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Encyclopedia > List of notable brain tumor patients
United States Senator Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania (right) is a long-term brain tumor survivor who continues to serve in public office.
United States Senator Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania (right) is a long-term brain tumor survivor who continues to serve in public office.

This list of notable brain tumor patients includes people who made significant contributions to their chosen field and who had a primary or metastatic brain tumor at some point in their lives, as confirmed by public information. Tumor type and survival duration are listed where the information is known. Blank spaces in these columns appear where precise information has not been released to the public. Medicine does not designate most long term survivors as cured. Image File history File links Specter_and_Casey. ... Image File history File links Specter_and_Casey. ... Arlen Specter (born February 12, 1930) is a United States Senator from Pennsylvania. ... Metastasis (Greek: change of the state) is the spread of cancer from its primary site to other places in the body. ... A brain tumor is any intracranial tumor created by abnormal and uncontrolled cell division, normally either found in the brain itself (neurons, glial cells (astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells), lymphatic tissue, blood vessels), in the cranial nerves (myelin-producing Schwann cells), in the brain envelopes (meninges), skull, pituitary and pineal gland...


To put survival periods in context, a Norwegian hospital reviewed 1,218 patient records from 1960–1994 and reported median survival times for several tumor types over this 35 year period as listed in the table below.[1]


According to the United States National Cancer Institute, an estimated 18,500 new cases and 12,760 deaths occurred nationwide in 2005. These high overall mortality rates are due to the prevalence of aggressive types such as glioblastoma multiforme. Nearly 14% of new brain tumor diagnoses occur in persons under 20 years of age.[2] The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is part of the United States Federal governments National Institutes of Health. ... Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), also known as grade 4 astrocytoma, is the most common and aggressive type of primary brain tumor, accounting for 52 percent of all primary brain tumor cases and 20% of all intracranial tumors. ...

Tumor type Median survival
Glioblastoma multiforme 12 months (1.0 years)
Anaplastic astrocytoma 25 months (2.1 years)
Astrocytoma (low grade) 95 months (7.9 years)
Oligodendroglioma 74 months (6.2 years)
Mixed glioma 65 months (5.4 years)
Medulloblastoma 109 months (9.1 years)
Brain stem tumors 9 months (0.8 years)
Pineal region tumors 60 months (5.0 years)

Contents

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), also known as grade 4 astrocytoma, is the most common and aggressive type of primary brain tumor, accounting for 52 percent of all primary brain tumor cases and 20% of all intracranial tumors. ... Categories: Move to Wiktionary | Stub ... Astrocytomas are primary intracranial tumors derived from astrocytes cells of the brain. ... Oligodendrogliomas are a type of glioma that are believed to originate from the oligodendrocytes of the brain or from a glial precursor cell. ... A glioma is a type of primary central nervous system (CNS) tumor that arises from glial cells. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into brain tumor. ... Mostly enveloped by the cerebrum and cerebellum (blue), the visible part of brainstem is shown in black. ... The pineal gland (also called the pineal body or epiphysis) is a small endocrine gland in the brain. ...

Acting

Name Life Comments Diagnosis Survival Reference
Margo Albert (1917–1985) A movie actress and dancer. [3]
Tony Anholt (1941–2002) An actor best known for his role as Charles Frere in the 80s TV series Howards' Way. [4]
Pamela Britton (1923–1974) An actress who played Lorelei Brown on the television program My Favorite Martian. 2 weeks [5]
Patrick Cargill (1918–1996) British film and television actor who had been in ill health since being treated for a brain tumour and died a year later. Initially his death was blamed on a 'hit and run' accident [6]
Bert Convy (1933–1991) Stage, film and TV actor/host. [7]
Ross Davidson (1949–2006) An actor who played Andy O'Brien in the BBC soap opera, EastEnders. glioblastoma multiforme 20 months [8]
Brenda De Banzie (1915–1981) British actress of stage and film; died during or after surgery on a benign brain tumour. [9]
Esmeray Diriker (1950–2002) A singer and actress. [10]
Sandy Duncan (1946— ) Tony Award nominated Broadway actor, television star. 30+ years [11]
Linda Gary (1944–1995) Voice artist for Scooby Doo and other animated series. [12]
Brian Glover (1934–1997) An actor and former professional wrestler and teacher. [13]
Richard Greene (1918–1985) An actor best known as the star of the long running British TV series The Adventures of Robin Hood. 3 years [14]
Olivia Hamnett (19??–2001) English born Australian actor. [15]
Susan Hayward (1917–1975) Academy Award-winning film actor. 2 years [16]
Richard Jordan (1938–1993) A stage, screen and film actor. [17][18]
Martin Kemp (1961—) An actor and former pop musician with brother Gary Kemp in the band Spandau Ballet. 1995— [19]
Arthur Kennedy (1914–1990) Stage and film actor; Tony Award winner. [20]
Lois Kibbee (1922–1993) An actress best remembered for her role of Geraldine Weldon Whitney Saxon on the TV soap opera The Edge of Night. [21]
Alan Lake (1940–1984) An actor and the third husband of the actress Diana Dors. Committed suicide. [22]
Eugene Gordon Lee (1933–2005) Child actor who played Porky in the Our Gang (Little Rascals) comedies. metastatic tumor [23]
Katherine Locke (1910–1995) A Broadway star actress in the late 1930s. [24]
Meredith MacRae (1944–2000) An actress and TV host. [25]
Victor Maddern (1926–1993) An actor who often played a supporting role in films. [26]
Lea De Mae (1976–2004) A pornographic model and actress. glioblastoma multiforme 4 months [27]
Joseph Maher (1933–1998) Irish-born stage actor and film/TV character actor. [28]
Irish McCalla (1928–2002) An actress best known as the title star of the 1950s TV series Sheena, Queen of the Jungle. under 18 months [29]
Buster Merryfield (1920–1999) The actor who played Uncle Albert in the BBC comedy Only Fools and Horses. [30]
Bueno de Mesquita (1918–2005) A comedian, actor and stage artist, known for his ability to make funny faces. Had lung cancer and a brain tumor. [31][32]
Greg Morris (1933–1996) Television actor, best remembered for the Mission Impossible series. [33]
Pola Negri (1894–1987) A silent movie actress, famous for playing a femme fatale role. 2 years [34]
Jerry Paris (1925–1986) An actor and director best known for his role as Jerry Helper on The Dick Van Dyke Show. [35]
Pat Paulsen (1927–1997) Comedian, starred on the Smothers Brothers television show in the 1960s. [36]
Slim Pickens (1919–1983) Rodeo clown turned film actor, best remembered for Dr. Strangelove. [37][38]
Kate Reid (1930–1993) An actress. [39]
Mark Ruffalo (1967—) An actor. The operation to remove the benign tumor caused him temporary partial paralysis. 2001— [40]
Irene Ryan (1902–1973) An entertainer who found success in vaudeville, radio, film, television and on Broadway. [41]
Zachary Scott (1914–1965) Film villain. [42][43]
Alexis Smith (1921–1993) Canadian-born film actor. [44]
Michelle Stafford (1968—) An actress best known for her role as Phyllis Summers Abbott in the soap opera The Young and the Restless. 1985— [45]
Werner Stocker (1955–1993) Featured role in television's Highlander series. [46]
Kinuyo Tanaka (1910–1977) An actress and director. [47]
Anya Taranda (1915–1970) A model, showgirl, actress and wife of renowned songwriter Harold Arlen. [48]
Elizabeth Taylor (1932— ) Academy Award winning actor, star of numerous films. meningioma 1997 to present [49]
Bobby Van (1928–1980) Broadway muscian and actor. [50]
Henry Victor (1892–1945) A character actor who played the strongman Hercules in the 1932 film Freaks. [51][52]
Kim Walker (1968–2001) An actress whose most notable role was as Heather Chandler in the film Heathers. malignant glioma under 2 years [53]
Penelope Dudley Ward (1914–1982) British actress and socialite; wife of acclaimed film director Carol Reed [54]
Johnny Wayne (1918–1990) Canadian comedian of the Wayne and Shuster duo. [55]
Bill Williams (1915–1992) A movie actor who starred as Kit Carson in the 1950s TV series Adventures of Kit Carson. [56]
Jeff Winkless (1941–2006) An actor, composer and voice actor. [57]

Margo in The Leopard Man (1943) For the Irish singer Margo ODonnell go to Margo (music). ... Tony Anholt (January 19, 1941 - July 26, 2002) was a British actor best known for his role as Security Chief Tony Verdeschi in the second season of the 1970s television series Space: 1999. ... Howards Way was a television drama series produced by BBC Birmingham and transmitted between 1985 and 1990. ... Pamela Britton was an actress best known for appearing as Lorelei Brown in the television series My Favorite Martian. ... My Favorite Martian was an American television sitcom aired on CBS from September 29, 1963 to September 4, 1966 for 107 episodes (75 in black and white 1963-1965, 32 color 1965-1966). ... Patrick Cargill (3 June 1918 – 23 May 1996) was a British actor. ... Bernard Whalen (Bert) Convy (July 23, 1933 – July 15, 1991) was an American game show host, actor and singer. ... Ross as Andy in EastEnders Ross Davidson (August 25, 1949 - October 16, 2006), was a British actor. ... Andy OBrien was a fictional character in the BBC soap opera EastEnders. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion... For Philippine soap opera, see Teleserye. ... EastEnders is a popular BBC television soap opera, first broadcast in the United Kingdom on BBC1 on 19 February 1985[3] and continuing to date. ... Brenda De Banzie was born on July 28, 1915 in Manchester, England. ... Esmeray Diriker was born in Istanbul, Turkey in the town of Emirgan. ... Sandra Kay Sandy Duncan (born February 20, 1946) is an American singer and actress of stage and television. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Linda Gary (November 4, 1944-October 5, 1995) was a voice-over artist for countless animated projects. ... Scooby-Doo IS THE SHIT is a short ass-running American animated television series produced for your mom Saturday morning television in several different versions from 1969 to the present. ... Brian Glover (April 2, 1934 - July 24, 1997) was a British actor. ... ... Richard Greene (25 August 1918 in Plymouth, Devon, UK - 1 June 1985 in Norfolk, UK). ... The Adventures of Robin Hood was a popular, long-running British television series (143 half-hour, black and white episodes, 1955–1960) starring Richard Greene as Robin Hood. ... Olivia Hamnett (d. ... Susan Hayward (June 30, 1917 – March 14, 1975) was an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Richard Anson Jordan (July 19, 1938 – August 30, 1993) was an American stage, screen and film actor. ... Martin John Kemp (born 10 October 1961), brother of Gary Kemp, is an English actor and former pop musician. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke while waiting between takes during location filming An actor or actress is a person who acts, or plays a role, in a dramatic production. ... Depending on context, pop music is either an abbreviation of popular music or, more recently, a term for a sub-genre of it. ... Gary Kemp Gary Kemp (born 16 October 1959, in Islington, London) is an English pop artist who was the leader and chief songwriter for the 1980s New Romantic band Spandau Ballet. ... Spandau Ballet were a popular English band in the 1980s. ... Arthur Kennedy in Champion. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Image:Kibbee. ... The Edge of Night title card from 1956-67. ... Alan Lake (24 November 1940 - 10 October 1984) was a British actor. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... Diana Dors (October 23, 1931 – May 4, 1984) was an English actress. ... Eugene Gordon Lee (October 25, 1933–October 16, 2005) was a former American child actor, most notable for appearing in the Our Gang (Little Rascals) comedies as Porky from 1935 to 1939. ... A poster for the 1931 Our Gang comedy Love Business featuring depictions of (from left to right): Pete the Pup, Jackie Cooper, and Norman Chubby Chaney. ... Katherine Locke (June 24, 1910 - September 12, 1995) was a Broadway star actress in the late 1930s. ... Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ... Meredith MacRae (born May 30, 1944 in Houston, Texas, died July 14, 2000 in Manhattan Beach, California) was an American actress. ... Victor Jack Maddern (16 March 1926 — 22 June 1993) was an English actor. ... Lea De Mae (December 26, 1976 – December 9, 2004) was a Czech pornographic model and actress. ... Pornographic movies Pornography (Porn) (from Greek πόρνη (porne) prostitute and γραφή (grafe) writing), more informally referred to as porn or porno, is the explicit representation of the human body or sexual activity with the goal of sexual arousal. ... Photograph of the once famous model Dovima A model is a person who poses or displays for purposes of art, fashion, or other products and advertising. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... Joseph Maher (December 29, 1933 - July 17, 1998) was a character actor born in Westport, County Mayo, Ireland and educated by the Irish Christian Brothers. ... 1950s publicity still as TVs Sheena Nellie Elizabeth Irish McCalla (born December 25, 1928 or 1929 (sources differ), Pawnee City, Nebraska, United States; died February 1, 2002, Tucson, Arizona) was an American actress and artist best-known as the title star of the 1950s television series Sheena, Queen of... Sheena, Queen of the Jungle #18 (Winter 1952-53). ... Buster Merryfield in Only Fools and Horses Buster Merryfield (November 27, 1920 - June 23 1999) was a British actor who became a national institution after joining the hit BBC comedy Only Fools and Horses in 1984, as the sea faring Albert Trotter, affectionately known as Uncle Albert. ... Albert Gladstone Trotter (1920-1999) was a character in the popular BBC sitcom Only Fools and Horses. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion... Comedy has a classical meaning (comical theatre) and a popular one (the use of humour with an intent to provoke[[ laughter in general). ... Only Fools and Horses is a British television sitcom, created and written by John Sullivan, and made and broadcast by the BBC. Seven series were originally broadcast in the UK between 1981 and 1991, with sporadic Christmas specials until 2003. ... Abraham (Appie) Bueno de Mesquita (July 23, 1918 - August 19, 2005), commonly known under his stage name Bueno de Mesquita was a Dutch comedian, actor and stage artist, well known for his ability to make funny faces. ... Francis Gregory Alan Morris (September 27, 1933 - August 27, 1996) was an African-American television and movie actor. ... Mission: Impossible is the name of an American television series which aired on the CBS network from September 1966 to September 1973. ... Pola Negri Pola Negri [1] (December 31, 1894 - August 1, 1987) was a Polish film actress who achieved notoriety as a femme fatale in silent films between 1910s and 1930s. ... A silent film is a film which has no accompanying soundtrack. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Tall, comedic actor born William Gerald Grossman in San Francisco, California on July 25, 1925. ... The Dick Van Dyke Show was an American television situation comedy which aired on CBS from October 3, 1961 to September 7, 1966. ... Patrick Layton Paulsen (July 6, 1927 – April 24, 1997) was a United States comedian and satirist notable for his roles on several of the Smothers Brothers TV shows, and for his supposed campaigns for President of the United States in 1968, 1972, 1976, 1992, and 1996, which had primarily comedic... The Smothers Brothers are an American musical-comedy team, formed by real-life brothers Tom and Dick Smothers. ... Slim Pickens riding the bomb in the movie Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb Louis Bert Lindley, Jr. ... A rodeo clown or bull fighter is a rodeo performer who works on bull riding contests. ... Strangelove redirects here. ... Kate Daphne Reid (4 November 1930 – 27 March 1993) was a Canadian actress. ... Ruffalo in Just Like Heaven, 2005 Mark Alan Ruffalo (born November 22, 1967 in Kenosha, Wisconsin) is an American actor who has received critical acclaim for his film work. ... Irene Ryan (born Irene Noblette) was one of the few entertainers who found success in vaudeville, radio, film, television, and Broadway. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ... Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ... Zachary Scott (Austin, Texas February 24, 1914 – October 3, 1965 also in Austin from a brain tumour) was an American actor, most notable for his roles as villains and mystery men. He was a distant cousin of both George Washington and Bat Masterson. ... Alexis Smith Alexis Smith (June 8, 1921 – June 9, 1993) was an actress. ... Michelle Stafford as Phyllis Summers Abbott. ... Michelle Stafford as Phyllis Summers Abbott (2005) Phyllis Summers Abbott (neé Romalotti) is a fictional character in the CBS soap opera The Young and the Restless. ... For Philippine soap opera, see Teleserye. ... For the Australian band, see Young and restless (band). ... Werner Stocker as Darius in the highlander series Werner Stocker as Darius in the highlander series Werner Stocker (b. ... Kinuyo Tanaka (田中絹代 Tanaka Kinuyo, 28 November 1910 - 21 March 1977) was a Japanese actress and director. ... Anya Taranda (January 1, 1915 - March 9, 1970) was an American model, showgirl, actress and wife of renowned songwriter Harold Arlen. ... Photograph of the once famous model Dovima A model is a person who poses or displays for purposes of art, fashion, or other products and advertising. ... A Las Vegas showgirl, from the Folies Bergere. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other persons named Elizabeth Taylor, see Elizabeth Taylor (disambiguation). ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Bobby Van (December 6, 1928–July 31, 1980) was probably best known for his musical and acting career on Broadway in the 1960s and 1970s. ... Henry Victor (October 2, 1892 - March 15, 1945) was a character actor. ... Freaks is a Pre-Code 1932 horror film about sideshow performers, directed by Tod Browning. ... Kimberly Anne Walker (June 19, 1968-March 6, 2001) was a New York-born actress. ... Heathers is a 1989 black comedy film starring Winona Ryder, Shannen Doherty, and Christian Slater. ... A glioma is a type of primary central nervous system (CNS) tumor that arises from glial cells. ... Penelope Dudley Ward, Lady Reed (August 4, 1914 - January 22, 1982) was an English actress. ... Sir Carol Reed (30 December 1906 – 25 April 1976) was an English film director, winner of an Academy Award for his film version of the musical, Oliver! (1968). ... Wayne and Shuster was a Canadian comedy duo formed by Johnny Wayne and Frank Shuster. ... Wayne and Shuster were a Canadian comedy duo formed by Johnny Wayne and Frank Shuster. ... Williams in Deadline at Dawn Bill Williams (May 21, 1915 – September 21, 1992), born Hermann Katt, was a movie actor with over 70 movie credits. ... Kit Carson Kit Carson (December 24, 1809 – May 23, 1868), born Christopher Houston Carson, was an American frontiersman. ... Jeffrey Alan Winkless (June 2, 1941-June 26, 2006) was an American film and theatre actor, music composer, and voice actor. ...

Business

Name Life Comments Diagnosis Survival Reference
James Batten (1936?–1995) Chief Executive Officer of Knight-Ridder publishing. 1 year [58]
Raymond Bonham Carter (1929–2004) A banker who became a director of S G Warburg & Co and the father of actress Helena Bonham Carter. He became quadriplegic and partially blind after an operation to remove a non-cancerous brain tumor. 25 years [59]
Reginald Lewis (1942–1993) Chief Executive Officer of TLC Beatrice International Holdings Inc, the first African-American run company to have over $1 billion in annual sales. [60]
Gerry Pencer (1945–1998) Chief executive officer of Cott Beverages. Mr. Pencer and his family became significant philanthopists of brain tumor research and medicine. glioblastoma multiforme 8 months [61]
Rene Rivkin (1944–2005) A stockbroker convicted for insider trading. multiple meningioma [62]
Dawn Steel (1946–1997) First female top executive of a major Hollywood studio. 20 months [63]
Preston Robert Tisch (1926–2005) Businessman, former Postmaster General and half-owner of the New York Giants. [64]

James Batten (1936? - 1995) was chief executive officer of Knight-Ridder publishing. ... The Knight Ridder building in downtown San Jose, California. ... Raymond Bonham Carter (19 June 1929 – 17 January 2004) was a leading British banker, and a member of a distinguished British theatrical and political family. ... For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ... Helena Bonham Carter (born May 26, 1966) is an Oscar-nominated English actress. ... For the American basketball player, see Reggie Lewis. ... Gerald Norman Pencer (April 26, 1945 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada - February 3, 1998 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada) was a Canadian business executive. ... Cott is a leading supplier of private label carbonated soft drinks distributing to Canada, the United States, Mexico, the United Kingdom, and Europe. ... Rene Rivkin (6 June 1944 – 1 May 2005) was an Australian entrepreneur, stockbroker, and investment adviser. ... A stock broker or stockbroker or stock brokerage is someone or a firm who performs transactions in financial instruments on a stock market as an agent of his/her/its clients who are unable or unwilling to trade for themselves. ... Insider trading is the trading of a corporations stock or other securities (e. ... Dawn Steel (August 19, 1946 – December 20, 1997) was the first woman to run a major Hollywood film studio. ... Preston Robert Bob Tisch (April 29, 1926 – November 15, 2005) was the chairman, and, with his brother Laurence, part owner of the Loews Corporation. ... The United States Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Big Blue Wrecking Crew, Big Blue, G-Men, The Jints, The New York Football Giants Team colors Royal Blue, Red, Gray, and White Head Coach Tom Coughlin Owner John Mara (50%) and Steve Tisch (50%) General manager Jerry Reese League/Conference affiliations National...

Film, television and radio

Name Life Comments Diagnosis Survival Reference
Alan Berg (1934–1984) A liberal talk radio host in Denver, Colorado, who broadcast his program on KOA. He was murdered in 1984 and his story formed the basis of the Oliver Stone film Talk Radio. 8 years [65]
Jack Brickhouse (1916–1998) A sports broadcast announcer. 6 months [66]
Tom Cheek (1939–2005) A radio broadcaster who announced Major League Baseball games for the Toronto Blue Jays. [67]
Dan Curtis (1928–2006) An Emmy Award winning director and producer of television and film. 4 months [68]
Chuck Howard (1933–1996) A former producer at ABC Sports and winner of 11 Emmy Awards. [69]
Ted Husing (1901–1962) A pioneer radio sportscaster. 6 years [70][71]
Eleanor Mondale (1960— ) Cable television host on the E! network, daughter of former United States Vice President Walter Mondale June 2005— [72]
Andrew Olle (1947–1995) A presenter on Australia's ABC. glioblastoma multiforme [73]
Judd Rose (1955–2000) Emmy Award winning television news reporter, co-anchor of CNN Newsstand. astrocytoma ~6 years [74]
Gene Siskel (1946–1999) Film critic for the Chicago Tribune; television partner of fellow critic Roger Ebert. under 1 year [33]
Julia Somerville (1947—) A a TV news anchor and reporter who has worked for BBC News and ITN. 1992— [75]
François Truffaut (1932–1984) Film director famous for The 400 Blows. [76]
Stan Zemanek (1947—) A broadcaster. who presents a night time radio show on 2UE. 2006— [77]

For other people of the same name, see A. Berg. ... Progressive Talk (or Liberal Talk) is a talk radio format devoted to expressive progressive/liberal viewpoints of issues. ... Talk radio is a radio format which features discussion of topical issues. ... This article refers to the state capital of Colorado. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... KOA (850 AM), (NewsRadio 850 KOA) is a clear channel news/talk radio station serving the Denver, Colorado market. ... William Oliver Stone (born September 15, 1946), known simply as Oliver Stone, is a three-time Academy Award-winning American film director and screenwriter. ... Talk Radio is a 1988 film, starring Eric Bogosian as a controversial shock jock It is directed by Oliver Stone, and is based on the real life murder of radio host Alan Berg by Neo-Nazis[1], and the book about those events, Talked to Death: The Life and Murder... Jack Brickhouse (January 24, 1916 - August 6, 1998) was an American sports broadcast announcer. ... Thomas F. Cheek (June 13, 1939 - October 9, 2005) was an American broadcaster who announced Major League Baseball games for the Toronto Blue Jays on radio from the teams establishment in 1977 until 2004. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Continuity announcer. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Major league affiliations American League (1977–present) East Division (1977–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Toronto Blue Jays (1977–present) Ballpark Rogers Centre (1989–present) f. ... Dan Curtis (born August 12, 1928) is a director and producer of television and film, probably best known for the afternoon TV series Dark Shadows, which originally aired from 1966 to 1971 and has aired in syndication for the last thirty years. ... An Emmy Award. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... Charles (Chuck) Howard graduated from Duke University in 1945. ... Edward Britt (Ted) Husing (November 27, 1901 - August 10, 1962) was an American sports broadcaster. ... Eleanor Mondale Eleanor Mondale (born 1960 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) is the only daughter of Walter Mondale, 42nd Vice President of the United States. ... E!: Entertainment Television is an American cable television and direct broadcast satellite network. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ... Andrew Olle (1947 – 12 December 1995) was a presenter on Australias ABC, beginning his career in 1967 as a news cadet and, until his death, working in a wide variety of programs, including but not limited to: The 7. ... A television presenter is a British term for a person who introduces or hosts television programmes. ... The Australian Broadcasting Corporation or ABC is Australias national non-profit public broadcaster. ... Judd Rose (1955 - 2000) was an Emmy Award winning television journalist. ... An Emmy Award. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Gene Siskel Eugene Gene Kal Siskel (January 26, 1946 – February 20, 1999) was one of the worlds most successful film critics. ... The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize winning American film critic. ... Julia Mary Fownes Somerville (b. ... The current BBC News logo BBC News and Current Affairs is a major arm of the BBC responsible for the corporations newsgathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... ITN may refer to: Independent Television News In the news, a section on the Main Page of English Wikipedia This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... François Truffaut. ... This article is about the French film. ... Stan Zemanek is a Australian radio broadcaster. ... 2UE is a commercial radio station in Sydney, Australia. ...

Military

Name Life Comments Diagnosis Survival Reference
Jaime Milans del Bosch (1915–1997) A Lieutenant General in the Spanish Army who was dismissed in 1981 for his role in the failed coup d'état of 23 February 1981 (23-F). [78]
Bob Braham (1920–1974) The most highly decorated airman of the RAF in World War II. [79]
William S. Donaldson (1945–2001) A United States Navy pilot, founder of the Associated Retired Aviation Professionals (ARAP) and a famous critic of the US Government's TWA flight 800 investigation. 7 months [80][81]
Katharina Hammerschmidt (1943–1975) A member of the Baader-Meinhof Gang, one of the most significant terrorist organisations in post-war West Germany. [82]
Seyni Kountché (1931–1987) A military officer who led a 1974 coup d'état that deposed the government of Niger's first president, Hamani Diori. He ruled the country as military head of state from 1974 to 1987. [83]
Thomas W. Steed (1904–1973) A military officer in the United States Army Air Corps and United States Air Force. During World War II he commanded the 456th Bomb Group (Heavy) throughout its combat service. meningioma [84]
Leonard Wood (1860–1927) A physician who served as the Chief of Staff of the United States Army and Governor General of the Philippines. parasagittal meningioma [85]

Jaime Milans del Bosch y Ussía (June 8, 1915 - July 26, 1997) was a Lieutenant General in the Spanish Army who was dismissed in 1981 for his role in the failed coup détat of 23 February 1981 (23-F). ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ... The Spanish Army (Ejército de Tierra in Spanish; literally, Land Army) is one branch of the Spanish Armed Forces, in charge of land operations. ... Antonio Tejero with a gun in his hand, breaking into the Congress of Deputies February 23, 1981, attempting a coup. ... John Randall Daniel Bob Braham (6 April 1920 - 7 February 1974), Distinguished Service Order and 2 bars, Distinguished Flying Cross & 2 bars, Air Force Cross, was the most highly decorated airman of the RAF in World War II. He claimed 29 enemy aircraft destroyed, probably destroyed one more, and damaged... RAF is an three letter acronym for: Royal Air Force -- the Air Force of the United Kingdom (see also Air Ministry) Red Army Faction (Rote Armee Fraktion) -- a German terror organisation Rigas Autobusu Fabrika -- a factory making buses in Riga, Latvia Rapid Action Force in India Računarski Fakultet RAF... Cmdr. ... The United States Navy, also known as the USN or the U.S. Navy, is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for conducting naval operations. ... For other uses, see Aviator (disambiguation). ... The word critic comes from the Greek κριτικός, kritikós - one who discerns, which itself arises from the Ancient Greek word κριτής, krités, meaning a person who offers reasoned judgement or analysis, value judgement, interpretation, or observation. ... ... TWA Flight 800 (TW800, TWA800) was a TWA passenger flight that disintegrated while flying from John F. Kennedy International Airport (New York) to Charles de Gaulle International Airport (Paris) in July of 1996, killing all 230 aboard. ... Red Army Faction Insignia The Red Army Faction, also known as the Baader-Meinhof Gang, was one of the most significant terrorist organisations in post-war West Germany. ... RAF Logo The Red Army Faction (in German: Rote Armee Fraktion; RAF), also known as the Baader-Meinhof Gang, was postwar Germanys most active radical leftist paramilitary group, which is widely regarded as a terrorist organization. ... ... This article should be transwikied to wiktionary The term post-war is generally used for the period after the end of World War II, i. ... Seyni Kountché Seyni Kountché (b. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... A coup détat (pronounced ), or simply coup, is the sudden overthrow of a government through unconstitutional means by a part of the state establishment — mostly replacing just the high-level figures. ... List of Heads of State of Niger (Dates in italics indicate de facto continuation of office) Affiliations See also Niger Heads of Government of Niger Lists of Incumbents Categories: Lists of office-holders | Niger ... Diori Hamani (b. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Thomas Webster Steed (October 18, 1904-October 21, 1973) was a professional U.S. military officer in the United States Army Air Corps and United States Air Force. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... The United States Air Force (USAF) is the aerial warfare branch of the United States armed forces and one of the seven uniformed services. ... 15th USAAF patch The 456th Bomb Group (Heavy) was an air combat unit of the United States Army Air Forces during the Second World War. ... Leonard Wood (October 9, 1860 – August 7, 1927) was a physician who served as the US Army Chief of Staff and Governor General of the Philippines. ... The Doctor by Samuel Luke Fildes This article is about the term physician, one type of doctor; for other uses of the word doctor see Doctor. ... The Flag of the Chief of Staff of the United States Army The Chief of Staff of the United States Army (CSA) is the professional head of the United States Army who is responsible for insuring readiness of the Army. ... The Governor-General of the Philippines was the chief political executive of the Philippines from 1901 to 1935, during the period when they were governed by the United States of America. ...

Miscellaneous

Name Life Comments Diagnosis Survival Reference
Jon Bannenberg (1929–2002) A designer of over 200 yachts. [86]
Ben Bowen (2002–2005) Notable Huntington, West Virginia Resident and Toddler whose brave example has raise more than $3,000,000 for St. Jude Children's Hospital ATRT 1 year [87]
Margaret Brown (1867–1932) Socialite, philanthropist, and activist. Survivor of the Titanic disaster. Portrayed in the 1964 film The Unsinkable Molly Brown and the 1997 film Titanic. [88]
Johnnie Cochran (1937–2005) Prominent defense attorney. 1 year [89]
Robert W. Funk (1926–2005) An academic theologian, author and founder of the controversial Jesus Seminar. [90]
Henry Kock (1952–2005) A horticulturist at the University of Guelph Arboretum. 18 months [91]
Anatoli Levchenko (1941–1988) Research cosmonaut. [92]
Princess Marina, Duchess of Kent (1906–1968) Member of the British royal family [93]
Marshall McLuhan (1911–1980) Communications theorist and educator. 11 years [94]
Enric Miralles (1955–2000) An architect whose largest work is the Scottish Parliament Building. [95]
John Cardinal O'Connor (1920–2000) The eleventh bishop (eighth archbishop) of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York [96]
Deke Slayton (1924–1993) One of the original seven United States astronauts. [97]
Craig Shergold (1979—) A former brain cancer patient who is most famous for receiving over 33 million greeting cards, earning him a place in the Guinness Book of Records. He fully recovered, but the cards are still coming and are no longer welcome. 1989— [98]
Doris Tate (1924–1992) Prominent activist in the victims' rights movement, mother of murder victim Sharon Tate. metastatic tumor [99]
Charles Whitman (1941–1966) Ascended the University of Texas at Austin's 27-story tower in 1966, and shot passersby in the city and on the campus below before being shot dead by Austin Police. Tumor found on autopsy. [100]
Richard Wild (1912–1978) Former Chief Justice of New Zealand (1966–1978) [101]
Mary Hayward Weir (1915–1968) A steel heiress and socialite. [102]
Frank Wills (1948–2000) The security guard who uncovered the break-in that led to the Watergate scandal. [103]

Jon Bannenberg (1929-2002) was a yacht designer. ... A modern yacht A yacht (From Dutch Jacht meaning hunt) pron. ... Benjamin David Bowen, commonly called Big Ben Bowen,[1] (November 14, 2002—February 25, 2005[2]) was a young Huntington, West Virginia boy who was diagnosed with a very aggressive [3] brain tumour on March 2, 2004. ... Huntington is a city located in the U.S. State of West Virginia along the Ohio River. ... St. ... For the New York criminal, see Margaret Brown (criminal). ... For other uses, see Titanic. ... The Unsinkable Molly Brown is a musical play which tells the fictionalized account of the life of Margaret Brown, whose husband made a fortune in the Colorado gold mines, and who survived the sinking of the RMS Titanic. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Johnnie L. Cochran, Jr. ... Robert W. Funk (July 18, 1926-September 3, 2005), was founder of the controversial Jesus Seminar and the nonprofit Westar Institute in Santa Rosa, California. ... Theology (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογια, logia, words, sayings, or discourse) is reasoned discourse concerning religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... The Jesus Seminar is a research team of about two hundred New Testament scholars founded in 1985 by the late Robert Funk under the auspices of the Westar Institute. ... Henry Kock ( born 1952 - December 25, 2005) was a noted horticulturist, eco-activist, and founder of the Elm Recovery Project in Ontario. ... The Latin words hortus (garden plant) and cultura (culture) together form horticulture, classically defined as the culture or growing of garden plants. ... The University of Guelph is a medium-sized university located in Guelph, Ontario, established in 1964. ... An arboretum is a botanical garden primarily devoted to trees and other woody plants, forming a living collection of trees intended at least partly for scientific study. ... Anatoli Semyonovich Levchenko (born on May 5, 1941 in Krasnokutsk, Kharkiv Oblast of Ukrainian SSR - August 6, 1988 in Moscow, Russian SFSR) was a Soviet cosmonaut of Ukrainian descent. ... HRH Princess Marina, Duchess of Kent Princess Marina, Duchess of Kent (née Princess Marina of Greece and Denmark), (13 December 1906 - 27 August 1968) was a member of the British Royal Family; the wife of Prince George, Duke of Kent, the fourth son of King George V and Queen... McLuhan redirects here. ... Miralles Santa Caterina Market Enric Miralles (1955 - July 3, 2000) was a Catalan architect. ... An architect at his drawing board, 1893 An architect is a person who is involved in the planning, designing and oversight of a buildings construction. ... The Scottish Parliament building in April 2006 The Scottish Parliament Building is the home of the Scottish Parliament at Holyrood, within the UNESCO World Heritage Site in Edinburgh. ... John Cardinal OConnor John Joseph Cardinal OConnor, (January 15, 1920 – May 3, 2000) was the eleventh bishop (eighth archbishop) of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, serving from 1984 until his death in 2000. ... This article is about a title or office in religious bodies. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... St. ... Donald Kent Deke Slayton (March 1, 1924 – June 13, 1993) was one of the original Mercury Seven NASA astronauts. ... Craig Shergold (born 24 June 1979) is a Briton and former cancer patient who is most famous for receiving over 350 million greeting cards, earning him a place in the Guinness Book of Records. ... Greeting cards on display at retail. ... Suresh Joachim, minutes away from breaking the ironing world record at 55 hours and 5 minutes, at Shoppers World, Brampton. ... Doris Tate in 1984, confronting Charles Watson at his parole hearing with the presentation of her victims impact statement. ... Sharon Marie Tate (January 24, 1943 – August 9, 1969) was an American film actress. ... 1963 yearbook photo of Charles Whitman. ... The University of Texas at Austin, often called UT or Texas, is a doctoral/research university located in Austin, Texas. ... The Main Building Tower in the foreground. ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... The Right Honourable Sir Herbert Richard Churton Wild (known as Richard), (20 September 1912 - 22 May 1978) QC, was Chief Justice of New Zealand. ... The Chief Justice of New Zealand is the senior judge of the High Court of New Zealand, and presides over the Supreme Court of New Zealand. ... Mary Hayward Weir (1915 - 1968) was an American steel heiress and socialite. ... For other uses, see inheritance (disambiguation). ... A socialite is a person (male or female, but more often used for a woman) of social prominence who spends a significant amount of his or her time and resources entertaining and being entertained. ... Frank Wills (February 4, 1948 – September 27, 2000) was the security guard who uncovered the break in that led to the Watergate scandal. ... A security guard or security officer, is usually a privately and formally employed person who is paid to protect property, and/or assets, and/or people. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...

Music

Name Life Comments Diagnosis Survival Reference
William "Cat" Anderson (1916–1981) A jazz trumpeter who played with Duke Ellington's orchestra. [104]
Luther Allison (1939–1997) Blues guitarist. metastatic tumor less than 1 year [105]
Bill Black (1926–1965) Rock and roll bass player, recorded with Elvis Presley during 1954–1958. [106]
Davey von Bohlen (1975—) A musician and songwriter. meningioma 2000— [107]
Ray Bumatai (1952–2005) A musician, comedian and voice actor. glioblastoma 3 years [108]
Gregg Burge (1957–1998) A tap dancer and choreographer [109]
A. J. Croce (1971—) A singer-songwriter and the son of singer-songwriter Jim Croce. 1975— [110]
Celia Cruz (1925–2003) Cuban salsa singer, important figure in Afro-Cuban music. [111]
William Finn (1952— ) Tony Award winning Broadway songwriter. Finn wrote the show A New Brain about his experiences. 1992— [112]
Sergio Franchi (1926–1990) Italian-American singer; world-renowned tenor [113][114]
Marie Fredriksson (1958—) The lead singer of the Swedish pop duo Roxette 2002— [115]
George Gershwin (1898–1937) Jazz and classical music composer, co-wrote many stage musicals and film scores. glioblastoma multiforme 1 month [116]
Lou Gramm (1950—) A rock music vocalist and songwriter best known for his role as the lead vocalist for the rock band Foreigner. 1996— [117]
Bill Haley (1925–1981) Leader of one of the first rock and roll bands, The Comets. 2 years [118][119]
George Harrison (1943–2001) Lead guitarist of the Beatles. metastatic tumor [120]
Simon Jeffes (1949–1997) A guitarist, composer and arranger who was a member of the Penguin Cafe Orchestra. under 2 years [121]
Barney Kessel (1923–2004) Jazz guitarist who played with Charlie Parker, Billie Holiday, Benny Goodman, Elvis Presley, and the Beach Boys. [122]
Otto Klemperer (1885–1973) Conductor. 40 years [123]
John Loder (1946–2005) A sound engineer, record producer and founder of Southern Studios. under 2 years [124]
John Mack (1926–2006) Principle oboist with the Cleveland Orchestra. [125]
Brian MacLeod (1952–1992) A musician, songwriter and music producer, best known as a member of the bands Chilliwack and The Headpins. under 3 years [126]
Bob Marley (1945–1981) Reggae legend. metastatic tumor [33]
Johnny Mercer (1909–1976) Songwriter and lyricist. [127]
Ethel Merman (1908–1984) Legendary Broadway singer and actress. glioblastoma multiforme 10 months [128][129]
Robert Moog (1934–2005) Inventor of the modern music synthesizer. glioblastoma multiforme [130]
Ted Mulry (1947–2001) Singer, songwriter and musician, who formed the band Ted Mulry Gang (TMG). [131]
James Murphy (1967—) A guitarist. pituitary macro-adenoma 2001— [132]
Wayne Osmond (1951— ) Singer, second oldest of the Osmond brothers. 1994— [133]
Junior Parker (1932–1971) Blues singer. [134]
Frank Patterson (1938–2000) A classically-trained Irish tenor. [135]
Lucia Popp (1939–1993) An operatic soprano. [136]
Louis Prima (1910–1978) An entertainer, singer, actor, and trumpeter known as the King of the Swingers. He never recovered from an operation to remove a benign brain-stem tumor, which left him in a coma for nearly three years. [137]
Rainer Ptacek (1951–1997) Guitarist, singer and songwriter. [138]
Lou Rawls (1933–2006) Soul, jazz, and blues singer. Noted philanthropist. metastatic tumor 7 months [139]
Buddy Rich (1917–1987) A jazz drummer and bandleader. [140]
Chuck Schuldiner (1967–2001) Former guitarist and singer for the band Death, former guitarist for Control Denied. Influential figure in the development of death metal. pontine glioma 2 years [141]
Sam Sneed (—) A record producer and rapper. 1999— [142]
Tammi Terrell (1945–1970) Singer, duettist with Marvin Gaye on "Ain't No Mountain High Enough" and other hit singles. 2 years [143]
Russell Watson (1966—) A tenor singer, who has released popular albums of operatic-style songs. 2006— [144]
Sandy West (1959–2006) A musician, singer-songwriter and drummer. metastatic lung cancer [145]
Kai Winding (1922–1983) A trombonist and jazz composer. [146]
Webster Young (1932–2003) A jazz trumpeter and cornetist. [147]

William Alonzo Anderson, known as Cat Anderson (12 September 1916–29 April 1981) was an American jazz trumpeter best-known for his long period playing with Duke Ellingtons orchestra, and for his extremely wide range (more than five octaves), especially his playing in the higher registers. ... Jazz is a style of music which originated in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States at around the start of the 20th century. ... The trumpet is the highest brass instrument in register, above the horn, trombone, baritone, euphonium and tuba. ... Edward Kennedy Duke Ellington (April 29, 1899, Washington, D.C.; d. ... Luther Allison (August 17, 1939–August 12, 1997) was an American blues guitarist. ... William Bill Patton Black, Jr. ... Elvis Aron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977), often known simply as Elvis and also called The King of Rock n Roll or simply The King, was an American singer, musician and actor. ... Davey von Bohlen (born August 11, 1975) is an American musician and songwriter, best known for his roles as guitarist and vocalist in Capn Jazz, The Promise Ring, Vermont, and currently, Maritime. ... A musician is a person who plays or composes music Musicians can be classified by their role in creating or performing music: A singer (or vocalist) uses his or her voice as an instrument. ... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... Ray Bumatai (b. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Tap dance was born in the United States during the 19th century, and today is popular all around the world. ... Choreography (also known as dance composition) is the art of making structures in which movement occurs, the term composition may also refer to the navigation or connection of these movement structures. ... A.J. Croce (born Adrian James Croce on September 28, 1971 in Bryn Mawr, PA) is an American singer/songwriter. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... James Joseph Croce (January 10, 1943 – September 20, 1973), popularly known as Jim Croce (pronounced CROW-chee), was an American singer-songwriter. ... Celia Cruz (October 21, 1925 – July 16, 2003) was a three-time Grammy Award and four-time Latin Grammy winning Cuban-American salsa singer who spent most of her career living in New Jersey, and working in the United States and several Latin American countries. ... Cuban boys playing in Trinidad, Cuba The term Afro-Cuban refers to Cubans of African ancestry, and to historical or cultural elements in Cuba thought to emanate from this community. ... William Finn (* 28 February 1952), Tony-winning American composer, especially of musicals. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Sergio Franchi (April 6, 1926 – 1990) was an Italian tenor. ... Ercole de Roberti: Concert, c. ... In music, a tenor is a male singer with a high voice. ... Marie Fredriksson 2006   is best known as the lead singer of the Swedish pop duo Roxette. ... Ercole de Roberti: Concert, c. ... For popular music (music produced commercially rather than art or folk music), see Popular music. ... In music, a band is a group of musicians, or musical ensemble, usually popular or folk, playing parts of or improvising off of a musical arrangement. ... Roxette is a Swedish pop duo, sometimes rock influenced, that consists of Marie Fredriksson and Per Gessle. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Jazz is a style of music which originated in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States at around the start of the 20th century. ... Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ... Ready or Not album cover Lou Gramm (born Louis Grammatico on May 2, 1950 in Rochester, New York) is an American rock music vocalist and songwriter best known for his role as the lead vocalist for the rock band Foreigner. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Rock and roll. ... In music a singer or vocalist is a type of musician who sings, i. ... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Foreigner is a hard rock band formed in New York City in 1976 by veteran musicians Mick Jones and Ian McDonald, along with then unknown vocalist Lou Gramm (Louis Grammatico). ... Bill Haley, with his band, the Comets, was one of the first rock and roll acts to tour the United Kingdom. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... The original members of Bill Haley and His Comets, c. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... The Penguin Café Orchestra was a loose assembly of various musicians headed by classically-trained guitarist, composer and arranger Simon Jeffes (Sussex, England, 1949-1997). ... The Penguin Cafe Orchestra was a loose assembly of various musicians headed by classically-trained guitarist, composer and arranger Simon Jeffes (Sussex, England, 1949-1997). ... Cover of a Barney Kessel album. ... Charles Bird Parker, Jr. ... Billie Holiday(April 7, 1915 – July 17, 1959), born Eleanora Fagan and later called Lady Day, was an American singer known equally for her difficult life and her emotive, poignant singing voice. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Elvis Aron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977), often known simply as Elvis and also called The King of Rock n Roll or simply The King, was an American singer, musician and actor. ... The Beach Boys, originally the Beech Boys, a small team of four brothers from the south of Poland, emigrated to America in the early 1950s in search of a fortune to be made in the Arizonian logging industry. When it soon became evident they had been the victims of... Otto Klemperer (May 14, 1885 – July 6, 1973) was a German-born conductor and composer. ... John Loder (April 7, 1946 - August 12, 2005) was a British sound engineer, record producer and founder of Southern Studios, as well as a former member of EXIT and co-founder of the Southern Records distribution company with his wife Sue. ... Audio engineering is the branch of engineering dealing with the production of sound through mechanical means. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... Southern Studios is a recording studio in the Wood Green area of London. ... John Mack John Mack (born Somerville, New Jersey, 1927) is an American oboist. ... An oboist is a musician who plays the oboe. ... The Cleveland Orchestra is one of the major symphony orchestras in the United States. ... Brian Too Loud MacLeod (June 25, 1952 - April 25, 1992) was a Canadian musician, songwriter and music producer, best known as a member of the bands Chilliwack and The Headpins. ... In the music industry, record producer designates a person responsible for completing a master recording so that it is fit for release. ... Chilliwack was a Canadian rock band that existed during the 1970s and 1980s. ... Headpins are a Canadian rock group founded as a side project in the late 1970s by then Chilliwack members Ab Bryant and Brian MacLeod. ... Robert Nesta Marley OM (February 6, 1945 – May 11, 1981) was a Jamaican singer, songwriter, and guitarist. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Johnny Mercer John Herndon Johnny Mercer (November 18, 1909 – June 25, 1976) is regarded as one of Americas greatest songwriters. ... Ethel Merman (January 16, 1908 – February 15, 1984) was a Tony Award winning star of stage and film musicals, well known for her powerful voice and vocal range. ... Dr. Robert Arthur Moog (pronounced // to rhyme with vogue, not //) (May 23, 1934 – August 21, 2005) was a pioneer of electronic music, best known as the inventor of the Moog synthesizer. ... Ted Mulry (September 2, 1947 – September 1, 2001) was a British born singer, songwriter and musician who achieved success in Australia firstly, as a solo performer, and then leading his own band Ted Mulry Gang, sometimes officially credited as just TMG. // Solo Ted Mulry first came to the attention of... James Franklin Murphy (July 30th, 1967, Portsmouth, Virginia USA) is an American guitarist. ... Wayne Osmond (1951 - present) is the second oldest of the original Osmond Brothers singers. ... Junior Parkers style influenced early rockabilly artists, such as Elvis Presley. ... Frank Patterson (October 5, 1938 - June 10, 2000) He was born in Clonmel, County Tipperary, Ireland) and was a world famous tenor who died of brain cancer at the age of 61 in 2000. ... Lucia Popp (Lucia Poppova) (November 12, 1939–November 16, 1993) was a popular operatic soprano from Slovakia. ... The New Opera in Oslo, Norway The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, Italy. ... Look up soprano in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Louis Prima and Keely Smith singing for the radio in the 1950s Louis Prima (December 7, 1910 – August 24, 1978) was an American entertainer, singer, actor, and trumpeter. ... Ercole de Roberti: Concert, c. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke while waiting between takes during location filming An actor or actress is a person who acts, or plays a role, in a dramatic production. ... The trumpet is the highest brass instrument in register, above the horn, trombone, baritone, euphonium and tuba. ... Rainer Ptacek (June 7, 1951 – November 12, 1997) was a Tucson, Arizona-based guitarist, singer, and songwriter. ... Louis Allen Rawls (December 1, 1933 – January 6, 2006) was a Chicago-born American soul music, jazz, and blues singer. ... Bernard Buddy Rich (September 30, 1917 Brooklyn, New York – April 2, 1987) was an American jazz drummer and bandleader. ... Jazz is a style of music which originated in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States at around the start of the 20th century. ... A drummer in Action A drummer is a person who plays the drums, particularly the drum kit, marching percussion, or hand drums. ... A bandleader is the director of a band of musicians. ... Charles Michael Chuck Schuldiner (May 13, 1967, Long Island, New York – December 13, 2001) was an American musician. ... Death was an influential American death metal band founded in 1983 and dissolved in 1999. ... Control Denied was started by Chuck Schuldiner to create a European-style power metal/progressive metal band, mixed with elements death metal recognizable in his earlier band Death. ... Death metal is a sub-genre of heavy metal. ... Sam Sneed (born Sam Anderson in McKeesport, Pennsylvania) is a producer and rapper. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... Rapping is one of the elements of hip hop and the distinguishing feature of hip hop music; it is a form of rhyming lyrics spoken rhythmically over musical instruments, with a musical backdrop of sampling, scratching and mixing by DJs. ... Tammi Terrell (born Thomasina Montgomery) (April 29, 1945 – March 16, 1970) was an American Motown singer in the 1960s, best known for her duets with Marvin Gaye. ... Marvin Gaye (born Marvin Pentz Gay, Jr. ... Aint No Mountain High Enough is an R&B/soul song written by Nickolas Ashford and Valerie Simpson in 1966. ... Russell Watson, born in Salford, Greater Manchester, England, on 24 November 1966, is an English tenor who has released singles and albums of both operatic-style and pop songs. ... In music, a tenor is a male singer with a high voice. ... The New Opera in Oslo, Norway The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, Italy. ... Sandy West (July 10, 1959–October 21, 2006) was an American musician, singer, songwriter, and drummer. ... Kai Chresten Winding (May 18, 1922-May 6, 1983) was a popular trombonist and jazz composer. ... The trombone is a musical instrument in the brass family. ... Jazz is a style of music which originated in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States at around the start of the 20th century. ... Webster English Young (December 3, 1932 – December 13, 2003) was an American jazz trumpeter and cornetist. ... Jazz is a style of music which originated in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States at around the start of the 20th century. ... A trumpeter may be one of several things: A trumpeter is a musician who plays the trumpet. ... A trumpeter may be one of several things: A trumpeter is a musician who plays the trumpet. ...

Politics and government

Name Life Comments Diagnosis Survival Reference
Lee Atwater (1951–1991) Chairman of the United States Republican National Committee. glioblastoma multiforme 1 year [148]
William Casey (1913–1987) Director of the Central Intelligence Agency 5 months [149]
Chakufwa Chihana (1939–2006) Trade unionist and politician. 1 month [150]
Alan Clark (1928–1999) A British Conservative politician, historian and diarist. [151]
Clair Engle (1911–1964) United States senator from California. Late in his illness he broke a filibuster and helped pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Wheelchair bound and no longer able to speak, he raised his hand to signal his vote. [152]
Wayne Goss (1951— ) Former premier of Queensland, Australia. His tumor thwarted a potential career in federal politics. 1997— [153]
Paul B. Henry (1942–1993) An evangelical Christian, professor of political science, and politician [154]
David Hermelin (1936–2000) United States ambassador to Norway. 1 year [155]
Peter Law (1948–2006) Welsh politician, independent MP and AM. [156]
Clare Booth Luce (1903–1987) American politician and diplomat; also an editor, playwright, social activist & journalist [157]
Jean-Philippe Maitre (1949–2006) A politician and former President of the Swiss National Council. [158]
Gladys Marín (1941–2005) A political activist and former president of the Communist Party of Chile. glioblastoma multiforme [159][160]
Lennart Meri (1929–2006) A former president of Estonia. 7 months [161]
Mo Mowlam (1949–2005) Britain's Secretary of State for Northern Ireland. 7 years [162]
Bob O'Connor (1944–2006) Former Mayor of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. CNS lymphoma [163]
Arlen Specter (1930— ) United States senator from Pennsylvania. 1993— [164]
Mike Synar (1950–1996) United States congressional representative from Oklahoma. [33]
Frank Tejeda (1946–1997) United States congressional representative from Texas. 1 year [165]
Joop den Uyl (1919–1987) Former prime minister of the Netherlands from 1973 until 1977, as a member of the social-democratic PvdA party. [166]

Harvey Leroy Lee Atwater (February 26, 1951 – March 29, 1991) was an American Republican political consultant and strategist. ... Bush/Cheney, 2004 campaign manager Ken Mehlman is the current chairman of the RNC. The Republican National Committee (RNC) provides national leadership for the Republican Party of the United States. ... William Joseph Casey (March 13, 1913 - May 6, 1987) was the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency from 1981 to 1987. ... The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an intelligence agency of the United States government. ... Chakufwa Chihana was a Malawian trade unionist and politician. ... Alan Kenneth Mackenzie Clark (13 April 1928 - 5 September 1999) was a British Conservative politician, historian and diarist. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... Clair Engle (September 21, 1911–July 30, 1964) was an American politician. ... As a form of obstructionism in a legislature or other decision making body, a filibuster is an attempt to extend debate upon a proposal in order to delay or completely prevent a vote on its passage. ... President Johnson signs the Civil Rights Act of 1964. ... Wayne Keith Goss (b. ... List of Premiers of Queensland Before the 1890s there was no formal party system in Queensland. ... Capital Brisbane Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Quentin Bryce Premier Peter Beattie (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 28  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $158,506 (3rd)  - Product per capita  $40,170/person (6th) Population (End of September 2006)  - Population  4,070,400 (3rd)  - Density  2. ... Paul Brentwood Henry (July 9, 1942–July 31, 1993) was an evangelical Christian, professor of political science, and politician from the U.S. state of Michigan. ... The word evangelicalism usually refers to a broad collection of religious beliefs, practices, and traditions which are found among conservative Protestant Christians. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Christianity. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) varies. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... David Hermelin (December 26, 1936 - November 22, 2000) was United States ambassador to Norway and a Detroit area philanthropist and entrepreneur. ... Peter John Law (1 April 1948 – 25 April 2006) was a Welsh politician. ... This article is about the country. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... The National Assembly for Wales (NAW or NAfW) (Welsh: ) is a devolved assembly with power to make legislation in Wales. ... Categories: People stubs | U.S. dramatists and playwrights | Ambassadors of the United States | 1903 births | 1987 deaths ... Jean-Philippe Maitre (18 June 1949 – 1 February 2006) was a Swiss politician, member of the Swiss National Council (1983-2005). ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... Presidents of the National Council of Switzerland See also: Presidents of the Council of States Categories: Lists of members of parliament | Parliament of Switzerland ... Gladys Marín Gladys del Carmen Marín Millie (July 16, 1941 – March 6, 2005) was a Chilean activist and political figure. ... The Communist Party of Chile YOU MOTHERFUCKING COMMUNISTS GO TO HELL! (Spanish: Partido Comunista de Chile) is a Chilean political party that advocates communism. ... Lennart Meri Lennart Georg Meri (IPA: ˈlennÉ‘r̺t ˈgÌ¥eÉ”rgÌ¥ ˈmer̺i) (March 29, 1929 – March 14, 2006) was a writer, film director and politician who served as President of Estonia from 1992 to 2001. ... The Right Honourable Marjorie Mo Mowlam (September 18, 1949 - August 19, 2005) was a British politician, former Secretary of State for Northern Ireland and Labour MP. Her personal charisma, reputation for plain speaking and successful fight against a brain tumour led her to be perceived by many as one of... Bob OConnor (born December 9, 1944) is the Democratic Mayor of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Nickname: Steel City, Iron City, Steel Town, City of Champions, City of Bridges, City of Colleges, The Burgh Motto: Benigno Numine (With the Benevolent Deity) Location in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Allegheny County Founded November 25, 1758 Incorporated April 22, 1794 (borough)   March 18... A diagram showing the CNS: 1. ... Arlen Specter (born February 12, 1930) is a United States Senator from Pennsylvania. ... Congressman Mike Synar represented Oklahomas 2nd district in Congress until he was defeated in 1994 Primary by Vigil Hastings, a retired high-school principal, whose campaign was funded in large party by the tobacco industry. ... Frank Tejeda (October 2, 1945 – January 30, 1997) was a decorated Marine in the Vietnam War and a United States congressman from Texas. ... Prime Minister of the Netherlands Dr. Johannes Marten Joop den Uyl (August 9, 1919 - December 24, 1987) was a Dutch politician, prime minister of the Netherlands from 1973 until 1977, as a member of the socialist PvdA party. ... The prime minister of the Netherlands is the head of the cabinet, and, as such, coordinates the policy of the government. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... Social democracy is a political ideology that emerged in the late 19th century out of the socialist movement. ... For the Belgian political party of the same name, see Partij van de Arbeid (Belgium). ...

Science

Name Life Comments Diagnosis Survival Reference
Max Abraham (1875–1922) A physicist and contemporary of Einstein and Lorentz. [167]
William Bright (1928–2006) A linguist who specialized in Native American and South Asian languages and descriptive linguistics. He is the father of Susie Bright. [168]
Édouard Brissaud (1852–1909) A physician and pathologist. His tumor was unsuccessfully operated on by Sir Victor Horsley. [169]
Thomas Donaldson (–2006) A mathematician and cryonics advocate. [170]
Rhodes Fairbridge (1914–2006) A geologist and expert on climate change. [171]
Paul Feyerabend (1924–1994) A philosopher of science. under 1 year [172]
Thor Heyerdahl (1914–2002) Marine biologist famous for the Kon-Tiki expedition and other journeys that reproduced ancient technology and demonstrated the feasibility of ancient sea migrations. under 1 year [173]
J. Allen Hynek (1910–1986) An astronomer, professor, and ufologist. [174]
Norman Levinson (1912–1975) A mathematician. [175]
John von Neumann (1903–1957) Hungarian mathematician who made numerous contributions to many fields, including quantum physics, functional analysis, set theory, economics, computer science, numerical analysis, hydrodynamics (of explosions) and statistics. under 1 year [176]
John Vlissides (1961–2005) A software scientist specialising in object oriented technology, design patterns and software modelling. [177]
Aleksandr Zinovyev (1922–2006) A logician, sociologist, writer and satirist. [178]

Max Abraham (March 26, 1875 - November 16, 1922) was a German physicist. ... ... Albert Einstein( ) (March 14, 1879 – April 18, 1955) was a German-born theoretical physicist who is widely considered to have been one of the greatest physicists of all time. ... Hendrik Antoon Lorentz (July 18, 1853, Arnhem – February 4, 1928, Haarlem) was a Dutch physicist who shared the 1902 Nobel Prize in Physics with Pieter Zeeman for the discovery and elucidation of the Zeeman effect. ... William Bright (b. ... The following is a list of linguists, those who study linguistics. ... Native Americans are the indigenous peoples from the regions of North America now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska. ... This article is about the geopolitical region in Asia. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Susie Bright (also known as Susie Sexpert) (born March 25, 1958, Arlington, Virginia) is a writer, speaker, teacher, audio show host, performer, all on the subject of sexuality. ... Édouard Brissaud Édouard Brissaud (1852-04-15, Besançon – 1909-12-20) was a French physician and pathologist. ... The Doctor by Samuel Luke Fildes This article is about the term physician, one type of doctor; for other uses of the word doctor see Doctor. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Sir Victor Alexander Haden Horsley (April 14, 1857-July 16, 1916) was an accomplished scientist and professor. ... Thomas K. Donaldson Ph. ... Leonhard Euler is considered by many to be one of the greatest mathematicians of all time A mathematician is the person whose primary area of study and research is the field of mathematics. ... Cryonics (often mistakenly called cryogenics) is the practice of cryopreserving humans and pets that can no longer be sustained by contemporary medicine until resuscitation may be possible in the future. ... Rhodes Whitmore Fairbridge (21 May 1914–November 8, 2006) was an Australian geologist and expert on climate change. ... the are cool The Geologist by Carl Spitzweg A geologist is a contributor to the science of geology, studying the physical structure and processes of the Earth and planets of the solar system (see planetary geology). ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400,000 years For current global climate change, see Global warming. ... Paul Karl Feyerabend (January 13, 1924 – February 11, 1994) was an Austrian-born philosopher of science best-known for his work as a professor of philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley, where he worked for three decades (1958-1989). ... Philosophy of science is the study of assumptions, foundations, and implications of science, especially in the natural sciences and social sciences. ... Thor Heyerdahl Thor Heyerdahl (October 6, 1914, in Larvik, Norway – April 18, 2002, in Colla Micheri, Italy) was a Norwegian ethnographer and adventurer with a scientific background in zoology and geography. ... The Kon-Tiki raft is shown on the cover of the DVD of the documentary. ... Josef Allen Hynek (May 1, 1910 - April 27, 1986) was a U.S. astronomer, professor, and ufologist. ... An astronomer or astrophysicist is a person whose area of interest is astronomy or astrophysics. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) varies. ... Ufology is the study of unidentified flying object (UFO) reports, sightings, alleged physical evidence, and other related phenomena. ... Norman Levinson (August 11, 1912 - October 10, 1975) was an American mathematician. ... Leonhard Euler is considered by many to be one of the greatest mathematicians of all time A mathematician is the person whose primary area of study and research is the field of mathematics. ... John von Neumann (Hungarian Margittai Neumann János Lajos) (born December 28, 1903 in Budapest, Austria-Hungary; died February 8, 1957 in Washington D.C., United States) was a Hungarian-born American mathematician and polymath who made contributions to quantum physics, functional analysis, set theory, topology, economics, computer science, numerical... John M. Vlissides (?? - 24 November 2005) was one of the four authors (refered to as the Gang of Four) of the book Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software. ... Alexandr Zinoviev Aleksandr Aleksandrovich Zinovyev (, alternative transliterations: Alexandre, Alexander, Zinoviev, Zinovyev); (September 29, 1922 – May 10, 2006), was a well-known Russian logician, sociologist, writer and satirist. ... Russian literature refers to the literature of Russia or its émigrés, and to the Russian-language literature of several independent nations once a part of what was historically Russia or the Soviet Union. ...

Sports

Name Life Comments Diagnosis Survival Reference
Lyle Alzado (1949–1992) NFL football player. Made public statements attributing his tumor to anabolic steriods, a claim not supported by medical research. CNS lymphoma [179]
Lance Armstrong (1971— ) Cycling champion who won the Tour de France seven consecutive times after diagnosis and treatment for testicular cancer that spread to his abdomen, lungs and brain. metastatic tumor 1996— [180][181]
Kevin Berry (1945–2006) A butterfly swimmer and Olympic gold medalist. [182]
Angelo Bertelli (1921–1999) An American football quarterback. [183]
Bobby Bonds (1946–2003) A right fielder in Major League Baseball from 1968 to 1981, primarily with the San Francisco Giants. [184]
Ken Brett (1948–2003) A Major League Baseball pitcher. [185]
José María Buljubasich (1971—) Football goalkeeper. 2006— [186]
Richard Burns (1971–2005) Race car driver, Rally world champion astrocytoma 2 years [187]
Matt Cappotelli (1979—) A professional wrestler. [188]
Richard Chelimo (1972–2001) Track champion from Kenya, former 10,000 meter world record holder. [189]
Maurice Colclough (1953–2006) Rugby player, played a noteworthy role in England's grand slam win in 1980. [190]
Dan Duva (1951–1996) Boxing promoter behind over 100 world championship bouts. primary brain tumor [191]
Josh Gibson (1911–1947) Negro League baseball player, famous home run hitter with the highest career batting average in league history. 4 years [192]
Tim Gullikson (1951–1996) Champion doubles tennis player and coach of Pete Sampras. [193]
Scott Hamilton (1958—) A figure skater and Olimpic gold medalist. pituitary gland 2004— [194]
Craig "Ironhead" Heyward (1966–2006) An American football running back who played in the National Football League. chordoma 8 years [195]
Heiko Herrlich (1971— ) German soccer player, UEFA Champions League and Intercontinental Cup winner brain tumor 2000— [196]
Dick Howser (1936–1987) Major League Baseball shortstop and manager. 1 year [197]
Emlyn Hughes (1947–2004) Soccer player, European Cup winner of 1977, also known from the BBC quiz show A Question of Sport. 15 months [198]
Colin Ingleby-Mackenzie (1933–2006) English cricketer 4 months [199]
"Badger" Bob Johnson (1931–1991) Ice hockey coach, won the 1991 Stanley Cup with the Pittsburgh Penguins. 2 months [200]
Walter Johnson (1887–1946) An right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. [201][202]
Eric Liddell (1902–1945) Olympic gold medalist in track, portrayed in the film Chariots of Fire. [203]
Jushin Liger (1964—) A professional wrestler. 1996— [204]
Reginald Lisowski (1926–2005) A professional wrestler known as "The Crusher". [205]
Wayne Maki (1944–1973) A a professional ice hockey player and an early star of the Vancouver Canucks club in the NHL. under 5 months [206][207]
Peter May (1929–1994) An English cricketer who played for Surrey, Cambridge University and England. [208]
Frank Edward "Tug" McGraw (1944–2004) Major league baseball pitcher. glioblastoma multiforme 9 months [209]
Lenny "The Guv'nor" McLean (1949–1998) Champion bare knuckle fighter, undefeated in 3000 fights. Also acted small roles in films including The Fifth Element. metastatic tumor [210]
Bobby Murcer (1946–) Major league baseball player, broadcaster. [211]
Johnny Oates (1946–2004) Major league baseball catcher and manager. glioblastoma multiforme 3 years [212]
Kim Perrot (1967–1999) Basketball player, WNBA Houston Comets. metastatic (lung cancer) [213]
John Prentice (1926–2006) A former football player and Scotland manager. [214]
Remy Presas (1936–2001) The founder of Modern Arnis, a popular Filipino martial art. 10 months [215]
Dan Quisenberry (1953–1998) Major league baseball pitcher, mostly as a closer; noted for unusual "submarine" pitching style. 9 months [216]
Bobby Robson (1933—) A former football player and England manager. [217]
Glenn Roeder (1955—) An English football manager and former player. 2003— [218][219]
Pete Rozelle (1926–1996) NFL commissioner. [33]
Wilma Rudolph (1940–1994) Olympic gold medalist in track. [220]
Nick Sanborn (1935–1999) Automobile racer. [221]
Robert Stone (1956–2005) A rugby league player and official who played for the St. George Dragons. 17 months [222]
Earl Strom (1927–1994) Aa basketball referee for 29 years in the National Basketball Association (NBA) and for three years in the American Basketball Association (ABA). [223]
Fritz Von Erich (1929–1997) Wrestler and wrestling promoter. [224]

}}</ref> Lyle Alzado (April 3, 1949 – May 14, 1992) was a NFL football player most famous for his intense and intimidating style of play. ... Lance Armstrong (born Lance Edward Gunderson on September 18, 1971) is a retired American professional road racing cyclist. ... The Tour de France is the worlds best known cycling race, a three week long road race that covers a circuit of most areas around France, and sometimes neighbouring countries. ... Kevin John Berry (born April 10, 1945 in Sydney) was an Australian butterfly swimmer of the 1960s, who won a gold medal in the 200m butterfly at the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo. ... The butterfly, (fly for short) is a swimming stroke swum on the breast, with the arms moving synchronously. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Angelo Bertelli (June 18, 1921 - June 26, 1999) was an American football quarterback. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Navy quarterback Aaron Polanco sets up to throw. ... Bobby Lee Bonds (March 15, 1946 – August 23, 2003) was a Major League Baseball right fielder from 1968 to 1981. ... The position of the right fielder A right fielder, abbreviated RF, is the outfielder in baseball who plays defense in right field (e. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1968 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1981 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885-1957) New York Gothams (1883-1885) Troy Union Cities / Trojans (1879-1882) Ballpark AT... Kenneth Alven (Kemer) Brett (September 18, 1948-November 18, 2003) was a Major League Baseball pitcher and the older brother of Hall of Famer George Brett. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A baseball pitcher delivers the ball to home plate In baseball, pitching is the act of throwing the baseball from the pitchers mound toward the catcher with the goal of retiring a batter who attempts to make contact with it, or draw a walk. ... José María Buljubasich (born 12 May 1971 in Firmat , Argentina) is an international argentinian football player who actualy plays for Universidad Catolica of Chile and has also played in Spain and Mexico and other teams in Chile, he reached the top of his carrer in the current club he... Football (soccer) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... A football goalkeeper leaves the ground to parry a shot on goal In many team sports, a goalkeeper (termed goaltender, netminder, or goalie in some sports) is a designated player that is charged with directly preventing the opposite team from scoring by defending the goal. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Richard Chelimo (February 24, 1972 – August 15, 2001) was a Kenyan athlete, and a former world and world junior record holder over 10,000 m. ... Daniel Salvator Duva (7 November, 1951 – 28 January, 1996) was a boxing promoter who promoted or co-promoted over 100 world championship fights through his family run business Main Events. ... Josh Gibson For the Australian rules footballer, see Joshua Gibson (footballer). ... Part of the History of baseball series. ... Tim Gullikson (September 8, 1951-May 3, 1996) was a tennis player and coach from the United States. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Scott Scovell Hamilton (born August 28, 1958 in Toledo, Ohio) is an American figure skater and Olympic gold medalist known for his originality and engaging on-ice personalities. ... Figure skating is an ice skating sporting event where individuals, mixed couples, or groups perform spins, jumps, and other moves on the ice, often to music. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Craig Ironhead Heyward (September 26, 1966, Passaic, New Jersey – May 27, 2006) was an American football running back who played for the New Orleans Saints, Chicago Bears, Atlanta Falcons, St. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... High school running back A running back, halfback, tailback or wingback is the position of a player on an American and Canadian football team who lines up in the offensive backfield. ... The National Football League (NFL) is the largest professional American football league, consisting of thirty-two teams from American cities and regions. ... Heiko Herrlich (* 3. ... The Union of European Football Associations, almost always referred to by the acronym UEFA (pronounced (you-AY-fuh) or (oo-Ay-fuh) or ), is the administrative and controlling body for European football. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Champions League Logo Copa Libertadores Logo The European/South American Cup, commonly referred to as the Intercontinental Cup, and also known as the World Club Championship or Toyota Cup, was a football competition endorsed by UEFA and CONMEBOL, contested between the winners of the European Champions League and the South... Richard Dalton (Dick) Howser (May 14, 1936 - June 17, 1987) was an American Major League Baseball shortstop and manager. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Emlyn Walter Hughes, OBE (August 28, 1947 - November 9, 2004) was an English footballer who captained the much-decorated Liverpool F.C. side of the 1970s. ... A Question of Sport is a long-running BBC quiz show which started on 5 January 1970 and continues to this day. ... Alexander Colin David Ingleby-Mackenzie (15 September 1933 – 9 March 2006) was an English cricketer: a left-handed batsman who played for Hampshire between 1951 and 1966, captaining the county from 1958 to 1965 as Hampshires last amateur captain and leading his side to their first County Championship in... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... Robert Badger Bob Johnson (1931-1991) was an American-born college and professional ice hockey coach. ... The Stanley Cup The Stanley Cup is the championship trophy of the National Hockey League (NHL), the major professional hockey league in Canada and the United States. ... The Pittsburgh Penguins are a professional ice hockey team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... Walter Perry Johnson (November 6, 1887-December 10, 1946), American professional baseball pitcher. ... mcv ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Eric Henry Liddell, circa 1923. ... Chariots of Fire is a British film released in 1981. ... Keiichi Yamada (山田恵一 Yamada Keiichi) (born November 30, 1964), better known as Jushin Liger (獣神ライガー - JÅ«shin Raigā) and later, Jushin Thunder Liger (獣神サンダーライガー - JÅ«shin Sandā Raigā) is a Japanese professional wrestler. ... New Japan Pro Wrestling is one of the most popular professional wrestling promotions in the World. ... Reginald Lisowski was an American professional wrestler, better known by his ring name, The Crusher. ... ... Wayne Maki (November 10, 1944 - May 1, 1974) was a professional ice hockey player and an early star of the Vancouver Canucks club in the NHL. Maki was born in Sault Ste. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The Vancouver Canucks are the professional National Hockey League (NHL) ice hockey team based in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... NHL can also be an abbreviation for National Historic Landmark or Non-Hodgkins lymphoma. ... Peter Barker Howard May, C.B.E. was born( 31 December 1929 in Reading, Berkshire and died on 27 December 1994) in Liphook, Hampshire from a brain tumour. ... The logo of the England Cricket Team which shows the three Lions of England below a five-pointed crown The England cricket team is a cricket team which represents England and Wales, operating under the auspices of the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB). ... A cricketer is a term used to refer to a person who plays cricket. ... Surrey County Cricket Club (SCCC) is an English first-class cricket team, based at The Oval cricket ground in south London. ... Cambridge University Cricket Club (now subsumed into the Cambridge University Centre of Cricketing Excellence) is a first-class cricket team. ... The logo of the England Cricket Team which shows the three Lions of England below a five-pointed crown The England cricket team is a cricket team which represents England and Wales, operating under the auspices of the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB). ... Tug McGraw (1969) Frank Edwin Tug McGraw Jr. ... Lenny The Guvnor McLean Leonard McLean (born April 9, 1949, died July 28, 1998) better known as The Guvnor was a former weightlifter, bouncer, Londons Heavyweight Unlicensed Boxing Champion, and actor. ... The Fifth Element (1997) is a science fantasy, action, comedy, techno thriller film, written and directed by Luc Besson, starring Bruce Willis, Gary Oldman, Milla Jovovich, Ian Holm, and Chris Tucker. ... Bobby Murcer (b. ... Johnny Lane Oates (January 21, 1946 Sylva, North Carolina – December 24, 2004 Richmond, Virginia) was an American catcher and manager in Major League Baseball. ... Kim Perrot Kim Perrot (January 18, 1967 — August 19, 1999), was an American basketball player. ... John Prentice (circa 1926 – February 10, 2006) Scottish footballer and manager. ... Football (soccer) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... First international Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Biggest win Scotland 11 - 0 Ireland (Glasgow, Scotland; 23 February 1901) Biggest defeat Uruguay 7 - 0 Scotland (Basel, Switzerland; 19 June 1954) World Cup Appearances 8 (First in 1954) Best result Round 1, all European Championship Appearances 2 (First... Remy Amador Presas was the founder of Modern Arnis, perhaps the most popular Filipino martial art in the world. ... Modern Arnis is the system of Filipino martial arts founded by the late Remy Presas as a comprehensive self-defense system. ... Hawaiian State Grappling Championships. ... Dan Quisenberry autograph on a 1986 Fleer baseball card - 1986 Series, #18 Daniel Raymond Quisenberry (February 7, 1953 – September 30, 1998), nicknamed Quiz, was an American right-handed relief pitcher in Major League Baseball who played primarily for the Kansas City Royals. ... In baseball, a submarine is a pitch delivered with a three-quarter sidearm or underhand motion. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... First International Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Largest win Ireland 0 - 13 England (Belfast, Northern Ireland; 18 February 1882) Worst defeat Hungary 7 - 1 England (Budapest, Hungary; 23 May 1954) World Cup Appearances 11 (First in 1950) Best result Winners, 1966 European Championship Appearances 7 (First... In sports, a coach is an individual involved in the direction and instruction of the on-field operations of an athletic team or of individual athletes. ... Glenn Victor Roeder, (born December 13, 1955 in Woodford Essex), is an English football manager and former player. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... Football (soccer) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Alvin Ray Pete Rozelle (March 1, 1926&#8211;December 6, 1996) was the commissioner of the National Football League (NFL) from January 1960 to November 1989, when he retired from office. ... Wilma Glodean Rudolph (June 23, 1940 – November 12, 1994) was an American athlete and three time Olympic champion. ... Nick Sanborn (1935 - 1999) was born in Colorado Springs, Colorado. ... Robert Stone (1956 - August 1, 2005) was a rugby league player and official playing 281 games for the St. ... Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... The Saint George Dragons was a team in the National Rugby League competition in Australia. ... Earl Strom Earl Strom (December 15, 1927 – July 10, 1994), born in Pottstown, Pennsylvania, was a basketball referee for 29 years in the National Basketball Association (NBA) and for three years in the American Basketball Association (ABA). ... Sara Giauro shoots a three-point shot, FIBA Europe Cup for Women Finals 2005. ... A referee is a person who has authority to make decisions about play in many sports. ... The National Basketball Association (NBA) is the worlds premier mens basketball league. ... For information about the ABA that began in 2000 see American Basketball Association (21st century). ... Jack Barton Adkisson (August 16, 1929 - September 10, 1997) was an American professional wrestler under the ring name Fritz Von Erich, better known today as a wrestling promoter and the patriarch of the Von Erich wrestling family. ...

John Vukovich (1947–2007) Major League Baseball infielder and third base coach. 18 months [225]
Dick Wantz (1940–1965) A relief pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the California Angels. 1 month [226]

John Christopher Vukovich (July 31, 1947 - March 8, 2007) was an infielder who primarily played third base for the Philadelphia Phillies, the Cincinnati Reds, and the Milwaukee Brewers. ... Richard Carter (Dick) Wantz (April 11, 1940 - May 13, 1965) was a relief pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the California Angels. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For the Pacific Coast League franchise see: Los Angeles Angels (PCL). ...

Visual arts

Name Life Comments Diagnosis Survival Reference
Kevyn Aucoin (1962–2002) A make-up artist and photographer. pituitary gland tumor [227]
Fred Conlon (1943–2005) A sculptor. glioblastoma 8 months [228][229]
Arthur 'Weegee' Fellig (1899–1968) A photographer and photojournalist, known for his stark black and white street photography. [230]
Eva Hesse (1936–1970) Abstract sculptor. [231]
Philip Iverson (1965–2006) An expressionist painter. [232]
Lynn Kohlman (1946—) A fashion model, photographer, and author. glioblastoma multiforme 2002— [233][234]
Owen Merton (1887–1931) A painter in the Post-Impressionist representational style, primarily through watercolor landscapes and seascapes. [235]
Bob Parent (1923–1987) Jazz photographer whose works appeared in Life and Downbeat. [236]
Ferdinand Preiss (1882–1943) Art deco sculptor who specialized in ivory and bronze. [237]
Eero Saarinen (1910–1961) Architect best known for the gateway arch in St. Louis, Missouri. [238]
John Willie (1902–1962) A fetish photographer and bondage artist. [239]

Kevyn Aucoin (February 14, 1962 in Shreveport, Louisiana; died May 7, 2002) was a make-up artist and photographer who was well known for catering to the laywomans need to feel beautiful. ... Cosmetics or makeup are substances to enhance the beauty of the human body, apart from simple cleaning. ... This is a list of notable photographers in the art, documentary and fashion traditions. ... Fred Conlon (1943–2005) was an Irish sculptor. ... Weegee was the pseudonym of Arthur Fellig (June 12, 1899 - December 26, 1968), an American photographer and photojournalist. ... Photography is the process of making pictures by means of capturing light on a light-sensitive medium, such as a sensor or film. ... Photojournalism is a particular form of journalism (the collecting, editing, and presenting of news material for publication or broadcast) that creates images in order to tell a news story. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Eva Hesse (January 11, 1936 - May 29, 1970), was a German-born American sculptor, known for her pioneering work in materials such as latex, fiberglass, and plastics. ... Philip Iverson BFA (26 January 1965 - 13 August 2006) was a Canadian expressionist painter who gained national attention for his artistry. ... The Scream by Edvard Munch (1893) which inspired 20th century Expressionists Portrait of Eduard Kosmack by Egon Schiele Rehe im Walde by Franz Marc Elbe Bridge I by Rolf Nesch On White II by Wassily Kandinsky, 1923. ... Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ... Lynn Kohlman Lynn Kohlman on Oprah Winfrey Lynn Kohlman (b. ... Owen Heathcote Grierson Merton, RBA (1887 - 1931) was a New Zealand-born British painter. ... Post-Impressionism is a term applied to a number of painters of the late 19th and early 20th centuries whose style developed out of or reacted against that of the Impressionists. ... Watercolor is a painting technique making use of water-soluble pigments that are either transparent or opaque and are formulated with gum to bond the pigment to the paper. ... Landscape art depicts scenery such as mountains, valleys, trees, rivers, and forests. ... Seascape may refer to: A photograph, painting, or other work of art which depicts the sea. ... Bob Parent (1923 - 1987) was Canadian-born photographer who specialized in photographing the Jazz musicians of New York City. ... For other uses, see Life (disambiguation). ... Downbeat can have several meanings: // In Music Theory In music performance and music theory, the downbeat is also the first beat of a measure in music. ... Ferdinand Preiss (February 13, 1882 - 1943) was a German sculptor. ... Asheville City Hall. ... Saarinens Gateway Arch frames The Old Courthouse, which sits at the heart of the city of Saint Louis, near the rivers edge. ... Book cover for The Adventures of Sweet Gwendoline John Alexander Scott Coutts (December 9, 1902 - August 5, 1962), better known as John Willie, was a pioneering fetish photographer and bondage artist. ... A fetish photographer is a photographer who takes photographs of people in fetishistic situations, such as in bondage, or wearing rubber or leather clothing. ... A fetish artist is an artist who depicts people in fetishistic situations. ...

Writing

Name Life Comments Diagnosis Survival Reference
Barbara Albright (1955–2006) An author of about 25 food and knitting books. [240]
Duygu Asena (1946–2006) An author and activist for women’s rights. 2 years [241]
Susan Bergman (1957–2006) Best known for her 1984 book Anonymity, also sister of Anne Heche. 3 years [242]
Joseph Reylan B. Viray (1977–) An educator from the Polytechnic University of the Philippines, a kapampangan and tagalog poet. Meningioma [243]
Reginald Horace Blyth (1898–1964) An author and devotee of Japanese culture. [244]
Bebe Moore Campbell (1950–2006) An author whose books dealt with race and mental health issues. [245]
Raymond Carver (1938–1988) Short story writer and poet. metastatic tumor [246]
Hugh Cook (1956— ) Author of fantasy series Chronicles of an Age of Darkness. [247]
Carl Foreman (1914–1984) A screenwriter and film producer. [248]
Robert Forward (1932–2002) Physicist and science fiction writer. 4 months [249]
John Galsworthy (1867–1933) A Nobel prize winning novelist and playwright whose works include The Forsyte Saga. [250]
Veronica Geng (1941–1997) A writer, humorist and former editor of The New Yorker. 13 months [251]
Johnny Gunther (1929–1947) Teenage brain tumor patient, son of novelist John Gunther. Johnny's illness became the central theme of his father's book Death Be Not Proud. 14 months [252]
Frigyes Karinthy (1887–1938) An author, playwright, poet, journalist and translator. [253]
Stephen Knight (1951–1985) An author who was known for his books criticising the Freemasons. He started having seizures in 1977 and in 1980, agreed to take part in a BBC documentary TV program Horizon on epilepsy. The producers arranged for a brain scan, which showed up a tumour. This was removed but returned in 1984 and despite further surgery he died in 1985. 5 years [254]
Jonathan Kwitny (1941–1998) A writer and investigative journalist. [255]
Lynda Lee-Potter (1935–2004) Columnist for the British newspaper Daily Mail. [256]
Paulo Marques (1948–2006) A journalist and broadcaster. [257]
Terence McKenna (1946–2000) Writer and counterculture figure. glioblastoma multiforme under 1 year [258]
William Vaughn Moody (1869–1910) A dramatist and poet. [259]
Ivan Noble (1967–2005) BBC journalist and science writer who published columns about his experience with the illness, author of Like a Hole in the Head (Hodder & Stoughton 2005) ISBN 0-340-86428-1 glioblastoma multiforme 2 1/2 years [260][261]
Chaim Potok (1929–2002) Author and rabbi best known for his 1967 novel The Chosen. 2 years [262]
Timothy Reuter (1947–2002) A historian who specialized in the study of medieval Germany [263]
David Shaw (1943–2005) A Los Angeles Times journalist known who won the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism in 1991. under 3 months [264]
Charles Sheffield (1935–2002) Mathematician, physicist and science fiction writer. 3 months [265]
Mary Shelley (1797–1851) Author of Frankenstein, wife of Percy Bysshe Shelley. [266]
Lou Stathis (1952–1997) A writer, editor and critic. 10 months [267]
Trumbull Stickney (1874–1904) Swiss born American poet. [268]
James Weinstein (1926–2005) A socialist historian and journalist best known as the founder and publisher of In These Times. [269]

Barbara Albright (b. ... Cosette Dwyer is an amazing author. ... Knit hat, yarn, and knitting needles Knitting is a craft by which thread or yarn may be turned into cloth. ... Duygı Asena (1946-2006) was a Turkish pedagogue, columnist, best seller author and activist for women’s rights. ... Cosette Dwyer is an amazing author. ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action to bring about social or political change. ... Anne Celeste Heche (IPA: ) (born May 25, 1969) is an American actress, director and screenwriter. ... Joseph Reylan B. Viray is teaching philosophy and literature at the Polytechnic University of the Philippines. ... The Polytechnic University of the Philippines System (PUP) (Filipino: Politeknikong Unibersidad ng Pilipinas), also called Philippine National Comprehensive University (as declared by Pres. ... Meningiomas are tumors arising from the outer part of the arachnoid mater in the meninges of the brain or the spinal cord. ... Reginald Horace Blyth (December 3, 1898 - October 28, 1964), English author and devotee of Japanese culture. ... Bebe Moore Campbell (February 18, 1950- November 27, 2006) was the author of three New York Times bestsellers, Brothers and Sisters, Singing in the Comeback Choir, and What You Owe Me, which was also a Los Angeles Times Best Book of 2001. ... Raymond Carver Raymond Clevie Carver, Jr. ... Hugh Cook (b. ... The Chronicles of an Age of Darkness are a ten-volume series of cross-genre fantasy / science fiction novels created by cult author Hugh Cook. ... Carl Foreman Carl Foreman (July 23, 1914 – June 26, 1984) was an American screenwriter and film producer who was blacklisted by the Hollywood movie studio bosses in the 1950s. ... Screenwriters, scenarists or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies and television programs are made. ... Robert Lull Forward commonly known as Robert L. Forward (August 15, 1932 - September 21, 2002) was a United States physicist and science fiction writer. ... John Galsworthy OM (14 August 1867 – 31 January 1933) was an English novelist and playwright. ... The Nobel Prize in literature is awarded annually to an author from any country who has produced the most outstanding work of an idealistic tendency. The work in this case generally refers to an authors work as a whole, not to any individual work, though individual works are sometimes... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... It has been suggested that Soames Forsyte be merged into this article or section. ... Veronica Geng (1941 &#8211; December 24, 1997) was an American writer. ... The term writer can apply to anyone who creates a written work, but the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... A humorist is an author who specializes in short, humorous articles or essays. ... Editing may also refer to audio or film editing. ... The New Yorker is an American magazine that publishes reportage, criticism, essays, cartoons, poetry and fiction. ... John Gunther, Jr. ... John Gunther (August 30, 1901 – May 29, 1970) was an American author whose success came primarily in the 1940s and 1950s with a series of non-fiction books about the political situations in various corners of the world. ... Death Be Not Proud is a title that has been used by several writers. ... Frigyes Karinthy (June 25, 1887 in Budapest - August 29, 1938 in Siófok) was a Hungarian author, playwright, poet, journalist and translator. ... Cosette Dwyer is an amazing author. ... Template:Unsourced A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is someone who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Look up Translator in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Stephen Knight (September 26, 1951 at Hainault, Essex - 25 July 1985) was a British author. ... The Masonic Square and Compasses. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion... Horizon is a long-running BBC popular science and history documentary programme, notable for coining the term supervolcano. ... Jonathan Kwitny is an American writer. ... The term writer can apply to anyone who creates a written work, but the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... Investigative journalism is a kind of journalism in which reporters deeply investigate a topic of interest, often related to crime, scandals, government corruption, or white collar crime. ... Lynda Lee-Potter (born Lynda Higginson; May 2, 1935 &#8211; October 20, 2004) was a Daily Mail columnist. ... The Daily Mail is a British tabloid newspaper first published in 1896. ... Paulo Marques was a Brazilian journalist and broadcaster. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Note: broadcasting is also the old term for hand sowing. ... Terence Kemp McKenna (November 16, 1946 – April 3, 2000) was a writer and philosopher. ... William Vaughn Moody (1869 - 1910) was a U.S. dramatist and poet. ... A dramatist is an author of dramatic compositions, usually plays. ... Ivan Noble Ivan Noble (June 1967 - January 31, 2005) was a British journalist working for BBC News Online. ... Rabbi Dr. Chaim Potok (February 17, 1929 - July 23, 2002) was an American author and rabbi. ... Rabbi, in Judaism, means ‘teacher’, or more literally ‘great one’. The word Rabbi is derived from the Hebrew root word , rav, which in biblical Hebrew means ‘great’ or ‘distinguished (in knowledge)’. Sephardic and Yemenite Jews pronounce this word ribbī; the modern Israeli pronunciation rabbī is derived from a recent (18th... The Chosen is a book by Chaim Potok published in 1967. ... Timothy Reuter (1947-2002) was a British historian who specialized in the study of medieval Germany, particularly the social, military and ecclesiastical institutions of the Ottonian and Salian periods (10th-12th centuries). ... David Shaw (born January 4, 1943 in Dayton, Ohio; died August 1, 2005) was a Los Angeles Times journalist known who won the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism in 1991. ... The Los Angeles Times (also known as the LA Times) is a daily newspaper published in Los Angeles, California and distributed throughout the Western United States. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Criticism has been presented since 1970 to a newspaper writer who has demonstrated distinguished criticism. Recipients of the award are chosen by an independent board and officially administered by Columbia University. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Charles Sheffield (June 25, 1935 – November 2, 2002), was an English-born mathematician, physicist and science fiction author. ... Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (30 August 1797 – 1 February 1851) was an English romantic/gothic novelist and the author of Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. ... This article is about the 1818 novel. ... Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 – July 8, 1822; pronounced ) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyrical poets of the English language. ... Lou Stathis (1952-1997) was an American writer, editor and critic. ... Joseph Trumbull Stickney (June 20, 1874 - October 11, 1904) was an American classical scholar and poet. ... James Weinstein, (July 17, 1926 – June 16, 2005) was an American journalist best known as the founder and publisher of In These Times. ... Socialism refers to a broad array of doctrines or political movements that envisage a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to control by the community. ... In These Times is a biweekly magazine of news and opinion published in Chicago. ...

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The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is part of the United States Federal governments National Institutes of Health. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... 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The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ... January 7 is the seventh day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... 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The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... July 21 is the 202nd day (203rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 163 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 19 is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... 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September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 14 is the 226th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (227th in leap years), with 139 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 19 is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years). ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 19 is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 19 is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 19 is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 19 is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 30 is the 334th day (335th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 31 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... January 14 is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 25 is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 189 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 24 is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 19 is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 195 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... January 5 is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... August 6 is the 218th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (219th in leap years), with 147 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 9 is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... March 27 is the 86th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (87th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 22 is the 234th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (235th in leap years), with 131 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... For the Lebanese political coalition, see March 14 Alliance. ... A news release, press release or press statement is a written or recorded communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing something claimed as having news value. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... July 16 is the 197th day (198th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 168 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 23 is the 235th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (236th in leap years), with 130 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 3 is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 58 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (258th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 7 is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 177 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 27 is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... April 10 is the 100th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (101st in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 30 is the 89th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (90th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... February 10 is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 4 is the 124th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (125th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... June 13 is the 164th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (165th in leap years), with 201 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 26 is the 360th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 361st in leap years. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... January 10 is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... January 4 is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (128th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 7 is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... August 24 is the 236th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (237th in leap years), with 129 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 19 is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 26 is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 188 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 7 is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 177 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 19 is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years). ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 30 is the 334th day (335th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 31 days remaining. ... A news release, press release or press statement is a written or recorded communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing something claimed as having news value. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 10 is the 130th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (131st in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 19 is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... July 27 is the 208th day (209th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 157 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 10 is the 253rd day of the Gregorian calendar (254th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 10 is the 253rd day of the Gregorian calendar (254th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 23 is the 235th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (236th in leap years), with 130 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (258th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (258th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (258th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 26 is the 238th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (239th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (258th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (258th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... January 7 is the seventh day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (258th in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... January 16 is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 5 is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (258th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 29 is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 29 is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 22 is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 70 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (258th in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In the Gregorian Calendar, December 18 is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years), at which point there will be 13 days remaining to the end of the year. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... August 4 is the 216th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (217th in leap years), with 149 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... June 12 is the 163rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (164th in leap years), with 202 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (258th in leap years). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... September 7 is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (258th in leap years). ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 20 is the 110th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (111th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 6 is the 126th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (127th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (258th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (116th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 19 is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 9 is the 68th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (69th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... March 15 is the 74th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (75th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... April 30 is the 120th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (121st in leap years), with 245 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 20 is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 2 is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (134th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 5 is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 23 is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... Who Named It is a Norwegian database of several thousand eponymous medical signs and the doctors associated with their identification. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... January 23 is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 31 is the 151st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (152nd in leap years), with 214 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 27 is the 331st day (332nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... March 17 is the 76th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (77th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... May 10 is the 130th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (131st in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the United States holiday, the Fourth of July, see Independence Day (United States). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 19 is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years). ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 9 is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 52 days remaining. ... A news release, press release or press statement is a written or recorded communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing something claimed as having news value. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 10 is the 253rd day of the Gregorian calendar (254th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 8 is the 342nd day (343rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... June 29 is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 185 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 23 is the 235th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (236th in leap years), with 130 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 20 is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 25 is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 29 is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 2 is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 2 is the 61st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (62nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 21 is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years). ... A news release, press release or press statement is a written or recorded communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing something claimed as having news value. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 11 is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 50 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... May 28 is the 148th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (149th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (80th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 23 is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 6 is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 359 days (360 in leap years) remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... January 10 is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... January 10 is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 24 is the 358th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (359th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... August 20 is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... February 10 is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 21 is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 6 is the 157th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (158th in leap years), with 1 day remaining // 1508 - Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor, is defeated in Friulia by Venetian forces; he is forced to sign a three-year truce and cede several territories to Venice 1513... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... May 16 is the 136th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (137th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... December 8 is the 342nd day (343rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 2 is the 214th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (215th in leap years), with 151 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... February 7 is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... October 17 is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... July 22 is the 203rd day (204th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 162 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 16 is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... February 4 is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 11 is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 11 is the 70th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (71st in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... July 6 is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 178 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... January 5 is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 26 is the 238th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (239th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 29 is the 333rd (in leap years the 334th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... October 22 is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 70 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... May 17 is the 137th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (138th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 10 is the 253rd day of the Gregorian calendar (254th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 24 is the 328th day (329th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 20 is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 72 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 10 is the 253rd day of the Gregorian calendar (254th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (258th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 10 is the 253rd day of the Gregorian calendar (254th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 30 is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 10 is the 253rd day of the Gregorian calendar (254th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... July 24 is the 205th day (206th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 160 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 10 is the 253rd day of the Gregorian calendar (254th in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... October 17 is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 2 is the 214th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (215th in leap years), with 151 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... November 4 is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 57 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 10 is the 253rd day of the Gregorian calendar (254th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 10 is the 253rd day of the Gregorian calendar (254th in leap years). ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (128th in leap years). ... A news release, press release or press statement is a written or recorded communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing something claimed as having news value. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 10 is the 253rd day of the Gregorian calendar (254th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 21 is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 193 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ...

External links

  • The Brain Tumor Foundation
  • American Brain Tumor Association
  • European Brain Tumor Network
  • German Brain Tumor Association
  • Musella Foundation For Brain Tumor Research & Information, Inc
  • National Brain Tumor Foundation
  • The Childhood Brain Tumor Foundation
  • The Brain Tumor Society
  • Voices Against Brain Cancer

 
 

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