A lesbian is a woman who is romantically and sexually attracted only to other women. ... Skin lesions caused by Chickenpox A lesion is any abnormal tissue found on or in an organism, usually damaged by disease or trauma. ... Dr. Leslie A. Zebrowitz is a social psychologist who studies the effects of the way people look on others attitudes towards them. ... Lethologica is a psychological disorder that inhibits an individuals ability to articulate their thoughts by temporarily forgetting key words, phrases or names in conversation. ... Lev Vygotsky Lev Semenovich Vygotsky (Лев Семенович Выготский) (November 17 (November 5 Old Style), 1896 – June 11, 1934) was a Soviet developmental psychologist and the founder of the Cultural-historical psychology. ... The levels-of-processing effect was first identified by Craik and Lockhart in 1972. ... Lewis Madison Terman (born 15 January 1877 in Johnson County, Indiana, died 21 December 1956 in Palo Alto, California) was a U.S psychologist, noted as a pioneer in cognitive psychology in the early 20th century at Stanford University. ... Liaison psychiatry, also known as consultative psychiatry or consultation-liaison psychiatry is the branch of psychiatry that specialises in the interface between other medical specialties and psychiatry, and concerns itself with patients with problems in both physical and mental health, as well as patients who may report physical symptoms as... Liberation by Oppression: A Comparative Study of Slavery and Psychiatry is a work on, and a critique of, psychiatry by Thomas Stephen Szasz. ... Liberation Social Psychology (la psicología social de la liberación, PSL) has developed amongst a body of psychologists in Latin America since the 1980s. ... For other uses, see Libido (disambiguation). ... Lev Vygotsky Lev Semyonovich Vygotsky (November 17 (November 5 (O.S.)), 1896—June 11, 1934) was a Russian developmental psychologist, discovered by the Western world in the 1960s. ... Life-Line is Heinleins first published science fiction story, about a man who builds a machine that will predict how long a person will live. ... In the first five years of life beginning at conception, the organism being created first learns the sort of environment it lives in. ... Lifespring can refer to a series of New Age/human potential training LGATs or to the organisation offering such trainings. ... In epidemiology, the prevalence of a disease in a statistical population is defined as the total number of cases of the disease in the population at a given time, or the total number of cases in the population, divided by the number of individuals in the population. ... Bright light therapy is a common treatment for seasonal affective disorder. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The limbic system (Latin limbus: border or edge) includes the structures in the human brain involved in emotion, motivation, and emotional association with memory. ... Linda Papadopoulos Dr. Linda Papadopoulos (born February 3, 1973) is a Cypriot-Canadian psychologist based in Great Britain. ... Linguistics is the scientific study of language, which can be theoretical or applied. ... Genetic linkage occurs when particular alleles are inherited together. ... The Linking pin model is an idea developed by Rensis Likert in which an organisation is represented as a number of overlapping work units in which members of one unit are leaders of another. ... Lipoic acid, also known as α-lipoic acid (alpha lipoic acid) or thioctic acid, has formula C8H14S2O2 and systematic name 5-(1,2-dithiolan-3-yl)pentanoic acid. ... Lisa Feldman Barrett, Ph. ... Cognitive bias is distortion in the way humans perceive reality (see also cognitive distortion). ... This list is of professional and academic credentials in the field of psychology and allied fields (psychotherapy, counseling and social work). ... A genius is a person with distinguished mental abilities. ... This list includes notable psychologists and contributors to psychology, some of whom may not have thought of themselves primarily as psychologists but are included here because of their important contributions to the discipline. ... These are some of the sub-fields within the field of psychology: Abnormal psychology Activity theory Analytical psychology Applied psychology Asian Psychology Behavior analysis Behavioural medicine Behavioural psychology Biobehavioural health Biological psychology Biopsychology Cognitive neuropsychology Cognitive psychology Cognitive neuroscience Community psychology Comparative psychology Clinical psychology Counselling psychology Critical psychology Developmental... Here is a selection of psychology journals published throughout the world. ... List of organizations and societies in psychology. ... This is a list of important publications in psychology, organized by field. ... This list present representative scientific journals in the field of psychology and its branches. ... This article is about the chemical element named Lithium. ... Lithium carbonate (Li2CO3) is a chemical compound of lithium and carbonate that is used as a mood stabilizer in psychiatric treatment of manic states and bipolar disorder. ... A living will, also called will to live, advance health directive, or advance health care directive, is a specific type of power of attorney or health care proxy or advance directive. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... The Lüscher color test is a psychological test invented by Dr. Max Lüscher. ... A human brain that has undergone lobotomy. ... The Locus ceruleus, also spelled locus coeruleus, (Latin for the blue bit) is a nucleus in the brain stem apparently responsible for the physiological reactions involved in stress and panic. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Logorrhoea (US logorrhea) (Greek λογορροια, logorrhoia, word-flux) is defined as an excessive flow of words and, when used medically, refers to incoherent talkativeness that occurs in certain kinds of mental illness, such as mania. ... Developed by neurologist and psychiatrist Viktor Frankl, Logotherapy is considered the third Viennese school of psychotherapy after Freuds psychoanalysis and Adlers individual psychology. ... Logovisual technology developed out of structural communication. ... Look up Loner in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Long-term memory (LTM) is memory, stored as meaning, that can last as little as 30 seconds or as long as decades. ... Long-term potentiation is the persistent increase in synaptic strength following high-frequency stimulation of a synapse. ... Long-term memory (LTM) is memory that lasts from days to years. ... A longitudinal study is a correlational research study that involves observations of the same items over long periods of time, often many decades. ... Longitudinal studies form a class of research methods that involve observations of the same items over a longer time. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... In prospect theory, loss aversion. ... The horizontal axis shows frequency in Hz Loudness is the quality of a sound that is the primary psychological correlate of physical intensity. ... Lovaas technique, a form of Applied Behavior Analysis, is a therapy for autism. ... Love styles are models of lovers developed by Susan Hendrick and Clyde Hendrick. ... A lovemap is a concept originated by John Money to assist a discussion of why people like what they like sexuoerotically. ... Proponents of Albert Ellis Rational-emotive therapy cite a condition they call low frustration tolerance, or short-term hedonism in order to explain why people procrastinate, why some are quick to anger, and other apparently paradoxical or self-defeating behaviors. ... Lysergic acid diethylamide, commonly called LSD, LSD-25, or acid. ... Hypnos and Thanatos,Sleep and His Half-Brother Death by John William Waterhouse A lucid dream is a dream in which the person is aware that he or she is dreaming while the dream is in progress. ... Lucio Bini (1908-1964) was an Italian psychiatrist and professor at the University of Rome, Italy. ... A patient undergoes a lumbar puncture at the hands of a neurologist. ... The MNaghten rules, also known as McNaughten or Macnaughton rules, are a set of guidelines for an insanity defense formulated by the Judges of the House of Lords in 1843, used in England and Wales until the 1960s: Persons acting under the influence of an insane delusion are punishable...


M

MacDonald triad - Machiavellianism - Madonna-whore complex - Magical thinking - Magnetic resonance imaging - Magnetoencephalography - Main effect - Mainstreaming - Maintenance dose - Maintenance drug therapy - Major affective disorders - Major depression - Major depressive disorder - Major epilepsy - Maladaptive - Maladjustment - Male erectile disorder - Male orgasmic disorder - Maleness - Malignant Narcissism - Malingering - Malingering - Malleus - Mammillary body - Man and His Symbols - Managed care - Manas K. Mandal - Mania - Maniac - Manic-depressive illness - Manic episode - Manifest content - Manipulation - MAOI - Marathon group - Marcia K. Johnson - Margaret Floy Washburn - Margaret Mahler - Margaret Singer - Marijuana - Marilynn Brewer - Marital therapy - Mark Diamond - Marketing - Marriage guidance - Martin Hoffman - Martin Seligman - Martyr complex - Marvin Minsky - Mary Calkins - Mary Cover Jones - Masculine - Masculine protest - Masculine psychology - Masking - Masochism - Masochism, sexual - Mass behavior - Mass hysteria - Massed practice - Masturbation - Matching - Maternal deprivation - Mathematical psychology - Mathematics disorder - Maturation - Maturation and environmentalism - Maturational crisis - Max Wertheimer - McLean Hospital - MDMA - Mean - Mean World Syndrome - Meaning - Meaning - Meaning - Measure of central tendency - Measurement, scales of - Median - Mediational theory of learning - Mediator - Medicaid - Medical audit - Medical ethics - Medical model - Medical power of attorney - Medical psychology - Medical record - Medical review - Medicare - Medication-induced movement disorders - Medulla - Medulla oblongata - Megalomania - Megavitamin therapy - Meiosis - Melancholia - Melanie Klein - Memory-prediction framework - Memory - Memory and aging - Memory augmentation - Memory consolidation - Memory effect - Memory inhibition - Memory prosthesis - Memory suppression - Menarche - Mendacity - Meninges - Meningitis - Meningococcal meningitis - Mensa - Mental age - Mental age scale - Mental block - Mental calculation - Mental deficiency - Mental disease - Mental disease criterion - Mental disorder - Mental function - Mental health - Mental health consumer - Mental health disorders - Mental illness - Mental management - Mental model - Mental model - Mental obsession - Mental retardation - Mental status - Mental status examination - Mentalism - Mentally ill - Mentoring - Meprobamate - Merrill Carlsmith - Mescaline - Mesmerism - Mesmerize - Mesokurtic - Mesolimbic dopamine system - Mesomorphic - Messianic complex - Meta-analysis - Meta analysis - Metabolism - Metabolite - Metacognition (thinking about thinking) - Metaknowledge (knowledge about knowledge) - Metaplan - Metapsychiatry - Metapsychology - Methadone - Methadone maintenance programs - Methedrine - Method of approximations - Method of loci - Method variables - Methylphenidate (Ritalin) - MHPG - Michael Argyle - Michael Langone - Michael Liebowitz - Michael White - Microcephaly - Microexpression - Microphilia - Mid-life crisis - Midbrain - Middle age - Migraine headaches - Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi - Mild mental retardation - Milgram experiment - Millieu therapy - Milton H. Erickson - Milton model - Miltown - Mind's eye - Mind-body problem - Mind - Mind control - Mind Dynamics - Mind map - Mindset - Minimal brain damage - Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory - Miriam Stewart - Mirror stage - MIT - Mitosis - Mixed anxiety-depressive disorder - Mixed design - MMPI-2 - Mnemonics - Mnemonic link system - Mnemonist - Mob psychology - Mob psychology - Modafinil (Provigil) - Mode - Model - Conceptual model - Modelling - Moderate mental retardation - Modified leucotomy - Monism - Monoamine - Monoamine oxidase inhibitors - Monoamine theories - Monoamines - Monomania - Monozygotic twins - Mood - Mood disorders - Mood swing - Moral anxiety - Moral psychology - Moral reasoning - Moral treatment - Morbidity risk - Morita Shoma - Moron - Morphine - Mortality - Mortido - Motion illusion - Motivation - Mozart Effect Motive - Motor epilepsy - Motor pathways - Motor skills disorder - Mourning work - Movement context in handwriting - MSU Department of Psychology - Multiaxial classification - Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies - Multifactorial - Multilevel model - Multilevel models Multimethod approach - Multimodal integration - Multimodal Therapy - Multimodal therapy - Multiple-baseline design - Multiple-complex Developmental Disorder - Multiple correlation - Multiple personality disorder - Multitasking - Multnomah Community Ability Scale - Murray Bowen - Mutism - Muzafer Sherif - Myers-Briggs Type Indicator - Myotonia - Mysophilia - Mysophobia - Mythomania - Myxedema - Machiavellianism is primarily the term some social and personality psychologists use to describe a persons tendency to deceive and manipulate others for personal gain. ... The term Madonna-whore complex refers to a psychological complex in Freudian psychoanalysis that develops in the human male. ... In psychology and cognitive science, magical thinking is non-scientific causal reasoning (e. ... “MRI” redirects here. ... Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is the measurement of the magnetic fields produced by electrical activity in the brain, usually conducted externally, using extremely sensitive devices such as SQUIDs. ... Main effect is the term used in research methods for the effect that is produced by the average of an independent variable that has been produced over another independent variable. ... Mainstream is, generally, the common current of thought of the majority. ... It is common to feel sad, discouraged , or down once in a while, and anyone in this state might say they are suffering from depression. ... It is common to feel sad, discouraged , or down once in a while, and anyone in this state might say they are suffering from depression. ... In psychology, a behavior or trait is adaptive when it helps an individual adjust and function well within their environment. ... Impotence or, more clinically, erectile dysfunction is the inability to maintain an erection of the penis for satisfactory sexual intercourse regardless of the capability of ejaculation. ... Look up Sex in Wiktionary, the free dictionary The members of many species of living things are divided into two or more categories called sexes (or loosely speaking, genders). ... Otto Kernberg described malignant narcissism as a syndrome characterized by a narcissistic personality disorder (NPD), antisocial features, paranoid traits, and ego-syntonic aggression. ... Malingering is a medical and psychological term that refers to an individual fabricating or exaggerating the symptoms of mental or physical disorders for a variety of motives, including getting financial compensation (often tied to fraud), avoiding work, obtaining drugs, getting lighter criminal sentences, or simply to attract attention or sympathy. ... Malingering is a medical and psychological term that refers to an individual fabricating or exaggerating the symptoms of mental or physical disorders for a variety of motives, including getting financial compensation (often tied to fraud), avoiding work, obtaining drugs, getting lighter criminal sentences, or simply to attract attention or sympathy. ... The malleus is hammer-shaped small bone or ossicle of the middle ear which connects with the incus and is attached to the inner surface of the eardrum. ... The mammillary bodies (Latin: corpus mamillare) are a pair of small round bodies in the brain forming part of the limbic system. ... Man and His Symbols is the last psychological work undertaken by Carl Jung. ... Managed care is a concept in U.S. health care. ... Manas Kumar Mandal is the Director of the Defence Institute of Psychological Research (DIPR), Delhi, India since January 5, 2004. ... Mania is a severe medical condition characterized by extremely elevated mood, energy, and thought patterns. ... The term maniac can mean more than one thing: (archaic) A maniac is a person who exhibits the behaviour known as mania. ... Manic depression, with its two principal sub-types, bipolar disorder and major depression, was first clinically described near the end of the 19th century by psychiatrist Emil Kraepelin, who published his account of the disease in his Textbook of Psychiatry. ... The word manipulation can refer to: Joint manipulation Social influence Sleight of hand tricks in magic or XCM. Abuse Advertising Brainwashing Charisma Fraud Indoctrination Love bombing Machiavellianism Media manipulation Mind control Neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) Propaganda Social psychology Puppeteer Photo manipulation Categories: | | ... Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are a class of antidepressant drugs prescribed for the treatment of depression. ... Marathon Media Group is a French television production company based in Paris that produces shows for all ages: children, teenagers and adults. ... Marcia K. Johnson is Dilley Professor of Psychology at Yale University. ... Margaret Floy Washburn (1871-1939), psychologist, was best known for her experimental work in animal behavior and motor theory development. ... Margaret Schönberger Mahler (May 10, 1897 – October 2, 1985) was a Hungarian physician, who later became interested in psychiatry. ... Margaret Thaler Singer (1921 - 2003) was a clinical psychologist and emeritus professor of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley, USA. Dr. Singer was born in Denver and received her bachelors, masters and doctoral degrees from the University of Denver. ... A Cannabis sativa plant The drug cannabis, also called marijuana, is produced from parts of the cannabis plant, primarily the cured flowers and gathered trichomes of the female plant. ... Marilynn B. Brewer is a professor of psychology at the Ohio State University. ... “Next big thing” redirects here. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Relationship counseling. ... Martin Hoffman is currently serving as a professor of psychology at NYU. His work largely has to do with the development of empathy, and its relationship with moral development. ... Martin E.P. Seligman (Albany, New York, 12 August 1942) is an American psychologist and writer. ... In the fields of psychology and psychoanalysis, an inferiority complex is a feeling that one is inferior to others in some way. ... Marvin Lee Minsky (born August 9, 1927), sometimes affectionately known as Old Man Minsky, is an American cognitive scientist in the field of artificial intelligence (AI), co-founder of MITs AI laboratory, and author of several texts on AI and philosophy. ... Mary Whiton Calkins (1863-1930) was an American philosopher and psychologist. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... The word masculine can refer to: the property of being biologically male masculinity, a traditionally male gender role the masculine grammatical gender This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Robert A. Johnsons He: Understanding Masculine Psychology Masculine psychology is a term sometimes used to describe and categorize issues concerning the gender related psychology of male human identity, as well as the issues that males confront during their lives. ... Personality masking is the process in which an individual changes or masks his or her natural personality to conform to social pressures or abuse. ... Flogging demonstration at Folsom Street Fair 2004. ... A field founded by multi-disciplinarian Howard Bloom in the 1990s. ... Mass hysteria, also called collective hysteria or collective obsessional behavior, is the sociopsychological phenomenon of the manifestation of the same or similar hysterical symptoms by more than one person. ... Woman masturbating, 1913 drawing by Gustav Klimt. ... Dheeraj Gedam This article is about mathematical matchings. ... Mathematical Psychology is an approach to psychological research that is based on mathematical modeling of perceptual, cognitive and motor processes, and on the establishment of law-like rules that relate quantifiable stimulus characteristics with quantifiable behavior. ... Dyscalculia is a specific learning difficulty affecting a persons ability to understand and/or manipulate numbers. ... Maturation is the increase in the state of maturity. ... Maturation is the guiding notion in educational theory that developing children will develop their cognitive skills on their own with no influence from their environment. ... Max Wertheimer (Prague, April 15, 1880 - New York, October 12, 1943) was one of the founders of Gestalt psychology. ... McLean Hospital (pronounced Mc-Lane) is a psychiatric hospital in Belmont, Massachusetts, USA. It is noted for its clinical staff expertise and ground-breaking neuroscience research. ... ecstasy and religious ecstasy MDMA, most commonly known today by the street name ecstasy, is a synthetic entactogen of the phenethylamine family whose primary effect is to stimulate the brain to rapidly secrete large amounts of serotonin, causing a general sense of openness, empathy, energy, euphoria, and well-being. ... In statistics, mean has two related meanings: the arithmetic mean (and is distinguished from the geometric mean or harmonic mean). ... Mean World Syndrome is described as the distinguishing characteristic of Media Induced Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (MIPTSD). ... In linguistics, meaning is the content carried by the words or signs exchanged by people when communicating through language. ... A non-linguistic meaning is an actual or possible derivation from sentience, which is not associated with signs that have any original or primary intent of communication. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Central tendency is a term used in some fields of empirical research to refer to what statisticians sometimes call location. A measure of central tendency is either a location parameter or a statistic used to estimate a location parameter. ... In probability theory and statistics, a median is a type of average that is described as the number dividing the higher half of a sample, a population, or a probability distribution, from the lower half. ... Mediator may refer to: A neutral party who assists in negotiations and conflict resolution, the process being known as mediation By analogy, someone who channels contact between mortals and divinity; e. ... Medicaid is the US health insurance program for individuals and families with low incomes and resources. ... Medical Audit is defined as the evaluation of medical care in retrospect thorough analysis of medical records. ... Medical ethics is primarily a field of applied ethics, the study of moral values and judgments as they apply to medicine. ... Medical model is the term (cited by psychiatrist Ronald D. Laing in his The Politics of the Family and Other Essays) for the set of procedures in which all doctors are trained. ... Medical psychology (also known as Clinical Health Psychology, Psychosomatic Medicine, Health Care Psychology, Behavioral Medicine, or Health Psychology) revolves around the idea that both the body and mind are one, indivisible structure. ... A medical record folder being pulled from the records A medical record, health record, or medical chart is a systematic documentation of a patients medical history and care [1][2]. The term Medical record is used both for the physical folder for each individual patient and for the body... There are several publicly funded health services in various countries called Medicare: Medicare (Canada) is a comprehensive, universal (for all the citizens and permanent residents in the country) public health financing system. ... Medulla in general means the inner part, and derives from the Latin word for marrow. In medicine it is contrasted to the cortex. ... The medulla oblongata is the lower portion of the brainstem. ... Look up megalomania in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In nutrition and CAM, megavitamin therapy makes use of large amounts of vitamins, often many times greater than the recommended dietary allowance (RDA), to treat many types of diseases. ... Not to be confused with miosis. ... Melancholy redirects here. ... Melanie Klein Melanie Klein (March 30, 1882 – September 22, 1960) was an Austrian-born British psychoanalyst, who devised therapeutic techniques for children with great impact on contemporary methods of child care and rearing. ... The memory-prediction framework is a theory of brain function that was created by Jeff Hawkins and described in his book On Intelligence. ... For other uses, see Memory (disambiguation). ... One of the key concerns of older adults is experiencing memory loss, especially as it is one of the hallmark symptoms of Alzheimers Disease. ... Memory augmentation is the process by which ones ability to retain information is increased. ... The broad definition of memory consolidation is the process by which recent memories are crystallised into long-term memory. ... With batteries, the memory effect, also known as lazy battery effect, is an effect observed in some rechargeable batteries that causes them to hold less charge. ... In order to remember, it is essential not only to activate the relevant information but also to inhibit irrelevant information. ... A memory prosthesis is a (hypothetical) device that helps or enable people to remember. ... In order to remember, it is essential not only to activate the relevant information but also to inhibit irrelevant information. ... Menarche (IPA: ) is the first menstrual period, or first menstrual bleeding in the females of human beings. ... For other uses, see Deception (disambiguation). ... The meninges (singular meninx) are the system of membranes that envelop the central nervous system. ... Meningitis is the inflammation of the protective membranes covering the central nervous system, known collectively as the meninges. ... Inferior view of a brain with meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenzae. ... There are multiple pages related to Mensa. Mensa International is an organization for persons with high IQs. ... Mental age is a controversial concept in psychometrics. ... Mental Block is a Canadian childrens comedy, which premiered September 1, 2003, on the YTV Canadian childrens channel. ... Mental calculation is the practice of doing mathematical calculations using only the human brain, with no help from any computing devices. ... Mental retardation (abbreviated as MR), is a term for a pattern of persistently slow learning of basic motor and language skills (milestones) during childhood, and a significantly below-normal intellectual capacity as an adult. ... The Scream, the famous painting commonly thought of as depicting the experience of mental illness. ... A mental disorder or mental illness is a clinically significant psychological pattern that occurs in an individual and is usually associated with distress or disability that is not expected as part of normal development or culture. ... Mental functions and cognitive processes are terms often used interchangeably (although not always correctly so, the term cognitive tends to have specific implications - see cognitive and cognitivism) to mean such functions or processes as perception, introspection, memory, imagination, conception, belief, reasoning, volition, and emotion--in other words, all the different... Mental health is a term used to describe either a level of cognitive or emotional wellbeing or an absence of mental illness. ... A mental health consumer is a person who is under treatment for a psychiatric illness or disorder. ... The Scream, the famous painting commonly thought of as depicting the experience of mental illness. ... A mental illness or mental disorder refers to one of many mental health conditions characterized by distress, impaired cognitive functioning, atypical behavior, emotional dysregulation, and/or maladaptive behavior. ... Mental Management explores, describes and studies the mental processes in their diversity. ... A mental model is an explanation in someones thought process for how something works in the real world. ... A mental model is an explanation in someones thought process for how something works in the real world. ... Mental obsession is an obsession that may cause mental, physical, or even emotional pain. ... Mental retardation is a term for a pattern of persistently slow learning of basic motor and language skills (milestones) during childhood, and a significantly below-normal global intellectual capacity as an adult. ... Mental status examination, or MSE, is a medical process where a clinician working in the field of mental health (usually a psychotherapist, social worker, psychiatrist, psychiatric nurse or psychologist) systematically examines a patients mind. ... Mental status examination, or MSE, is a medical process where a clinician working in the field of mental health (usually a social worker, psychiatrist, psychiatric nurse or psychologist) systematically examines a patients mind. ... In psychology, mentalism refers to those branches of study that concentrate on mental perception and thought processes, like cognitive psychology. ... The Scream, the famous painting commonly thought of as depicting the experience of mental illness. ... Mentoring refers to a developmental relationship between a more experienced mentor and a less experienced partner referred to as a mentoree (sometimes vernacularized into mentee) or protégé. // Historical The roots of the practice are lost in antiquity. ... Meprobamate (marketed under the brand names Miltown® by Wallace Laboratories and Equanil® by Wyeth) is a carbamate derivative which is used as an anxiolytic drug. ... J. Merrill Carlsmith was a social psychologist perhaps best known for his collaboration with Leon Festinger in the creation of cognitive dissonance theory. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Hypnosis, as defined by the American Psychological Association Division of Psychological Hypnosis, is a procedure during which a health professional or researcher suggests that a client, patient, or experimental participant experience changes in sensations, perceptions, thoughts, or behavior. ... Mesmerize can refer to the following things: Look up mesmerize in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The far red light has no effect on the average speed of the gravitropic reaction in wheat coleoptiles, but it changes kurtosis from platykurtic to leptokurtic (-0. ... Mesomorphic is one of the three classic somatotypes or body types created by William Sheldon. ... Messianic Complex is a psychological state in which the individual believes him/herself to be the saviour of the world. ... A meta-analysis is a statistical practice of combining the results of a number of studies. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A few of the metabolic pathways in a cell. ... A metabolite is the product of metabolism. ... Metacognition refers to thinking about cognition (memory, perception, calculation, association, etc. ... Metaknowledge or meta-knowledge is knowledge about knowledge. ... Metaplan, Metaplan technique or simply card techique is a system for collecting ideas when a group of people are working together. ... Thomas Hora (January 25, 1914 - October 30, 1995) is considered the founder of the discipline of metapsychiatry, an attempt to integrate principles from metaphysics, spirituality, and psychology. ... Methadone is a synthetic opioid, used medically as an analgesic and in the treatment of narcotic addiction. ... Methamphetamine is a synthetic stimulant drug which induces a strong feeling of euphoria and is highly addictive. ... The method of loci or Ars memoriae (art of memory) is a technique for remembering that has been practiced since Classical times. ... Vitamin R redirects here. ... Professor Michael Argyle (August 11, 1925, Nottingham – September 6, 2002) was one of the best known English social psychologists of the twentieth century. ... Michael Langone, Ph. ... Dr. Michael R. Liebowitz is a Columbia University psychiatrist and founder of the Anxiety Disorders Clinic, the first of its kind, at the New York Psychiatric Institute. ... Michael White is a practicing clinician and co-director of the Dulwich Centre in Adelaide, South Australia. ... A microexpression is a tiny facial expression that lasts less than a quarter of a second. ... Microphilia is the sexual attraction to a smaller person. ... Midlife crisis is the notion, popular in certain cultures, that many middle-aged people go through a period of dramatic self doubt brought on by the realization that their life is half over and they havent accomplished what they once wanted to. ... In biological anatomy, the mesencephalon (or midbrain) is the middle of three vesicles that arise from the neural tube that forms the brain of developing animals. ... Middle age is the period of life beyond young adulthood but before the onset of old age. ... This article is about the disorder. ... Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, a Psychology professor, formerly head of the department at the University of Chicago, is noted for his work in the study of happiness, creativity, subjective well-being, and fun, but is best known for his having been the architect of the notion of flow and for his years... The experimenter (V) orders the subject (L) to give what the subject believes are painful electric shocks to another subject (S), who is actually an actor. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... The Milton Model in Neuro-linguistic programming is an early model of Milton Ericksons hypnotic techniques. ... Meprobamate is a tranquilizing drug that acts as a depressant of the central nervous system and is commonly used in the treatment of anxiety and sometimes schizophrenia. ... The phrase minds eye refers to the human ability for visual perception, imagination, visualization, and memory, or, in other words, ones ability to see things with the mind. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see Mind (disambiguation). ... Mind control (or thought control) has the premise that an outside source can control an individuals thinking, behavior or consciousness (either directly or more subtly). ... Mind Dynamics, a seminar-based proto-LGAT founded by Alexander Everett in Texas in 1968, led to derivative organisations such as est and Lifespring. ... A students summary of the Cosmological Argument in mind map form. ... A mindset, in decision theory and general systems theory, refers to a set of assumptions, methods or notations held by one or more people or groups of people which is so established that it creates a powerful incentive within these people or groups to continue to adopt or accept prior... The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) is the most frequently used personality test in the mental health fields. ... After finishing a Bachelor of Nursing Degree at McMaster in 1967, Dr. Miriam Stewart continued her education at Dalhousie University with a Masters degree in 1976 and a Ph. ... child and mirror The mirror stage was the subject of Jacques Lacans first official contribution to psychoanalytic theory (Fourteenth International Psychoanalytical Congress at Marienbad in 1936). ... Mapúa Institute of Technology (MIT, MapúaTech or simply Mapúa) is a private, non-sectarian, Filipino tertiary institute located in Intramuros, Manila. ... It has been suggested that Binary fission be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Mnemonic (disambiguation). ... A mnemonic link system is a method of remembering lists, based on creating an association between the elements of that list. ... The title Mnemonist (derived from the term Mnemonic) refers to an individual with the ability to remember and recall unusually long lists of data, for example: unfamiliar names, lists of numbers, entries in books, etc. ... Mob psychology is a theoretical approach attempting to explain collective behavior solely on the basis of the psychological states of people who participate. ... Mob psychology is a theoretical approach attempting to explain collective behavior solely on the basis of the psychological states of people who participate. ... Modafinil is a eugeroic drug generally prescribed to treat narcolepsy, made by the pharmaceutical company Cephalon Inc. ... For other uses, see Fashion (disambiguation). ... An abstract model (or conceptual model) is a theoretical construct that represents something, with a set of variables and a set of logical and quantitative relationships between them. ... Please see Model (abstract). ... Look up model in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Monist (disambiguation). ... In biochemistry, monoamines are a group of organic compounds containing only one amino group. ... Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are a class of antidepressant drugs prescribed for the treatment of depression. ... In psychiatry, monomania (from Greek monos, one, and mania, mania) is a type of paranoia in which the patient has only one idea or type of ideas. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Twin. ... A mood is a relatively lasting emotional or affective state. ... A mood disorder is a condition where the prevailing emotional mood is distorted or inappropriate to the circumstances. ... A mood swing is an extreme or rapid change in mood. ... Moral psychology is the study of morality in its psychological dimensions. ... Moral reasoning is a study in psychology that overlaps with moral philosophy. ... Moral treatment marks a period in psychiatry where asylums began to offer humane care to the mentally ill. ... // Dr. Morita Masatake (1874 - 1938) (森田 正馬) was a contemporary of Sigmund Freud; however, Morita was the founder of Morita Therapy, a very different branch of clinical psychology, rooted in the writings of Shinran, the founder of Shinshu Buddhism. ... Moron was originally a scientific term, coined by psychologist Henry H. Goddard from a Greek word meaning foolish and used to describe a person with a genetically determined mental age between 8 and 12 on the Binet scale. ... Morphine (INN) (IPA: ) is a highly potent opiate analgesic drug and is the principal active agent in opium and the prototypical opiate. ... This article is in need of attention. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Illusory motion. ... Look up Motivation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Mozart effect can refer to: A disputed set of research results that indicate that listening to certain kinds of complex music may induce a short-lived (fifteen minute) improvement on the performance of certain kinds of mental tasks known as spatio-temporal reasoning; [1] [2] Popularized versions of the... Often interpreted as relational to Sigmund Freuds psychoanalytic theory and unconscious or subconscious motive theories, base motives have value in understanding action. ... Motor skills disorder (also known as motor coordination disorder or motor dyspraxia) is a human developmental disorder and is neurological in origin. ... See: graphonomics Editing movement context in handwriting are the handwriting movements performed before or after the current movement. ... Department of psychology at the Moscow State University was established in 1966 and headed by Alexei Nikolaevich Leontev until his death in 1979. ... The Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) is a non-profit organization that aims to assist scientists to design, fund, obtain approval for and report on studies into the risks and benefits of MDMA, psychedelic drugs and marijuana. ... In mathematics, the factorial of a natural number n is the product of the positive integers less than or equal to n. ... Multilevel models are known by several names: hierarchical models, nested models and split-plot designs. ... In statistics, multilevel models are used when some variable under study varies at more than one level. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Multimodal Therapy is an approach to psychotherapy founded by Arnold Lazarus, and based on the idea that humans are biological beings that think, feel, act, sense, imagine, and interact and that each of these modalities should be addressed in psychological treatment. ... Multiple-complex Developmental Disorder (McDD) represents a distinct group within the autistic spectrum based on symptomatology. ... // Introduction In statistics, regression analysis is a method for explanation of phenomena and prediction of future events. ... Overview In psychiatry, Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) is the current name of the condition formerly listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders as Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD) and Multiple Personality Syndrome. ... Multitasking may refer to any of the following: Computer multitasking - the apparent simultaneous performance of two or more tasks by a computers central processing unit. ... The Multnomah Community Ability Scale is a standardized mental health assessment which scores several different axes of functionality independently. ... Murray Bowens most important work Family theraphy in clinical practice, Aronson edition 1994 Murray Bowen, M.D., (13 January 1913, Waverly, Tennessee - 9 October 1990) was an American psychiatrist and a professor in Psychiatry at the Georgetown University. ... Selective mutism is a social anxiety condition, in which a person who is quite capable of speech, is unable to speak in given situations. ... Muzafer Sherif (born July 29, 1906, in Odemis, Izmir, Turkey – died October 16, 1988, in Fairbanks, Alaska) was one of the founders of social psychology. ... The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) is a personality questionnaire designed to identify certain psychological differences according to the typological theories of Carl Gustav Jung as published in his 1921 book Psychological Types (English edition, 1923). ... Myotonia is a neuromuscular disorder characterized by the slow relaxation of the muscles after voluntary contraction or electrical stimulation. ... Mysophilia is a paraphilia relating to soiled or dirty material. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Myxedema (British spelling: myxoedema) is a skin and tissue disorder usually due to severe prolonged hypothyroidism. ...


N

N-Affil - N-Pow - N - Naloxone - Naltrexone - Nancy Chodorow - Napoleon complex - Narcissism - Narcissistic personality - Narcosis therapy - Narcosynthesis - Narcotics - Narziss Ach - NASAP - Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research - Nathaniel Branden - Natural environmental type phobia - Naturalistic observation - NCE score - Neal E. Miller - Necrophobia - Need - Need for treatment - Negative correlation - Negative equality nostalgia - Negative reinforcement - Negative skew - Negative symptoms - Negative triad - Negativism - Neo-Freudian - Neo-Freudian theory - Neologism - Neonate - Neophobia - Nerve impulse - Nervous system - Neural sub-centers - Neurite - Neuro-linguistic programming - NLP - Neurocognition - Neurodermatitis - Neurofeedback - Neurofibrillary tangles - Neuroleptics - Neurologist - Neuron - Neuroplasticity - Neuropsychological test - Neuropsychologist - Neuropsychology - Neuroscience - Neuroses - Neurosis - Neurosyphillis - Neurotic anxiety - Neurotic paradox - Neuroticism Extraversion Openness Personality Inventory - Neurotransmitter - Neutral stimulus - Neutrois - Niacin - Nicaraguan Sign Language - Nicotine - Niemann-Pick disease - Night owl - Nightlight - Nightmare - Nightmare disorder - Nitrous oxide - Noam Chomsky - Noema - Noesis - Noetic Psychology - Nominal aphasia - Nominal scale - Nomothetic approach - Nomothetic context - Nonadaptive reaction - Nondeclarative memory - Nonparametric test - Nonsense syllables - Nonverbal communication Nonviolent self defense - Noogenesis - Norepinephrine - Norepinephrine - Norm - Normal curve - Normal distribution - Norman Triplett - Norms - Nosology - NT - Nuclear magnetic response imaging - Nucleus - Null hypothesis - Number form - Numeracy - Nurturant parent model - Nurture - Nyctophobia - Nymphophilia - N-Affil (Need for Affiliation) is a term introduced by David McClelland into the field of psychology, to describe a persons need to feel like he needs to belong to a group. ... N-Pow (Need for Power) is a term introduced by David McClelland into the field of psychology, referring to an individuals need to be in charge. ... Naloxone is a drug used to counter the effects of opioid overdose, for example heroin and morphine overdose. ... Naltrexone is an opioid receptor antagonist used primarily in the management of alcohol dependence and opioid dependence. ... Nancy Chodorow is a feminist sociologist and psychoanalyst born 20 January 1944 in New York City. ... In the fields of psychology and psychoanalysis, Napoleon complex (or Napoleon syndrome) is a colloquial term used to describe a type of inferiority complex suffered by people who are short. ... Narcissus, the Greek hero after whom narcissism is named, became obsessed with his own reflection. ... In psychology, narcosynthesis refers to a group of techniques which has its origins in the practice of narco-hypnosis. Narco-hypnosis as its name implies, is the use of various narcotics to induce various types of hypnotic states. ... The term narcotic, derived from the Greek word for stupor, originally referred to a variety of substances that induced sleep (such state is narcosis). ... North American Society of Adlerian Psychology The purpose of NASAP is to promote the knowledge, training, and teaching of the core concepts of Adlerian (Individual) Psychology Links http://www. ... The Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research (NKI) is a New York State-funded research Institute, located in Orangeburg New York. ... Nathaniel Branden (b. ... Naturalistic observation is a method of observation, commonly used by psychologists and social/behavioral scientists, that involves observing subjects in their natural habitats. ... Neal E Miller was born in Milwaukee in 1909. ... The English suffix -phobia is used to describe fear or hatred (the latter is often ignored) of a particular thing or subject. ... A need is the psychological feature that arouses an organism to action toward a goal and the reason for the action, giving purpose and direction to behavior. ... Negative Equality Nostalgia (or NEN), also known as Same boat syndrome is the positive feeling one gets when knowing a peer is in the same level of trouble they are. ... In operant conditioning, reinforcement is any change in an organisms surroundings that: occurs regularly when the organism behaves in a given way (that is, is contingent on a specific response), and is associated with an increase in the probability that the response will be made or in another measure... Half full or half empty? Pessimism describes a general belief that things are bad, and tend to become worse; or that looks to the eventual triumph of evil over good; it contrasts with optimism, the contrary belief in the goodness and betterment of things generally. ... The Neo-Freudian psychologists were those followers of Sigmund Freud who accepted the basic tenets of his theory of psychoanalysis but altered it in some way. ... A neologism (Greek νεολογισμός [neologismos], from νέος [neos] new + λόγος [logos] word, speech, discourse + suffix -ισμός [-ismos] -ism) is a word, term, or phrase which has been recently created (coined) — often to apply to new concepts, to synthesize pre-existing concepts, or to make older terminology sound more contemporary. ... A human infant The word Infant derives from the Latin in-fans, meaning unable to speak. ... Neophobia is the fear of new things or experiences. ... Schematic of an electrophysiological recording of an action potential showing the various phases which occur as the wave passes a point on a cell membrane. ... The nervous system of an animal coordinates the activity of the muscles, monitors the organs, constructs and also stops input from the senses, and initiates actions. ... Any projection from the cell body of a neuron can be referred to as a neurite. ... This article is not about the academic discipline of neurolinguistics which investigates the brain mechanisms underlying language. ... NLP may refer to: Natural language processing, an area of computational linguistics Neuro-linguistic programming, a set of models and principles to describe the relationship between mind, language and perception. ... Neurocognitive is a term used to describe cognitive functions closely linked to the function of particular areas, neural pathways, or cortical networks in the brain. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Neurofibrillary tangles are pathological protein aggregates found within neurons in cases of Alzheimers disease. ... The term antipsychotic is applied to a group of drugs used to treat psychosis. ... Neurology is the branch of medicine that deals with the nervous system and disorders affecting it. ... Drawing by Santiago Ramón y Cajal of neurons in the pigeon cerebellum. ... Neuroplasticity challenges the idea that brain functions are fixed in certain locations. ... Neuropsychological tests are specifically designed tasks used to measure a psychological function known to be linked to a particular brain structure or pathway. ... Neuropsychology is a branch of psychology and neurology that aims to understand how the structure and function of the brain relate to specific psychological processes. ... Neuropsychology is a branch of psychology and neurology that aims to understand how the structure and function of the brain relate to specific psychological processes and overt behaviors. ... Drawing of the cells in the chicken cerebellum by S. Ramón y Cajal Neuroscience is a field that is devoted to the scientific study of the nervous system. ... A neurosis, in psychoanalytic theory, is an ineffectual coping strategy that Sigmund Freud suggested was caused by emotions from past experience overwhelming or interfering with present experience. ... In modern psychology, the term neurosis, also known as psychoneurosis or neurotic disorder, is a general term that refers to any mental imbalance that causes distress, but (unlike a psychosis or personality disorder) does not prevent rational thought or an individuals ability to function in daily life. ... Neuroticism Extraversion Openness Personality Inventory, or NEO PI-R (same, revised) is a psychological personality inventory; a 240-questionnaire measure of the Five Factor Model: Extraversion, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Neuroticism, and Openness to experience. ... Chemical structure of D-aspartic acid, a common amino acid neurotransmitter. ... Neutral stimulus: a stimulus which iniatially produces no specific response other than provoking attention. ... Niacin, also known as nicotinic acid or vitamin B3, is a water-soluble vitamin whose derivatives such as NADH, NAD, NAD+, and NADP play essential roles in energy metabolism in the living cell and DNA repair. ... Nicaraguan Sign Language (or ISN, Idioma de Señas de Nicaragua or Idioma de Signos Nicaragüense) is a signed language spontaneously developed by deaf children in a number of schools in western Nicaragua in the 1970s and 1980s. ... Nicotine is an alkaloid found in the nightshade family of plants (Solanaceae), predominantly in tobacco, and in lower quantities in tomato, potato, eggplant (aubergine), and green pepper. ... Niemann-Pick disease is an inherited condition involving lipid metabolism (the breakdown and use of fats and cholesterol in the body) in which harmful amounts of lipids accumulate in the spleen, liver, lungs, bone marrow, and brain. ... Night owl is a term for a person who tends to stay up until late at night. ... Coleman lantern style nightlight A nightlight is a small, usually electrical, light source placed for comfort or convenience in indoor dark areas or areas that become dark at certain times. ... The current usage of the term nightmare refers to a dream which causes the sleeper a strong unpleasant emotional response. ... Nightmare disorder is a disorder characterized by frequent awakening from nightmares with a vivid remembrance of the dream. ... For other uses, see Nitrous oxide (disambiguation). ... Avram Noam Chomsky (Hebrew :אברם נועם חומסקי Yiddish: אברם נועם כאמסקי) (born December 7, 1928) is an American linguist, philosopher, political activist, author, and lecturer. ... Look up Noesis in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Noetic Psychology is a specific theme in psychology dedicated to the disovery of meaning and purpose; resolution of existential angst; the integration of affect(emotions) with cognition (thinking i. ... Nominal aphasia (also known as anomic aphasia) is a form of aphasia (loss of language capability caused by brain damage) in which the subject has difficulty remembering or recognizing names which the subject should know well. ... The level of measurement of a variable in mathematics and statistics is a classification that was proposed in order to describe the nature of information contained within numbers assigned to objects and, therefore, within the variable. ... Non-Parametric statistics are statistics where it is not assumed that the population fits any parametrized distributions. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Nonviolent Self Defense (NSD) is a system of self-protection and humane control developed in the 1970s by Harvard-trained psychologist Dr. William Paul. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Norepinephrine (INN)(abbr. ... Norepinephrine (INN)(abbr. ... The word norm coming from the latin word norma which means angle measure or (lawlike) rule, has a number of meanings: A social or sociological norm; see norm (sociology). ... The normal distribution, also called Gaussian distribution (named after Carl Friedrich Gauss, a German mathematician, although Gauss was not the first to work with it), is an extremely important probability distribution in many fields. ... The normal distribution, also called the Gaussian distribution, is an important family of continuous probability distributions, applicable in many fields. ... In 1897, he published the first experiment on a social facilitation effect ... The word norm coming from the latin word norma which means angle measure or (lawlike) rule, has a number of meanings: A social or sociological norm; see norm (sociology). ... ... NT, for iNtuitive Thinker, is a classification of personality under the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator system, specifically as augmented by David Kersey. ... HeLa cells stained for DNA with the Blue Hoechst dye. ... In statistics, a null hypothesis is a hypothesis set up to be nullified or refuted in order to support an alternative hypothesis. ... A number form from one of Francis Galtons (1881b) subjects. ... Numeracy is a term that emerged in the United Kingdom as a contraction of numerical literacy. In the United States, it is familiar to math educators and intellectuals but not in the common usage. ... The nurturant parent model envisions a family model where children are expected to explore their surrounding with protection from their parents. ... Nurture is usually defined as the process of caring for and teaching a child as they grow. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... An adult male who is attracted to young females. ...


O

O. H. Mowrer - Object choice - Object constancy - Object permanence - Object relations school - Goals and goal setting - Goal setting - Objective anxiety - Objective techniques - Objective test - Observation - Observation schedule - Observational learning - Observer drift - Observer effect - Obsession - Obsessive-compulsive disorder - Obsessive-compulsive personality - Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder - Obsessive Relational Intrusion - Occipital lobe - Occupational psychology - Occupational psychosis - Occupational therapy - Octave illusion - Odd-eccentric personality disorders - Odd-Even reliability - Oedipus complex - Olfaction - Olfactory receptors - Oliver James - Oliver L. Zangwill - One-upmanship - One-Way aNOVA - One half of the interquartile range - Open-system thinking - Open relationship - Operant behavior - Operant conditioning - Operationalization - Operationism - Operations research - Opiates - Opioids - Opium - Opponent-process theory - Oppositional defiant disorder - Optical dot gain - Optimal level of arousal - Option awareness - Oral aggressive personality - Oral receptive personality - Oral stage - Order effects - Ordered array - Ordinal scale - Organ of Corti - Organic psychosis - Organismic variable - Organizational citizenship behavior - Organizational communication - Organizational psychology - Orgasm - Orgasmic reorientation - Orgone - Orientation - Ornithophobia - Osmophobia - Otto F. Kernberg - Otto Rank - Outcome studies - Outdated percept - Oval window - Overcontrol - Overcontrolled - Overjustification effect - Overlearning - Oxford University Department of Psychology - Oxiracetam - Object permanence is the term used to describe the awareness that objects continue to exist even when they are no longer visible. ... An objective or goal is a personal or organizational desired end point in development. ... Goal Setting involves setting specific, measurable and time targeted objectives. ... Objective tests are different from obtrusive tests, because objective tests are not projective in nature. ... Observation is an activity of a sapient or sentient living being (e. ... Observational learning or social learning is learning that occurs as a function of observing, retaining and replicating behavior observed in others. ... Observer Effect is the name of the 87th episode from the television series Star Trek: Enterprise. ... Look up obsession in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Obsessive compulsive personality disorder (OCPD), or anankastic personality disorder, is a personality disorder that is characterized by a general psychological inflexibility, rigid conformity to rules and procedures, perfectionism, moral code, and/or excessive orderliness. ... Obsessive Relational Intrusion (ORI) is a term used in criminal psychology research used to describe the willful and continued intrusion into the personal life of a victim by an aspiring or former relational partner. ... The occipital lobe is the visual processing center of the mammalian brain. ... Occupational Therapists work with the disabled, the elderly, newborns, school-aged children, and with anyone who has a permanent or temporary impairment in their physical or mental functioning. ... Occupational psychosis is the concept that ones occupation or career makes that person so biased that they could be described as psychotic. ... Occupational therapy refers to the use of meaningful occupations to assist people who have difficulty in achieving occupationally balanced lives. ... Discovered by Diana Deutsch in 1973, the octave illusion is an auditory illusion produced by simultaneously playing two sequences of two notes, high to low, and low to high, in separate stereo channels over headphones. ... The Oedipus complex in Freudian psychoanalysis refers to a stage of psychosexual development in childhood where children of both sexes regard their father as an adversary and competitor for the exclusive love of their mother. ... Young boy smelling a flower Olfaction, which is also known as Olfactics is the sense of smell, and the detection of chemicals dissolved in air. ... Olfactory receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor in olfactory receptor neurons. ... Oliver James is a clinical psychologist, writer and television documentary producer. ... One-upmanship is the systematic and conscious practice of making ones associates feel inferior and thereby gaining the status of being one-up on them, as described by Stephen Potter in his tongue-in-cheek self-help books, and in film and television derivatives from them. ... See also open marriage. ... There are multiple factors involved in any behavioral event. ... Operant conditioning is the use of consequences to modify the occurrence and form of behavior. ... Operationalization is the process of converting concepts into specific observable behaviors that a researcher can measure. ... Operations Research or Operational Research (OR) is an interdisciplinary branch of mathematics which uses methods like mathematical modeling, statistics, and algorithms to arrive at optimal or good decisions in complex problems which are concerned with optimizing the maxima (profit, faster assembly line, greater crop yield, higher bandwidth, etc) or minima... An opioid is any agent that binds to opioid receptors found principally in the central nervous system and gastrointestinal tract. ... An opioid is any agent that binds to opioid receptors found principally in the central nervous system and gastrointestinal tract. ... This article is about the drug. ... Opponent-process theory is a psychological model proposed by Richard Solomon in 1980 to account for addictive behavior. ... Oppositional defiant disorder is a controversial psychiatric category listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders where it is described as an ongoing pattern of disobedient, hostile, and defiant behavior toward authority figures that goes beyond the bounds of normal childhood behavior. ... Dot gain is a phenomenon in printing and graphic arts whereby printed dots are perceived and actually printed bigger than intended. ... The oral stage in psychology is the term used by Sigmund Freud to describe the childs development during the first 18 to 24 months of life, in which an infants pleasure centers are in the mouth. ... An ordinal scale defines a total preorder of objects; the scale values themselves have a total order; names may be used like bad, medium, good; if numbers are used they are only relevant up to strictly monotonically increasing transformations (order isomorphism). ... The organ of Corti is the organ in the inner ear of mammals that contains auditory sensory cells, or hair cells. // Structure and function It has highly specialized structures that respond to fluid-borne vibrations in the cochlea with a shearing vector in the hairs of some cochlear hair cells. ... Dennis Organ of Indiana University is widely credited with introducing OCB in academic literature. ... Organizational communication, broadly speaking, is: the transactional, symbolic process in which the activities of a social collective are coordinated to achieve individual and collective goals. ... Industrial and organizational psychology (or I/O psychology) is also known as occupational psychology (in the United Kingdom) and work psychology (from the German, Arbeitpsychologie). ... An orgasm (sexual climax) is the conclusion of the plateau phase of the sexual response cycle, and is experienced by both males and females. ... Orgone energy is a concept of a universal life energy that physician and psychoanalyst Wilhelm Reich said he had discovered in the late 1930s. ... Orientation is a function of the mind involving awareness of three dimensions: time, place and person. ... Ornithophobia is a type of specific phobia, an abnormal, irrational fear of birds. ... Osmophobia refers to a fear or aversion to smells or odors. ... Otto F. Kernberg, was born in Vienna in 1928 and in 1939 his family left Germany to escape the Nazi regime and emigrated to Chile where he later studied biology and medicine and afterwards psychiatry and psychoanalysis with the Chilean Psychoanalytic Society. ... Otto Rank (April 22, 1884 – October 31, 1939) was an Austrian psychologist. ... The overjustification effect (also called the undermining effect) is the effect whereby giving someone an incentive (monetary or otherwise) to do something that they already enjoy doing decreases their intrinsic motivation to do it. ... Overlearning is a pedagogical concept according to which newly acquired skills should be practiced well beyond the point of initial mastery, leading to automaticity. ... The following selected researchers, lecturers and fellows are currently working at the Oxford University Department of Experimental Psychology: Paul Azzopardi Dorothy Bishop Oliver Braddick Mark Buckley Deborah Clarke Martin Davies Nick Davis Ann Dowker David Gaffan Bruce Henning Miles Hewstone Maryann Martin Kate Nation Kia Nobre Brian Parkinson Dick Passingham... Oxiracetam (2-(4-hydroxy-2-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl)acetamide) is a nootropic. ...


P

Padded cell - Pain and pleasure - Pain disorder - Pair by association - Pairwise comparison - Palilalia - Panic attack - Panic disorder - Panic disorders - Papert's principle - Paradoxical intention - Parallel form reliability - Parallel play - Paramatman - Parameter - Paranoid-schizoid position - Paranoid disorder - Paranoid personality - Paranoid personality disorder - Paranoid schizophrenia - Paraphilia - Paraphrenia - Paraprofessional - Parapsychology - Paraskavedekatriaphobia - Parasuicide - Parasympathetic nervous system - Parent coach - Parenting - Paresthesia - Parietal lobe - Parkinson's disease - Parosmia - Part learning - Parthenophobia - Partial reinforcement schedule - Partialism - Passion - Passive intellect - Passive learning - Password psychology - Pastoral counseling - Pathogenic theory of schizophrenia - Pathognomy - Pathological gambling - Pathological liar - Pathological lying - Pathology - Patience - Pattern matching - Pattern recognition - Paul Ekman - Paul Phelps - Paul Slovic - Paul Watzlawick - PDD not otherwise specified - Peak experience - Pearson product-Moment correlation - Pedagogy - Pedigree - Pedology - Pedophile - Pedophilia - Pelvic thrust - Penile pleysthmograph - Penis - Penis envy - Percentile rank - Percept - Percept - Perception - Perceptual constancy - Perceptual defense - Perceptual positions - Perceptual psychology - Perceptual selectivity - Perfect correlation - Perfectionism - Performance anxiety - Performance psychology - Performance test - Perpetual child - Persecution complex - Persecutory delusion - Perseveration - Person centered planning - Person centered therapy - Persona - Personal commitment - Personal construct psychology - Personal construct theory - Personal equation - Personality alteration - Personality Assessment Inventory - Personality disorder - Personality inventory - Personality psychology - Personality tests - Personality trait - Personality type - Perspective - Persuasion - Pervasive developmental disorders - PET scan - Peter Cathcart Wason - Peter Gollwitzer - Petit mal epilepsy - Peyote - Phagophobia - Phallic personality - Phallic stage - Phantom mobile device vibration - Phencyclidine - Phenibut - Phenomenology - Phenothiazines - Phenotype - Phenylalanine - Phenylcyclidine - Phenylketonuria - Phi correlation - Phi phenomenon - Philanthropist - Philip Johnson-Laird - Philip Zimbardo - Philippine psychology - Philomath - Philosophy of mind - Philosophy of psychology - Phineas Gage - Phobia - Phobic reaction - Phoebe C. Ellsworth - Phonological disorder - Phonology - Photopic vision - Phrenology - Physiological psychology - Physiology - Pick's disease - Picture thinking - Pierre Janet - Pillow talk - Pilomotor response - Pinto's law - Piquerism - Piracetam (Nootropil) - Pitch - Place learning - Place theory - Placebo - Placebo control group - Placebo effect - Planning - Plasticity - Plateau - Plateau phase - Platykurtic - Play therapy - Pleasure principle - Pleysthmograph - Point biserial correlation - Point estimation - Point prevalence - Poker psychology - Polarization - Political psychology - Polygenic - Polygraph - Polymath - Polysubstance abuse - Pons - Popular psychology - Population - Population mean - Population standard deviation - Brain and mind - Mind and brain - Positive and negative - Positive correlation - Positive Mental Attitude - Positive psychology - Positive psychotherapy - Positive reinforcement - Positive self-talk - Positive skew - Positive spikes - Positive symptoms - Post-cognitivist psychology - Post-purchase rationalization - Post-traumatic stress disorder - Postcognitivism - Postvention - Potential development level - Poverty of content - Poverty of speech - Power - Power Law of Practice - Power process - Practical equine psychology - Prairie madness - Praise - Pramiracetam - Pre- and perinatal psychology - Preconscious - Prediction - Predictive validity - Predisposition - Prefrontal cortex - Prefrontal lobotomy - Prejudice - Premature ejaculation - Premenstrual dysphoric disorder - Premise - Premorbid - Premorbid adjustment - Preoperational stage - Prepared classical conditioning - Prescientific period - Prescriptions regarding gender roles - Presenile dementia - Pretest-Posttest method - Prevalence - Prevention - Primacy effect - Primal therapy - Primary colors - Primary empathy - Primary laws of association - Primary narcissism - Primary process - Primary reinforcer - Primary self - Primitivization - Principles of Psychology - Privileged communication - Proactive inhibition - Proactive interference - Probability of error - Probability sample - Probands - Problem-based learning - Problem finding - Problem shaping - Problem solving - Process-reactive dimension of schizophrenia - Process Oriented Psychology - Process studies - Procrastination - Prodromal symptoms - Profound mental retardation - Progestins - Prognosis - Program evaluation - Programmed learning - Projection - Projective hypothesis - Projective identification - Projective techniques - Projective test - Pronoia - Pronoun reversal - Properception - Propinquity - Proposition - Propositional attitude - Prosopagnosia - Prospect theory  - Prospection - Prospective longitudinal study - Protoself - Proxemics - Proximodistal axis - Prudence - Pseudocertainty effect - Pseudocommunity - Pseudologia - Psikhushka - Psilocybin - Somatoform Pain Disorder - Psyche - Psychedelic - Disability, psychiatric - Disability, psychiatric - Psychiatric social worker - Psychiatrist - Psychiatry - Psychic driving - Psychoacoustics - Psychoactive - Psychoactive drug - Psychoanalysis - Psychoanalyst - Psychoanalytic feminism - Psychoanalytic paradigm - Psychoanalytic theory - Psychoanalytical film theory - Psychobiography - Psychodrama - Psychodynamic theory - Psychodynamic therapy - Psychodynamics - Psychogenesis - Psychogenic amnesia - Psychogenic polydipsia - Psychogram - Psychohistory - Psycholinguist - Psycholinguistics - Psychological abuse - Psychological adaptation - Psychological autopsy - Psychological bond - Psychological deficit - Psychological dependency - Psychological factor influencing a medical condition - Psychological horror - Psychological identity - Psychological pain - Psychological repression - Repression - research methods - Research methods - Psychological resilience - Psychological Review - Psychological statistics - Psychological testing - Psychological tests - Psychological types - Psychology - Psychology of learning - Psychology of Monogamy - Psychology of programming - Psychology of religion - Psychology of Selves - Psychology Today - Psychology, Philosophy and Physiology - Psychology/rewrite - Psychometrics - Psychomotor agitation - Psychomotor epilepsy - Psychomotor retardation - Psychonomics - Psychoorganic syndrome - Psychopathologists - Psychopathology - Psychopharmacology - Psychophysics - Psychophysiological disorders - Psychophysiology - Psychosexual stages - Psychosexual trauma - Psychosis - Psychosocial approach - Psychosomatic disorders - Psychosomatic hypertension - Psychotherapeutic Postural Integration - Psychotherapy - Psychotic depression - Psychotic symptoms - Psychotropic medication - PsycINFO - Pteronophobia - Puer Aeternus - Punishment - Purkinje phenomenon - Pychological autopsy - Pyritinol (Enerbol) - A padded cell is a cell in a mental hospital with cushions lining the walls; this is done for the patients who want to commit suicide. ... Track listing Go Back - 4:48 (Marc Verhaeghen, Dirk Ivens) Drowning In Your Sleep - 2:10 (Verhaeghen, Ivens) Pain And Pleasure (Recorded Live in Paradiso, Amsterdam (Netherlands), 9 May 1986) - 5:30 (Verhaeghen, Ivens) Categories: Music stubs | 1986 albums ... Pain disorder or body dysmorphic disorder is when a patient experiences chronic and constant pain in one or more areas, and is thought to be caused by psychological stress. ... In relation to psychology i. ... Pairwise comparison generally refers to any process of comparing entities in pairs to judge which of each pair is preferred, or has a greater amount of some quantitative property. ... Palilalia is the repetition or echoing of ones own spoken words. ... Panic attacks are sudden, discrete periods of intense anxiety, fear and discomfort that are associated with a variety of somatic and cognitive symptoms[1]. The onset of these episodes is typically abrupt, and may have no obvious trigger. ... Panic Disorder is a psychiatric condition characterized by reccurring panic attacks in combination with significant behavioral change or at least a month of ongoing worry about the implications or concern about having other attacks. ... Panic Disorder is a mental condition that causes the sufferer to experience sporadic bouts of frightening symptoms, such as racing heart, shortness of breath, or a feeling of hopeless loss of control. ... In child psychology, Paperts principle is often used to explain the results of Jean_Piagets experiments. ... In psychotherapy, paradoxical intention is the deliberate practice of a neurotic habit or thought, undertaken in order to identify and remove it. ... Parallel play is a concept from developmental psychology. ... In Hindu theology, Paramatman is the Absolute Atman or Supreme Soul or Spirit (also known as Supersoul or Oversoul) in the Vedanta and Yoga philosophies of India. ... The factual accuracy of this article is disputed. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Paranoid personality disorder is a psychiatric diagnosis that denotes a personality disorder with paranoid features. ... Schizophrenia is a psychiatric diagnosis denoting a persistent, often chronic, mental illness variously affecting behavior, thinking, and emotion. ... Look up paraphilia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Paraphrenia is a particularly paranoid form of schizophrenia occurring in the elderly as opposed to adolescents. ... Paraprofessional is a job title given to people in various occupational fields, such as education, healthcare, and law, that have a certificate that they have obtained by passing an exam enabling them to perform a task requiring a lot of knowledge, but dont have the occupational license to perform... Early parapsychological research employed the use of Zener cards in experiments designed to test for possible telepathic communication. ... Paraskavedekatriaphobia (also known as paraskevidekatriaphobia or friggatriskaidekaphobia) is a specialized form of triskaidekaphobia, the phobia of Friday the 13th. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Autonomic nervous system innervation, showing the sympathetic and parasympathetic (craniosacral) systems, in red and blue, respectively The parasympathetic nervous system is one of three divisions of the autonomic nervous system. ... A Parent Coach is a professionally trained person who guides parents in fulfilling their roles as powerful mentors to their children. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. ... Paresthesia or paraesthesia (in British English) is a sensation of tingling, pricking, or numbness of a persons skin with no apparent long-term physical effect, more generally known as the feeling of pins and needles or of a limb being asleep (but not directly related to the phenomenon of... The parietal lobe is a lobe in the brain. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... In psychology, Parthenophobia refers to an abnormal and persistent fear of virgins or young girls. ... Look up passion in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Passive intellect is a term used in both psychology and philosophy. ... Living on the intersection of cryptography and psychology, password psychology is the study of what makes passwords or cryptographic keys easy to remember or guess. ... Pastoral counseling is a branch of counseling in which ordained ministers, rabbis, priests and others provide therapy services. ... The pathogenic theory of schizophrenia, also called the germ theory of schizophrenia, is a pathogenic theory of disease in which it is thought that the proximal cause of schizophrenia is not genetic but due to the environment in the form of pathogens such as bacteria or viruses. ... Pathognomy is the study of passions and emotions. ... Pathological gambling, as defined by American Psychiatric Association is an impulse control disorder associated with gambling. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that Pathological liar be merged into this article or section. ... A renal cell carcinoma (chromophobe type) viewed on a hematoxylin & eosin stained slide Pathologist redirects here. ... Patience, engraving by Hans Sebald Beham, 1540 Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Patience Patience is the ability to endure waiting, delay, or provocation without becoming annoyed or upset, or to persevere calmly when faced with difficulties. ... In computer science, pattern matching is the act of checking for the presence of the constituents of a given pattern. ... Pattern recognition is a field within the area of machine learning. ... Paul Ekman (born 1934) is a psychologist and has been a pioneer in the study of emotions and facial expressions. ... Paul Slovic (b. ... Paul Watzlawick Paul Watzlawick PhD (* July 25, 1921 in Villach, Austria) is one of the worlds leading theoreticians in Communication Theory and Radical Constructivism and very important inspiration in the field of family therapy and general psychotherapy. ... PDD not otherwise specified or PDD-NOS is a pervasive developmental disorder. ... Peak experience is a term used to describe certain extra-personal and ecstatic states, particularly ones tinged with themes of unification, harmonization and interconnectedness. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. ... A pedigree is a list of ancestors (usually implying distinguished), a list of ancestors of the same breed (usually in the case of animals), the purity of a breed, individual, or strain, or a document proving any of these things. ... See also Pedology (soil study). ... Pedophilia, paedophilia, or pædophilia (see spelling differences), is the paraphilia of being sexually attracted primarily or exclusively to pre-pubescent children. ... Pedophilia or pædophilia (see spelling differences) is a mental state in which an adult has a preferential sexual attraction to prepubescent and in some definitions, preadolescent children. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The penis (plural penises, penes) is an external male sexual organ. ... For the Crass album, see Penis Envy (album). ... The percentile rank of a score is the percentage of scores in its frequency distribution which are lower. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... In psychology and the cognitive sciences, perception is the process of acquiring, interpreting, selecting, and organizing sensory information. ... Subjective constancy or perceptual constancy is the perception of an object or quality as constant under changing conditions. ... Perceptual positions is a neuro-linguistic programming and psychology term denoting that a complex system may look very different, and different information will be available, depending how one looks at it and ones point of view. ... Perceptual psychology - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Perfectionism, in psychology, is a belief that perfection should be strived for. ... A summary of Performance anxiety can be found at http://yearoftheowl. ... Performance psychology is the branch of psychology that studies the factors that allow individuals, communities and societies to flourish, anf poo. ... The performance test or PT is a section of the bar exam that is intended to mimic a real-life legal task that future lawyers may face. ... A perpetual child is a person who is grown-up in stature but is not capable of living as an independent adult. ... A persecution complex is a term given to an array of psychologically complex behaviours, that specifically deals with the perception of being persecuted, for various possible reasons. ... Look up perseverate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Person Centered planning in mental healthcare is the practice of listening to the mental health consumer for their choice of direction and assisting them in setting and obtaining true living goals. ... Persona literally means mask , although it does not usually refer to a literal mask but to the social masks all humans supposedly wear. ... Personal commitment is an interaction dominated by obligations. ... Personal Construct Psychology (PCP) is a theory of personality developed by the American psychologist George Kelly in the 1950s. ... Personal construct theory (PCT) is a psychological theory of human cognition. ... The personal equation, in 19th- and early 20th-century science, referred to the idea that every individual observer had an inherent bias when it came to measurements and observations. ... Personality alteration is a theory often associated with cults. ... Personality Assessment Inventory is a test applied by psychologists. ... Personality disorder, formerly referred to as a Characterological disorder is a class of mental illness characterized by rigid and on-going patterns of thought and action. ... Personality psychology is a branch of psychology which studies personality and individual differences. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Perspective in theory of cognition is the choice of a context or a reference (or the result of this choice) from which to sense, categorize, measure or codify experience, cohesively forming a coherent belief, typically for comparing with another. ... Persuasion is a form of influence. ... Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medicine medical imaging technique which produces a three dimensional image or map of functional processes in the body. ... Peter Cathcart Wason (22 April 1924 - 17 April 2003) was a cognitive psychologist, who worked on the psychology of reason. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The English suffix -phobia is used to describe fear or hatred (the latter is often ignored) of a particular thing or subject. ... The phallic stage is the third of Freuds psychosexual stages, when awareness of and manipulation of the genitals is supposed to be a primary source of pleasure. ... Ringxiety is a portmanteau neologism formed from the words ringer and anxiety. ... “Angel Dust” redirects here. ... Beta-phenyl-gamma-aminobutyric acid, better known as Phenibut or less commonly Fenibut or Phenybut, is a neuropsychotropic drug, derived from the neurotransmitter GABA that is capable of passing the blood brain barrier. ... This article is about the philosophical movement. ... Phenothiazines are the largest of the 5 main classes of antipsychotic drugs. ... Individuals in the mollusk species Donax variabilis show diverse coloration and patterning in their phenotypes. ... Phenyl alanine is an α-amino acid with the formula HO2CCH(NH2)CH2C6H5. ... PhenylKetonUria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by a deficiency in the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). ... The phi phenomenon is a perceptual illusion described by Max Wertheimer in his 1912 Experimental Studies on the Seeing of Motion, in which a disembodied perception of motion is produced by a succession of still images. ... A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ... Philip Johnson-Laird (1936 - ) is a psychologist and author of several notable books on human cognition and reasoning, including Psychology of Reasoning: Structure and Content (1972, co-author Peter C. Wason), Mental Models: Toward a Cognitive Science of Language, Inference and Consciousness (1983), Deduction (1991, co-author Ruth M. J... Philip G. Zimbardo (born March 23, 1933) is an American psychologist, best known for his Stanford prison experiment and bestselling introductions to psychology. ... Philippine Psychology is the Philippine branch of a more wider perspective of the Asian Psychology. ... Philomath (pronunciation: FIL-oh-math) is defined as a lover of learning, from Greek philos (beloved, loving, as in philosophy or philanthropy) + Greek manthanein, math- (to learn, as in polymath). ... A Phrenological mapping of the brain. ... Philosophy of psychology typically refers to a set of issues at the theoretical foundations of modern psychology. ... Phineas Gages death mask Phineas P. Gage (1823 – May 21, 1860) was a railroad construction foreman who suffered a traumatic brain injury when a tamping iron accidentally passed through his skull, damaging the frontal lobes of his brain. ... For other uses, see Phobia (disambiguation). ... Speech disorders or speech impediments, as they are also called, are a type of communication disorders where normal speech is disrupted. ... Phonology (Greek phonÄ“ = voice/sound and logos = word/speech), is a subfield of linguistics which studies the sound system of a specific language (or languages). ... Photopic vision is the vision of the light-adapted eye; in many animals, color vision, mediated by cone cells. ... A 19th century phrenology chart. ... Physiological psychology is sometimes related to psychiatry, and in fact may end up becoming the parent branch which contains psychiatry. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Picks disease has two meanings that are often confused: 1) Pathology: Neurologists currently use the term Picks disease to mean specifically one of the pathological subtypes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). ... Picture Thinking, Visual Thinking or Visual/Spatial Learner is the phenomenon of thinking through visual processing, where most people would think with linguistic or verbal processing. ... Pierre Marie Félix Janet, (May 30, 1859 - February 24, 1947) was a pioneering French psychologist in the field of dissociation and traumatic memory. ... Painting by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec Pillow talk is the relaxed, intimate conversation that often occurs between two sexual partners after the act of lovemaking, usually accompanied by cuddling, caresses, and other physical intimacy. ... Piquerism is a psychosexual disorder in which the person finds pleasure in penetrating the victims body with a foreign object such as a sharp pin, or a knife. ... Piracetam (brand name: Nootropil®, Myocalm®), is a nootropic, (though it is only called so by off-label users, see As a nootropic below). ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Place theory is a theory of hearing which states that our perception of sound depends on where each component frequency produces vibrations along the basilar membrane. ... For other uses, see Placebo (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Placebo. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up plasticity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Plateau (disambiguation). ... During the 1950s and 1960s, William H. Masters and Virginia E. Johnson conducted many important studies within the field of human sexuality. ... The far red light has no effect on the average speed of the gravitropic reaction in wheat coleoptiles, but it changes kurtosis from platykurtic to leptokurtic (-0. ... Play Therapy is defined by the Association for Play Therapy as the systematic use of a theoretical model to establish an interpersonal process wherein trained play therapists use the therapeutic powers of play to help clients prevent or resolve psychosocial difficulties and achieve optimal growth and development. ... The pleasure principle and the reality principle are two psychoanalytical terms coined by Sigmund Freud. ... In statistics, point estimation involves the use of sample data to calculate a single value (known as a statistic) which is to serve as a best guess for an unknown (fixed or random) population parameter. ... In epidemiology, point prevalence is a measure of the proportion of people in a population who have a disease or condition at a particular time, such as a particular date. ... After all is said and done, poker is ultimately about psychology - playing against your competitors. ... In communications and psychology, polarization is the process whereby a social or political group is divided into two opposing sub-groups with fewer and fewer members of the group remaining neutral or holding an intermediate position. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political psychology is an interdisciplinary academic field dedicated to the relationship between psychology and political science, with a focus on the role of human thought, emotion, and behavior in politics. ... A genetic disorder, or genetic disease is a disease caused, at least in part, by the genes of the person with the disease. ... Polygraph results are sometimes recorded on a chart recorder A polygraph (commonly yet incorrectly referred to as a lie detector) is a device that measures and records several physiological variables such as blood pressure, pulse, respiration and skin conductivity while the subject is asked and answers a series of questions. ... “Renaissance man” redirects here. ... Position of the pons in the human brain The pons (sometimes pons Varolii after Costanzo Varolio) is a knob on the brain stem. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... In statistics, mean has two related meanings: the average in ordinary English, which is more correctly called the arithmetic mean, to distinguish it from geometric mean or harmonic mean. ... In probability and statistics, the standard deviation of a probability distribution, random variable, or population or multiset of values is a measure of the spread of its values. ... The term positive is often used generally to mean desirable or beneficial, and negative is usually used to mean undesirable of bad. But in neuro-linguistic programming it also has a specific technical meaning, in the phrases positive intent and stated in the positive. ... In probability theory and statistics, correlation, also called correlation coefficient, is a numeric measure of the strength of linear relationship between two random variables. ... The philosophy of having a positive mental attitude is the belief that one can increase achievement through optimistic thought processes. ... Positive psychology is a relatively young branch of psychology that studies the strengths and virtues that enable individuals and communities to thrive. ... Positive psychotherapy is a psychodynamic method of psychotherapy founded by Dr. Nossrat Peseschkian in the early 1970s in Germany. ... Definition: Positive Reinforcement: the presentation of something pleasant or rewarding immediately following a behavior. ... Post-cognitivist psychology comprises varieties of psychology which emerged in the 1990s which challenged the basic assumptions of cognitivism or even information processing models of cognition. ... It is a common phenomenon after people have invested a lot of time, money, or effort in something to convince themselves that it must have been worth it. ... Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a term for certain severe psychological consequences of exposure to, or confrontation with, stressful events that the person experiences as highly traumatic. ... Psychological movements are considered to be post-cognitivist if they are opposed or move beyond the cognitivist theories posited by Noam Chomsky, Jerry Fodor, David Marr and others. ... A Postvention is an intervention conducted after a suicide, largely taking the form of support for the bereaved (family, friends, professionals and peers). ... Potential development level is the level a child is able to reach with the assistance of parents, teachers, peers or experts. ... In psychology, alogia, or poverty of speech, is a general lack of additional, unprompted content seen in normal speech. ... Much of the recent sociological debate on power revolves around the issue of the constraining and/or enabling nature of power. ... The Power Law of Practice states that the logarithm of the reaction time for a particular task decreases linearly with the logarithm of the number of practice trials taken. ... The power process is a theoretical process necessary to fulfill ones psychological need to exert power to fulfill goals, discussed in Theodore Kaczynskis manifesto, Industrial Society and Its Future. ... Practical equine psychology refers to the practical study of horse psychology. ... Prairie madness is a term that describes an affliction that was common in the United States among white settlers of the Great Plains during the mid to late 1800s. ... In religion, praise is an impassioned exaltation of God (ie. ... Pramiracetam (amacetam, CI 879) is a nootropic derived from piracetam, but is more potent (lower dosage is used). ... Pre- and perinatal psychology is the study of the psychological implications of the earliest experiences of the individual, before (prenatal) and during (perinatal) childbirth. ... The Preconscious is a structure of the mind, postulated by Sigmund Freud, containing all memories that can be easily accessed by the conscious mind. ... A prediction is a statement or claim that a particular event will occur in the future in more certain terms than a forecast. ... In psychometrics, predictive validity is the extent to which a scale predicts scores on some criterion measure. ... A genetic predisposition is a genetic effect which influences the phenotype of an organism but which can be modified by the environmental conditions. ... The prefrontal cortex is the anterior part of the frontal lobes of the brain, lying in front of the motor and premotor areas. ... Psychosurgery is the practice of performing surgery on the brain to treat or alleviate severe mental disease. ... For with(out) prejudice in law, see Prejudice (law). ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a severe form of premenstrual syndrome, afflicting 8% of all women. ... Look up Premise in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Preoperational stage is the second of four stages of cognitive development theorized in Piagets theory. ... In most if not all societies there are prescriptions regarding gender roles. ... Alzheimers disease (A.D), also known simply as Alzheimers, is a neurodegenerative disease that, in its most common form, is found in people over age 65. ... In epidemiology, the prevalence of a disease in a statistical population is defined as the total number of cases of the disease in the population at a given time, or the total number of cases in the population, divided by the number of individuals in the population. ... This article lacks information on the importance of the subject matter. ... The primacy effect, in psychology and sociology, is a cognitive bias that results from disproportionate salience of initial stimuli or observations. ... Primal Therapy is a trauma-based psychotherapy created by Arthur Janov, Ph. ... Primary Colors, a 1996 novel by Anonymous (later revealed by Donald Foster to be journalist Joe Klein), is a roman à clef about U.S. President Bill Clintons first presidential campaign in 1992. ... The Principles of Psychology is a monumental text in the history of psychology, written by William James and published in 1890. ... A privilege—etymologically private law or law relating to a specific individual—is an honour, or permissive activity granted by another person or a government. ... Proactive Inhibition is a psychological concept that describes the increased difficulty learning or remembering a set of words after that set had been learned in a previous, different context. ... Proactive interference occurs when information learned earlier disrupts the recall of material learned later. ... Probability of error in hypothesis testing In hypothesis testing in statistics, two types of error are distinguished. ... Proband is a term used most often in medical genetics and other medical fields to denote a particular subject (person or animal) being studied or reported on. ... Problem-based learning (PBL) is a pedagogical strategy of active learning often used in higher education, but it can be adapted for use in K-12 education. ... Problem finding means problem discovery. ... Problem shaping means revising a question so that the solution process can begin or continue. ... Problem solving forms part of thinking. ... Process Oriented Psychology refers to a body of theory and practice that encompasses a broad range of psychotherapeutic, personal growth, and group process applications. ... Look up Procrastination in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In medicine, a prodrome is an early symptom indicating the development of a disease, or indicating that a disease attack is imminent. ... Progestagens (also spelled progestogens or gestagens) are hormones similar in effect to progesterone, the only natural progestagen. ... Prognosis (older Greek πρόγνωσις, modern Greek πρόγνωση - literally fore-knowing, foreseeing) is a medical term denoting the doctors prediction of how a patients disease will progress, and whether there is chance of recovery. ... Program evaluation is essentially a set of philosophies and techniques to determine if a program works. It is a practice field that has emerged, particularly in the USA, as a disciplined way of assessing the merit, value, and worth of projects and programs. ... Programmed Learning is a learning technique first proposed by the behaviorist B. F. Skinner in 1958. ... The word projection can mean more than one thing. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A projective test, in psychology, is a personality test designed to let a person respond to ambiguous stimuli, presumably revealing hidden emotions and internal conflicts. ... A projective test, in psychology, is a personality test designed to let a person respond to ambiguous stimuli, presumably revealing hidden emotions and internal conflicts. ... Pronoia in the Twentieth Century It seems that pronoia, aside from being a system of provisions, took on a practical psychological and linguistic role during the mid-Twentieth Century. ... A language abnormality common in the speech of autistic children is pronoun reversal. ... Properception is a term used in psychiatry as oposed to perception. ... In social psychology, propinquity is one of the main factors leading to interpersonal attraction. ... This article is about the word proposition as it is used in logic, philosophy, and linguistics. ... A propositional attitude is a relational mental state connecting a person to a proposition. ... Prosopagnosia (sometimes known as face blindness) is disorder of face perception where the ability to recognize faces is impaired, while the ability to recognize objects may be relatively intact. ... Prospect theory was developed by Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky in 1979 as a psychologically realistic alternative to expected utility theory. ... Prospection is defined by psychologist Daniel Gilbert in his novel Stumbling on Happiness as The act of looking forward in time or considering the future (Gilbert 2006:1). ... The concept of a protoself was popularized by a neurology department chairman from University of Iowa College of Medicine, Antonio Damasio . ... Bus shelter with seats with armrests, designed to deter proximity, as well as sleeping. ... Prudence, by Luca Giordano Allegory of Prudence, by Simon Vouet Look up Prudence, prudence in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The pseudocertainty effect is a concept from prospect theory. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Psikhushka (Russian: ) is a Russian colloquialism for psychiatric hospital. ... Psilocybin (also known as psilocybine) is a psychedelic alkaloid of the tryptamine family, found in psilocybin mushrooms. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wikiquote. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... For psychedelics, see psychedelic drug. ... Psychiatry is a branch of medicine that studies and treats mental and emotional disorders (see mental illness). ... Psychiatry is a branch of medicine dealing with the prevention, assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of the mind and mental illness. ... Psychic driving is a type of brainwashing where an essential piece of information that is in contradiction to the patients personality is implanted in the mind. ... Psychoacoustics is the study of subjective human perception of sounds. ... A psychoactive drug or psychotropic substance is a chemical that alters brain function, resulting in temporary changes in perception, mood, consciousness, or behaviour. ... An assortment of psychoactive drugs A psychoactive drug or psychotropic substance is a chemical substance that acts primarily upon the central nervous system where it alters brain function, resulting in temporary changes in perception, mood, consciousness and behavior. ... Psychoanalysis is a family of psychological theories and methods based on the work of Sigmund Freud. ... Psychoanalysis is the revelation of unconscious relations, in a systematic way through an associative process. ... Psychoanalytic feminism is based on Freud and his psychoanalytic theories. ... Psychoanalytic theory is a general term for approaches to psychoanalysis which attempt to provide a conceptual framework more-or-less independent of clinical practice rather than based on empirical analysis of clinical cases. ... The concepts of psychoanalysis have been applied to films in various ways; however the 1970s and 1980s saw the development of theory that took concepts developed by the French psychoanalyst and writer Jacques Lacan and applied them to the experience of watching a film. ... Psychobiography is a type of biography that seeks to understand individual, often historical, people and their motivations in history. ... Psychodrama is a method of psychotherapy which explores, through action, the problems of people. ... Sigmund Freud - the central Bold textfounder of psychodynamics as well as psychoanalysis. ... It has been suggested that Psychodynamic psychology be merged into this article or section. ... Sigmund Freud - the central founder of psychodynamics Psychodynamics is the application of the principles of thermodynamics to psychology. ... Psychogenesis is the relatively unheard of psi power of creating matter merely from thought, can also be loosly related to reality bending. ... Psychogenic Amnesia is a form of amnesia popularized by popular culture, particularly film. ... Psychogenic polydipsia is a special form of polydipsia, caused by mental disorders. ... The term psychogram was coined by Hollingworth in 1922, and now refers, in general, to any chart on which personality traits are marked according to a guiding psychological viewpoint. ... Psychohistory is the study of the psychological motivations of historical events. ... A psycholinguist is a social scientist who studies Psycholinguistics. ... Psycholinguistics or psychology of language is the study of the psychological and neurobiological factors that enable humans to acquire, use, and understand language. ... Psychological abuse refers to the humiliation or intimidation of another person, but is also used to refer to the long-term effects of emotional shock. ... A psychological adaptation, also called an evolved psychological mechanism or EPM, is an aspect of a human or other animals psychology that serves a specific purpose, and was created and selected by evolutionary pressures. ... A personal relationship may result in a psychological bond. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Identity in psychological terms relates to self-image, self-esteem and individuation. ... Psychological pain refers to pain caused by psychological stress and by emotional trauma, as distinct from that caused by physiological injuries and syndromes. ... Psychological repression, or simply repression, is the psychological act of excluding desires and impulses (wishes, fantasies or feelings) from ones consciousness and attempting to hold or subdue them in the subconscious. ... A repressed memory, according to some theories of psychology, a memory (often traumatic) of an event or environment which is stored by the unconscious mind but outside the awareness of the conscious mind. ... A very wide range of research methods are used in psychology. ... The specific methods used in any type of research depend on the type of research being performed. ... Resilience is a commonly used concept in psychology (such as in child development, adolescent development, psychopathology, and positive psychology) to describe the positive capacity of people to cope with stress and catastrophe. ... Psychological Review is a highly-acclaimed scientific journal that publishes review articles in the field of psychology. ... Psychological statistics is the application of statistics to psychology. ... Psychological testing or psychological assessment is a field characterized by the use of samples of behavior in order to infer generalizations about a given individual. ... Psychological testing or psychological assessment is a field characterized by the use of samples of behavior in order to infer generalizations about a given individual. ... Psychological Types is the sixth volume in the Princeton/Bollingen edition of the Collected Works of Carl Jung. ... Psychology (from Greek: ψυχή, psukhÄ“, spirit, soul; λόγος, logos, knowledge) is both an academic and applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes and behavior. ... Learning is a process that depends on experience and leads to longterm changes in behavior potential. ... The psychology of monogamy deals with the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors that commonly occur in monogamous relationships. ... The psychology of programming is the field of research that deals with the psychological aspects of writing programs (often computer programs). ... Psychology of religion is psychologys theory of religious experiences and beliefs. ... Psychology of Selves is Drs. ... Cover of April 2004 issue of Psychology Today. ... Psychology, Philosophy and Physiology (PPP) is a degree at the University of Oxford. ... Psychology (from Greek: ψυχή, psukhÄ“, spirit, soul; λόγος, logos, knowledge) is both an academic and applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes and behavior. ... For the parapsychology phenomenon of distance knowledge, see psychometry. ... Psychomotor agitation is a series of unintentional and purposeless motions that stem from mental tension of an individual. ... Psychomotor retardation comprises a slowing down of thought and a reduction of physical movements in a person. ... Psychonomics describes an approach to psychology that aims at discovering the laws (Greek: nomos) that govern the workings of the mind (Greek: psyche). The field is directly related to experimental psychology. ... Psychoorganic syndrome is a progressive disease comparable to presenile dementia. ... Psychopathology is a term which refers to either the study of mental illness or mental distress, or the manifestation of behaviors and experiences which may be indicative of mental illness or psychological impairment. ... Psychopharmacology is the study of the effects of any psychoactive drug that acts upon the mind by affecting brain chemistry. ... Psychophysics is the branch of cognitive psychology dealing with the relationship between physical stimuli and their perception. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In Freudian psychology, an individual progresses through psychosexual stages as they develop. ... Psychosis is a generic psychiatric term for a mental state often described as involving a loss of contact with reality. Stedmans Medical Dictionary defines psychosis as a severe mental disorder, with or without organic damage, characterized by derangement of personality and loss of contact with reality and causing deterioration... Psychosomatic disorder, now more commonly referred to as psychophysiologic illness, is an illness whose symptoms are caused by mental processes of the sufferer rather than immediate physiological causes. ... Psychotherapeutic Postural Integration (PPI) is a wider development of Postural integration (PI), an alternative body-psychotherapy method, which attempts to help individuals to become aware of themselves in their body and empowering them to change their bodymind - their bodies, their emotions and attitudes. ... Psychotherapy is an interpersonal, relational intervention used by trained psychotherapists to aid clients in problems of living. ... Psychotic depression is one of the most severe forms of the general depressive diseases in which the person experiences moments of delusional or paranoid being. ... PsycINFO is a database produced and copyrighted by the American Psychological Association. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Puer Aeternus is Latin for Eternal Boy. ... Look up Punishment in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Nootropics are drugs that are used to enhance mental performance in healthy individuals. ...


Q

Qualia - Quality assurance - Quantitative psychological research - Quantitative psychology - Quantum Psychology - Quasi-Experimental research - Question - Redness is the canonical quale. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Quantitative psychological research is psychological research which performs statistical estimation or statistical inference. ... Quantitative psychology is the application of statistical and mathematical methods to the study of psychology. ... Quantum Psychology: How Brain Software Programs You & Your World was written by Robert Anton Wilson and originally published in 1990. ... A question may be either a linguistic expression used to make a request for information, or else the request itself made by such an expression. ...


R

Radial arm maze - Radical behaviorism - Radical Psychology Network - Radicalization - Radiophobia - Rage - Random assignment - Random sample - Range - Rank-Ordered array - Rapid-smoking treatment - Rapid cycling bipolar disorder - Rapport - Rapport - Rapport congruency - Rashomon effect - Rat Race - Rate theory - Ratio scale - Rational-emotive therapy - Rational choice theory - Rational emotive therapy - Rationality - Rationalization - Raw data - Raymond Cattell - Raymond Moody - Raynaud's disease - Re-evaluation Counseling - Reachback - Reactance - Reaction formation - Reaction time test - Reactive attachment disorder - Reactivity - Reactivity of behavior - Reading - Reading disorder - Reality distortion field - Reality principle - Reason - Reasoning - Recency effect - Reception strategies - Receptive aphasia - Recessive gene - Reciprocal liking - Reciprocity - Recklessness - Recluse - Recognition (Recall) - Recollection - Reconstruction - Recovery time - Recovery, Inc. - Recuperation - Recurring dream - Redecision work - Reference group - Reference scales - Referent power - Reflection - Reformulated learned helplessness theory - Refractory period - Reframing - Regression - Regression analysis - Rehabilitation - Rehabilitation counseling - Rehearsal - Reinforcement - Reinforcer - Rejection - Relapse prevention programs - Relational frame theory - Relational Stage Model - Relationship therapy - Relationships - Relative refractory period - Release therapy - Reliability - Reliability coefficient - Religious instinct - Reminiscence - Remorse - Renfield syndrome - René Arped Spitz - Repetition compulsion - Replication - Representations - Representative sample - Representativeness heuristic - Repressed memory disorder - Repression - Repressive coping style - Rescorla-Wagner model - Resentment - Residual schizophrenia - Residual symptoms - Resistance (psychology) - Resistance to extinction - Resisting Tx change - Respondent behavior - Respondent conditioning - Conditioning, respondent - Response acquiescence - Response cost - Response deviation - Response hierarchy - Response prevention - Response set - Resting potential - Reticular activating system - Reticular formation - Retina - Retinal disparity - Retrieval - Retroactive inhibition - Retroactive interference - Retrograde amnesia - Retrogression - Retrospective memory - Retrospective reports - Reuptake - Reversal design - Reverse learning - Reverse psychology - Reversibility - Reward power - Rh factor - Rhetoric - Rhodiola Rosea - Ribonucleic acid - Richard Bandler - Richard E. Petty - Richard Herrnstein - Richard Isay - Richard Nisbett - Right - Right to refuse treatment - Right to treatment - Righteous indignation - Risk analysis - Risk factor - Risky shift - Ritualization - Robert A. Johnson - Robert Cialdini - Robert Grosseteste - Robert S. Woodworth - Robert Spitzer - Robert Sternberg - Robert Yerkes - Robert J. Zajonc - Roberto Assagioli - Rods - Roger Brown - Role-playing - Role reversal - Role theory - Rollo May - Rom Harré - Ronald Fairbairn - Ronald L. Cohen - Ronald Melzack - Root cause analysis - Rorschach inkblot test - Rosenthal effect - Rotter Incomplete Sentence Blank - Round window - Rousseau Institute - Routine actualization - Roy Schafer - Russell Fazio - The Radial Arm Maze is used to measure Spatial learning and Memory. ... Radical behaviorism is a philosophy that underlies the experimental analysis of behavior approach to psychology, developed by B. F. Skinner. ... The Radical Psychology Network (RadPsyNet) began in Toronto in 1993 when two dozen people attended a discussion at the American Psychological Association convention entitled Will Psychology Pay Attention to its Own Radical Critics? Today the group has more than 500 members in over three dozen countries. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... This article is in need of attention. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... In experimental design, the random placement of participants in experimental versus control groups in order to insure that all groups are matched at the outset of the experiment. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Look up range in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Rapport is one of the most important features or characteristics of unconscious human interaction. ... Italic text:For other uses, see Rapport (disambiguation). ... Rapport congruency is the human tendency to form rapport with someone who seems to be portraying a common role, such as a friend. ... The Rashomon effect is the effect of the subjectivity of perception on recollection, by which observers of an event are able to produce substantially different but equally plausible accounts of it. ... Look up rat race in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Rate theory is a theory of hearing which states that our perception of sound depends on the rate at which neurons signal the frequency of each component. ... The level of measurement of a variable in mathematics and statistics is a classification that was proposed in order to describe the nature of information contained within numbers assigned to objects and, therefore, within the variable. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Rational choice theory assumes human behavior is guided by instrumental reason. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In psychology, rationalization is the process of constructing a logical justification for a decision, action or lack thereof that was originally arrived at through a different mental process. ... Á á É é Í í Ó ó Ú ú À à È è ÃŒ ì Ã’ ò Ù ù  â Ê ê ÃŽ î Ô ô Û û Ä ä Ë ë Ï ï Ö ö Ãœ ü ß Ã ã Ñ ñ Õ õ Ç ç Ä¢ Ä£ Ķ Ä· Ä» ļ Å… ņ Å– Å— Åž ÅŸ Å¢ Å£ Ć ć Ĺ ĺ Ń Å„ Å” Å• Åš Å› Ý ý Ź ź Đ Ä‘ Å® ů ÄŒ č ÄŽ ď Ľ ľ Ň ň Ř Å™ Å  Å¡ Ť Å¥ Ž ž Ǎ ÇŽ Äš Ä› Ǐ ǐ Ç‘ Ç’ Ç“ Ç” Ä€ ā Ä’ Ä“ Ī Ä« ÅŒ ō Ū Å« Ç– ǘ Çš Çœ Ĉ ĉ Äœ ĝ Ĥ Ä¥ Ä´ ĵ Åœ ŝ Å´ ŵ Ŷ Å· Ä‚ ă Äž ÄŸ Ŭ Å­ ÄŠ Ä‹ Ä– Ä— Ä  Ä¡ Ä° ı Å» ż Ä„ Ä… Ę Ä™ Ä® į Ų ų Ł Å‚ Ő Å‘ Å° ű Ä¿ Å€ Ħ ħ Ð ð Þ þ Å’ Å“ Æ æ Ø ø Ã… Ã¥ Ə É™ – — … [] [[]] {{}} ~ | ° → ± − × ¹ ² ³ ‘ “ ’ ” € ... Raymond Bernard Cattell (20 March 1905 - 2 February 1998) was a British and American psychologist who theorized the existence of fluid and crystallized intelligences to explain human cognitive ability. ... Raymond Moody (born June 30, 1944) is a parapsychologist. ... Raynauds disease (RAY-noz) is a condition that affects blood flow to the extremities which include the fingers, toes, nose and ears when exposed to temperature changes or stress. ... Re-evaluation Counseling, or RC is the worlds major organization for Co-counseling. ... Eric Berne, the founder of transactional analysis, coined the term reachback for the effect an impending atypical event can have on a persons schedule as well as his or her mental state before the event begins. ... Reactance is an action in direct contradiction to rules and/or regulations that threaten or eliminate specific behavioral freedoms; it can occur when someone is heavily pressured to accept a certain view or attitude. ... In Sigmund Freuds psychoanalytic theory, reaction formation is a defense mechanism in which anxiety-producing or unacceptable emotions are replaced by their direct opposites. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Attachment disorder. ... Reactivity refers to the rate at which a chemical substance tends to undergo a chemical reaction in time. ... Reading is a process of retrieving and comprehending some form of stored information or ideas. ... Reality distortion field (RDF) is both slang and computer industry jargon. ... The pleasure principle and the reality principle are two psychoanalytical terms coined by Sigmund Freud. ... For other uses, see Reason (disambiguation). ... Reasoning is the mental (cognitive) process of looking for reasons to support beliefs, conclusions, actions or feelings. ... The recency effect, in psychology, is a cognitive bias that results from disproportionate salience of recent stimuli or observations. ... Receptive aphasia, also known as Wernickes aphasia, Fluent aphasia or sensory aphasia in clinical neuropsychology and cognitive neuropsychology, is a type of aphasia often (but not always) caused by neurological damage to Wernickes area in the brain. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Dominance relationship. ... We dont have an article called Reciprocal liking Start this article Search for Reciprocal liking in. ... In social psychology, reciprocity refers to in-kind positive or negative responses of individuals towards the actions of others. ... Recklessness is wanton disregard for the dangers of a situation. ... For the spider, see Brown Recluse. ... As Thought Process During the process of thinking, recognition occurs when some event, process, pattern, or object recurs. ... Recollection is the retrieval of memory. ... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... Recovery, Inc. ... Recuperation is the process by which radical ideas and images are commodified and incorporated within mainstream society, such as the movement for civil rights in the United States or the push for womens rights. ... Special Edition Live Album cover Cover of the Special Edition Live Album included with selected versions of Recurring Dream. ... This article or section seems not to be written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia entry. ... Referent power is individual power based on a high level of identification with, admiration of, or respect for the powerholder. ... Look up reflection in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The refractory period in a neuron occurs after an action potential and generally lasts one millisecond. ... In film, reframing is changing the view of a subject. ... Generally, regression is related to moving backwards, and the opposite of progression. ... In statistics, regression analysis examines the relation of a dependent variable (response variable) to specified independent variables (explanatory variables). ... Rehabilitation of sensory and cognitive function typically involves methods for retraining neural pathways or training new neural pathways to regain or improve neurocognitive functioning that has been diminished by disease or traumatic injury. ... Rehabilitation Counseling is focused on helping people who have disabilities to find, get, and keep employment. ... 82. ... In operant conditioning, reinforcement is an increase in the strength of a response following the presentation of a stimulus contingent on that response. ... In operant conditioning, reinforcement is the presentation of a stimulus contingent on a response which results in an increase in response strength (as evidenced by an increase in the frequency of response). ... Emotional rejection is the feeling a person experiences when disappointed about not achieving something desired or expected. ... Relational frame theory, or RFT, is a psychological theory of human language and cognition, developed and tested largely through the efforts of Steven C. Hayes and Dermot Barnes-Holmes. ... Relational Stage Model The stage model shows relationship characteristics by the stages of interaction as they develop communication changes and they move to different stages. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. ... Schematic of an electrophysiological recording of an action potential showing the various phases which occur as the wave passes a point on a cell membrane. ... Reliability concerns quality or consistency. ... The virtual universality of religion in all known human cultures has led many scholars to conclude that it must be part of our native endowment, that it is instictive. ... Literary reminiscence is writing based on the authors memory of a particular time, place, or incident. ... People feel remorse when reflecting on their actions that they believe are wrong. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... René Arped Spitz (1887-1974) was a psychiatrist and psychanalist, follower of Freud, who studied the development of the childs early psychic life. ... Repetition compulsion is psychological phenomenon in which a person repeats a traumatic event or its circumstances over and over again. ... Replication may mean: In biology: Self-replication, when a molecule (or any other pattern) makes a copy of itself DNA replication, the act of copying the genetic material of a cell (DNA) to a daughter cell Semiconservative replication, mechanism of DNA replication Other: replication (computer science), the provision of redundant... In cognitive psychology a representation is a hypothetical internal cognitive symbol that represents external reality. ... Sampling is that part of statistical practice concerned with the selection of individual observations intended to yield some knowledge about a population of concern, especially for the purposes of statistical inference. ... The representativeness heuristic is a heuristic wherein we assume commonality between objects of similar appearance. ... A repressed memory, according to some theories of psychology, a memory (often traumatic) of an event or environment which is stored by the unconscious mind but outside the awareness of the conscious mind. ... The Rescorla-Wagner model is a model of classical conditioning in which the animal is theorized to learn from the discrepancy between what it predicted would happen and what actually happened. ... Resentment is an emotion, from ressentiment, a French word, meaning malice, anger, being rancorous. The English word has the sense of feeling bitter. ... Resistance as initially used by Sigmund Freud, referred to patients blocking memories from conscious memory. ... Classical conditioning, also called Pavlovian conditioning or respondent conditioning, is a type of learning found in animals, caused by the association (or pairing) of two stimuli. ... The resting potential of a cell is the membrane potential that would be maintained if there were no action potentials, synaptic potentials, or other active changes in the membrane potential. ... The reticular activating system is the name given to part of the brain (the Reticular Formation and its connections) believed to be the centre of arousal and motivation in animals (including humans). ... The reticular formation is a part of the brain which is involved in stereotypical actions, such as walking, sleeping, and lying down. ... Human eye cross-sectional view. ... Stereopsis (from stereo meaning solidity, and opsis meaning vision or sight) is the process in visual perception leading to perception of stereoscopic depth. ... Look up retrieval in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In psychology, retroactive inhibition is the tendency of later learning to hinder the memory of previously learned material. ... Retroactive interference occurs when the material learned later disrupts retrieval of information learned earlier. ... Retrograde amnesia is a form of amnesia where someone will be unable to recall events that occurred before the onset of amnesia. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Reuptake, or re-uptake, is the reabsorption of a neurotransmitter by the neurotransmitter transporter of a pre-synaptic neuron after it has performed its function of transmitting a neural impulse. ... Reverse learning is a neurobiological theory of dreams. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Reversibility can refer to Reversible dynamics - a mathematical dynamical system, or physical laws of motion, for which time-reversed dynamics are well defined. ... A blood type is a description an individuals characteristics of red blood cells due to substances (carbohydrates and proteins) on the cell membrane. ... Rhetoric (from Greek , rhêtôr, orator, teacher) is generally understood to be the art or technique of persuasion through the use of spoken language; however, this definition of rhetoric has expanded greatly since rhetoric emerged as a field of study in universities. ... Binomial name L. Synonyms Sedum rosea (L.) Scop. ... Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is a nucleic acid consisting of a string of covalently-bound nucleotides. ... Richard Wayne Bandler (born February 24, 1950) is an American author on personal development. ... Richard Herrnstein (1930-1994) was a prominent researcher in comparative psychology who did pioneering work on pigeon intelligence employing the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. ... Dr. Richard Isay is a professor of psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College and the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic and a faculty member of the Columbia University Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research. ... Richard E. Nisbett is a professor of Psychology and Co-Director of the Culture and Cognition Program at the University of Michigan. ... In jurisprudence and law, a right is the legal or moral entitlement to do or refrain from doing something or to obtain or refrain from obtaining an action, thing or recognition in civil society. ... Righteous indignation is an emotion one feels when one gets angry over perceived mistreatment, insult, or malice. ... Risk analysis is a technique to identify and assess factors that may jeopardize the success of a project or achieving a goal. ... A risk factor is a variable associated with an increased risk of disease or infection but risk factors are not necessarily causal. ... The risky shift is a concept in social psychology. ... Ritualization is a behavior that occurs typically in the member of a given species in a highly stereotyped fashion and independent of any direct physiological significance. ... Dr. Robert A. Johnson is a Jungian Analyst. ... Robert B. Cialdini is a well known social psychologist who is currently a professor of psychology at Arizona State University. ... A 13th century portrait of Grosseteste. ... Robert Sessions Woodworth (1869-1962) was an influential American academic psychologist of the first half of the twentieth century. ... Dr. Robert L. Spitzer is a Professor of Psychiatry at Columbia University. ... Robert J. Sternberg (8 December 1949-) is the Dean of Arts and Sciences at Tufts University and is the former IBM Professor of Psychology and Education at Yale University. ... Robert Mearns Yerkes, PhD, (b. ... Robert B. Zajonc (1923-present) is a social psychologist who is best known for his decades of work on the mere exposure effect, the phenomenon that repeated exposure to a stimulus brings about an attitude change in relation to the stimulus. ... Roberto Assagioli (Venice,February 27, 1888 - Capolona dArezzo, August 23, 1974) was an influential Italian psychiatrist who was the founder of the psychological movement known as Psychosynthesis. ... Rod cells, or rods, are photoreceptor cells in the retina of the eye that can function in less intense light than can the other type of photoreceptor, cone cells. ... Roger A. Brown (born May 22, 1942 in Brooklyn, New York) is a former professional basketball player. ... In role-playing, participants adopt characters, or parts, that have personalities, motivations, and backgrounds different from their own. ... In Psychodrama, Role Reversal is a procedure or method in which the Protagonist is asked, normally by the Psychodrama Director, to exchange places with another character on stage (an Auxiliary Ego) so that the former moves into the role of the latter and vice versa. ... Role theory is a perspective in social psychology that considers most of everyday activity to be living up to the roles, or expectations, of others. ... Rollo May (April 21, 1909, Ada, Ohio - October 22, 1994, Tiburon, California) was the best known American existential psychologist, authoring the influential book Love and Will in 1969. ... Horace Romano Harré (born 1927 in New Zealand), known widely as Rom, is a distinguished philosopher and psychologist // He graduated in mathematics and physics and he afterwards lectured at the University of Punjab, India. ... William Ronald Dodds Fairbairn (1889-1964) was a noted Scottish psychoanalyst and is generally regarded as the father of British object relations theory. ... Ronald L. Cohen is a social psychologist whose research is focused on justice. ... Ronald Melzack (born July 19, 1929, Montreal, Quebec) is a Canadian neurophysiologist. ... Root cause analysis (RCA) is a class of problem solving methods aimed at identifying the root causes of problems or events. ... A black outline of the first of the ten cards in the Rorschach inkblot test. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Rotter Incomplete Sentence Blank is a projective psychological test developed by Julian Rotter. ... The round window is one of two membranes that separates the inner ear from the middle ear. ... In 1912, Edouard Claparède (1873-1940) created an institute to turn educational theory into a science. ... // When telling a lifestory it is always possible to develop and communicate meaning in more than one way. ...


S

Sadistic Ritual Abuse - Sadomasochism - Safety in numbers - Safety signal hypothesis - Salvia Goddess - Sam Maniar - Sample - Sample mean - Sample standard deviation - Sampling error - Samuel Renshaw - Sander illusion - Sapience - Sapir-Whorf hypothesis - Sara Shettleworth - Saturation - Sauce bearnaise syndrome - Savant - Savings method - Scale - Scales of measurement - Scatter plot - Schedules of reinforcement - Schema - Schemata theory - Schirmer Abduction - Schizoaffective disorder - Schizoid personality - Schizophrenia - Schizophrenics Anonymous - Schizophreniform disorder - Schizophrenogenic mother - Schizotypal personality disorder - Scholastic Aptitude Test - School phobia - School refusal - Science - Science and Consciousness Review - Scientific method - Scientific period - Sclera - Scotopic vision - Seasonal affective disorder - Secondary gain - Secondary notation - Secondary process - Secondary reinforcement - Secondary reinforcer - Secondary sexual characteristics - Security blanket - Sedative - Selection bias - Selection strategies - Selective abstraction - Selective distortion - Selective mortality - Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors - Selegiline (Deprenyl)|]] - Self-actualization - Self-awareness - Self-concept - Self-consciousness - Self-consciousness - Self-criticism - Self-deception - Self-determination Theory - Self-disclosure - Self-efficacy - Self-esteem - Self-help - Self-injury - Self-instructional training - Self-knowledge - Self-loathing - Self-monitoring - Self-parenting - Self-perception theory - Self-pity - Self-punishment - Self-realization - Self-regulated learning - Self (Jung) - Self (psychology) - Self actualization - Self control - Self efficacy - Self motivation - Self propaganda - Self psychology - Self serving bias - Selfishness - Semantic dementia - Semantic differential - Semantic dyslexia - Semantic memory - Semantic network - Semantics - Semi-Interquartile range - Semicircular canals - Semiosis - Semiotics - Senile dementia - Senile plaques - Sensate focus therapy - Sensation - Sensation and Perception Psychology - Sense of time - Senses - Sensitivity - Sensitivity training group - Sensorimotor stage - Sensorimotor tests - Sensory-awareness procedures - Sensory adaptation - Sensory gating - Sensory memory - Sensory neuroscience - Sensory pathways - Sensory preconditioning - Sensory receptor - Sensory threshold - Sentience - Separation anxiety disorder - Serge Moscovici - Serial position effect - Serial sevens - Serotonin - Sesquipedelaphobia - Set point - Severe mental retardation - Sex-reassignment surgery - Sexual arousal disorders - Sexual arousal - Sexual aversion disorder - Sexual desire - Sexual desire disorder - Sexual deviation - Sexual disorders - Sexual dysfunctions - Sexual masochism - Sexual orientation - Sexual orientation disturbance - Sexual response cycle - Sexual sadism - Sexual script - Sexual value system - Sexuality - Sexuoerotic tragedy - Shadow - Shaping - Shellshock - Shock value - Short term memory - Shyness - Siberian ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus) - Sibling - Siderophobia - Sidra Stone - Siege mentality - Sigmund Freud - Sigmund Freud Archives - Sign-significant theories - Significantly different - Similarity - Simon effect - Simplicity theory - Simulated consciousness - Simulated pregnancy - Simulation heuristic - Single-subject experimental design - Single case study - Sitophobia - Situational attribute - Situational awareness - Situational determinants - Situational orgasmic dysfunction - Situational tests - Situational type phobias - Six Thinking Hats - Size-weight illusion - Skeletal muscle - Skew - Skewed distribution - Skinner box - Sleep-learning - Slow brain wave - Sluggishly progressing schizophrenia - Smart mob - Snellen chart - SNS - Sociability - Social-skills training - Social-withdrawal disorder - Social anxiety - Sociophobia - Social cognition - Social desirability - Social disruption - Social distance - Social distance scale - Social facilitation - Social group - Social influence - Social inhibition - Social interaction - Social learning theory - Social loafing - Social motive - Social neuroscience - Social norm - Social phobia - Social problem-solving - Social proof - Social psychiatry - Social psychology (psychology) - Social psychology (sociology) - Social rejection - Social rhythm therapy - Social role - Social selection therapy - Social skills - Social statistics - Social support - Socialization - Society of Mind theory - Socioeconomic status - Sociogenic hypothesis - Sociometry - Socionics - Sociosexual orientation - Sodomy - Soldier's heart - Solitary confinement - Solomon Asch - Soma - Somatic-weakness - Somatic nervous system - Somatization disorder - Somatoform disorder - Somatogenesis - Somatotherapy - Sophrology - SORC - Soul - Soundness - South African College of Applied Psychology - Spatial-temporal reasoning - Speaker recognition - Spearman's rho - Specific-reaction theory - Specific hungers - Specific phobia - Specious present - Spectator role - Speech act - Speech perception - Speed reading - Spine-tingling - Spiral dynamics - Split-Half reliability - Split half reliability - Splitting - Spoiled identity - Spontaneous recovery - Sport psychology - Sport psychology - St John's Wort  - Stability-lability - Stage - Stage theory - Stages of faith development - Stan Gooch - Standard deviation - Standard error - Standard error of measurement - Standard error of the mean - Standard score - Standardization - Standardized test - Stanford-Binet - Stanine - Stanislav Grof - Stanley Milgram - Stanley Schachter - Stanley Smith Stevens - State-dependent learning - State-dependent memory - State - State dependent memory - Statistic - Statistics (this is not the plural of "statistic") - Statistical deviance—see deviance (statistics) - Statistical significance - Status - Stem and leaf display - Stephen A. Mitchell - Stephen Rollnick - Stepping-stone theory - Steppingstone theory - Stereotypes - Steve Biddulph - Steven Pinker - Stigmatic/eligibilic paraphilia - Stimming - Stimulant - Stimulus-response theories - Stimulus - Stimulus discrimination - Stimulus generalization - Stir crazy - Storage - Strategic planning - Strategic processing - Strategy (NLP) - Strategy - Stream of consciousness - Stress-management interventions - Stress - Stress management - Stressor - Stroke - Structural communication - Structural equation modeling - Structural social support - Structuralism - Structure-agency debate - Structure building - Structured interview - Structured stimulus - Structures - Study Skills - Subdural hematoma - Subintentioned death - Subject matching - Subjective discomfort - Subjective reality - Sublimation - Subliminal advertising - Subliminal perception - Submissive - Substance-related disorder - Substance - Substance abuse - Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration - Substance dependence - Substance intoxication - Substance withdrawal - Subvocalization - Successive approximations - SUDS - Suffering - Suffocation false alarm theory - Suicidal ideation - Suicide - Suicide prevention centers - Suicide treatment - Suicide watch - Suicidology - Sulcus - Sultan - Sujit Kumar - Superego - Superiority complex - Superman complex - Superordinate goals - Supertraits - Suppression - Surprise - Statistical survey - Sutherlandia frutescens - Swept-plane display - Syllogism - Sylvia Plath effect - Sylvia Rimm - Symbolic loss - Symbolic violence - Sympathetic nervous system - Sympathy - Symptom - Symptom prescription - Synapse - Synaptic plasticity - Syndrome - Synectics - Syntax - System of diagnosis - Systematic desensitization - Systematic rational restructuring - Systemic psychology - Systems intelligence - Systems of psychology - Systems perspective - Systems theory Systems thinking - Sadistic Ritual Abuse, or SRA, refers to any extremely cruel, unusual or otherwise sadistic ritualistic abuse performed by individuals sometimes claiming to be members of cults. ... Flogging demonstration at Folsom Street Fair 2004. ... Safety in numbers is the theory that by being part of a large group, an individual member is proportionally less likely to be the victim of a mishap, accident, or other bad event. ... A sample is that part of a population which is actually observed. ... In mathematics and statistics, the arithmetic mean of a set of numbers is the sum of all the members of the set divided by the number of items in the set. ... In statistics, when analyzing collected data, the samples observed differ in such things as means and standard deviations from the population from which the sample is taken. ... Samuel Renshaw was a psychologist. ... Categories: Optical illusions ... Not to be confused with sentience. ... In linguistics, the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis (SWH) states that there is a systematic relationship between the grammatical categories of the language a person speaks and how that person both understands the world and behaves in it. ... Look up Saturation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Taste aversion. ... Look up savant in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Scaling is the measurement of a variable in such a way that it can be expressed on a continuum. ... The level of measurement of a variable in mathematics and statistics is a classification that was proposed in order to describe the nature of information contained within numbers assigned to objects and, therefore, within the variable. ... A scatterplot or scatter graph is a graph used in statistics to visually display and compare two sets of related quantitative, or numerical, data by displaying only finitely many points, each having a coordinate on a horizontal and a vertical axis. ... In operant conditioning, a schedule of reinforcement is any rule determining which responses should be followed by reinforcement under conditions where not every response is necessarily reinforced. ... It has been suggested that Schemata theory be merged into this article or section. ... Schemata Theory is a theory of learning. ... Nebraska Police Sergeant Herbert Schirmer claimed that he was abducted by extraterrestrials in 1967. ... Schizoid personality disorder (SPD) is a personality disorder characterized by a lack of interest in social relationships, a tendency towards a solitary lifestyle, secretiveness, and emotional coldness. ... Schizophrenics Anonymous is a 12 step program that uses the 12 steps found in Alcoholics Anonymous to help people who are affected by Schizophrenia cope with the desease. ... Schizophreniform disorder is characterized by the presence of criterion A symptoms of schizophrenia. ... Schizotypal personality disorder, or simply schizotypal disorder, is a personality disorder that is characterized by a need for social isolation, odd behaviour and thinking, and often unconventional beliefs such as being convinced of having extra sensory abilities. ... The SAT (pronounced S-A-T) Reasoning Test, formerly called the Scholastic Aptitude Test and Scholastic Assessment Test, is a type of standardized test frequently used by colleges and universities in the United States to aid in the selection of incoming students. ... School refusal is a term originally used in Great Britain to describe refusal to attend school, due to emotional distress. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... Question posted by anon IP user 80. ... Scientific method is a body of techniques for investigating phenomena and acquiring new knowledge, as well as for correcting and integrating previous knowledge. ... Schematic diagram of the human eye. ... Scotopic vision is the monochromatic vision of the eye in dim light. ... Seasonal affective disorder, or SAD, also known as winter depression or winter blues is an affective, or mood, disorder. ... In psychology, primary gain, or a reduction in anxiety, is the primary motivation for seeking help seen in those suffering from Somatization disorders. ... Secondary notation is defined as visual cues which are not part of formal notation. Properties like position, indentation, color, symmetry, when used to convey information, are secondary notation. ... Secondary sex characteristics are traits that distinguish the two sexes of a species, but that are not directly part of the reproductive system. ... A security blanket is any familiar object whose presence provides comfort or security to its owner, such as the literal blankets often favored by small children. ... A sedative is a substance that depresses the central nervous system (CNS), resulting in calmness, relaxation, reduction of anxiety, sleepiness, and slowed breathing, as well as slurred speech, staggering gait, poor judgment, and slow, uncertain reflexes. ... Selection bias is the error of distorting a statistical analysis by pre- or post-selecting the samples. ... This concept, along with selective attention and selective retention, makes it hard for marketers to get their message across and create good product perception. ... Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are a class of antidepressants. ... Selegiline (l-deprenyl, Eldepryl® or Anipryl® [veterinary]) is a drug used for the treatment of early-stage Parkinsons disease and senile dementia. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Maslows hierarchy of needs. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Self-consciousness. ... A persons self image is the mental picture, generally of a kind that is quite resistant to change, that depicts not only details that are potentially available to objective investigation by others (height, weight, hair color, nature of external genitalia, I.Q. score, is this person double-jointed, etc. ... For the understanding that one exists, see Self-awareness. ... For the understanding that one exists, see Self-awareness. ... Self-criticism (or auto-critique) refer to criticizing ones own beliefs, thoughts, actions, behaviour or results; it could occur in private or in public. ... Self-deception is a process of denying or rationalizing away the relevance, significance, or importance of opposing evidence and argument. ... Self-disclosure is both the conscious and unconscious act of revealing more about ourselves to others. ... Self efficacy is an individuals estimate or personal judgment of his or her own ability to succeed in reaching a specific goal, e. ... In psychology, self-esteem or self-worth is a persons self-image at an emotional level; circumventing reason and logic. ... Though the term self-help can refer to any case whereby an individual or a group betters themselves economically, intellectually or emotionally, the connotations of the phrase have come to apply particularly to psychological or psychotherapeutic nostrums, often purveyed through the popular genre of the self-help book. ... Self-harm (SH) is deliberate injury to ones own body. ... The four Techniques of Knowledge, also known as kriyas may have originated from the Surat Shabda Yoga, Sant Mat and other ancient traditions in the Far East. ... Self-loathing in general refers to an extreme dislike of oneself or of oneselfs characteristics, often a symptom of Depression; in this sense, it is more or less synonymous with self-hatred, although neither are clinical terms. ... The idea of Self-parenting is that a persons mind is created in the form of a conversation between two voices generated by the two parts of the cerebral hemisphere. ... Self-perception theory is an account of attitude change developed by psychologist Daryl Bem. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Categories: Substubs ... Social Cognitive Perspective Zimmerman et al specified three important characteristics: self-observation (monitoring ones activities); self-judgement (self-evaluation of ones performance) and self-reactions (reactions to performance outcomes) Cognitive Processing Perspective Winne & Marx posited that motivational thoughts and beliefs are governed by the basic principles of cognitive... Jungs archetype self is the perfect personality. ... The self is a key construct in several schools of psychology. ... Maslows hierarchy of needs is a theory in psychology proposed by Abraham Maslow in his 1943 paper A Theory of Human Motivation, later extended. ... Discipline is any training intended to produce a specific character or pattern of behaviour, especially training that produces moral or mental development in a particular direction. ... Self-efficacy is an impression that one is capable of performing in a certain manner or attaining certain goals. ... Self motivation is the ability to satisfy a desire, expectation, or goal without being influenced to do so by another person. ... Self propaganda is a form of propaganda performed by an individual or a group on oneself. ... Self psychology is a school of psychoanalytic theory and therapy developed in the United States. ... A self-serving bias occurs when people are more likely to claim responsibility for successes than failures. ... Selfishness is an noun denoting the precedence given in thought or deed to self interests and self concerns, the act of placing ones own needs or desires above the needs or desires of others. ... Semantic dementia (SD) is a progressive language disorder characterized by fluent, empty speech and loss of word meaning. ... Semantic differential is a type of a rating scale designed to measure connotative meaning of objects, events, and concepts. ... Semantic Dyslexia is, as the name suggests, a subtype of the group of mental disorders known as dyslexia. ... Semantic memory refers to the memory of meanings, understandings, and other factual knowledge; in contrast to episodic memory. ... A semantic network is often used as a form of knowledge representation. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... See also Labyrinth, an article treating the mythical maze that imprisoned the Minotaur. ... Semiosis is any form of activity, conduct, or process that involves signs, including the production of meaning. ... Semiotics, semiotic studies, or semiology is the study of signs and symbols, both individually and grouped into sign systems. ... Dementia (from Latin demens) is progressive decline in cognitive function due to damage or disease in the brain beyond what might be expected from normal aging. ... Senile plaques are clumps of A-beta peptides commonly found in Alzheimers disease on microscopic examination of brain tissue. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Sensation and perception psychology. ... Although the sense of time is not associated with a specific sensory system, the work of psychologists and neuroscientists indicates that our brains do have a system governing the perception of time. ... Senses Senses are a UK based alternative rock band from Coventry. ... The sensitivity or insensitivity of a human, often considered with regard to a particular kind of stimulus, is the strength of the feeling it results in, in comparison with the strength of the stimulus. ... The sensorimotor stage is the first of four stages of cognitive development theorized by Jean Piaget. ... Sensory adaptation is a change in the responsiveness of the sensory system based on the average level of surrounding stimulation. ... Look up Sensory gating in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Sensory memory is our ability to retain impressions of sensory information after the original stimulus has ceased. ... Sensory neuroscience is a subfield of neuroscience which tries to understand the behaviour of neurons in sensory systems. ... In a sensory system, a sensory receptor is a structure that recognizes a stimulus in the internal or external environment of an organism. ... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary. ... Not to be confused with sapience. ... Separation anxiety disorder (or simply separation anxiety) is a psychological condition in which an individual has excessive anxiety regarding separation from home or from people to whom the individual has a strong emotional attachment (like a mother). ... Biography Serge Moscovici was one of Europes most prominent social psychologists. ... In what is known as the serial position effect, items at the beginning of a list are the easiest to recall, followed by the items near the end of a list. ... Serial sevens, counting down from one hundred by sevens, is a diagnostic test used by doctors to test for loss of mental concentration; for example, to test mental status after possible concussion, or by psychiatrists to test for psychotic delirium. ... Serotonin (pronounced ) (5-hydroxytryptamine, or 5-HT) is a monoamine neurotransmitter synthesized in serotonergic neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) and enterochromaffin cells in the gastrointestinal tract of animals including humans. ... Set point might mean one of: Set point (tennis), a tennis term meaning one player is one point away from winning a set Set point (electronics), a term which refers to the point at which an electrical circuit is either activated or de-activated Set point (medicine), a term referring... Turn on redirects here. ... Inhibited sexual desire (ISD), sometimes called frigidity, sexual aversion, sexual apathy or hypoactive sexual desire, refers to a low level of sexual desire and interest manifested by a failure to initiate or be responsive to a partners initiation of sexual activity. ... The word lust means sexual desire (this meaning is sometimes metaphorically extended to other forms of desire, e. ... Paraphilia (in Greek para παρά = over and philia φιλία = friendship) is a mental health term recently used to indicate sexual arousal in response to sexual objects or situations that are not part of societally normative arousal/activity patterns, or which may interfere with... Sexual dysfunction or sexual malfunction (see also sexual function) is difficulty during any stage of the sexual act (which includes desire, arousal, orgasm, and resolution) that prevents the individual or couple from enjoying sexual activity. ... Sexual Masochism involves the act of being humiliated, bound, beaten and otherwise made to physically suffer for purposes of sexual stimulation. ... Sexual orientation refers to the direction of an individuals sexuality, normally conceived of as falling into several significant categories based around the sex or gender that the individual finds attractive. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... This article is about human sexual perceptions. ... Sexuoerotic tragedy occurs when a persons lovemap becomes vandalized, especially as a result of the disruption of sexuoerotic development in childhood. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Shaping, also known as Body Shaping, is a proprietary system of weight-training exercises aimed primarily at women. ... The military term combat stress reaction (CSR) comprises the range of adverse behaviours in reaction to the stress of combat and combat related activities. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Short-term memory, sometimes referred to as primary or active memory, is that part of memory which stores a limited amount of information for a limited amount of time (roughly 30-45 seconds). ... In humans, shyness is the feeling of apprehension or lack of confidence experienced in regard to social association with others, e. ... Binomial name Eleutherococcus senticosus Rupr. ... Binomial name Rupr. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The English suffix -phobia is used to describe fear or hatred (the latter is often ignored) of a particular thing or subject. ... Drs. ... A siege mentality is a shared feeling of helplessness, victimization and defensiveness. ... Sigmund Freud (IPA: ), born Sigismund Schlomo Freud (May 6, 1856 – September 23, 1939), was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist who founded the psychoanalytic school of psychology. ... The Sigmund Freud Archives mainly consists of a trove of documents housed at the US Library of Congress and in a former residence of Freud. ... In social psychology, similarity refers to how closely attitudes, values, interests and personality match between people. ... In psychology, the Simon effect states that reaction times are usually faster when stimulus and response occur at the same location than when they do not, even if the stimulus location is irrelevant ot the task. ... Synthetic consciousness refers to attempts by computer scientists and others to implement machines which, as a minimum, give the impression to observers that they possess aspects of consciousness. ... A simulated pregnancy is a deliberate attempt to create the false impression of pregnancy. ... The simulation heuristic is a psychological heuristic, or simplified mental strategy, first theorized by Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky as a specialized adaptation of the availability heuristic to explain counterfactual thinking and regret. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Situation awareness (SA) is a human factors term which of late has become something of a buzzword. ... Six Thinking Hats is the title and subject of a book by Edward De Bono, published in 1985. ... Size-weight illusion is also known as Charpentier illusion (or Charpentier-Koseleff illusion). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... In telecommunication, the term skew has the following meanings: 1. ... In probability theory and statistics, skewness is a measure of the asymmetry of the probability distribution of a real-valued random variable. ... An operant conditioning chamber (usually Skinner box) is a laboratory apparatus used in experimental psychology to study animal cognition. ... Sleep-learning (also known as hypnopædia) attempts to convey information to a sleeping person, typically by playing a sound recording to them in their sleep. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A smart mob is a form of self-structuring social organization through technology-mediated, intelligent emergent behavior. The concept was introduced by Howard Rheingold in his book Smart Mobs: The Next Social Revolution. ... Traditional Snellen chart. ... SNS may refer to: Salinas Municipal Airport, in Monterey County, California, USA Saturday night special, slang for an inexpensive handgun Scuola Normale Superiore, an Italian higher education institution. ... Sociability is the ability to be fond of the company of others, people who are sociable are inclined to conversating with others. ... Social anxiety is an experience of fear, apprehension or worry regarding social situations and being evaluated by others. ... Social anxiety, sometimes known as social phobia or social anxiety disorder (SAD), is a common form of anxiety disorder that causes sufferers to experience intense anxiety in some or all of the social interactions and public events of everyday life. ... Social cognition is the name for both a branch of psychology that studies the cognitive processes involved in social interaction, and an umbrella term for the processes themselves. ... Social disruption is a term used in sociology to describe the alteration or breakdown of social life, often in a community setting. ... Social distance describes the distance between different groups of society and is opposed to locational distance. ... Social facilitation is a term within social psychology, traditionally seen to be the tendency for people to be aroused into better performance of simple tasks (or tasks at which we are expert) when under the eye of others rather than while they are alone. ... In sociology, a group is usually defined as a collection consisting of a number of people who share certain aspects, interact with one another, accept rights and obligations as members of the group and share a common identity. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Social Inhibition is what keeps humans from involving in potentially objectionable actions and/or expressions in a social setting. ... Social interaction is a dynamic, changing sequence of social actions between individuals (or groups) who modify their actions and reactions due to the actions by their interaction partner(s). ... For the article on social learning theory in psychology and education see social cognitivism. ... In the social psychology of groups, social loafing is the phenomenon that persons make less effort to achieve a goal when they work in a group than when they work alone. ... Social neuroscience is a field of research that spans social psychology, neuroscience, and physiology. ... In sociology, a norm, or social norm, is a pattern of behavior expected within a particular society in a given situation. ... Social anxiety, sometimes known as social phobia or social anxiety disorder (SAD), is a common form of anxiety disorder that causes sufferers to experience intense anxiety in some or all of the social interactions and public events of everyday life. ... Social proof, aka informational social influence, is a psychological phenomenon which occurs in ambiguous social situations when people are unable to determine the appropriate mode of behavior. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Social psychology is the scientific study of how peoples thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by the actual, imagined, or implied presence of others (Allport, 1985). ... Social Psychology is a subfield of sociology which looks at the social behavior of humans in terms of associations and relationships that they have. ... Social rejection includes both interpersonal rejection or peer rejection, and romantic rejection. ... A type of behavioral therapy used to treat the disruption in circadian rhythms that is related to Bipolar Disorder. ... A function is part of an answer to a question about why some object or process occurred in a system that evolved or was designed with some goal. ... Social skills are skills a social animal uses to interact and communicate with others to assist status in the social structure and other motivations. ... Social statistics is the use of statistical measurement systems to study human behavior in a social environment. ... Social Support. ... The term socialization is used by sociologists, social psychologists and educationalists to refer to the process of learning one’s culture and how to live within it. ... This article or section should be merged with Society of Mind Marvin Minskys theory of the Society of Mind asserts that the mind is the product of the interaction of a vast society of distinct and individually simple processes known as agents. ... Social status is the honor or prestige attached to ones position in society (ones social position). ... Sociometry is the science and art of measuring relationships developed by psychotherapist Jacob L. Moreno in his studies of the relationship between social configurations or structures and psychological well-being. ... Socionics (Russian: соционика) is a model of personality based on Carl Jungs work on Psychological Types, Freuds theory of the conscious and subconscious mind, and Antoni KÄ™piÅ„skis theory of information metabolism. ... Sociosexual orientation in social psychology, refers to individual differences in the tendency to prefer either unrestricted sex (without the necessity of love) or restricted sex (only in the context of a long term loving relationship). ... François Elluin, Sodomites provoking the wrath of God, from Le pot pourri de Loth (1781). ... Soldiers heart was a term during the U.S. Civil War era that described the mental / emotional changes of combatants resulting from the wars horrific conditions and violence. ... Solitary confinement, colloquially referred to as the hole (or in British English the block), is a punishment in which a prisoner is denied contact with any other persons, excluding guards, chaplains and doctors. ... Solomon E. Asch (September 14, 1907 - February 20, 1996) was a world-renowned American Gestalt psychologist and pioneer in social psychology. ... This article is about the Vedic plant and ritual. ... The somatic nervous system is that part of the peripheral nervous system associated with the voluntary control of body movements through the action of skeletal muscles, and also reception of external stimuli. ... Somatization disorder (or Briquets disorder) is a type of mental illness in which a patient manifests a psychiatric condition as a physical complaint. ... Somatotherapy is the treatment of mental illness by physical means (such as medication, electroconvulsive therapy, or psychosurgery) rather than psychotherapy. ... Sophrologie was created by Alfonso Caycedo in the 1960s. ... The soul, according to many religious and philosophical traditions, is the self-aware essence unique to a particular living being. ... (This article discusses the soundess notion of informal logic. ... South African College of Applied Psychology, located in Cape Town, South Africa, was established in 1997. ... Spatial-temporal reasoning is the ability to visualize spatial patterns and mentally manipulate them over a time-ordered sequence of spatial transformations. ... Speaker recognition, or voice recognition is the task of recognizing people from their voices. ... In statistics, Spearmans rank correlation coefficient, named after Charles Spearman and often denoted by the Greek letter ρ (rho), is a non-parametric measure of correlation – that is, it assesses how well an arbitrary monotonic function could describe the relationship between two variables, without making any assumptions about the frequency... Specific phobia is a generic term for any kind of anxiety disorder that amounts to an unreasonable or irrational fear related to exposure to specific objects or situations. ... The specious present is the time duration wherein ones perceptions are considered to be in the present. ... The speech act is a concept in linguistics and the philosophy of language. ... Speech perception refers to the processes by which humans are able to interpret and understand the sounds used in language. ... Speed reading is a collection of reading methods which attempt to increase rates of reading without greatly reducing comprehension or retention. ... Spine-tingling is a reaction to either being spooked (e. ... Spiral Dynamics is a theory of human development introduced in the 1996 book Spiral Dynamics by Don Beck and Chris Cowan. ... In math, splitting means partition. ... Spoiled identity refers to the loss of ego integrity to self-derogation and to a lessened sense of control resulting from being labeled or cast as a deviant. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Sport psychology is a specialization within psychology that seeks to understand psychological/mental factors that affect performance in sports, physical activity and exercise and apply these to enhance individual and team performance. ... Sport psychology is a specialization within psychology that seeks to understand psychological/mental factors that affect performance in sports, physical activity and exercise and apply these to enhance individual and team performance. ... Binomial name Hypericum perforatum L. St Johns wort (IPA pronunciation: , rhyming with hurt, or ) used alone refers to the species Hypericum perforatum, also known as Klamath weed or Goat weed, but, with qualifiers, is used to refer to any species of the genus Hypericum. ... Stage theories are based on the idea that elements in systems move through a pattern of distinct stages over time and that these stages can be described based on their distinguishing characteristics. ... A series of stages of faith development was proposed by Professor James W. Fowler, a developmental psychologist at Candler School of Theology, in the book Stages of Faith. ... Born 1932 in London, England, Stan Gooch is a British psychologist and the leading proponent of the Hybrid-origin theory, which hypothesizes that modern humans originated approximately 40,000 years B.P. as a result of interbreeding between at least two types of archaic human species, for example Cro-magnon... In probability and statistics, the standard deviation of a probability distribution, random variable, or population or multiset of values is a measure of the spread of its values. ... Standard error can refer to: In statistics, an expression of the uncertainty in a value - see standard error (statistics). ... The standard error of a method of measurement or estimation is the estimated standard deviation of the error in that method. ... Compares the various grading methods in a normal distribution. ... Standardization, in the context related to technologies and industries, is the process of establishing a technical standard among competing entities in a market, where this will bring benefits without hurting competition. ... A standardized test is a test administered and scored in a standard manner. ... The modern field of intelligence testing began with the Stanford-Binet IQ test. ... Stanine (STAndard NINE) is a method of scaling test scores on a nine point standard scale with a mean of 5 and a standard deviation of two. ... Stanislav Grof (born 1931 in Prague, Czechoslovakia) is one of the founders of the field of transpersonal psychology and a pioneering researcher into the use of altered states of consciousness for purposes of healing, growth, and insight. ... Stanley Milgram Stanley Milgram (August 15, 1933 – December 20, 1984) was a psychologist at Yale University, Harvard University and the City University of New York. ... Stanley Schachter was born on April 15, 1922, to Nathan and Anna Schachter in Flushing, New York. ... Stanley Smith Stevens (1906-1973) was an American psychologist best known as the founder of Harvards Psycho-Acoustical Laboratory and credited with the introduction of Stevens power law. ... State-dependent learning is a phenomenon where learning and recalling is based upon the physiological and mental state of the organism. ... State-dependent learning is a phenomenon of learning and recalling that is based upon the physiological and mental state of the organism. ... For other uses, see State (disambiguation). ... A statistic (singular) is the result of applying a statistical algorithm to a set of data. ... This article is about the field of statistics. ... In statistics, deviance is a quantity whose expected values can be used for statistical hypothesis testing. ... In statistics, a result is significant if it is unlikely to have occurred by chance, given that a presumed null hypothesis is true. ... In statistics, a stemplot (or stem-and-leaf plot) is a graphical display of quantitative data that is similar to a histogram and is useful in visualizing the shape of a distribution. ... Stephen A. Mitchell (d. ... Stephen Rollnick grew up in Cape Town, South Africa and completed a Masters training in research methods in Strathclyde University, Glasgow (1978) and a professional training in clinical psychology in Cardiff (1983). ... According to the steppingstone theory, people who use one substance such as nicotine will go on to drink alcoholic beverages, smoke marijuana, and progress on to use hard drugs such as cocaine. ... In modern usage, a stereotype is a simplified mental picture of an individual or group of people who share a certain characteristic (or stereotypical) qualities. ... Steve Biddulph is an influential author, activist and psychologist from Tasmania, Australia who is the author of a number of influential books and now speaks world wide. ... Steven Pinker Steven Arthur Pinker (born September 18, 1954) is a prominent Canadian-born American experimental psychologist, cognitive scientist, and popular science writer known for his spirited and wide-ranging advocacy of evolutionary psychology and the computational theory of mind. ... Stigmatic/eligibilic paraphilia is a label for the type of sexual desire in which those desired are 1. ... Stimming is a behavior observed in people who have Aspergers syndrome or autism. ... Stimulants are drugs that temporarily increase alertness and wakefulness. ... Look up stimulus in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Conditioned taste aversion is an example of classical conditioning, also called Pavlovian conditioning. ... Stir crazy is a phrase that dates to about 1925 according to http://www. ... Look up storage in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Strategic planning is an organizations process SCREW YOU, RILEY of defining its strategy, or direction, and making decisions on allocating its resources to pursue this strategy, including its capital and people. ... In Neuro-linguistic programming, a strategy is a mental sequence used to achieve a goal. ... A strategy is a long term plan of action designed to achieve a particular goal, most often winning. Strategy is differentiated from tactics or immediate actions with resources at hand by its nature of being extensively premeditated, and often practically rehearsed. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... In medical terms, stress is the disruption of homeostasis through physical or psychological stimuli. ... A cluttered environment with too many tasks can lead to stress. ... A stressor is something that either speeds up a reaction rate or keeps the reaction rate the same. ... For other uses, see Stroke (disambiguation). ... Structural communication was developed by John G. Bennett and his research team in the 1960s, originally designed to simulate the structure and quality of a small group tutorial through automated means. ... Structural equation modeling (SEM) is a statistical technique for building and testing statistical models, which are sometimes called causal models. ... Structuralism as a term refers to various theories across the humanities, social sciences and economics many of which share the assumption that structural relationships between concepts vary between different cultures/languages and that these relationships can be usefully exposed and explored. ... Especially important among sociological social psychologists, the structure-agency debate (sometimes referred to by the terms individualism and holism) involves questions about the nature of social behavior: whether it is ultimately predictable in terms of the creative volition of the individual, or is largely a product of socialization, interaction, and... Stucture building is a framework proposed by Morton Ann Gernsbacher (1990) for understanding reading comprehension. ... A structured interview (also known as a standardised interview or a researcher-administered survey) is a quantitative research method commonly employed in survey research. ... Look up Structure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Study skills are strategies and methods of purposeful learning, usually centered around reading and writing. ... A subdural hematoma (SDH) is a form of traumatic brain injury in which blood collects between the dura (the outer protective covering of the brain) and the arachnoid (the middle layer of the meninges). ... In psychology, sublimation is a coping mechanism. ... A subliminal message is a signal or message designed to pass below (sub) the normal limits of perception. ... A subliminal message is a signal or message embedded in another object, designed to pass below the normal limits of perception. ... Submissiveness is the trait of being willing to yield to the will of another person or a superior force. ... Look up substance in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Also see Alcoholism and Drug addiction. ... Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is the US Federal agency charged with improving the quality and availability of prevention, treatment, and rehabilitative services in order to reduce illness, death, disability, and cost to society resulting from substance abuse and mental illnesses. ... Drug addiction, or substance dependence is the compulsive use of drugs, to the point where the user has no effective choice but to continue use. ... Subvocalization, or silent speech, is defined as the internal speech made when reading a word, thus allowing the reader to imagine the sound of the word as it is read (Carver 1990). ... Production Order Suds is a SpongeBob SquarePants episode from season one. ... Suffering is any aversive (not necessarily unwanted) experience and the corresponding negative emotion. ... Suicidal ideation is common medical term for the mere thoughts about and of plans of committing suicide, not the actual following through or act itself. ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ... Treatment is directed at the underlying causes of suicidal thinking. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... this is a rare disease that makes many people usually people from religious background go very crazy. ... Sulcus (pl. ... Sultan, one of the brightest of the early chimpanzees used for psychological research, was tested by Gestalt psychologist Wolfgang Köhler. ... In his theory of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud sought to explain how the unconscious mind operates by proposing that it has a particular structure. ... Superiority Complex refers to a subconscious neurotic mechanism of compensation developed by the individual as a result of feelings of inferiority. ... A Superman Complex is an unhealthy sense of responsibility, or the belief that everyone else lacks the capacity to successfully perform any task. ... Superordinate goals, in psychology, are goals which can only be achieved by the contribution and co-operation of two or more people or groups must. ... Censorship is the control of speech and other forms of human expression, often by government intervention. ... Wide eyes are a common human physiological expression of emotional surprise. ... Statistical surveys are used to collect quantitative information about items in a population. ... Sutherlandia frutescens is regarded as the most profound and multi-purpose of the medicinal plants in Southern Africa. ... Swept-plane display is a structure from motion technique with which one can create the optical illusion of a volume of light, due to the persistence of vision property of human visual perception. ... A syllogism (Greek: — conclusion, inference), usually the categorical syllogism, is a kind of logical argument in which one proposition (the conclusion) is inferred from two others (the premises) of a certain form. ... The Sylvia Plath effect is a psychological finding by James C. Kaufman, coined in 2001, that female poets are more likely to be mentally ill than any other type of writer. ... Dr. Sylvia Rimm is a psychologist specializing in gifted people. ... The concept of symbolic violence was first introduced by French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu to differentiate the classification of knowledge and social organisation. ... Grays FIG. 838– The right sympathetic chain and its connections with the thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic plexuses. ... ... The term symptom (from the Greek meaning chance, mishap or casualty, itself derived from συμπιπτω meaning to fall upon or to happen to) has two similar meanings in the context of physical and mental health: Strictly, a symptom is a sensation or change in health function experienced by a patient. ... Illustration of the major elements in a prototypical synapse. ... In neuroscience, synaptic plasticity is the ability of the connection, or synapse, between two neurons to change in strength. ... In medicine, the term syndrome is the association of several clinically recognizable features, signs, symptoms, phenomena or characteristics which often occur together, so that the presence of one feature alerts the physician to the presence of the others. ... Synectics is a relatively unknown problem solving approach that stimulates thought processes of which the subject is generally unaware. ... For other uses, see Syntax (disambiguation). ... Systematic desensitization is a type of behavioral therapy used in the field of psychology to help effectively overcome phobias and other anxiety disorders. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Systems intelligence is a concept developed in the fields of engineering sciences and applied philosophy. ... This article cites its sources but does not provide page references. ... Systems thinking is an approach to integration that is based on the belief that the component parts of a system will act differently when isolated from the systems environment or other parts of the system. ...


T

T-groups - T-Score - T Test - T. Schjelderup-Ebbe - T.O.T.E. - Taboo - Tabula rasa - Tachycardia - Tachypsychia - Tactile - Taijin kyofusho - Talking cure - Taphophobia - Tarantism - Tardive dyskinesia - Target fixation - Task variables - Taste buds - TAT - Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale - Tea - Technophobia - Telempathy - Telepathy - Temperament - Temporal lobe - Terdekaphobia - Ternus illusion - Test-retest reliability - Test battery - Test of Primary Mental Abilities - Testes - Testosterone - Tetrachoric correlation coefficient - Tetrahydrocannabinol - Texas State Board of Examiners of Psychologists - Thalamus - Thanatopian Psychology - The Blank Slate - The Fifth Discipline - Fifth discipline - The g Factor - The Imaginary - The International Journal of Psychiatry - The Mean Reds - The Psychology Wiki - The Real - The Retreat - The Social Animal - The Symbolic - The Third Wave - The Wisdom of Crowds - Wisdom of crowds - Theanine - Thematic Apperception Test - Theophylline - Theoretical psychology - Theory - Theory of Cognitive development - Theory of Constraints - Theory of Deadly Initials - Theory of disuse - Theory of mind - Theory of multiple intelligences - Therapeutic community - Think tank - Thinkabout - Thinking - Thinking maps - Thinking Processes - Third variable - Third variable problem - Thomas Gilovich - Thomas McGlashan - Thomas Ogden - Thomas S. Kirkbride - Thorazine - Thought-terminating cliché - Thought - Thought act - Thought broadcasting - Thought disorder - Thought experiment - Thought Field Therapy - Thought insertion - Thought stopping - Thought withdrawal - Thoughts Without a Thinker - Thousand-yard stare - Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality - Threshold - Thyroid gland - Timbre - Time series design - Timeline of psychology - Timothy Leary - Togetherness situation - Toilet training - Token economy - Token economy - Tolerance - Tony Buzan - Tools of assessment - Touch illusion - Traffic psychology - Trait - Trait theories - Trance logic - Tranquilizer - Transactional analysis - Transduction - Transfer - Transfer of learning - Transfer of training - Transference - Transference - Transference neurosis - Transpersonal - Transpersonal experience - Transpersonal psychology - Transsexual - Transsexualism - Transvestic fetishism - Transvestism - Trauma - Traumatic disease - Tree of Knowledge System - Tremor - Triadic reciprocality - Trial and error method - Triarchic theory of intelligence - Tricyclic antidepressants - Tricyclic drugs - Triskaidekaphobia - Trisomy - Trollope ploy - True experiment - True score - True self - Trust - Trust metric - Trypanophobia - Tryptophan - Tumescence - Tumor - Tunnel of light - Twin study - Two-factor therapy - Two-Way ANOVA - Tympanic membrane - Type A behavior patterns - Type A personality - Type B personality - Type I error - Type II error - Type theories - Tyrosine - In 1947, the National Training Laboratories Institute starts up in the Bethel ME. They pioneer the use of T-groups (Sensitivity or Laboratory Training) in which the learners use feedback, problem solving, and role play to gain insights into themselves, others, and groups. ... A t-test is any statistical hypothesis test in which the test statistic has a Students t-distribution if the null hypothesis is true. ... Thorleif Schjelderup-Ebbe is best known for coining the term Peck Order, or Pecking Order as it is more commonly known. ... Test Operate Test Exit Test to obtain some representation of the problem state Operate - intervene in some way Test again to see if the problem state is the same - if it is loop back to operate if it isnt Exit - problem solved ... This article is about cultural prohibitions in general, for other uses, see Taboo (disambiguation). ... Tabula rasa (Latin: scraped tablet or clean slate) refers to the epistemological thesis that individual human beings are born with no innate or built-in mental content, in a word, blank, and that their entire resource of knowledge is built up gradually from their experiences and sensory perceptions of the... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Tachypsychia is a neurological condition that distorts the perception of time, usually induced by physical exertion, drug use, or a traumatic event. ... Tactition is the sense of pressure perception. ... Taijin kyofusho (対人恐怖症, TKS, for taijin kyofusho symptoms), is a culture-bound syndrome (cultural disorder, or mental illness) specific to Japan. ... The Talking cure is a controversial therapy treatment developed by Sigmund Freud in the early 1900s, and still in use today. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Premature burial. ... Tarantism is, allegedly, a deadly envenomation resulting from the bite of a kind of wolf spider called a tarantula (Lycosa_tarentula). ... Tardive dyskinesia is a serious neurological disorder caused by the long-term and/or high-dose use of dopamine antagonists, usually antipsychotics and among them especially the typical antipsychotics. ... Target fixation is a process by which the brain is focused so intently on an observed object that awareness of other obstacles or hazards can diminish. ... Taste buds (or lingual papillae) are small structures on the upper surface of the tongue that provide information about the taste of food being eaten. ... The Thematic Apperception Test or TAT is amongst the most widely used, researched, and taught psychological tests. ... Tea leaves in a Chinese gaiwan. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Telepathy, from the Greek τῆλε, tele, remote; and πάθεια, patheia, to be effected by, describes the hypothetical transfer of information on thoughts or feelings between individuals by means other than the five classical senses. ... For temperament in dog fancy, see conformation point. ... The temporal lobes are part of the cerebrum. ... Look up Triskaidekaphobia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Triskaidekaphobia is an irrational fear of the number 13. ... The Ternus illusion is an illusion of human visual perception involving apparent motion. ... Test-retest is a statistical method used to examine how reliable a test is: A test is performed twice, e. ... Human male anatomy The testicles, known medically as testes (singular testis), are the male generative glands in animals. ... Testosterone is a steroid hormone from the androgen group. ... In statistics, contingency tables are used to record and analyse the relationship between two or more variables, most usually categorical variables. ... “THC” redirects here. ... Texas State Board of Examiners of Psychologists The Texas State Board of Examiners of Psychologists is the agency authorized by Texas state law to regulate the practice of psychology in the state of Texas. ... The thalamus (from Greek θάλαμος = bedroom, chamber, IPA= /ˈθælÉ™mÉ™s/) is a pair and symmetric part of the brain. ... The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature is a 2002 book (published by Penguin Putnam, ISBN 0670031518) by Steven Pinker arguing against tabula rasa models of psychology, claiming that the human mind is shaped by evolutionary psychological adaptations. ... The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of the Learning Organization is a book by Peter Senge (a senior lecturer at MIT) focusing on group problem solving using the systems thinking method in order to convert companies into learning organizations. ... The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of the Learning Organization is a book by Peter Senge (a senior lecturer at MIT) focusing on group problem solving using the systems thinking method in order to convert companies into learning organizations. ... The g Factor is a book by Arthur Jensen, explaining his views about the general intelligence factor (or g) and its apparent relation to race. Links Stalking the wild taboo - review of The g Factor in Mankind Quarterly, Vol. ... In Jacques Lacans theory of psychic structures, the Imaginary refers to the non-linguistic aspect of the psyche, formulated during the Mirror Stage. ... The International Journal of Psychiatry is an international scientific medical journal dedicated to publish papers in the field of psychiatry. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Real is a term used by the psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan in his theory of psychic structures. ... The Retreat is a not for profit charitable organisation in the United Kingdom. ... The Social Animal is Elliot Aronsons famous book about the social psychology. ... In Jacques Lacans theory of psychic structures, the Symbolic refers to the realm of language into which the child enters under the impetus of the Name of the Father. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Wisdom of Crowds: Why the Many Are Smarter Than the Few and How Collective Wisdom Shapes Business, Economies, Societies and Nations, first published in 2004, is a book written by James Surowiecki about the aggregation of information in groups, resulting in decisions that, he argues, are often better than... The Wisdom of Crowds: Why the Many Are Smarter Than the Few and How Collective Wisdom Shapes Business, Economies, Societies and Nations, first published in 2004, is a book written by James Surowiecki about the aggregation of information in groups, resulting in decisions that, he argues, are often better than... Theanine is an amino acid which is a deriviative of glutamine. ... The Thematic Apperception Test or TAT is amongst the most widely used, researched, and taught psychological tests. ... Theophylline is a methylxanthine drug used in therapy for respiratory diseases such as COPD or asthma under a variety of brand names. ... Theoretical psychology is concerned with theoretical and philosophical aspects of the discipline of psychology. ... The word theory has a number of distinct meanings in different fields of knowledge, depending on their methodologies and the context of discussion. ... // Although there is no general theory of cognitive development, one of the most historically influential theories was developed by Jean Piaget, a Swiss psychologist (1896–1980). ... Theory of Constraints (TOC) is an overall management philosophy that aims to continually achieve more of the goal of a system. ... This article is considered orphaned, since there are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The phrase theory of mind (often abbreviated as ToM) is used in several related ways: general categories of theories of mind - theories about the nature of mind, and its structure and processes; theories of mind related to individual minds; in recent years, the phrase theory of mind has more commonly... Multiple intelligences is educational theory put forth by psychologist Howard Gardner, which suggests that an array of different kinds of intelligence exists in human beings. ... Therapeutic community is a term applied to a participative, group-based approach to long-term mental illness that includes group psychotherapy as well as practical activities, and which may or may not be residential with the clients and therapists living together. ... This article is about the institution. ... “The following is from a cooperative project for acquiring skills essential to learning,” notes the announcer at the beginning of Thinkabout. ... Thought or thinking is a mental process which allows beings to model the world, and so to deal with it effectively according to their goals, plans, ends and desires. ... (This page is about Theory of constraints. ... Thomas D. Gilovich is a professor of psychology at Cornell University who has researched decision making and behavioral economics and has written popular books on said subjects. ... Dr. Thomas McGlashan (born 1942) is a professor of psychiatry at Yale University. ... Chlorpromazine was the first antipsychotic drug, used during the 1950s and 1960s. ... A thought-terminating cliché is a commonly used phrase, sometimes passing as folk wisdom, used to quell cognitive dissonance, especially in cases where the person experiencing the cognitive dissonance might resolve it by reaching a thought-provoking epiphany. ... Personification of thought (Greek Εννοια) in Celsus Library in Ephesos, Turkey Thought or thinking is a mental process which allows beings to model the world, and so to deal with it effectively according to their goals, plans, ends and desires. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... In psychiatry, thought disorder or formal thought disorder is a term used to describe a pattern of disordered language use that is presumed to reflect disordered thinking. ... In philosophy, physics, and other fields, a thought experiment (from the German Gedankenexperiment) is an attempt to solve a problem using the power of human imagination. ... Thought Field Therapy, or TFT, is a fringe psychological treatment, developed by Dr. Roger Callahan. ... In psychiatry, thought insertion is the delusion that thoughts are being inserted into ones mind by someone else. ... In psychiatry, thought withdrawal (or thought extraction) is the delusion that thoughts have been taken out of the patients mind. ... Thoughts Without a Thinker: Psychotherapy from a Buddhist Perspective (1995, BasicBooks, ISBN 0-465-03931-6) is a book by Mark Epstein, and it deals with the conception or image we have of ourselves — In other words, who we think we are. ... The phrase thousand-yard stare refers to an unfocused gaze of the eyes, typically by soldiers, typical of acute battle shock and/or post-traumatic stress disorder; also seen in reactions to traumatic events. ... Category: ... Look up Threshold in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The thyroid gland and its relations In anatomy, the thyroid (IPA θaɪɹoɪd) is an endocrine gland. ... In music, timbre, or sometimes timber, (from Fr. ... This is a timeline of psychology. ... Timothy Francis Leary, (October 22, 1920 – May 31, 1996) was an American writer, psychologist, modern pioneer and advocate of psychedelic drug research and use, and one of the first people whose remains have been sent into space. ... Toilet training (or potty training) is the process of weaning a young child off diapers (or nappies in the British Isles and many Commonwealth countries) and training the child to use the toilet for urination and defecation. ... A token economy is a system of behavior modification based on the principles of operant conditioning. ... A token economy is a system of behavior modification based on the principles of operant conditioning. ... It has been suggested that toleration be merged into this article or section. ... Tony Buzan Tony Buzan (1942-) is a proponent of the techniques of mind mapping and mental literacy. ... Touch illusions are illusions that exploit the sense of touch. ... Traffic psychology is a young expanding field in psychology. ... Look up trait in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A sedative is a drug that depresses the central nervous system (CNS), which causes calmness, relaxation, reduction of anxiety, sleepiness, slowed breathing, slurred speech, staggering gait, poor judgment, and slow, uncertain reflexes. ... Transactional analysis, commonly known as TA to its adherents, is a psychoanalytic theory of psychology developed by psychiatrist Eric Berne during the late 1950s. ... The process by wich a receptor cell produces an electrical change in response to a physical stimilus. ... Portrait of Bill Clinton, the American flag placed nonchalantly in the background Transfer is a technique used in propaganda and advertising. ... The Theory of Transfer of Learning was introduced by Thorndike and Woodworth (1901). ... Holding (1991) says that transfer of training occurs whenever the effects of prior learning influence the performance of a later activity (in Training for Performance Morrison, J. (Ed p. ... Transference is a phenomenon in psychology characterized by unconscious redirection of feelings for one person to another. ... Transference is a phenomenon in psychology characterized by unconscious redirection of feelings for one person to another. ... The term Transpersonal is often used to refer to psychological categories that transcend the normal features of ordinary ego-functioning. ... A transpersonal experience is an experience of being out-of-body, out-of-place and/or out-of-time. ... Transpersonal psychology is a school of psychology that studies the transpersonal, the transcendent or spiritual aspects of the human mind. ... A transsexual (sometimes transexual) person establishes a permanent identity with the opposite gender to their assigned (usually at birth) sex. ... Look up Transsexualism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A folded cream-coloured full slip Some men find the sheer fabric of stockings highly enticing Transvestic fetishism is a sexual fetish for the clothing of the opposite gender. ... Transvestism is literally the practice of cross-dressing, wearing the clothing of the opposite sex, and transvestite literally refers to a person who cross-dresses. ... Psychological trauma is a type of damage to the psyche that occurs as a result of a traumatic event. ... Gregg Henriques Tree of Knowledge System The Tree of Knowledge (ToK) System is a novel, theoretical approach to the unification of psychology developed by professor Gregg Henriques of James Madison University. ... For the film see Tremors (film). ... The Triarchic Theory of Intelligence was formulated by Robert J. Sternberg, a prominent figure in the research of human intelligence. ... Chemical structure of the tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline. ... The stall numbers at the Santa Anita Park Triskaidekaphobia is a fear of the number 13. ... A trisomy means the presence of three (instead of the normal two) chromosomes of a particular numbered type in an organism. ... A Trollope ploy is a negotiation technique in which, after a demand is rejected, it is followed by a stronger demand. ... True Self is the upcoming 5th album from nu-metal band SOiL. It will the first album to feature vocals from singer AJ Cavalier and is set for release on May 2 2006. ... Trust is the belief in the good character of one party, presumed to seek to fulfill policies, ethical codes, law and their previous promises. ... In psychology and sociology, a trust metric is a measure of how a member of a group is trusted by the other members. ... Trypanophobia is the extreme and irrational fear of medical procedures involving injections or hypodermic needles. ... Tryptophan is an essential amino acid involved in human nutrition. ... Tumescence is the quality or state of being tumescent or swollen. ... Tumor or tumour literally means swelling, and is sometimes still used with that meaning. ... The tunnel of light is an element of the usual near-death experience. ... Twin studies are one of a family of designs in behavior genetics which aid the study of individual differences by highlighting the role of environmental and genetic causes on behavior. ... The tympanum or tympanic membrane, colloquially known as eardrum, is a thin membrane that separates the outer ear from the middle ear. ... In some psychological theories, the Type A personality, also known as the Type A Behavior Pattern, is a set of characteristics that includes being impatient, excessively time-conscious, insecure about ones status, highly competitive, hostile and aggressive, and incapable of relaxation. ... Type B personality is a term used to describe people who tend to be Relaxed Likelier than a Type A personality to be patient Creative and imaginative Inclined to self-analysis In the 1950s, the cardiologist Meyer Friedman argued that risk of heart disease is greater in Type A personality... In statistical hypothesis testing, a Type I error consists of rejecting a null hypothesis that is true, in other words finding a result to have statistical significance when this has in fact happened by chance. ... In statistical hypothesis testing, a Type II error consists of failing to reject an invalid null hypothesis (i. ... Tyrosine (from the Greek tyros, meaning cheese, as it was first discovered in 1846 by German chemist Justus von Liebig in the protein casein from cheese[1][2]), 4-hydroxyphenylalanine, or 2-amino-3(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propanoic acid, is one of the 20 amino acids that are used by cells...


U

Ulf-Dietrich Reips - Ulric Neisser - Ultradian - Ultrasound - Unconditional positive regard - Unconditioned response - Unconditioned stimulus - Unconscious - Unconscious motives - Undercontrolled behavior - Understanding - Undifferentiated schizophrenia - Unilateral ECT - Unipolar depression - United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy - Universal law of generalization - Universalization - Unstructured stimulus - Unstructured view - Upper confidence level - Urie Bronfenbrenner - Dr. Ulf-Dietrich Reips is currently an assistent of Prof. ... Ulric Neisser (born 8 December 1928) is an American psychologist. ... Ultradians are the regular recurrence in cycles of less than 24 hours from one stated point to another, as certain biologic activities which occur at such intervals, regardless of conditions of illumination. ... Ultrasound is a form of cyclic sound pressure with a frequency greater than the upper limit of human hearing, this limit being approximately 20 kilohertz (20,000 hertz). ... Carl Rogers, the founder of Person Centred Counselling, said that three conditions were necessary for therapeutic change: empathy, congruence and unconditional positive regard. ... Classical Conditioning (also Pavlovian or Respondent Conditioning) is a form of associative learning that was first demonstrated by Ivan Pavlov. ... ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Look up understanding in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... It is common to feel sad, discouraged , or down once in a while, and anyone in this state might say they are suffering from depression. ... The United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy (UKCP) is the United Kingdoms umbrella body and regulator for all forms of psychotherapy. ... The universal law of generalization is a theory of cognition originally posited by Roger Shepard. ... In Social Work practice and psychotherapy, universalization is a supportive intervention utilized by the therapist to reassure and encourage his/her client. ... Urie Bronfenbrenner (April 29, 1917-September 25, 2005) was a renowned psychologist and a co-founder of the U.S. national Head Start program. ...


V

Vaginal barrel - Vaginal orgasm - Vaginal pleythsmograph - Vaginismus - Valence - Validity - Valium - Value - Value - Value judgment - Value theory - Variability - Variable - Variable error - Variable interval schedule - Variable ratio schedule - Variance - Vascular dementia - Vasocongestion - Vasoconstriction - Vasopressin - Vegetotherapy - Ventricles - Verbal test - Vertical thinking - Vibrational psychology - Vicarious conditioning - Vicarious reinforcement - Victimology - Vienna Psychoanalytic Society - Vigilance - Viktor Frankl - Vilayanur S. Ramachandran - Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale - Vinpocetine - Virginia Satir - Viscera - Vision-logic - Visual acuity - Visual hallucination - Visual learning - Visual perception (vision) - Visual thinking - Vitamin B12 - Vitamin B3 - Vitamin B5 - Vitamin B6 - Vitamin C - Vitamins - Vocational education - Volition - Volley theory - Voodoo death - Voyeurism - Vulnerability - Vulnerability schema - An orgasm, also known as a sexual climax, is a pleasurable psychological or emotional response to prolonged sexual stimulation. ... Vaginismus is a condition which affects a womans ability to engage in any form of vaginal penetration, including sexual penetration, insertion of tampons, and the penetration involved in gynecological examinations. ... Valence, as used in psychology, especially in discussing emotions, means the intrinsic attractiveness (positive valence) or aversiveness (negative valence) of an event, object, or situation[1] However, the term is also used to characterize and categorize specific emotions. ... In logic, the form of an argument is valid precisely if it cannot lead from true premises to a false conclusion. ... Diazepam, brand names: Valium, Seduxen, in Europe Apozepam, is a 1,4-benzodiazepine derivative, which possesses anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, sedative and skeletal muscle relaxant properties. ... In general, the economic value of something is how much a product or service is worth to someone relative to other things (often measured in money). ... “Value” redirects here. ... A value judgment is a judgment of the rightness or wrongness of something, based on a particular set of values or on a particular value system. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... In computer science and mathematics, a variable is a symbol denoting a quantity or symbolic representation. ... In computer science and mathematics, a variable (IPA pronunciation: ) (sometimes called a pronumeral) is a symbolic representation denoting a quantity or expression. ... In probability theory and statistics, the variance of a random variable (or somewhat more precisely, of a probability distribution) is a measure of its statistical dispersion, indicating how its possible values are spread around the expected value. ... Vasocongestion is a term for the swelling of bodily tissues caused by increased vascular blood flow and a localized increase in blood pressure. ... The blood vessels are part of the circulatory system and function to transport blood throughout the body. ... Arginine vasopressin (AVP), also known as argipressin or antidiuretic hormone (ADH), is a human hormone that is released when the body is low on water; it causes the kidneys to conserve water, but not salt, by concentrating the urine and reducing urine volume. ... Vegetotherapy is a form of psychoanalytical therapy which involves the physical simulation of emotions. ... The ventricular system is a set of structures in the brain continuous with the central canal of the spinal cord. ... Vertical thinking is a type of approach to problems that usually involves one being selective, analytical, and sequential. ... Victimology is the study of why certain people are victims of crime and how lifestyles affect the chances that a certain person will fall victim to a crime. ... Formerly the Psychological Wednesday Society. ... Vigilance is the act of watching for something to happen, of watching for danger. ... Viktor Emil Frankl, M.D., Ph. ... Dr. Vilayanur Ramachandran on an episode of PBSs NOVA Television program. ... Vinpocetine (brand names: Cavinton, Intelectol; chemical name: ethyl apovincaminate) is a semisynthetic derivative of vincamine, which is extracted from the periwinkle plant. ... Virginia Satir (26 June 1916 - 10 September 1988) was a noted psychotherapist, known especially for her approach to family therapy. ... In anatomy, the viscera are the internal organs of an animal, in particular the internal organs of the head, thorax and abdomen. ... In Ken Wilbers integral theory of developmental psychology, vision-logic is a post-formal but personal level of cognitive development. ... Traditional Snellen chart used for visual acuity testing. ... A hallucination is a sensory perception experienced in the absence of an external stimulus, as distinct from an illusion, which is a misperception of an external stimulus. ... Visual learning is a proven teaching method in which ideas, concepts, data and other information are associated with images and represented graphically. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Spatial-temporal reasoning. ... Cobalamin or vitamin B12 is a chemical compound that is also known as cyanocobalamine. ... Niacin, also known as nicotinic acid or vitamin B3, is a water-soluble vitamin whose derivatives such as NADH play essential roles in energy metabolism in the living cell. ... Pantothenic acid, also called vitamin B5, is an antioxidant water-soluble vitamin needed to break down carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. ... Pyridoxine Pyridoxal phosphate Vitamin B6 is a water-soluble vitamin. ... This article is about the nutrient. ... Retinol (Vitamin A) Vitamins are nutrients required in very small amounts for essential metabolic reactions in the body [1]. The term vitamin does not encompass other essential nutrients such as dietary minerals, essential fatty acids, or essential amino acids. ... A blacksmith is a traditional trade. ... Volition is the study of will, choice, and decision. ... Volley theory attempts to account for the maximum theoretical limit for the neuronal firing of action potentials and the small time scales over which sound discrimination must occur. ... “Voyeur” redirects here. ... For other uses of the word Vulnerability, please refer to vulnerability (computer science). ...


W

Wafa Sultan - WAIS-III - Wait list control group - Waking states - Walter Dill Scott - Waxy flexibility - Weapon focus - Web Experimental Psychology Lab - Weber's law - Wechsler adult intelligence scale - Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children - Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence - Well-formed outcome - Wernicke's encephalopathy - Wernicke's aphasia - White bear principle - White matter - Whole learning - Wilhelm Reich - Wilhelm Wundt - Will - William Alanson White Institute - William C. Menninger - William James - William Masters and Virginia Johnson - William McDougall - Wise old man - Withdrawal distress - Withdrawal symptoms - Witzelsucht - Wizard - Wolfgang Köhler - Wolfgang Metzger - Womb envy - Woolly mammoth - Word salad - Working memory - Working through - World Federation for Mental Health - World Mental Health Day - Writing - Wrong - Wafa Sultan on Al Jazeera February 2006 Wafa Sultan (Arabic: وفاء سلطان) (born 1958, Baniyas, Syria) is a secular activist [1] and vocal critic of Islam. ... Waking states of consciousness is all the thoughts, feelings, perceptions you have while you are awake. ... Walter Dill Scott (1869-1955) was one of the first applied psychologists. ... Waxy flexibility is psychomotor symptom of catatonic schizophrenia where a posture, into which placed, is indefinitely maintained [1]. For instance, if you were to move the arm of someone with waxy flexibility, he would keep his arm where you moved it until it was moved again, as if made from... Weapon focus is a factor affecting the reliability of eyewitness testimony. ... The Web Experimental Psychology Lab is a Web site to participate in Web experiments, a method used in experimental psychology. ... The Weber–Fechner law attempts to describe the relationship between the physical magnitudes of stimuli and the perceived intensity of the stimuli. ... Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale or WAIS is a general test of intelligence (IQ), published in February 1955 as a revision of the Wechsler-Bellevue test (1939), standardised for use with adults over the age of 16. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... The Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence (WPPSI) is an intelligence test designed for children ages 2 years 6 months to 7 years 3 months developed by David Wechsler in 1967. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Wernicke encephalopathy is a severe syndrome characterised by loss of short-term memory. ... Receptive aphasia, also known as Wernickes aphasia, Fluent aphasia or sensory aphasia in clinical neuropsychology and cognitive neuropsychology, is a type of aphasia often (but not always) caused by neurological damage to Wernickes area in the brain. ... The White Bear Phenomenon is a demonstration of the difficulty people have in suppressing a thought — by trying not to think of something, we find we continually think it. ... White matter is one of the two main solid components of the central nervous system. ... Wilhelm Reich (March 24, 1897 – November 3, 1957) was an Austrian psychiatrist and psychoanalyst. ... Wilhelm Wundt, circa 1890 Wilhelm Maximilian Wundt (August 16, 1832 – August 31, 1920) was a German noted Texas Longhorn, a physiologist and psychologist. ... // For the racing driver, see Will Power. ... The William Alanson White Institute, founded in 1946, is an institution for training psychoanalysts. ... William C. Menninger is a co-founder with his brother Karl and his father of The Menninger Foundation in Topeka, Kansas. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Time magazine, May 25, 1970 Gynecologist William Howell Masters (December 27, 1915 – February 16, 2001) and psychologist Virginia Eshelman Johnson (born February 11, 1925) pioneered research into human sexual behavior during the 1950s and 1960s. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A wise old man: Philosopher in Meditation by Rembrandt The wise old man (or Senex) is an archetype as described by Carl Jung. ... Withdrawal refers to the characteristic signs and symptoms that appear when a drug that causes a physical dependency is regularly used for a long time and then suddenly discontinued or decreased in dosage. ... Witzelsucht, from the German witzel(ei) meaning pun or joke, and sucht meaning addiction or yearning, is a set of rare neurological symptoms characterized by the patients uncontrollable tendency to pun, tell inappropriate jokes and pointless or irrelevant stories at inconvenient moments. ... Maluma type shape Takete type shape Wolfgang Köhler (January 21, 1887, Reval (now Tallinn), Estonia – June 11, 1967, New Hampshire) was a German Gestalt psychologist. ... Wolfgang Metzger (* July 22, 1899 in Heidelberg, Germany; † December 20, 1979 in Bebenhausen, Germany) is considered one of the main representatives of Gestalt psychology (Gestalt theory) in Germany. ... Womb envy, a term coined by Karen Horney, is the neo-Freudian feminist equivalent of penis envy. ... Binomial name Blumenbach, 1799 For the rock band, see Wooly Mammoth (band). ... In context of e-mail spamming, see also Word salad (computer science). ... Working memory is a theoretical framework within cognitive psychology that refers to the structures and processes used for temporarily storing and manipulating information. ... The World Federation for Mental Health (WFMH) was founded in 1948. ... World Mental Health Day is a global mental health education, awareness and advocacy project of World Federation for Mental Health, a global mental health organization with members and contacts in more than 150 countries. ... Illustration of a scribe writing Writing, in its most common sense, is the preservation of and the preserved text on a medium, with the use of signs or symbols. ... A wrong or being wrong is a concept in law, ethics, and science. ...


X

Xenophobia - Look up xenophobia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Y

Yerkes-Dodson law - Yohimbe - Young-Helmholz theory - Young adult - The Yerkes-Dodson law demonstrates an empirical relationship between arousal and performance. ... Yohimbine, also known under the outdated names quebrachin, aphrodin, corynine, yohimvetol, and hydroergotocin, is the principal alkaloid of the bark of the West-African tree Pausinystalia yohimbe Pierre (formerly Corynanthe yohimbe), family Rubiaceae (Madder family). ... According to Erik Eriksons stages of human development, first enumerated in Childhood and Society (1950) a young adult is a person between the ages of 19 and 40, whereas an adolescent is a person between the ages of 12 and 21. ...


Z

z-score - z-test - Zeitgeist - Zener cards - Zero-defects mentality - Zero correlation - Ziwo yixiang - Zoophobia - In statistics, a standard score (z) is a dimensionless quantity derived by subtracting the sample mean from an individual (raw) score and then dividing the difference by the sample standard deviation: The quantity z represents the number of standard deviations between the raw score and the mean; it is negative... The Z-test is a statistical test used in inference. ... This article is about the German word. ... Zener cards are cards used to conduct experiments for extra-sensory perception, most often clairvoyance. ... A zero-defects mentality exists when a command-and-control structure does not tolerate mistakes. ... Ziwo yixiang is the Chinese language translation for the Western psychology term self image. In China, particularly in mainland China, a positive self image is regarded as an undesirable state. ... The English suffix -phobia is used to describe fear or hatred (the latter is often ignored) of a particular thing or subject. ...

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List of psychology topics - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (551 words)
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Skinner -- behavioral imprinting -- behavioral psychology -- behaviorism -- belief -- bipolar disorder -- brain -- brain injury -- brainwashing -- bystander effect
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