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Encyclopedia > List of massacres

Below is a list of incidents that are commonly labeled as "massacres" by reliable sources. They are typically, but not exclusively, single events that resulted in large numbers of deliberate and direct civilian deaths. Photographs of the My Lai massacre provoked world outrage and made it an international scandal. ...


Generally, the list includes individual events only, but where such an event includes too many individual massacres to list separately (e.g. the Holocaust, the Great Purge), the wider event may be listed as well as some of the more prominent individual massacres. Note that the figure for deaths is usually an estimate, and is frequently contested. See the individual article on each massacre for more information. Furthermore, the distinction between a genocide and a massacre may be difficult and controversial, so this categorization should be seen as neither definitive nor authoritative. Please see relevant articles for further information. For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ... The Great Purge (Russian: , transliterated Bolshaya chistka) refers collectively to several related campaigns of political repression and persecution in the Soviet Union orchestrated by Joseph Stalin during the 1930s, which removed all of his remaining opposition from power. ... For other uses, see Genocide (disambiguation). ... Photographs of the My Lai massacre provoked world outrage and made it an international scandal. ...

Contents

Background key

Light yellow background Massacres in which 10,000 or more civilians were intentionally killed.
Dark grey background Massacres forming part of the Holocaust.[1]
Grey background Massacres during World War II other than those forming part of the Holocaust.

For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...

Antiquity and the European Middle Ages (to 1500)

Date Name Deaths Location Summary Claimants
334 BCE Destruction of Thebes c.6,000 to 8,000 Greece

Alexander the Great slaughters the population of the city following a revolt. (Subsequently Alexander massacres at least a quarter of a million city dwellers at Sindimana, Gaza and other locations.) Thebes (Demotic Greek: Θήβα — Thíva; Katharevousa: — Thêbai or Thívai) is a city in Greece, situated to the north of the Cithaeron range, which divides Boeotia from Attica, and on the southern edge of the Boeotian plain. ... For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... Not to be confused with the Spanish name Garza or the Egyptian town of Giza. ...

[citation needed]
332 BCE Siege of Tyre 8,000 Tyre, Phoenicia

Macedonian victory over the Persians. In 332 BC, Alexander the Great set out to conquer Tyre, a strategic coastal base in the war between the Greeks and the Persians. ... The Triumphal Arch Tyre (Arabic , Phoenician , Hebrew Tzor, Tiberian Hebrew , Akkadian , Greek Týros) is a city in the South Governorate of Lebanon. ... Phoenicia (or Phenicia ,[1] from Biblical Phenice [1]) was an ancient civilization centered in the north of ancient Canaan, with its heartland along the coast of modern day Lebanon and Syria. ...

[citation needed]
265 BCE Kalinga War c.100,000 Orissa, India

The Kalinga War was fought between the Mauryan Empire under Ashoka the Great and the state of Kalinga, a feudal republic located on the coast of the present-day Indian state of Orissa. slaughters the population of the city following a revolt. Combatants Mauryan Empire State of Kalinga Commanders Ashoka Unknown Strength Unknown larger quantity Unknown smaller quantity Casualties 10,000 (approx. ... Orissa (2001 provisional pop. ...

[2]
260 BCE Battle of Changping c.400,000 Jincheng, China

The State of Qin defeats the State of Zhao, killing 400,000 Zhao people. The battle becomes a decisive victory in the establishment of the Qin Dynasty. Combatants State of Zhao State of Qin Commanders Lian Po Zhao Kuo† Wang He () Bai Qi Strength 650,240 men+ 500,000 Casualties 450,000+ killed 250,000 The Battle of Changping () in 260 BC was a decisive victory of the state of Qin of China over Zhao during the... Jincheng (Chinese: 晋城; pinyin: Jìnchéng) is a prefecture-level city in Shanxi province of the Peoples Republic of China. ... State of Qin (small seal script, 220 BC) Qin or Chin (Wade-Giles) (秦) (778 BC-207 BC) was a state during the Spring and Autumn and Warring States Periods of China. ... State of Zhao (small seal script, 220 BC) Zhao (pinyin: zhao4, simplified Chinese: èµµ, traditional Chinese: 趙) was a Chinese state during the Warring States Period. ... Qin Dynasty in 210 BC Capital Xianyang Language(s) Chinese Religion Taoism Government Monarchy History  - Unification of China 221 BC  - Death of Qin Shi Huangdi 210 BC  - Surrender to Liu Bang 206 BC The Qin Dynasty (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chin Chao) (221 BC - 206 BC) was preceded...

[citation needed]
194 BCE Hispania Citerior massacres "multitudes" Spain

Roman troops under Cato the Elder massacre Hispania Citerior citizens During the Roman Republic, Hispania Citerior was a region of Hispania roughly located in the northeastern coast and in the Ebro valley of modern Spain. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Marcus Porcius Cato (Latin: M·PORCIVS·M·F·CATO[1]) (234 BC, Tusculum–149 BC) was a Roman statesman, surnamed the Censor (Censorius), Sapiens, Priscus, or the Elder (Major), to distinguish him from Cato the Younger (his great-grandson). ...

[citation needed]
150 BCE Lusitanian massacres c.8,000 Portugal

Roman troops under Galba massacre Lusitani citizens after convincing them to surrender. In red is the province of Lusitania within the Roman Empire, 120 AD Lusitania was an ancient Roman province approximately including current Portugal, except for the area between the rivers Douro and Minho (part of Hispania Tarraconensis), and part of modern day western Spain, the present autonomous communities of Extremadura... Look up Circa on Wiktionary, the free dictionary The Latin word circa, literally meaning about, is often used to describe various dates (often birth and death dates) that are uncertain. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Servius Sulpicius Galba (December 24, 3 BC – January 15, 69) was Roman Emperor from June 8, 68 until his death. ...

[citation needed]
146 BCE The Fall of Carthage c.450,000 Carthage

When the Third Punic War ended, the remaining 50,000 Carthaginians (perhaps a tenth of the original pre-war population) were sold into slavery. Roman Carthage with former military harbor Carthage (Greek: , Latin: , from the Phoenician meaning new town; Arabic: ) refers both to an ancient city in Tunisia and to the civilization that developed within the citys sphere of influence. ... Roman Carthage with former military harbor Carthage (Greek: , Latin: , from the Phoenician meaning new town; Arabic: ) refers both to an ancient city in Tunisia and to the civilization that developed within the citys sphere of influence. ... Combatants Roman Republic Carthage Commanders Scipio Aemilianus Hasdrubal the Boetarch Strength 40,000 90,000 Casualties 17,000 62,000 The Third Punic War (149 BC to 146 BC) was the third and last of the Punic Wars fought between the former Phoenician colony of Carthage, and the Republic of... The institution of slavery in ancient Rome made many people non-persons before their legal system. ...

[3][4]
146 BCE Destruction of Corinth Corinth

The Romans under Lucius Mummius Achaicus destroyed Corinth after a siege in 146 BCE. All men were put to the sword, and the women and children enslaved. This battle between Rome and Corinth in 146 BC resulted in the complete and total destruction of the Greek state famous for its fabulous wealth. ... Corinth, or Korinth (Greek: Κόρινθος, Kórinthos; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a Greek city-state, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece. ...

88 BCE Asiatic Vespers c.80,000 Anatolia

After conquering western Anatolia in 88 BC, Mithridates VI reportedly ordered the killing of all Romans living there. The massacre of Roman men, women and children is known as the Asiatic Vespers. Asiatic Vespers - (Night of the Vespers) Date: Exact Date Unknown; circa 88-83 B.C.E. Mithridates Eupator VI of Pontus (Mithridates the Great) ordered the excecution of roughly 100,000 Italians that were Roman citizens or any person who spoke with an Latin accent. ... This article is about two nested areas of Turkey, a plateau region within a peninsula. ... Mithridates VI of Pontus, (132 BC- 63 BC), called Eupator Dionysius, was the king of Pontus in Asia Minor and one of Romes most formidable and successful enemies. ... This article refers to the state which existed from the 6th century BC to the 1st century BC. For alternate meanings, see Roman Republic (18th century) and Roman Republic (19th century). ... Asiatic Vespers - (Night of the Vespers) Date: Exact Date Unknown; circa 88-83 B.C.E. Mithridates Eupator VI of Pontus (Mithridates the Great) ordered the excecution of roughly 100,000 Italians that were Roman citizens or any person who spoke with an Latin accent. ...

[5]
71 BCE Third Servile War c.6,000 Roman Republic

Surrendering slaves are crucified along the Via Appia Combatants Army of escaped slaves Roman Republic Commanders Crixus †, Oenomaus †, Spartacus † , Castus †, Gannicus † Gaius Claudius Glaber, Publius Varinius, Gnaeus Clodianus, Lucius Gellius Publicola, Gaius Cassius Longinus, Gnaeus Manlius, Marcus Licinius Crassus, Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus, Marcus Terentius Varro Lucullus, Lucius Quinctius, Gnaeus Tremellius Scrofa Strength 120,000 escaped slaves and gladiators... This article refers to the state which existed from the 6th century BC to the 1st century BC. For alternate meanings, see Roman Republic (18th century) and Roman Republic (19th century). ... Remains of the Appian Way in Rome, Italy The Appian Way (Latin: Via Appia) is a famous road built by the Romans. ...

[citation needed]
58 BCE Helvetii campaign c.260,000 Gaul

Julius Caesar's campaign against the Helvetii, the Celtic inhabitants of modern Switzerland: approximately 60% of the tribe was killed, and another 20% taken into slavery. A map of Gaul showing the northern Alpine position of the Helvetii. ... Gaul (Latin: ) was the name given, in ancient times, to the region of Western Europe comprising present-day northern Italy, France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... A map of Gaul showing the northern Alpine position of the Helvetii. ... This article is about the European people. ... Slave redirects here. ...

[6][7]
c. 4 BCE Massacre of the Innocents c.14,000-64,000 Iudaea province

All boys in the village of Bethlehem are allegedly slaughtered by Herod the Great The Holy Innocents by Giotto di Bondone. ... Iudaea Province in the 1st century Iudaea (Hebrew: יהודה, Standard Yehuda Tiberian , praise God; Greek: Ιουδαία; Latin: Iudaea) was a Roman province that extended over the region of Judea proper, later Palestine. ... Central Bethlehem This article is about the city in the West Bank. ... Herod the Great. ...

[8]
9 Battle of the Teutoburg Forest c.15,000-20,000 Teutoburg Forest, Germania

The alliance of Germanic tribes led by Arminius ambushed and annihilated three Roman legions led by Publius Quinctilius Varus in the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest. Combatants Germanic tribes (Cherusci, Marsi, Chatti, Bructeri and Chauci) Roman Empire Commanders Arminius Publius Quinctilius Varus † Strength 10,000 to 18,000 3 Roman legions, 3 alae and 6 auxiliary cohorts, probably 20,000 - 25,000 Casualties Unknown; but far less than Roman losses 15,000-20,000 The Battle... View over the Teutoburg Forest The Teutoburg Forest (German: Teutoburger Wald) is a range of low, forested mountains in the German states of Lower Saxony and North Rhine-Westphalia, which was believed to be the environ of a decisive battle in AD 9. ... Map of the Roman Empire and the free Germania, Magna Germania, in the early 2nd century For other uses, see Germania (disambiguation). ... The Hermannsdenkmal Arminius (also Armin, 18 BC/17 BC - 21 AD) was a chieftain of the Cherusci who defeated a Roman army in the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest. ... The Roman Legion (from Latin , from lego, legere, legi, lectus — to collect) is a term that can apply both as a transliteration of legio (conscription or army) to the entire Roman army and also, more narrowly (and more commonly), to the heavy infantry that was the basic military unit of... The Defeated Varus (2003), a sculpture by Wilfried Koch in Haltern am See, Germany. ... Combatants Germanic tribes (Cherusci, Marsi, Chatti, Bructeri and Chauci) Roman Empire Commanders Arminius Publius Quinctilius Varus † Strength 10,000 to 18,000 3 Roman legions, 3 alae and 6 auxiliary cohorts, probably 20,000 - 25,000 Casualties Unknown; but far less than Roman losses 15,000-20,000 The Battle...

[9]
36 Pontius Pilate's Massacre of Samaritans Iudaea province Pilate murdered Samaritans attempting to "escape the violence of Pilate", considered excessive by Roman standards, action resulted in his recall to Rome [10]
c. 50 Jerusalem Passover Riot c.20,000-30,000 Iudaea province Passover riot in Jerusalem [11]
c. 55 Egyptian Prophet Massacre c.30,000 Iudaea province 30,000 unarmed Jews doing The Exodus reenactment massacred by Procurator Antonius Felix [12]
60-61 Boudica's revolt c.70,000 Roman Britain

Some 70,000 Romans and pro-Roman Britons were massacred by Celtic Britons. Ecce Homo (Behold the Man!), Antonio Ciseris depiction of Pontius Pilate presenting a scourged Jesus to the people of Jerusalem. ... For the ethnic group of this name, see Samaritan. ... Iudaea Province in the 1st century Iudaea (Hebrew: יהודה, Standard Yehuda Tiberian , praise God; Greek: Ιουδαία; Latin: Iudaea) was a Roman province that extended over the region of Judea proper, later Palestine. ... Iudaea Province in the 1st century Iudaea (Hebrew: יהודה, Standard Yehuda Tiberian , praise God; Greek: Ιουδαία; Latin: Iudaea) was a Roman province that extended over the region of Judea proper, later Palestine. ... Iudaea Province in the 1st century Iudaea (Hebrew: יהודה, Standard Yehuda Tiberian , praise God; Greek: Ιουδαία; Latin: Iudaea) was a Roman province that extended over the region of Judea proper, later Palestine. ... The Exodus or Ytsiyat Mitsrayim (Hebrew: יציאת מצרים, Tiberian: , the going out of Egypt) refers to the Exodus of the Israelites out of Egypt. ... A procurator is the incumbent of any of several current and historical political or legal offices. ... Marcus Antonius Felix (Felix in Greek: ο Φηλιξ, born between 5/10-?) was the ancient Rome procurator of Iudaea Province 52-60, in succession to Ventidius Cumanus. ... Boudica and Her Daughters near Westminster Pier, London, commissioned by Prince Albert and executed by Thomas Thornycroft Boudica (also spelt Boudicca, formerly better known as Boadicea) (d. ... Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the European people. ...

[13][14]
64-68 Nero's persecution after the Great Fire of Rome Roman Empire "...a vast multitude, were convicted ... they were wrapped in the hides of wild beasts and torn to pieces by dogs, or nailed to crosses, or set on fire, and when day declined, were burned to serve for nocturnal lights." [15]
164 Sack of Seleucia c.300,000 Seleucia, Parthian Empire Hellenistic city of Seleucia on the Tigris, despite the welcome it reserved for the Roman general Avidius Cassius, was sacked and destroyed by the Romans. [16][17]
258 Valerian's Massacre Roman Empire All Christian bishops, priests, and deacons were executed immediately [18]
303-312 Diocletian Persecution 3,000–3,500 Roman Empire The last, and most severe, episode of persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire [19]
518 or 523 Najran massacre unknown Najran (on the southern part of the Arabian Peninsula)

Jewish King Dhu Nuwas orders the forceful conversion of the Christians (mainly Aksumites) in Najran. The Christians are subsequently massacred. According to the historian Tacitus, the Great Fire of Rome started on the night of 18 July in the year 64, among the shops clustered around the Circus Maximus. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Seleucia (Greek: Σέλεύχεια) – also transliterated as Seleuceia, Seleukeia, or Seleukheia – may refer to many cities of the Seleucid Empire (Syria): Seleucia on the Tigris (first capital of the Seleucid Empire; currently in Iraq) Seleucia (Sittacene) – in antiquity, across the Tigris from the above city, currently in Iraq Seleucia above Zeugma – on... Seleucia (Greek: Σέλεύχεια) – also transliterated as Seleuceia, Seleukeia, or Seleukheia – may refer to many cities of the Seleucid Empire (Syria): Seleucia on the Tigris (first capital of the Seleucid Empire; currently in Iraq) Seleucia (Sittacene) – in antiquity, across the Tigris from the above city, currently in Iraq Seleucia above Zeugma – on... Parthian Empire at its greatest extent, c60 BCE. The Parthian Empire was the dominating force on the Iranian plateau beginning in the late 3rd century BCE, and intermittently controlled Mesopotamia between ca 190 BCE and 224 CE. Parthia was the arch-enemy of the Roman Empire in the east and... The term Hellenistic (established by the German historian Johann Gustav Droysen) in the history of the ancient world is used to refer to the shift from a culture dominated by ethnic Greeks, however scattered geographically, to a culture dominated by Greek-speakers of whatever ethnicity, and from the political dominance... Seleucia (Greek: Σέλεύχεια) – also transliterated as Seleuceia, Seleukeia, or Seleukheia – may refer to many cities of the Seleucid Empire (Syria): Seleucia on the Tigris (first capital of the Seleucid Empire; currently in Iraq) Seleucia (Sittacene) – in antiquity, across the Tigris from the above city, currently in Iraq Seleucia above Zeugma – on... The Tigris is the eastern member of the pair of great rivers that define Mesopotamia, along with the Euphrates, which flows from the mountains of Anatolia through Iraq. ... Gaius Avidius Cassius (c. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Publius Licinius Valerianus[1] (c. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... The Diocletian Persecution was the last, and most severe, episode of persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Spanish Leftists during the Red Terror Shoot at a statue of Christ The persecution of Christians is religious persecution that Christians sometimes undergo as a consequence of professing their faith, both historically and in the current era. ... Najran is a province of Saudi Arabia, located in the south of the country along the border with Yemen. ... Arabia redirects here. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... Yusuf Dhu Nuwas (also called Yusuf Asar Dhu Nuwas, Masruq, and Dunas Zhidovin) was the last king of Yemen (then called Himayar) from a Jewish dynasty of unknown origin. ... The Kingdom of Aksum (or Axum, Geez አክሱም), was an important trading nation in northeastern Africa, growing from the proto-Aksumite period ca. ...

[20]
532 Nika riots c.30,000 Byzantine Empire

After a sports rivalry turns into a full-scale riot, Emperor Justinian I locks the rioters in the Hippodrome and has them killed. The Nika riots (Greek: Στάση του Νίκα), or Nika revolt, took place over the course of a week in Constantinople in 532. ... Byzantine redirects here. ... This article is about the Roman emperor. ...

[citation needed]
614 Jerusalem massacres Unknown Jerusalem

Persian invaders, aided by local Jews, massacre up to 90,000 Christians. For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Persia redirects here. ...

[21]
627 Qurayza massacre 600-900 Medina After the Battle of the Trench, Muslims besiege the Jewish tribe of Banu Qurayza and after its surrender kill all adult males, while women and children are enslaved. [22]
750 Abbasid massacre of the Umayyads 80 Arab Empire The successful Abbasid Revolt overthrew the Umayyad dynasty. When Abbasids declared amnesty for members of the Umayyad family, eighty gathered to receive pardons, and all were massacred. [23][24]
782 Bloody Verdict of Verden 4,500 Verden, Germany

Massacre of non-Christian Saxons by Charlemagne; The actual scale of the massacre is subject to debate. The massacre of the Banu Qurayza. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... Combatants Muslims Quraysh-led Coalition Commanders Muhammad Abu Sufyan ibn Harb Strength 3,000 10,000 Casualties only few few hundreds or more The Battle of the Trench or Battle of the Ditch (Arabic غزوة الخندق), also known as or Battle of Confederates (Arabic غزوة الاحزاب) was an attack by the non-Muslim Ahzab... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... The massacre of the Banu Qurayza. ... Mashriq Dynasties  Maghrib Dynasties  The Abbasid Caliphate Abbasid (Arabic: , ) is the dynastic name generally given to the caliph of Baghdad, the second of the two great Sunni dynasties of the Arab Empire, that overthrew the Umayyad caliphs from all but Spain. ... The Umayyad Dynasty (Arabic الأمويون / بنو أمية umawiyy; in Turkish, Emevi) was the first dynasty of caliphs of the Prophet Muhammad who were not closely related to Muhammad himself, though they were of the same Meccan tribe, the... The Arab Empire at its greatest extent The Arab Empire usually refers to the following Caliphates: Rashidun Caliphate (632 - 661) Umayyad Caliphate (661 - 750) - Successor of the Rashidun Caliphate Umayyad Emirate in Islamic Spain (750 - 929) Umayyad Caliphate of Córdoba in Islamic Spain (929 - 1031) Abbasid Caliphate (750-1258... Combatants Abbasids Umayyad Caliphate Commanders Abu al-Abbas al-Saffah Marwan II The Battle of the Zab took place on the banks of the Great Zab river in what is now Iraq on January 25, 750. ... The Umayyad Dynasty (Arabic الأمويون / بنو أمية umawiyy; in Turkish, Emevi) was the first dynasty of caliphs of the Prophet Muhammad who were not closely related to Muhammad himself, though they were of the same Meccan tribe, the... The Bloody Verdict of Verden (from German Blutgericht) was an alleged massacre of Saxons in 782, ordered by Charlemagne during the Saxon Wars. ... Verden (Aller), or Verden (IPA: ), is a city in Lower Saxony, Germany, on the River Aller. ... For other uses, see Saxon (disambiguation). ... Charlemagne (left) and Pippin the Hunchback. ...

[citation needed]
1002 St. Brice's Day massacre unknown England

Ethelred II orders the slaughter of an unknown number of Danes. The St. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Ethelred II or Æþelræd Unræd (c. ...

[citation needed]
1026 Somnath massacre 50,000 India

Hindu Defenders of Somnath massacred by Mahmud of Ghazni. The Somnath Temple located in the Prabhas Kshetra near Veraval in Saurashtra, on the western coast of Gujarat, India is one of the twelve Jyotirlings (golden lingas) symbols of the God Shiva. ... Bhavna says there are 300 million gods in Hinduism. ... The Somnath Temple located in the Prabhas Kshetra near Veraval in Saurashtra, on the western coast of Gujarat, India is one of the twelve Jyotirlings (golden lingas) symbols of the God Shiva. ... Mahmud and Ayaz The Sultan is to the right, shaking the hand of the sheykh, with Ayaz standing behind him. ...

1033 Fez massacre 6,000 Fez, Morocco

Jews slaughtered in Fez by Muslim mobs. Fez may refer to: Fez (clothing), a brimless felt skullcap of Morroccan origin. ... Fez may refer to: Fez (clothing), a brimless felt skullcap of Morroccan origin. ...

[25][26]
1066 Granada massacre 4,000 Granada, Spain

Muslim mob stormed the royal palace in Granada, crucified Jewish vizier Joseph ibn Naghrela and massacred most of the Jewish population of the city. On December 30, 1066, Muslim mob stormed the royal palace in Granada, crucified Jewish vizier Joseph ibn Naghrela and massacred most of the Jewish population of the city. ... For other uses, see Granada (disambiguation). ... Abu Husain Joseph ibn Naghrela (c. ...

[27]
1096 German Crusade c.10,000 Rhine River

The "People's Crusade" prior to the First Crusade results in the deaths of thousands of Jews living beside or near the river Rhine (see also Emicho). The German Crusade of 1096 is that part of the First Crusade in which peasant crusaders, mostly from Germany, attacked not Muslims but Jews. ... It has been suggested that River Rhine Pollution: November 1986 be merged into this article or section. ... Combatants Christendom, Catholicism West European Christians, Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia Seljuks, Arabs and other Muslims The First Crusade was launched in 1095 by Pope Urban II with the dual goals of liberating the sacred city of Jerusalem and the Holy Land from Muslims and freeing the Eastern Christians from Muslim... Count Emicho (of Flonheim) was a count in the Rhineland in the late 11th century and the leader of the German Crusade in 1096. ...

[citation needed]
1098 Siege of Antioch c.20,000 Antioch, Syria

Almost all Muslim inhabitants are slaughtered after the fall of the city to the Crusaders. Combatants Crusaders Seljuk Turks Commanders Raymond of Toulouse Godfrey of Bouillon Bohemund of Taranto Yaghi-Siyan Kerbogha Strength 25,000[1] 75,000[2] Casualties Unknown Unknown For other uses please see Siege of Antioch (disambiguation) The Siege of Antioch took place during the First Crusade in 1097 and 1098. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Antakya. ...

[citation needed]
1099 Siege of Jerusalem c.70,000 Jerusalem

Almost all Muslim and Jewish inhabitants are slaughtered after the fall of the city to the Crusaders. Combatants Crusaders Fatimids Commanders Raymond of Toulouse Godfrey of Bouillon Iftikhar ad-Dawla Strength 1,500 knights 12,000 infantry 1,000 garrison Casualties Unknown At least 40,000 military and civilian dead The Siege of Jerusalem took place from June 7 to July 15, 1099 during the First Crusade. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ...

[citation needed]
1190 Clifford's Tower c.150 York, England

A mob attacks Jewish residents; many commit suicide. York Castle is an area of York near the confluence of the Rivers Ouse and the Foss. ... York shown within England Coordinates: , Sovereign state Constituent country Region Yorkshire and the Humber Ceremonial county North Yorkshire Admin HQ York City Centre Founded 71 City Status 71 Government  - Type Unitary Authority, City  - Governing body City of York Council  - Leadership: Leader & Executive  - Executive: Liberal Democrat  - MPs: Hugh Bayley (L) John...

[citation needed]
1191 Siege of Acre (Akko) 2,750 Akko

Richard the Lionheart slaughters Muslim and Jewish prisoners taken during the siege. The Siege of Acre was the most important event of the Third Crusade, lasting from August 28, 1189 until July 12, 1191, and the first time in the history of the crusades that the king was compelled to personally see to the defense of the Holy Land. ... “Akko” redirects here. ... Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England from 6 July 1189 to 6 April 1199. ...

[citation needed]
1209 Albigensian Crusade 20,000 to 100,000 Béziers, France

Crusaders slaughter the Cathars. Other civilian slaughters occur in Toulouse and Saint-Nazaire. The Albigensian Crusade or Cathar Crusade (1209 - 1229) was a 20-year military campaign initiated by the Roman Catholic Church to eliminate the heresy of the Cathars of Languedoc. ... Béziers (Besièrs in Occitan, and Besiers in Catalan) is a town in Languedoc, in the southwest of France. ... Cathars being expelled from Carcassonne in 1209. ... New city flag (Occitan cross) Traditional coat of arms Motto: (Occitan: For Toulouse, always more) Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country Region Midi-Pyrénées Department Haute-Garonne (31) Intercommunality Community of Agglomeration of Greater Toulouse Mayor Jean-Luc Moudenc  (UMP) (since 2004) City Statistics Land... Saint-Nazaire is also a commune of the Gard département of France. ...

[citation needed]
1220 Samarkand massacre c.75,000 Samarkand, Khwarezm[28]

After the city's surrender, the Mongols under Genghis Khan drive out and slaughter its population. Over 75,000 men, women and children perish. Samarkand (Tajik: Самарқанд, Persian: ‎ , Uzbek: , Russian: ), population 412,300 in 2005, is the second-largest city in Uzbekistan and the capital of Samarqand Province. ... After Islamic Conquest  Modern SSR = Soviet Socialist Republic Afghanistan  Azerbaijan  Bahrain  Iran  Iraq  Tajikistan  Uzbekistan  This box:      Khwarezm was a series of states centered on the Amu Darya river delta of the former Aral Sea, in modern Uzbekistan, extending across the Ust-Urt plateau and possibly as far west as... For other uses, see Mongols (disambiguation). ... This article is about the person. ...

[citation needed]
1221 Herat massacre 600,000 Herat

Genghis Khan's Mongols destroy the city and massacre the population. Herāt (Persian: ‎ ) is a city in western Afghanistan, in the province also known as Herāt. ... This article is about the person. ...

[citation needed]
1240 Sack of Kiev Tens of thousands Kiev, Kievan Rus

Batu Khan's Mongols destroy the city and massacre the population. Over the three years (1237-1240) the Mongols destroyed and annihilated all of the major cities of Russia with the exceptions of Novgorod and Pskov. Approximately half of the Russian population died during the Mongol invasion of Rus. Two battles of World War II are known as the Battle of Kiev, fought around the city of Kiev in the Soviet Union (now Ukraine): In the Battle of Kiev (1941) two German Panzer Groups encircled a Soviet army in the city. ... Map of Ukraine with Kiev highlighted Coordinates: , Country Ukraine Oblast Kiev City Municipality Raion Municipality Government  - Mayor Leonid Chernovetskyi Elevation 179 m (587 ft) Population (2006)  - City 4,450,968  - Density 3,299/km² (8,544. ... Kievan Rus′ (Ки́евская Ру́сь, Kievskaya Rus in Russian; Київська Русь, Kyivs’ka Rus’ in Ukrainian) was the early, mostly East Slavic¹ state dominated by the... Batu Khan (Russian: , Ukrainian: ) (c. ... For other uses, see Mongols (disambiguation). ... Velikiy Novgorod (Russian: ) is the foremost historic city of North-Western Russia, situated on the M10(E95) federal highway connecting Moscow and St. ... The Trinity Cathedral (1682-99) is a symbol of Pskovs former might and independence. ... The Mongol Invasion of Rus was heralded by the Battle of the Kalka River (1223) between Subutais reconnaissance unit and the combined force of several princes of Rus. After fifteen years of peace, it was followed by Batu Khans full-scale invasion in 1237-40. ...

[29][30]
1258 Battle of Baghdad 90,000 to  1,000,000 Baghdad

Hulagu Khan's Mongols destroy the city and massacre the population. Combatants Mongols Abbasid Caliphate Commanders Hulagu Khan Guo Kan Caliph Al-Mustasim Strength Unknown Unknown Casualties Unknown, but believed minimal Military, 50,000(est. ... Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Governorate. ... Hulagu Khan, also known as Hulagu, Hülegü or Hulegu (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Chaghatay/Persian: ; Arabic:هولاكو; c. ...

[31]
1268 Siege of Antioch 40,000 Antioch, Syria

Sultan Baibars' of Egypt attacks, captures and loots the Christian-held city of Antioch. His armies slaughter or enslave every Christian in the city. This marks the end of Antioch's 1500-year history; the city never recovers. In 1260 Baibars, the Sultan of Egypt and Syria, began to threaten the crusader state of Antioch, which (as a vassal of the Armenians) had supported the Mongols, the traditional enemies of the Turks. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Antakya. ... al-Malik al-Zahir Rukn al-Din Baibars al-Bunduqdari (also spelled Baybars) (Arabic: ) was a Mamluk Sultan of Egypt and Syria. ...

[citation needed]
1282 Sicilian Vespers Thousands Italy

French followers ot the House of Anjou in Sicily are killed during a revolt. Sicilian Vespers (1846), by Francesco Hayez The Sicilian Vespers is the name given to a rebellion in Sicily in 1282 against the rule of the Angevin king Charles I, who had taken control of the island with Papal support in 1266. ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ...

[32]
1289 Siege of Tripoli c.10,000 Palestine

Muslim conquest of Christian County of Tripoli; virtually the whole Christian population is killed. Armenian Cilicia and Crusader States The County of Tripoli was the last of the four major Crusader states in the Levant to be created. ... This article is about the geographical area known as Palestine. ...

[33]
1291 Siege of Tyre 10,000 Tyre, Palestine

Khalil' army destroys the city and massacres the Christian population. Tyre (Arabic , Phoenician , Hebrew Tzor, Tiberian Hebrew , Akkadian , Greek Týros) is a city in the South Governorate of Lebanon. ... The Triumphal Arch Tyre (Arabic , Phoenician , Hebrew Tzor, Tiberian Hebrew , Akkadian , Greek Týros) is a city in the South Governorate of Lebanon. ... This article is about the geographical area known as Palestine. ... Al-Malik Al-Ashraf Khalil (Arabic: المالك الأشرف خليل ) (died 1293) was the Mamluk sultan of Egypt from 1290 until his assassination in December, 1293. ...

[34]
1291 Siege of Acre Thousands Palestine

Those Christians unable to leave the city were slaughtered by the Egyptian Mamluks. The Siege of Acre took place in 1291 and resulted in the fall of Acre, the last territory of the crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem. ... This article is about the geographical area known as Palestine. ... An Ottoman Mamluk, from 1810 Mamluks (or Mameluks) (the Arabic word usually translates as owned, singular: مملوك plural: مماليك) comprised slave soldiers used by the Muslim Caliphs and the Ottoman Empire, and who on more than one occasion seized power for...

[35]
1296 Massacre of Berwick 30,000 Berwick, Scotland[36]

As they invade Scotland, forces under the command of Edward I massacre the population of Berwick. Map sources for Berwick-upon-Tweed at grid reference NT9952 Berwick-upon-Tweed from across the river Berwick-upon-Tweed, (pronounced Berrick) situated in the county of Northumberland, is the northernmost town in England, situated on the east coast on the mouth of the river Tweed. ... This article is about the country. ... Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1], also as Edward the Lawgiver or the English Justinian because of his legal reforms, and as Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and tried to do the same to Scotland. ...

[citation needed]
1325 Crow Creek Massacre c.500 South Dakota

Several hundred Initial Coalescent men, women and children were slaughtered, mutilated and scalped by the Middle Missouri villagers. The Crow Creek Massacre occurred in the early 14th century between Native Americans in the South Dakota area. ... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ...

[37]
1348 Black Death Scapegoats 6,000 to 16,000 Germany

Jews are blamed as the cause of the Black Death, leading to their massacre in Mainz (up to 12,000) and Strasbourg (4,000). This article concerns the mid fourteenth century pandemic. ... This article concerns the mid fourteenth century pandemic. ... Mainz is a city in Germany and the capital of the German federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate. ... For other uses, see Strasburg. ...

[citation needed]
1358 Jacquerie Revolts 8,000 Meaux, France

Peasants are massacred in the aftermath of a revolt. The Jacquerie in Froissarts chronicles The Jacquerie was a popular revolt in late medieval Europe that took place in northern France in 1358, during the Hundred Years War. ... Meaux is a commune in the metropolitan area of Paris, France. ... In a detail of Brueghels Land of Cockaigne (1567) a soft-boiled egg has little feet to rush to the luxuriating peasant who catches drops of honey on his tongue, while roast pigs roam wild: in fact, hunger and harsh winters were realities for the average European in the...

[citation needed]
1361 Battle of Visby 2,800 Gotland, Sweden

Danish King Valdemar's troops massacred the peasant army of Gotland. Combatants Denmark Sweden Commanders unknown unknown Strength 2500 unknown Casualties 100 1800 The Battle of Visby was fought in 1361 in Visby on the island of Gotland, between the forces of Sweden and Denmark. ...   is a county, province and municipality of Sweden and the second largest island in the Baltic Sea after Zealand. ... Valdemar IV of Denmark (Valdemar Atterdag) shown on a fresco in Næstveds Saint Peters Church (Sankt Peders Kirke). ...

[38][39]
1370 Siege of Limoges 3,000 France Edward, the Black Prince oversaw a cruel siege, which concluded with the massacre of some 3,000 residents according to the chronicler Froissart. [40]
1387 Massacre of Isfahan 70,000 Isfahan, Persia

In the city of Isfahan (Persia) Timur Lenk ordered the building of a pyramid of 70,000 human skulls, from those that his army had beheaded. Edward of Woodstock, Prince of Wales, KG (15 June 1330 – 8 June 1376), popularly known as the Black Prince, was the eldest son of King Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault, and father to King Richard II of England. ... Naghsh-i Jahan Square, Isfahan This article is about the city of Isfahan. ... Naghsh-i Jahan Square, Isfahan This article is about the city of Isfahan. ... Anthem SorÅ«d-e MellÄ«-e Īrān Â² Capital (and largest city) Tehran Official languages Persian Demonym Iranian Government Islamic Republic  -  Supreme Leader  -  President Unification  -  Unified by Cyrus the Great 559 BCE   -  Parthian (Arsacid) dynastic empire (first reunification) 248 BCE-224 CE   -  Sassanid dynastic empire 224–651 CE   -  Safavid dynasty... Naghsh-i Jahan Square, Isfahan This article is about the city of Isfahan. ... For the chess engine Tamerlane, see Tamerlane. ...

[41][42]
1396 Battle of Nicopolis 3,000-10,000 Bulgaria

After the battle, the Ottoman Sultan Bayezid I ordered between 3,000 to 10,000 Christian prisoners to be executed, in retaliation for the Rahovo massacre of the Ottoman prisoners by French Crusaders. // Combatants Ottoman Empire Kingdom of Hungary, Holy Roman Empire, France, Wallachia, Poland, England, Kingdom of Scotland, Old Swiss Confederacy, Republic of Venice, Republic of Genoa, Knights of St. ... Ottoman redirects here. ... // Bayezid I (Ottoman: بايزيد الأول, Turkish: Beyazıt, nicknamed Yıldırım (Ottoman: ییلدیرم), the Thunderbolt; 1354–1403) was the sultan of the Ottoman Empire from 1389 to 1402. ... Oryahovo (Bulgarian: , Romanian: Rahova) is a port city in northwestern Bulgaria, part of Vratsa Province. ... The Crusaders (formerly the Canterbury Crusaders) are a New Zealand Rugby Union team based in Christchurch, New Zealand that competes in the Super 14 (formerly the Super 12). ...

[43]
1398 Massacre of Delhi 100,000 Delhi, India

Massacre of prisoners under Timur Lenk. Statue of Timur in Shahrisabz, Uzbekistan Tīmūr bin Taraghay Barlas (Chagatai Turkic: تیمور - Tēmōr, iron) (1336 – February 1405), known in the West as Tamerlane, was a 14th century warlord of Turco-Mongol descent,[1][2][3][4] conqueror of much of western and central Asia, and founder... For other uses, see Delhi (disambiguation). ... For the chess engine Tamerlane, see Tamerlane. ...

[citation needed]
1400 Siege of Sivas 4,000 Anatolia

Timur Lenk buried alive 4,000 Christian soldiers of the garrison of Sivas after their capitulation; but the Muslim prisoners he spared. Sivas is the provincial capital of Sivas Province in Turkey. ... This article is about two nested areas of Turkey, a plateau region within a peninsula. ... For the chess engine Tamerlane, see Tamerlane. ...

[44][45]
1401 Massacre of Baghdad 20,000-90,000 Baghdad, Iraq

Timur Lenk sacked Baghdad and massacred at least 20,000. Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Governorate. ... Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Governorate. ... For the chess engine Tamerlane, see Tamerlane. ...

[46] [47]
1415 Agincourt c.5,000 Agincourt, France

So that guards may join the fight, Henry V orders the deaths of 5,000 prisoners of war during the Battle of Agincourt. Azincourt (sometimes: Agincourt) is a village and commune of northern France in the Pas-de-Calais département, 14 miles to the north-west of Saint-Pol-sur-Ternoise by road, famous on account of the victory, on October 25, 1415, of Henry V of England over the French in... Henry V of England (16 September 1387 – 31 August 1422) was one of the great warrior kings of the Middle Ages. ... Combatants Kingdom of England Kingdom of France Commanders Henry V of England Charles dAlbret Strength About 6,000 (but see Modern re-assessment). ...

[citation needed]
1453 Constantinople c.10,000 Byzantine Empire Following the fall of the city, the Ottoman Turks massacre the Greek Orthodox population for three days . [citation needed]
1459 Braşov massacre c.30,000 Braşov, Transylvania

Vlad the Impaler, also known as Vlad Dracula, voivode of Wallachia in present-day Romania, had 30,000 of the Saxon merchants and officials of the Transylvanian city of Braşov that were breaking his authority impaled. This article is about the city before the Fall of Constantinople (1453). ... Byzantine redirects here. ... Combatants  Byzantine Empire Ottoman Sultanate Commanders Constantine XI †, Loukas Notaras, Giovanni Giustiniani †[1] Mehmed II, ZaÄŸanos Pasha Strength 80,000[2] 80,000[1]-200,000[1][3] Casualties 4,000 dead[4] [5][6] unknown The Fall of Constantinople refers to the capture of the Byzantine Empires... County BraÅŸov County Status County capital Mayor George Scripcaru, Democratic Party, since 2004 Area 267. ... County BraÅŸov County Status County capital Mayor George Scripcaru, Democratic Party, since 2004 Area 267. ... This article is about the region in Romania. ... Vlad Tepes redirects here. ... The Transylvanian Saxons (German: ; Hungarian: ; Romanian: ) are a people of German origin who settled in Transylvania (German: ) from the 12th century onwards. ... For other uses, see impale. ...

[48][49]
1462 The Night Attack c.20,000 Wallachia

Sultan Mehmed the Conqueror, during his campaign against Wallachia, is “greeted” by the sight of a veritable forest of stakes on which Wallachian ruler Vlad the Impaler has impaled 20,000 Turkish prisoners. // Combatants Wallachia Ottoman Empire Commanders Vlad III Dracula Mehmed II Strength up to 30,000[1] most realistic source mentions 60,000 regulars and 20-30,000 irregulars (90,000); 120 cannons[2] Casualties 5,000 [3] 15,000 [3] The Night Attack (Romanian: ) was a skirmish fought between Vlad... Map of Romania with Wallachia in yellow. ... Mehmed II (Ottoman Turkish: محمد ثانى Meḥmed-i sānÄ«, Turkish: ), (also known as el-Fatih (الفاتح), the Conqueror, in Ottoman Turkish, or, in modern Turkish, Fatih Sultan Mehmet) (March 30, 1432 – May 3, 1481) was Sultan of the Ottoman Empire for a short time from 1444 to 1446, and later from... Vlad Tepes redirects here. ...

[50][51]
1465 Jewish massacre in Fez Thousands Fez, Morocco

Arab mobs in Fez slaughtered thousands of Jews, leaving only 11 alive. Fez may refer to: Fez (clothing), a brimless felt skullcap of Morroccan origin. ... Fez may refer to: Fez (clothing), a brimless felt skullcap of Morroccan origin. ...

[52][53]
1480 Sack of Otranto 12,000 Otranto, Italy the Italian city of Otranto is held by the Ottoman Empire [citation needed]
1487 Aztec human sacrifice 10,000-80,400 Aztec Empire, Mexico

For the re-consecration of Great Pyramid of Tenochtitlan in 1487, the Aztecs reported that they slaughtered about 80,400 prisoners over the course of four days. According to Ross Hassing, author of Aztec Warfare, "between 10,000 and 80,400 persons" were sacrificed in the ceremony. Combatants Ottoman Empire Kingdom of Naples Kingdom of Aragon Kingdom of Hungary Commanders Gedik Ahmed Pasha Francesco Largo † Alphonso II of Naples Strength Between 18,000 and 100,000 men. ... Otranto is a town and commune in the province of Lecce (Apulia, Italy), in a fertile region, and once famous for its breed of horses. ... Otranto is a town and commune in the province of Lecce (Apulia, Italy), in a fertile region, and once famous for its breed of horses. ... Ottoman redirects here. ... The word Aztec is usually used as a historical term, although some contemporary Nahuatl speakers would consider themselves Aztecs. ... Tenochtitlan, looking east. ... Events Richard Fox becomes Bishop of Exeter. ... The word Aztec is usually used as a historical term, although some contemporary Nahuatl speakers would consider themselves Aztecs. ...

[54]

[55]

March 1495 Hispaniola Pacification campaign Several thousand Central Hispaniola

Christopher Columbus leads first organized slaughter of native Americans to “pacify” them in order to enact his hand-amputating, gold-acquiring “tribute system.” Early map of Hispaniola Hispaniola (from Spanish, La Española) is the second-largest and most populous island of the Antilles, lying between the islands of Cuba to the west, and Puerto Rico to the east. ... Early map of Hispaniola Hispaniola (from Spanish, La Española) is the second-largest and most populous island of the Antilles, lying between the islands of Cuba to the west, and Puerto Rico to the east. ... Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator and colonialist who is one of the first Europeans to discover the Americas, after the Vikings. ... For other uses, see Murder (disambiguation). ... Native Americans redirects here. ...

[56]

Modern times (from 1500)

1500 to 1799

Date Name Deaths Location Summary Claimants
1503 Xaraguá Massacre c.300 Xaraguá, Hispaniola

The governor of Hispaniola, Nicolas de Ovando, leads expedition to “improve relations” with remaining unconquered natives of island, and slaughters 300 of the leadership of southwestern Hispaniola. Early map of Hispaniola Hispaniola (from Spanish, La Española) is the second-largest and most populous island of the Antilles, lying between the islands of Cuba to the west, and Puerto Rico to the east. ... Early map of Hispaniola Hispaniola (from Spanish, La Española) is the second-largest and most populous island of the Antilles, lying between the islands of Cuba to the west, and Puerto Rico to the east. ... This article has been rewritten to resolve copyright issues. ...

[57]
1506 Lisbon Massacre c.2000-4000 Lisbon, Portugal

In a Lisbon riot, Jewish converts to Christianity are slaughtered. For other uses, see Lisbon (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Lisbon (disambiguation). ... The history of the Jews in Portugal is directly related to Sephardi history, a Jewish ethnic division that represents communities who have originated in the Iberian Peninsula (Spain, Portugal, Gibraltar, but also Morocco). ...

[58]
1511 Cuba expedition under Diego Velázquez At least 20,000 Cuba

As gold and slaves run low on Hispaniola, an expedition of 300 men to Cuba pursued the survivors of the 1503 Xaraguá Massacre and slaughters the natives. For loved to eat live babies and terrorists the Spanish painter, see Diego Velázquez. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... The Buxton Memorial Fountain, celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, London. ... Early map of Hispaniola Hispaniola (from Spanish, La Española) is the second-largest and most populous island of the Antilles, lying between the islands of Cuba to the west, and Puerto Rico to the east. ...

[59]
1513 Pacra Massacre c. 600 Pacra, Panama

During Vasco Núñez de Balboa's expedition to discover Pacific Ocean, night attack on sleeping village. Forty men fed to the Spaniards' dogs for the crime of “dressing like women.” Vasco Núñez De Balboa (1475–January 15, 1519) was a Spanish explorer, governor, and conquistador. ...

[60]
1513 Shiite Massacre c.40,000 Ottoman Empire

Sultan Selim I ("The Grim") ordered the massacre of 40,000 Shia Muslim "heretics". Shi‘as (the adjective in Arabic is شيعى shi‘i; English has traditionally used Shiite) which mean follower in Arabic make up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%-35% of all Muslim. ... Ottoman redirects here. ... Selim I (Ottoman: سليم الأول, Turkish:) (also known as the Grim or the Brave, Yavuz in Turkish, the long name is Yavuz Sultan Selim)(October 10, 1465 – September 22, 1520) was the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire from 1512 to 1520. ... Shiʻa Islam (Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite) makes up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%–35% of all Muslim. ...

[61][62]
1519 Tlaxcala Massacres Thousands Tlaxcala, Mesoamerica

On way to Aztec capital, Hernán Cortés was attacked by the Tlaxcalan state and engages in battles for two weeks. After he burns a dozen towns and slaughters thousands of non-combatants – a style of warfare unknown in Mesoamerica – and prevails in several battles against Tlaxcalan warriors, the Tlaxcalans capitulate and become his most faithful allies. For other uses, see Tlaxcala (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Tlaxcala (disambiguation). ... This article is about the culture area. ... Aztec is a term used to refer to certain ethnic groups of central Mexico, particularly those groups who spoke the Nahuatl language and who achieved political and military dominance over large parts of Mesoamerica in the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries, a period referred to as the Late post-Classic... Hernán(do) Cortés Pizarro, 1st Marqués del Valle de Oaxaca (1485–December 2, 1547) was the conquistador who became famous for leading the military expedition that initiated the Spanish Conquest of Mexico. ... Tlaxcaltec leader speaking to conquistador as depicted in History of Tlaxcala by Diego Muñoz Camargo, published in 1590 The Tlaxcaltecs or Tlacullos were an indigenous group of the Nahuatl culture that inhabited the area in Meso-America that approximates the territory currently known as the state of Tlaxcala, Mexico. ...

[63] [64]
1519 Cholula Massacre c. 3,000 Cholula, Mexico

On way to Aztec capital, Hernán Cortés and his 400 men, accompanied by about 6,000 Tlaxcalan warriors, visits religious center of Cholula and slaughters city residents who he accuses of “plotting” against him. The Cholula Massacre of 1519 Cholula (Nahuatl: ), was an important city of pre-Columbian Mesoamerica, dating back to at least the 2nd century BCE, with settlement as a village going back at least some thousand years earlier. ... The Roman Catholic church of Nuestra Señora de los Remedios overlooks the town of Cholula from atop the Great Pyramid. ... Aztec is a term used to refer to certain ethnic groups of central Mexico, particularly those groups who spoke the Nahuatl language and who achieved political and military dominance over large parts of Mesoamerica in the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries, a period referred to as the Late post-Classic... Hernán(do) Cortés Pizarro, 1st Marqués del Valle de Oaxaca (1485–December 2, 1547) was the conquistador who became famous for leading the military expedition that initiated the Spanish Conquest of Mexico. ... Tlaxcaltec leader speaking to conquistador as depicted in History of Tlaxcala by Diego Muñoz Camargo, published in 1590 The Tlaxcaltecs or Tlacullos were an indigenous group of the Nahuatl culture that inhabited the area in Meso-America that approximates the territory currently known as the state of Tlaxcala, Mexico. ... The Roman Catholic church of Nuestra Señora de los Remedios overlooks the town of Cholula from atop the Great Pyramid. ...

[65]
1520 Stockholm bloodbath c.100 Stockholm, Sweden

The mass execution of Swedish nobles by the Danish king Christian II. Stockholm Bloodbath - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Look up Circa on Wiktionary, the free dictionary The Latin word circa, literally meaning about, is often used to describe various dates (often birth and death dates) that are uncertain. ... For other uses, see Stockholm (disambiguation). ... Christian II (July 2, 1481 – January 25, 1559) was a Danish monarch and King of Denmark, Norway (1513 – 1523) and Sweden (1520 – 1521), under the Kalmar Union. ...

[66][67]
1520 Huitzilopochtli Festival Massacre c. several hundred-3,000 Tenochtitlan, Mexico

While Cortés is away battling other Spaniards, Pedro Alvarado with eighty soldiers massacred Aztecs during festival, accusing the natives of plotting against the Spaniards. A pictorial representation of Huitzilopochtli from the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e História, México In Aztec mythology, Huitzilopochtli, also spelled Uitzilopochtli, (IPA: (Hummingbird of the South, He of the South, Hummingbird on the Left (South), or Left-Handed Humming Bird – huitzil is the Nahuatl word for hummingbird... Tenochtitlan, looking east. ... Pedro de Alvarado y Contreras (also known as Don Pedro de Alvarado and Tonatiuh by Mexican natives; born Badajoz, Spain, c. ...

[68][69]
1521 Post-siege massacre of Tenochtitlan c. 40,000 Tenochtitlan, Mexico

After successful conquest of Aztec capital city by 900 Spaniards and as many as 150,000 Cortes’s Tlaxcalan and Texcocan allies, most of the city’s survivors are put to death. Tenochtitlan, looking east. ... Tenochtitlan, looking east. ... Aztec is a term used to refer to certain ethnic groups of central Mexico, particularly those groups who spoke the Nahuatl language and who achieved political and military dominance over large parts of Mesoamerica in the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries, a period referred to as the Late post-Classic... Tlaxcaltec leader speaking to conquistador as depicted in History of Tlaxcala by Diego Muñoz Camargo, published in 1590 The Tlaxcaltecs or Tlacullos were an indigenous group of the Nahuatl culture that inhabited the area in Meso-America that approximates the territory currently known as the state of Tlaxcala, Mexico. ...

[70]
1524-1526 Peasants' War c. 100,000 Germany

It is estimated that as many as 100,000 German peasants were massacred during the revolt, usually after the battles had ended. Peasants War map. ...

[71][72]
1526 Battle of Mohács 2,000 Mohács, Hungary

Christian prisoners massacred by the Ottoman Turks after their defeat at Mohács. Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent gave orders to keep no prisoners. // Combatants Ottoman Empire Kingdom of Hungary Commanders Suleiman I Louis II of Hungary † Pál Tomori † György Zápolya Strength ~ 100,000 supported by 10,000 to 20,000 irregulars 160 to 300 cannons ~ 25,000 to 28,000 53 cannons (85 initial) John Zápolyas 8,000... Mohács (Croatian and Bunjevac: Mohač, Serbian: Мохач, German: Mohatsch, Turkish: Mohaç) is a town in Baranya county, Hungary on the right bank of the Danube, 115 miles south of Budapest. ... Ottoman redirects here. ... Suleiman I (Ottoman Turkish: Sulaymān, Turkish: ; formally Kanuni Sultan Süleyman in Turkish) (November 6, 1494 – September 5/6, 1566), was the tenth and longest‐serving Sultan of the Ottoman Empire, reigning from 1520 to 1566. ...

[73][74]
1527 Sack of Rome c. 4,000 Rome, Italy

Rome is sacked by the mutinous troops of Emperor Charles V. Of 189 Swiss Guards on duty only 42 survived. After the execution of some 1,000 defenders, the pillage began. Nuns and other women were freely raped; men were tortured and killed. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... For the Carlist claimant King Carlos V, see Infante Carlos, Count of Molina. ... Swiss Guards have been Swiss who fought for various European powers from the 15th century until the 19th century, called up from the separate Swiss cantons and placed at the disposal of various foreign powers by treaties (the capitulations), in return for money payments. ...

[75][76]
1532 Cajas Massacre Hundreds Cajas, Ecuador

While raping the several hundred nuns of the Sun Temple, Hernando de Soto’s men slaughter the angry residents of Cajas. todo: flora Categories: Stub ... todo: flora Categories: Stub ... The Sun Temple complex at Písac. ... Hernando de Soto is a: Spanish explorer. ... todo: flora Categories: Stub ...

[77]
1532 Cajamarca Massacre c. 3,000 Cajamarca, Ecuador

In surprise attack, killing 3,000 unarmed retainers and top commanders of the Inca's army, Pizarro’s expedition captures the Incan sovereign, Atahualpa. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the city of Cajamarca. ... Francisco Pizarro ( 1475–June 26, 1541) was a Spanish conquistador, conqueror of the Inca Empire and founder of the city of Lima. ... For other meanings of Inca, see Inca (disambiguation). ... Lifetime portrait of Atahuallpa, the last sovereign Inca emperor Atahualpa or Atawallpa (c. ...

[78]
1535 Mahon Massacre Hundreds Minorca, Spain

Ottoman admiral and Turkish privateer Khair ad Din attacked Mahon, Balearic Islands, killing or enslaving over half the population. Municipality of Mahón Mahón (alternately, Maó; Catalan it is also the official name, Spanish Mahón), is a municipality and the capital city of the Balearic Island of Minorca (an autonomic Spanish community), located in the eastern part of the island. ... Capital Maó Official languages Catalan & Spanish Area  -  Total 694. ... Ottoman redirects here. ... The Turkish Navy was once the largest sea power in the Mediterranean Sea, Black Sea, Red Sea, Persian Gulf and the Indian Ocean; entering the history books of many countries in distant lands such as the British Isles, Scandinavia, Iceland, Labrador, Gulf of Saint Lawrence, Newfoundland and Virginia in the... Khair ad Din A statue in Barbaros Park near the ferry stop in BeÅŸiktaÅŸ Khair ad Din (circa 1475-1546) was an Ottoman-Turkish admiral and privateer who served in the Ottoman Empire and in the Barbary Coast. ... Capital Palma de Mallorca Official language(s) Spanish and Catalan Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 17th  4,992 km²  1. ...

[79]
1539 Napituca Massacre c. 200 Napituca, Florida

Hernando de Soto's expedition prevails in battle against Timucuan warriors near town of Napituca in what became northern Florida. De Soto violated Charles V's ordinance to treat the natives well. Two hundred captured warriors were taken into Napituca and subsequently slaughtered at Soto’s command, making it the first documented large-scale massacre of natives by Europeans on soil that became the United States. Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami metropolitan area Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... Hernando de Soto is a: Spanish explorer. ... For the Carlist claimant King Carlos V, see Infante Carlos, Count of Molina. ... The European peoples are the various nations and ethnic groups of Europe. ...

[80][81]
1540 Mabila Massacre c. 2,500 Mabila, Alabama

Hernando de Soto’s expedition ambushed by Choctaws[82] burns down palisaded town of Mabila and kills in a battle lasting several hours approx. 2,500. ... ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Hernando de Soto is a: Spanish explorer. ... ...

[83][84]
1541 Moho Pueblo Massacre c. 200 Moho Pueblo, New Mexico

Francisco Vásquez de Coronado's expedition conquers Moho Pueblo, near the Rio Grande River, after a two-month siege. After the pueblo surrenders, the defenders are slaughtered, mostly by being burned at the stake. Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... Coronado Sets Out to the North, by Frederic Remington, 1861-1909 Francisco Vázquez de Coronado (ca. ...

[85]
1554 Vieste Massacre Hundreds Vieste, Italy In 1554, Vieste in Calabria, Italy, was raided by the Bey of Algiers and Turkish admiral Turgut Reis. Several hundreds citizens were beheaded and 7,000 inhabitants enslaved. [86]
1568 Chittorgarh massacre 30,000 India

Rajput defenders of Chittorgarh massacred by Akbar the Great. Province of Foggia Vieste is a town and comune in the province of Foggia in the Apulia region of southeast Italy. ... Province of Foggia Vieste is a town and comune in the province of Foggia in the Apulia region of southeast Italy. ... For other uses, see Calabria (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of Algeria. ... Turgut Reis Turgut Reis (1485-1565) was a Turkish privateer and Ottoman admiral as well as Bey of Algiers; Beylerbey of the Mediterranean; and first Bey later Pasha of Tripoli. ... Chittorgarh fort Chittorgarh (also Chittor, Chittaur, or Chittaurgarh) is an ancient city in Rajasthan state of western India. ... Rajput is a Hindu Kshatriya caste which decendend from India . ... Chittorgarh fort Chittorgarh (also Chittor, Chittaur, or Chittaurgarh) is an ancient city in Rajasthan state of western India. ... For other uses, see Akbar (disambiguation). ...

[87]
1570 Massacre of Novgorod 15,000-60,000 Tsardom of Russia

Between 500 and 1000 people were gathered every day by the troops, then tortured and killed in front of the Tsar Ivan the Terrible. According to the Third Novgorod Chronicle, the massacre lasted for five weeks. The First Pskov Chronicle estimates the number of victims at 60,000. The Massacre of Novgorod was a State-sponsored genocide that occoured in the city of Novgorod, Russia in 1570. ... The Tsardom of Russia (Russian: Московское царство or Царство Русское) was the official name for the Russian state between Ivan IVs assumption of the title of Tsar in 1547 and Peter the Greats foundation of the Russian Empire in 1721. ... Ivan IV (August 25, 1530–March 18, 1584) was the first ruler of Russia to assume the title of tsar. ...

[88] [89] [90]
1570 Cyprus massacre 30,000 Cyprus, Republic of Venice

The Turkish forces massacre thousands of Christians (mostly Greeks and Armenians) following the capture of the island. The Cyprus massacre occurred on 1570, resulting in the massacre of c. ... Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin, Italian Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ...

[91][92]
1571 Sack of Moscow by Crimean Tatars 170,000 Tsardom of Russia

In May, 1571 the 120-thousand strong Crimean Tatar army led by the Crimean Khan Devlet I Giray invaded Russia, devastated unprotected towns and villages and then sacked Moscow, burning everything but the Kremlin. The Tatars enslaved 150,000 Russians and massacred 170,000 in Moscow alone. For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... Flag Crimean Khanate in 1600 Capital Bakhchisaray Government Monarchy History  - Established 1441  - Annexed to Russia 1783 The Crimean Khanate or the Khanate of Crimea (Crimean Tatar: ; Russian: - Krymskoye khanstvo; Ukrainian: - Krymske khanstvo; Turkish: ) was a Crimean Tatar state from 1441 to 1783. ... The Tsardom of Russia (Russian: Московское царство or Царство Русское) was the official name for the Russian state between Ivan IVs assumption of the title of Tsar in 1547 and Peter the Greats foundation of the Russian Empire in 1721. ... Events January 11 - Austrian nobility is granted Freedom of religion. ... Flag Crimean Khanate in 1600 Capital Bakhchisaray Government Monarchy History  - Established 1441  - Annexed to Russia 1783 The Crimean Khanate or the Khanate of Crimea (Crimean Tatar: ; Russian: - Krymskoye khanstvo; Ukrainian: - Krymske khanstvo; Turkish: ) was a Crimean Tatar state from 1441 to 1783. ... Devlet I Giray (Crimean Tatar: I Devlet Geray) (1512–1577) — a khan of the Crimean Khanate in 1551–1577. ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... A monument celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, erected in Victoria Tower Gardens, Millbank, Westminster, London Look up Slavery in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Slavery is a condition of control over a person against their will, enforced by violence or other forms of coercion. ...

[93][94]
1571 Siege of Mount Hiei 20,000-30,000
Mount Hiei, Japan

Daimyo Oda Nobunaga burns down the monastery of Enryaku-ji (Enryakuji), at the time a cultural symbol. His target is the disobedient Buddhist Tendai warrior monks. Combatants forces of Oda Nobunaga warrior monks of Mt. ... Mount Hiei (Jp. ... Daimyo Matsudaira Katamori visits the residence of a retainer. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Monastery of St. ... Konpon-chudo Enryaku-ji (Japanese: 延暦寺), a monastery on Mount Hiei overlooking Kyoto, was founded during the late eighth and early ninth centuries by Saicho (767–822), also known as Dengyo Daishi, who introduced the Tendai sect to Japan from China. ... Tendai (Japanese: 天台宗, Tendai-shū) is a Japanese school of Mahayana Buddhism, a descendant of the Chinese Tiantai or Lotus Sutra school. ... The sōhei Benkei with Minamoto no Yoshitsune Sohei (僧兵), lit. ...

[95]
1572 St. Bartholomew's Day massacre 70,000 France

A wave of Catholic mob violence against the Huguenots. Painting by François Dubois (born about 1529, Amiens, Picardy) The St. ... In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France. ...

[citation needed]
1574 Siege of Nagashima 20,000 Nagashima, Japan

The Nagashima complex was set alight, and as many as 20,000 men, women, and children were slaughtered by Oda Nobunaga's forces, even after they attempted to surrender. The Sieges of Nagashima took place in 1571, 1573 and 1574 in Japan. ... Nagashima (長島) was a series of fortresses and fortifications controlled by the Ikko-ikki, a sect of warrior monks in Japans Sengoku period who opposed samurai rule. ... Nagashima (長島) was a series of fortresses and fortifications controlled by the Ikko-ikki, a sect of warrior monks in Japans Sengoku period who opposed samurai rule. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

[96][97]
1575 Rathlin Island Massacre 600 Rathlin Island, Ireland

MacDonnell clans-people massacred by Francis Drake. Rathlin Islands location Bird sanctuary on Rathlin Island False-colour NASA Landsat image showing Rathlin, the Antrim coast, and Kintyre Rathlin Island (Irish: Reachlainn) is an island off the coast of County Antrim in Northern Ireland, and is the northernmost point of the region. ... Rathlin Islands location Bird sanctuary on Rathlin Island False-colour NASA Landsat image showing Rathlin, the Antrim coast, and Kintyre Rathlin Island (Irish: Reachlainn) is an island off the coast of County Antrim in Northern Ireland, and is the northernmost point of the region. ... This article is about the Elizabethan naval commander. ...

[98] [99]
1576 Sack of Antwerp c. 8,000 Belgium

Badly paid Spanish soldiers loot Antwerp. The sack of Antwerp during the Eighty Years War is known as the Spanish Fury. ... For other uses, see Antwerp (disambiguation). ...

[citation needed]
1580 Siege of Smerwick 600 Smerwick, Ireland

English forces under Elizabeth I behead some 600 Spanish, Italian and Irish men and women during the Desmond Rebellions. The Second Desmond rebellion was the more significant and widespread of the two Desmond Rebellions launched by the Fitzgerald dynasty of the Desmond area of Munster, Ireland in the 1560s. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 52. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about Elizabeth I of England. ... The Desmond Rebellions occurred in the 1569- 1573 and 1579-1583 in Munster in southern Ireland. ...

[citation needed]
1598 Acoma Massacre c. 800 Acoma, New Mexico

In retaliation for the killing of 11 Spanish soldiers, Juan de Oñate leads punitive expedition to slaughter the natives in a three-day battle at the Acoma mesa. Spain's King later punished Oñate for his excesses. This article is about the township in Minnesota. ... This article is about the township in Minnesota. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... Don Juan de Oñate Salazar (1552 – 1626) was a Spanish explorer, colonial governor of the New Spain (present-day Mexico) province of New Mexico, and founder of various settlements in the present day Southwest of the United States. ... This article is about the township in Minnesota. ...

[100][101]
1622 Indian massacre of 1622 c.347 Virginia, North America

Powhatans attack the Virginia Colony, destroying virtually all the settlements save the heavily-fortified Jamestown, and kill 347 English men, women and children, almost one-third of the English population of colony. Indian massacre of 1622, depicted as a woodcut by Theodore de Bry The Indian massacre of 1622 (also known as the Jamestown massacre) occurred in the Virginia Colony on March 22, 1622. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Powhatan (also spelled Powatan and Powhaten) were a very powerful tribe of Native Americans, speaking an Algonquian language, who lived in what is now Virginia at the time of the first European-Native encounters. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... At Jamestown Settlement, replicas of Christopher Newports 3 ships are docked in the harbour. ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ...

[102]
1623 Pamunkey Peace Talks c. 200 Virginia

The English poison the wine at a peace conference with Powhatan leaders, killing ca. 200 in retaliation for the Jamestown Massacre. The Pamunkey Native American tribe has been in existence since pre-Columbian times. ... // [edit] Native Americans Virginia Indian chief in engraving after John White watercolor The portion of the New World designated Virginia in honor of the Virgin Queen (Elizabeth I) in the late 16th century had been inhabited by many groups of Native Americans for at least 3,000 years, based upon...

[103]
1637 Mystic Fort Massacre c. 600-700 Fort Mystic, Connecticut

John Underhill leads night attack on sleeping village of Fort Mystic, burning the Pequot inhabitants alive and slaughtering the survivors. The Mystic Massacre took place on May 26, 1637, when English settlers under Captain John Mason, and Narragansett and Mohegan allies set fire to a Pequot fort near the Mystic River, shooting whatever victims attempted to escape the wooden palisade fortress, killing the entire village of mostly women and children... The Mystic Massacre took place on May 26, 1637, when English settlers under Captain John Mason, and Narragansett and Mohegan allies set fire to a Pequot fort near the Mystic River, shooting whatever victims attempted to escape the wooden palisade fortress, killing the entire village of mostly women and children... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... John Underhill (1609-1672) was an early English colonist in the Massachusetts Bay Colony and a soldier in that and other colonies. ... The Mystic Massacre took place on May 26, 1637, when English settlers under Captain John Mason, and Narragansett and Mohegan allies set fire to a Pequot fort near the Mystic River, shooting whatever victims attempted to escape the wooden palisade fortress, killing the entire village of mostly women and children... See Main articles: Mashantucket Pequot Eastern Pequot Tribal Nation. ...

[104]
1641 Irish Rebellion of 1641 12,000 Ulster, Ireland

English Protestant planters are killed by dispossessed Irish Catholics. The Irish Rebellion of 1641 began as an attempted coup détat by Irish Catholic gentry, but rapidly degenerated into bloody intercommunal violence between native Irish Catholics and English and Scottish Protestant settlers. ... This article is about the nine-county Irish province. ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Plantations in 16th and 17th century Ireland involved the seizure of land owned by the native Irish and granting of it to colonists (planters) from Britain. ... Irish Catholics are persons of predominantly Irish descent who adhere to the Roman Catholic faith. ...

[citation needed]
1643 Wappinger Massacre c. 80 Pavonia, New Jersey

In 1643 an Iroquois tribe, the Mohawks, attacked a band of Wappingers. Wappingers flees to Manhattan Island seeking protection of Dutch governor, who has hired John Underhill. The sleeping village is slaughtered and the group exterminated. Kiefts War, also known as the Wappinger War, was a conflict between Dutch settlers and Native Americans in the colony of New Netherland from 1643 to 1645. ... Pavonia may refer to: biota: Pavonia (genus), moth genus Pavonia pavonia, emperor moth, moth species Pavonia (plant), a garden plant places: Pavonia, New Netherland Pavonia (New Netherlands), the Dutch settlement that was to become Hudson County, New Jersey Pavonia/Newport (PATH station), a mass transit station in Jersey City Pavonia... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... Mohawk is: A tribe of Native Americans: see Mohawk nation The Mohawk language spoken by the Mohawk people. ... The Wappani, also called Wappingers, were a group of Native Americans whose territory in the 17th century spread along the eastern side of the Hudson River from Dutchess County south to Manhattan and east into parts of Connecticut. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... John Underhill (1609-1672) was an early English colonist in the Massachusetts Bay Colony and a soldier in that and other colonies. ...

[105]
1644 English Massacre of sleeping village c. 500 New Amsterdam (present day New York)

Hired by the Dutch, John Underhill reproduces successful Fort Mystic strategy of burning sleeping village and slaughtering the survivors. This article is about the settlement in present-day New York City. ... This article is about the state. ... John Underhill (1609-1672) was an early English colonist in the Massachusetts Bay Colony and a soldier in that and other colonies. ... The Mystic Massacre took place on May 26, 1637, when English settlers under Captain John Mason, and Narragansett and Mohegan allies set fire to a Pequot fort near the Mystic River, shooting whatever victims attempted to escape the wooden palisade fortress, killing the entire village of mostly women and children...

[106]
1648 Khmelnytsky Uprising tens of thousands Poland

Jews, Polish nobles and Uniates are killed during a Cossack and peasant uprising led by Bohdan Khmelnytsky. Khmelnytsky Uprising (also Chmielnicki Uprising or Khmelnytsky/Chmielnicki Rebellion) refers to a rebellion in the lands of in present-day Ukraine which raged from 1648-1654. ... The term Eastern Rites may refer to the liturgical rites used by many ancient Christian Churches of Eastern Europe and the Middle East that, while being part of the Roman Catholic Church, are distinct from the Latin Rite or Western Church. ... For other uses, see Cossack (disambiguation). ... In a detail of Brueghels Land of Cockaigne (1567) a soft-boiled egg has little feet to rush to the luxuriating peasant who catches drops of honey on his tongue, while roast pigs roam wild: in fact, hunger and harsh winters were realities for the average European in the... Bohdan Zynovii Mykhailovych Khmelnytskyi (Ukrainian: , commonly transliterated as Khmelnytsky; known in Polish as Bohdan Zenobi Chmielnicki; in Russian as Богда́н Хмельни́цкий, translit. ...

[citation needed]
1651 Siege of Limerick 5,000 Ireland

The New Model Army under Oliver Cromwell besieged Limerick. Ireton reckoned that about 5000 persons had perished ‘by the sword without and the famine and plague within’. Combatants Irish Confederate Catholics Ulster Army and English Royalists English Parliamentarians New Model Army Commanders Hugh Dubh ONeill Henry Ireton Strength 2000 soldiers and civilian population 8000 men, 28 siege guns, 4 mortars Casualties c. ... For the band, see New Model Army (band). ... For other uses, see Oliver Cromwell (disambiguation). ... Combatants English Royalists and Irish Catholic Confederate troops English Parliamentarian New Model Army troops and allied Protestants in Ireland Commanders James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde (1649 - Dec. ... Henry Ireton Henry Ireton (1611 - November 26, 1651), was an English general in the army of Parliament during the English Civil War. ...

[107]
1680 Pueblo Revolt 380 New Mexico

Pueblo warriors killed 380 Spanish settlers and drove the other Spaniards from New Mexico. By 1690s, certain Pueblo groups wanted the Spanish to come back to protect them against Apache and Navajo raiders. 1680-The Pueblo Revolt, by George Chacón, Taos Mural Project The Pueblo Revolt of 1680 or Popés Rebellion was an uprising of many pueblos of the Pueblo people against Spanish colonists in the New Spain province of New Mexico. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... For other uses, see Apache (disambiguation). ... The Navajo (also Navaho) people of the southwestern United States call themselves the Diné (pronounced ), which roughly means the people. They speak the Navajo language, and many are members of the Navajo Nation, an independent government structure which manages the Navajo reservation in the Four Cs area of the United...

[108]
1689 Lachine massacre at least 68 Lachine, New France

Indian warriors burn the small village, kill 24 civilians and take many prisoners, 44 of them are tortured to death. More raids of this kind are to take place later. Lachine is a specific referring to a number of places in the Montreal area: Lachine, Quebec, now a borough of Montreal; the Lachine Rapids; the Lachine Canal; the Lachine Canal National Historic Site; The Fur Trade at Lachine National Historic Site. ... Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty...

[citation needed]
1690 Schenectady massacre at least 60 Schenectady, New York

Unarmed civilians including women and children are massacred by French and Indians. Early in 1690, a party of over 200 French and Sault and Algonquin Indian raiders set out from Montreal to attack English outposts to the south. ... Schenectady (IPA ) is a city in Schenectady County, New York, United States, of which it is the county seat. ...

[109][110]
1692 Candlemas Massacre at least 100 York, Maine

Approximately 100 British colonists, including women and children, massacred by Abenaki Indians, and another 80 taken into captivity and walked to Quebec City, during King William's War. The Candlemas Massacre took place in early 1692, when an estimated 150 Abenakis entered the town of York, Maine, killing about 100 of the English settlers and burning down buildings, taking another estimated 80 villagers hostage, on a forced walk to Canada,[1] where they were ransomed by Capt. ... York is a town located in York County, Maine, United States at the southwest corner of the state. ... The first of the French and Indian Wars, King Williams War (1689–1697) , was the North American theater of the War of the Grand Alliance (1688–1697) fought principally in Europe between the armies of France under Louis XIV and those of a coalition of European powers including England. ...

[111]
1704 Deerfield massacre over 56 Massachusetts

The Deerfield massacre occurred during the Queen Anne's War when joint French and Native American forces attacked the English Puritan settlement at Deerfield, Massachusetts killing fifty-six colonists. The Deerfield massacre occurred during Queen Annes War on February 29, 1704, when joint French and Native American forces under the command of Jean-Baptiste Hertel de Rouville attacked the English (predominantly puritan) settlement at Deerfield, Massachusetts at dawn, razing the town and killing fifty-six colonists. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Queen Annes War (1702–1713) was the second in a series of four French and Indian Wars fought between France and Great Britain in North America for control of the continent and was the counterpart of War of the Spanish Succession in Europe. ... Native Americans redirects here. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For the record label, see Puritan Records. ... Deerfield is a town located in Franklin County, Massachusetts. ...

[112]
1711 Tuscaroran Attacks unknown North Carolina, North America

Members of the Tuscarora tribe kill an unknown number of settlers along the Chowan and Roanoke Rivers in northeastern North Carolina, prompting the abandonment of New Bern and the beginning of the Tuscarora War. Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... The Tuscarora are an American Indian tribe originally in North Carolina, which moved north to New York, and then partially into Canada. ... The Chowan River is a blackwater river formed with the merging of Virginias Blackwater and Nottoway rivers near the stateline between Virginia and North Carolina. ... The Roanoke River is a river in southern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina in the United States, 410 mi (660 km) long. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... “New Bern” redirects here. ... The Tuscarora War was fought in North Carolina during the autumn of 1711 until 11 February 1715 between the British, Dutch, and German settlers and the Tuscarora, a local American Indian tribe. ...

[citation needed]
1715 Yamassee Attack unknown South Carolina, North America

Assisted by the Spanish, the Yamassee kill several hundred South Carolinian settlers, triggering the Yamassee War. Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Malachi Z. York as Chief Black Thunderbird Eagle, a Moorish Cherokee of the Yamassee tribe, addresses his followers on a spoken word CD The Yamassee Native Americans is a Nuwaubianist group led by Commander-in-Chief Derrick “Black-Hawk” Sanders (a. ...

[citation needed]
1739 Massacre of Delhi 30,000 Delhi, India

Persian troops under Nader Shah sack and plunder Delhi, massacring thousands. Nadir Shah’s portrait from the collection of Smithsonian Institute Nadir Shah (Persian: نادر شاه) (Nadir Qoli Beg (Persian: نادر قلی بیگ), also Tahmasp-Qoli Khan (Persian: تهماسپ قلی خان) also Nadir Shah Afshar (Persian: نادر شاه افشار) ) (October 22, 1688 - June 19, 1747) ruled as Shah of Iran (1736–47) and was the founder of the short-lived Turkic Afsharid... For other uses, see Delhi (disambiguation). ... Nader Shah’s portrait from the collection of Smithsonian Institute Nāder Shāh Afshar (Persian: نادر شاه افشار ; also known as Nader Qoli Beg, نادر قلی بیگ, Tahmasp-Qoli Khan, تهماسپ قلی خان) (October 22, 1688 - June 19, 1747) ruled as Shah of Iran (1736–47) and was the founder of the Afsharid dynasty. ...

[113]
1768 Massacre of Uman 12,000 - 20,000 Ukraine

Massacre of Poles and Jews in Uman during the Koliyivschyna rebellion. In 1768 Haidamacks (see Haidamaka) annihilated the Jews of Uman, together with the Jews from other places who had sought refuge there. ... Koliyivschina (from Ukr. ...

[citation needed]
1770-1771 125,000-200,000 Central Asia

Kalmyks from east of the Volga set out to return to China but two-thirds of them were massacred on the way by theirs Kazakh enemies. Map of Central Asia showing three sets of possible boundaries for the region Central Asia located as a region of the world Central Asia is a vast landlocked region of Asia. ... The Republic of Kalmykia (Russian: Респу́блика Калмы́кия; Kalmyk: Хальм Тангч) is a federal subject of the Russian Federation (a republic). ... For other meanings of the word Volga see Volga (disambiguation) Волга Length 3,690 km Elevation of the source 225 m Average discharge  ? m³/s Area watershed 1. ... Kazakh (Qazaq) people, or Kazakhs, is Turkic ethnic group that lives mainly in Kazakhstan, but also in Russia & China(East Turkistan). ...

[114][115][116]
1778 Cherry Valley massacre 33 Cherry Valley, New York, USA

Iroquois warriors raid a village, killing and scalping civilians. Incident in Cherry Valley - fate of Jane Wells from the original picture by Alonzo Chappel by Thomas Phillibrown, engraver. ... Cherry Valley is a town located in Otsego County, New York. ... This article is about the state. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... Native American Big Mouth Spring with decorated scalp lock on right shoulder. ...

[citation needed]
1782 Gnadenhutten massacre 96 Gnadenhutten, Ohio, USA Pennsylvanian militia execute Christian Lenape non-combatants, mostly women and children. [citation needed]
1785 Jewish massacre in Libya Hundreds Libya, North Africa

Ali Burzi Pasha murdered hundreds of Jews in Libya. The Gnadenhütten massacre (8 March 1782) was a mass murder of nearly 100 Native Americans (mostly women and children) by American militiamen during the American Revolutionary War. ... Gnadenhutten is a village located on the Tuscarawas River in Tuscarawas County, Ohio. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Largest metro area Delaware Valley Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... For the language, see Lenape language. ...  Northern Africa (UN subregion)  geographic, including above North Africa or Northern Africa is the northernmost region of the African continent, separated by the Sahara from Sub-Saharan Africa. ...

[117]
1792 September massacres 1,000 to 1,500 Paris, France The prison population of Paris is killed in a wave of mob violence. [citation needed]
1793-1796 Revolt in the Vendée 117,000 to 500,000 Vendée, France The Reign of Terror, seen elsewhere in France, was extraordinarily brutal in the Vendée. There was the massacre of 6,000 Vendée prisoners, many of them women, after the battle of Savenay. Then there was the drowning of 3,000 Vendée women at Pont-au-Baux. And 5,000 Vendée priests, old men, women, and children killed by drowning at the Loire River at Nantes. When the campaign dragged to an end in March 1796 the estimated dead numbered between 117,000 and 500,000, out of a population of around 800,000. [118][119][120] [121]
1797 Smyrna massacre (known as the Rebellion of Smyrna) 20,000 Smyrna /  Ottoman Empire Massacre of the Greeks and other Europeans in the city of Smyrna, after a failed revolution against the Turks. [122][123]

The September Massacres were a wave of violence which overtook Paris in late summer 1792, during the French Revolution. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Flag of the so-called Armée Royale et Catholique (Royal and Catholic Army) from Vendée Insigna of the royalist insurgents During the French Revolution, the 1793-1796 uprising in the Vendée, variously known as the Uprising, Insurrection, Revolt, Vendéan Rebellion, or Wars in the Vendée... Vendée is a department in west central France, on the Atlantic Ocean . ... For other uses of terror, see Terror. ... Savenay is a commune of the Loire-Atlantique département in France. ... The Loire River (pronounced in French), the longest river in France with a length of just over 1000 km, drains an area of 117,000 km², more than a fifth of France. ... Traditional city flag City coat of arms Motto: Favet Neptunus eunti (Latin: Shall Neptune favour the traveller) Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country Region Pays de la Loire Department Loire-Atlantique (44) Mayor Jean-Marc Ayrault  (PS) (since 1989) City Statistics Land area¹ 65. ... Smyrna (Greek: Σμύρνη) is an ancient city (today Ä°zmir in Turkey) that was founded at a very early period at a central and strategic point on the Aegean coast of Anatolia. ...

1800 to 1938

Date Name Deaths Location Summary Claimants
1804 Massacre of the French Thousands Haiti

Jean-Jacques Dessalines, first ruler of an independent Haiti, declared Haiti an all black nation, slaughters all the remaining whites on the island and forbids whites from ever again owning property or land there. Jean-Jacques Dessalines Jean-Jacques Dessalines (September 20, 1758–October 17, 1806) was a leader of the Haitian Revolution and an Emperor of Haiti (1804–1806 under the name of Jacques I). ... For the ethnic group, see White people. ...

[124][125]
1808 The Third of May 1808 5,000 Spain

Some 5,000 Spanish civilians are executed between May 2 and May 3 by Napoleon's troops after the popular uprising in Madrid. The Third of May 1808: The Execution of the Defenders of Madrid is a 1814 oil painting by the Spanish painter Francisco Goya. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Combatants Spain French Empire Commanders Pedro Velarde y Santillán Luís Daoíz de Torres Joachim Murat Casualties 200[1]–450 dead[2] 31[1]–150 dead[2] On May 2, 1808 (Spanish: Dos de Mayo) the people of Madrid rebelled against the occupation of the city by French... This article is about the Spanish capital. ...

[126]
1809 Boyd massacre 66 New Zealand

All but four of 70 passengers on the convict ship Boyd are murdered by Maori on the Whangaroa coast, Northland, after a Maori on board the ship reported being whipped twice for refusing to work. Many of the slain were cooked and eaten. The Boyd was a 395 ton brigantine convict ship which sailed from Sydney Cove to Whangaroa on the east coast of Northland Peninsula in New Zealand in October 1809, under the command of a Captain John Thompson and carrying about 70 passengers. ...

[citation needed]
1821 Massacres in Peloponnese 15,000 Peloponnese /  Southern Greece The Turks of Peloponnese, along with Albanian and Jewish minorities, are exterminated by the Greek rebels over a few weeks at the beginning of the Greek War of Independence. [127] [128] [129]
1821 Missolonghi massacre all but 22 Missolonghi, Greece Massacre of Turks, committed by Greek rebels. [130]
1821 Vrachori massacre 500 families Vrachori, Greece Massacre of Turks, committed by Greek rebels. [131]
1821 Navarino Massacre 3,000 Navarino, Greece Massacre of Turks, committed by Greek rebels. [132]
1821 Siege of Tripoli (1821) 30,000 Tripolis, Greece Massacre of Turks, committed by Greek rebels. [133]
March 1821 Massacre of Bucharest 10,000 Romania Massacre of the Orthodox Christians in Bucharest, "even the women and children are not spared" [134]
March 1821 Massacre of Galatz and Yassy thousands Greek Orthodox Romania "Turks of every rank, merchants, and sailors are surprised and massacred in cold blood" [135] [136]
1821 Constantinople massacre 30,000 Constantinople /  Ottoman Empire As a retaliation for the Greek War of Independence, the Sultan's forces exterminate thousands of Greeks in the capital, including Ecumenical Patriarch Gregory V. [137]
1821 Smyrna massacre 10,000 Smyrna /  Ottoman Empire As a retaliation for the Greek War of Independence, the Sultan's forces exterminate thousands of Greeks in Smyrna. [138][139]
1821 Samothrace massacre 15,000 Samothrace, Greece[140] The Greek population of the island is wiped out by the Turks. [141]
1821 Cyprus massacre 10,000 Cyprus /  then part of the Ottoman Empire Massacre of the Greek Cypriots by the Turks. [142]
1822 Chios massacre c. 42,000 massacred Chios island, Greece[140]

Reprisals are committed after the Greek Christian population rebels against the Ottoman Empire. An additional 50,000 are enslaved in "The most horrible massacre recorded in modern history" Greece and the Peloponnese The Peloponnese or Peloponnesus (Greek: Πελοπόννησος Peloponnesos; see also List of Greek place names) is a large peninsula in southern Greece, forming the part of the country south of the Gulf of Corinth. ... Combatants Greek revolutionaries United Kingdom France Russian Empire  Ottoman Empire Egyptian Khedivate Commanders Theodoros Kolokotronis Alexander Ypsilanti Georgios Karaiskakis Omer Vryonis Mahmud Dramali Pasha ReÅŸid Mehmed Pasha Ibrahim Pasha. ... Navarino Massacre[1] was one of the series of massacres that occurred following the outbreak of the Greek War of Independence, which had resulted in the extermination of the Turkish civilian population inhabiting the region over hundreds of years. ... The siege and capture of Tripoli (Greek: ) by Greek rebels in the summer of 1821 marked the first decisive victory of the Greek insurgency against the Ottoman Empire, which had began earlier that year. ... This article is about the city before the Fall of Constantinople (1453). ... Combatants Greek revolutionaries United Kingdom France Russian Empire  Ottoman Empire Egyptian Khedivate Commanders Theodoros Kolokotronis Alexander Ypsilanti Georgios Karaiskakis Omer Vryonis Mahmud Dramali Pasha ReÅŸid Mehmed Pasha Ibrahim Pasha. ... Gregory V was Patriarch of Constantinople from 1797 to 1798, from 1806 to 1808 and from 1818 to 1821. ... Smyrna (Greek: Σμύρνη) is an ancient city (today Ä°zmir in Turkey) that was founded at a very early period at a central and strategic point on the Aegean coast of Anatolia. ... Combatants Greek revolutionaries United Kingdom France Russian Empire  Ottoman Empire Egyptian Khedivate Commanders Theodoros Kolokotronis Alexander Ypsilanti Georgios Karaiskakis Omer Vryonis Mahmud Dramali Pasha ReÅŸid Mehmed Pasha Ibrahim Pasha. ... Coordinates 40°29′ N 25°31′ E Country Greece Periphery East Macedonia and Thrace Prefecture Evros Population 2,723 source (2001) Area 178. ... The Cyprus massacre occurred on 1570, resulting in the massacre of c. ... Greek Cypriot refers to the ethnic Greek population of Cyprus. ... After the beginning of the Greek War of Independence in 1821, Turkish soldiers began the massacre of thousands of Greeks around the Ottoman Empire. ... Look up Circa on Wiktionary, the free dictionary The Latin word circa, literally meaning about, is often used to describe various dates (often birth and death dates) that are uncertain. ... Chios (Greek: , alternative transliterations Khios and Hios), is the fifth largest of the Greek islands, situated in the Aegean Sea seven kilometres (five miles) off the Turkish coast. ... Ottoman redirects here. ...

[143]
1824 Kasos massacre 7,000 Chios / Psara islands, Greece [140]

Reprisals are committed after the Greek Christian population rebels against the Ottoman Empire; the island is burnt to the ground. The Kasos massacre was the massacre of Greek civilians, after the rebellions. ... Chios (Greek: , alternative transliterations Khios and Hios), is the fifth largest of the Greek islands, situated in the Aegean Sea seven kilometres (five miles) off the Turkish coast. ... Psara (Greek: Ψαρά) is a Greek island in the Aegean Sea. ... Ottoman redirects here. ...

[144]
1824 Psara massacre 17,000 Psara, Greece [140]

Reprisals are committed after the Greek Christian population rebels against the Ottoman Empire; the island is burnt to the ground. Psara (Greek: Ψαρά) is a Greek island in the Aegean Sea. ... Ottoman redirects here. ...

[145]
1825 Messolonghi massacre 8,000 Messolonghi, Greece[140] The Greek population of the city is exterminated after its capture by the Turkish forces. [citation needed]
1831 Salsipuedes genocide 40 to 300 Uruguay

President Fructuoso Rivera oversees the slaughter of Charrua chiefs; the Charruas are subsequently exterminated. Messolonghi is a town of about 12,000 people (as of 1991 census) in central Greece. ... Salsipuedes is a small town in California, USA. Its name is translated from Spanish language as get out if you can. Categories: Cities in California ... Gen. ... The Charrúa were an indigenous people of southern South America in the area today known as Uruguay, northeastern Argentina and southern Brazil. ...

[citation needed]
1835 Moriori massacre 300 Chatham Islands, New Zealand

Some 300 Moriori men, women and children are massacred and the remaining 1,200 to 1,300 survivors enslaved by mainland Māori. Moriori are the indigenous people of the Chatham Islands (Rekohu in the Moriori language), east of the New Zealand archipelago in the Pacific Ocean. ... The Chatham Islands from space. ... Moriori are the indigenous people of the Chatham Islands (Rekohu in the Moriori language), east of the New Zealand archipelago in the Pacific Ocean. ... This article is about the Māori people of New Zealand. ...

[146][147]
1838 Myall Creek massacre 28 Australia

Aborigines are murdered by white stockmen as revenge for lost cattle. The Myall Creek Massacre was a massacre of twenty-eight Aboriginal Australian people by twelve white stockmen and squatters on 10 June 1838, at the Myall Creek sheep station near Inverell, in northern New South Wales. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Australian Stockmans Hall of Fame ( a museum in Longreach, Queensland, Australia ) A stockman is the name given to a person who looks after the livestock on a station. ...

[citation needed]
1838 Haun's Mill massacre 17 Missouri, USA

Mormon men and boys are killed by over 200 militia. A stone from Hauns Mill, at one time used as a memorial at the site of the massacre. ... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St Louis[1] Area  Ranked 21st  - Total 69,709 sq mi (180,693 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 300 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the history and use of the word Mormon. For information about the religious beliefs and culture of Mormons, see Mormonism. ...

[citation needed]
1838 Weenen massacre c.300 South Africa

Zulus massacre Voortrekker men, women and children. An event in South African history in which Voortrekkers camped along the Blaukraans River, Natal were massacred by Zulus on February 16, 1838. ... Languages Zulu Religions Christian, African Traditional Religion Related ethnic groups Bantu Nguni Basotho Xhosa Swazi Matabele Khoisan The Zulu (South African English and isiZulu: amaZulu) are a South African ethnic group of an estimated 17-22 million people who live mainly in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. ... The Voortrekker Monument built in 1949. ...

[citation needed]
1840 Maria massacre 26 Coorong, South Australia

All survivors of the shipwrecked brig Maria are murdered by members of the Ngarrindjeri, resulting in a punitive police expedition from Adelaide. Henry Reynolds, and other historians, estimate up to 3,000 white people killed by Indigenous Australians in the frontier violence. Coorong is a national park in South Australia (Australia), 156 km southeast of Adelaide. ... Capital Adelaide Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Marjorie Jackson-Nelson Premier Mike Rann (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 11  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $59,819 (5th)  - Product per capita  $38,838/person (7th) Population (End of September 2006)  - Population  1,558,200 (5th)  - Density  1. ... The Ngarrinjeri is the language and traditional Aboriginal people of the lower Murray River and western Fleurieu Peninsula, Australia. ... For other uses, see Adelaide (disambiguation). ... For the ethnic group, see White people. ...

[148][149]
1841 Rufus River massacre Officially 35+ Australia

Police and volunteers from Adelaide kill a number of Maraura people after a two day conflict. For other uses, see Adelaide (disambiguation). ...

[150]
1847 Assyrian massacre 30,000 Kurdistan, Ottoman Empire

The Assyrian Christians eventually lose their autonomy when the region is conquered, after which 30,000 Assyrians are massacred. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Assyrian Church of the East... For other uses, see Kurdistan (disambiguation). ... Ottoman redirects here. ... Language(s) Aramaic Religion(s) Syriac Christianity Related ethnic groups Other peoples from the Fertile Crescent. ...

[151][152][153]
1847 Whitman massacre 17 near Walla Walla, Washington, USA

The Cayuse attack a medical mission established by Marcus Whitman. Marcus Whitman The Whitman massacre (also known as the Walla Walla massacre and the Whitman Incident) was the murder in the Oregon Country on November 29, 1847 of U.S. missionaries Dr. Marcus Whitman and his wife Narcissa Whitman, along with twelve others, by Cayuse and Umatilla Indians. ... Walla Walla is both the county seat of Walla Walla County, Washington, and the countys largest city. ... For other uses, see Cayuse (disambiguation). ... Marcus Whitman (September 4, 1802–November 29, 1847) was an American physician and missionary in the Oregon Country. ...

[citation needed]
1848 Rabacja massacre unknown Galicia

Polish peasants massacre nobles.[154] For other uses, see Galicia. ...

[citation needed]
1852 Bridge Gulch massacre c.150 to 300 Hayfork, California, USA

A posse from Weaverville attacks an undefended Wintu village. Hayfork is a census-designated place located in Trinity County, California. ... In common law, posse comitatus (Latin, county force, meaning a sort of local militia) referred to the authority wielded by the county sheriff to conscript any able-bodied male over the age of fifteen to assist him in keeping the peace or to pursue and arrest a felon; compare hue... Weaverville is a census-designated place and the county seat of Trinity County, California. ... The Wintu (also Northern Wintun) are Native Americans who lived in what is now Northern California. ...

[citation needed]
1853 Gunnison massacre 8 Utah, USA

An exploration party led by John W. Gunnison is massacred by Pahavant Utes. This article is about the U.S. state. ... John Williams Gunnison (November 11, 1812-October 26, 1853) was an American explorer. ... The Utes (; yoots) are an ethnically related group of American Indians now living primarily in Utah and Colorado. ...

[citation needed]
1853 Taiping Rebellion 30,000 Nanjing, China

Nanjing is captured and 30,000 massacred by Taiping rebels. Combatants Qing Empire United Kingdom France (United Kingdom and France join the war later) Taiping Heavenly Kingdom Commanders Xianfeng Emperor Tongzhi Emperor Empress Dowager Cixi Charles George Gordon Frederick Townsend Ward Hong Xiuquan Yang Xiuqing Xiao Chaogui Feng Yunshan Wei Changhui Shi Dakai Li Xiucheng Strength 2,000,000-5... For other uses, see Nanjing (disambiguation). ...

[155]
1857 Devil's Wind 100,000[156]-10million India

A 2007 book by Amaresh Misra estimates that the number of people who died as a result of the British retaliation for Indian Rebellion of 1857was 10 million. Other historians have questioned these figures. Combatants Rebellious East India Company Sepoys, 7 Indian princely states, deposed rulers of Oudh and Jhansi. ...

[157] [158]
1857 Mountain Meadows massacre 120 Utah, USA

A wagon train of farming families from Arkansas is killed by Mormon militia and local Paiute tribesmen. An Illustration of the Mountain Meadows massacre, from a seminal 1873 history of the Mormons by T.B.H. Stenhouse. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Wagon Train was a television series on NBC from 1957 to 1962 and on ABC from 1962 to 1965. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Largest metro area Little Rock Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the history and use of the word Mormon. For information about the religious beliefs and culture of Mormons, see Mormonism. ... “Piute” redirects here. ...

[citation needed]
1860 Damascus massacre 3,000 Damascus, Ottoman Empire

An uprising results in the destruction of the Christian quarter and the massacre of many Maronite Christians. For other uses, see Damascus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Damascus (disambiguation). ... Ottoman redirects here. ... Maronites (Arabic: , transliteration: , Syriac: ܡܪܘܢܝܐ) are members of one of the Eastern Catholic Churches, with a heritage reaching back to Maroun in the early 5th century. ...

[159]
1860 Maronite massacre 10,000 Mount Lebanon, Ottoman Empire

In a burst of sectarian violence in 1860, the Druze massacre more than 10,000 Christians, mostly Maronites. For other uses, see Mount Lebanon (disambiguation). ... Ottoman redirects here. ... Religions Druze Scriptures Rasail al-hikmah (Epistles of Wisdom) Languages Arabic. ...

[160]
1862 Minnesota massacre 800 Minnesota, USA

European settlers massacred throughout Minnesota as part of the Sioux Uprising. Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... Chief Taoyateduta, known as Chief Little Crow Settlers escaping the violence. ...

[161]
1864 Sand Creek massacre c.150 Colorado Territory, USA

United States Cavalry troops attack an undefended Cheyenne/Arapaho village. Combatants United States of America Cheyenne, Arapaho Commanders John M. Chivington Black Kettle Strength 800 soldiers 500, mostly elderly, women and children Casualties 15 killed, 50 wounded 150-184 killed The Sand Creek massacre (also known as the Chivington massacre or the Battle of Sand Creek) was an incident in... The Kansas, Nebraska, Utah, and New Mexico territories in 1860 The Colorado Territory was a historic, organized territory of the United States that existed between 1861 and 1876. ... The United States Cavalry was a horse-mounted cavalry force that existed in various forms between 1775 and 1942. ... For other uses, see Cheyenne (disambiguation). ... Scabby Bull, Arapaho 1806 Arapaho camp, ca. ...

[citation needed]
1864 Taiping Rebellion 100,000 Nanjing, China

As Qing Imperial troops retakr the Nanjing in 1864, massive slaughtering occurs in the city. Combatants Qing Empire United Kingdom France (United Kingdom and France join the war later) Taiping Heavenly Kingdom Commanders Xianfeng Emperor Tongzhi Emperor Empress Dowager Cixi Charles George Gordon Frederick Townsend Ward Hong Xiuquan Yang Xiuqing Xiao Chaogui Feng Yunshan Wei Changhui Shi Dakai Li Xiucheng Strength 2,000,000-5... For other uses, see Nanjing (disambiguation). ... Flag (1890-1912) Anthem Gong Jinou (1911) Qing China at its greatest extent. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...

[162]
1865-1871 Yahi Massacres c. 200 Northern California

Several massacres of native encampments by American settlers exterminate the Yahi tribe, such as the first in 1865 (74 killed), the 1866 Three Knolls (40 killed) and Dry Camp (33 killed) massacres, ending with the Kingsley Cave/Morgan Camp massacre (30 killed) in 1871. The Yahi were Ishi’s tribe. Yana The Yana people were a group of Native Americans indigenous to Northern California in the central Sierra Nevada Mountains, on the western side of the range. ... Northern California, sometimes referred to as NorCal, is the northern portion of the U.S. state of California. ... Yana The Yana people were a group of Native Americans indigenous to Northern California in the central Sierra Nevada Mountains, on the western side of the range. ... The Yahi were a group of Native Americans who lived in Northern California in the Northern Sierra Nevada, on the western side of the range. ... Ishi in 1914 Ishi (c. ...

[163]
1868 War of the Triple Alliance Thousands Paraguay

Imagining a huge conspiracy against himself, Paraguay's dictator Francisco Solano López begins executing people wholesale. Prominent Paraguayan citizens are seized and executed by his order, including his brothers and brothers-in-law, cabinet ministers, judges, military officers, bishops, and nine-tenths of the civil officers, together with 500 foreigners, including some diplomats. Combatants Paraguay Uruguay, Argentina, Empire of Brazil Commanders Francisco Solano López † José E. Díaz Pedro II of Brazil Duke of Caxias Bartolomé Mitre Venancio Flores Strength at the beginning of the war ca. ... Francisco Solano López Francisco Solano López (24 July 1827 - 1 March 1870) was president of Paraguay from 1862 until his death in 1870. ...

[164][165]
1868 Washita Massacre 103 Washita River, Oklahoma

George Custer leads dawn attack on sleeping Cheyenne tribe led by Black Kettle, who survived the Sand Creek Massacre. Combatants United States Cheyenne Commanders George A. Custer Black Kettle†, Little Rock † Strength 7th Cavalry Regiment ~250 warriors and civilians (150 warriors, 100 civilians) [2]. The children were moved by Black Kettle in an other village downstream prior to the battle. ... The Washita River forms in eastern Roberts County, Texas (35°38 N, 100°36 W) near the town of Miami, Texas in the Texas Panhandle. ... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Largest metro area Oklahoma City metro area Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,898 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... George Armstrong Custer George Armstrong Custer (December 5, 1839 - June 25, 1876) was an American cavalry commander in the Civil War and the Indian Wars who is best remembered for his defeat and death at the Battle of the Little Bighorn against a coalition of Native American tribes, led by... For other uses, see Cheyenne (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Combatants United States of America Cheyenne, Arapaho Commanders John M. Chivington Black Kettle Strength 800 soldiers 500, mostly elderly, women and children Casualties 15 killed, 50 wounded 150-184 killed The Sand Creek massacre (also known as the Chivington massacre or the Battle of Sand Creek) was an incident in...

[166]
1870s Conquest of the Desert "thousands" Patagonia, Argentina

Military campaign directed mainly by General Julio Argentino Roca in the 1870s, which established Argentine dominance over Patagonia, inhabited by indigenous peoples, mainly Mapuche. The Conquest of the Desert (Spanish: Conquista del desierto) was a military campaign directed mainly by General Julio Argentino Roca in the 1870s, which established Argentine dominance over Patagonia, which was inhabited by indigenous peoples. ... Patagonia, as most commonly defined (in orange). ... Alejo Julio Argentino Roca Paz (July 17, 1843 - October 19, 1914) was an army general who served as President of Argentina from 12 October 1880 to 12 October 1886 and again from 12 October 1898 to 12 October 1904. ... Patagonia, as most commonly defined (in orange). ... Mapuche test of Wikipedia at Wikimedia Incubator Mapuche (Mapudungun; Che, People + Mapu, of the Land) are the Indigenous inhabitants of Central and Southern Chile and Southern Argentina. ...

[citation needed]
1871 Camp Grant Massacre c. 150 Camp Grant, Arizona

Led by ex-Tucson mayor, William Oury, vigilante band from Tucson slaughter Apache women and children while the men are doing their spring planting. (April 30, 1871). ... Camp Grant was a U.S. Army facility located in the southern outskirts of Rockford, Illinois named in honor of General Ulysses S. Grant. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... Nickname: The Old Pueblo Location in Pima County and the state of Arizona Coordinates: Country United States State Arizona Counties Pima Mayor Bob Walkup (R) Area    - City 505. ... For other uses, see Apache (disambiguation). ...

[167]
1871 La Semaine sanglante c.20,000 to 50,000 Paris, France

People who took part in the Paris Commune are slaughtered by the French government Le Père Duchesne looking at the statue of Napoleon I on top of the Vendome column: Eh ben ! bougre de canaille, on va donc te foutre en bas comme ta crapule de neveu !… (Well now! buggering rascal, we will knock you the fuck off just like your crook of... This article is about the capital of France. ... Le Père Duchesne looking at the statue of Napoleon I on top of the Vendome column: Eh ben ! bougre de canaille, on va donc te foutre en bas comme ta crapule de neveu !… (Well now! buggering rascal, we will knock you the fuck off just like your crook of...

[citation needed]
1873 Cypress Hills massacre 16 to 23 Cypress Hills, Saskatchewan, Canada

Assiniboine (Nakoda) people are killed by wolf hunters; one hunter is killed. The Cypress Hills massacre was a massacre which occurred on June 1, 1873 in the Cypress Hills region of Battle Creek, Saskatchewan, involving a group of American wolf hunters or wolfers, American and Canadian whiskey traders, Métis cargo haulders or freighters and a camp of Nakoda (or Assiniboine) people. ... The Cypress Hills are a region of hills in southwestern Saskatchewan and southeastern Alberta, Canada. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Assiniboine Family, Montana, 1890-1891. ...

[citation needed]
1876 Batak massacre c.5,000 Batak[168]

Ottoman army irregulars massacre Bulgarian men, women and children barricaded in Batak's church as reprisal for the April Uprising. Batak massacre 1876 Batak massacre was a part of massacres of Christian civilians throughout Bulgaria in 1876 after the massacre of 300 Muslim villagers by Bulgarians. ... Batak (Bulgarian Батак) is a town in Southern Bulgaria. ... A bashi-bazouk (in Turkish başıbozuk, meaning disorganized, leaderless) was an irregular soldier of the Ottoman army. ... Development of the April Uprising The April Uprising (Bulgarian: Априлско въстание) was an insurrection organised by the Bulgarians in the Ottoman Empire from April to May 1876, the indirect result of which was the liberation of Bulgaria in 1878. ...

[169]
1895-1897 Hamidian massacres 80,000 to 300,000 Ottoman Empire

On the orders of Abdul Hamid II, Ottoman forces massacre Armenians living in Anatolia. Contemporary political cartoon portraying Hamid as a butcher of the Armenians During the long reign of Sultan Hamid, unrest and rebellion occurred in many areas of the Ottoman Empire. ... Ottoman redirects here. ... Abdülhamid II (Ottoman Turkish: عبد الحميد ثانی , Turkish: ) (September 21, 1842 – February 10, 1918) was the 34th sultan of the Ottoman Empire. ... This article is about two nested areas of Turkey, a plateau region within a peninsula. ...

[citation needed]
1897 Crete massacre 55,000 Crete,Greece[140]

Turkish forces massacre Greeks living on Crete after a rebellion. For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ...

[170]
1903 Kishinev pogrom 49 Chis¸ina˘u[171]

Anti-Jewish riots: fed by blood libel false charges, with no intervention by police or military to stop the rampage, lasting two (or three) days in April 1903, starting on Easter Sunday; 49 killed, more than 500 injured Herman S. Shapiro. ... Blood libels are unfounded allegations that a particular group eats people as a form of human sacrifice, often accompanied by the claim of using the blood of their victims in various rituals. ...

[172][173]
1904 Herero and Namaqua Genocide c.75,000 German South West Africa

German colonial troops attempt to exterminate the Herero and Namaqua peoples, directed by General Adrian Dietrich Lothar von Trotha. Surviving Herero after the escape through the arid desert of Omaheke. ... Flag of German South West Africa German South-West Africa (German: Deutsch-Südwestafrika or DSWA) was a colony of Germany from 1884 to 1915, when it was taken over by South Africa and administered as South-West Africa, later becoming Namibia. ... A group of Herero women. ... Nama (in older sourses also Namaqua) are a pastoral people of South Africa, Namibia and Botswana speaking the Nama language which belongs to the Khoe-Kwadi language family (previously known as Central Khoisan). ... Lothar von Trotha Adrian Dietrich Lothar von Trotha (July 3, 1848 – 1920) was a German military commander most famous for his method of waging war during the Herero Wars in South-West Africa, which the German government has since admitted was a form of genocide. ...

[citation needed]
1915-1917 Armenian Genocide c.400,000 to 1.5 million Ottoman Empire

Forced evacuation and mass killing of Anatolian Armenians during the Young Turks' government. Armenian Genocide photo. ... Ottoman redirects here. ... This article is about two nested areas of Turkey, a plateau region within a peninsula. ... This article is about the Turkish nationalist constitutionalist movement. ...

[citation needed]
1915-1918 Assyrian Genocide c.275,000 Ottoman Empire

The Assyrians of northern Mesopotamia are forcibly relocated and massacred by Ottoman and Kurdish forces. Bodies of Christians who perished during the Assyrian Genocide 40 Christians dying a day say Assyrian refugees - The Syracuse Herald, 1915. ... Ottoman redirects here. ... Language(s) Aramaic Religion(s) Syriac Christianity Related ethnic groups Other peoples from the Fertile Crescent. ... Mesopotamia was a cradle of civilization geographically located between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, largely corresponding to modern-day Iraq. ... Languages Kurdish Religions Predominantly Sunni Muslim also some Shia, Yazidism, Yarsan, Judaism, Christianity Related ethnic groups other Iranian peoples (Talysh Baluch Gilak Bakhtiari Persians) The Kurds are an ethnic group who consider themselves to be indigenous to a region often referred to as Kurdistan, an area which includes adjacent parts...

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1916-1919 Pontian Greek Genocide c.353,000 Ottoman Empire

Massacres of Pontic Greeks by the Young Turks' government. A procession of deported Greeks at Elazığ (Source: National Geographic Magazine 11/25). ... Ottoman redirects here. ... The term Pontic Greeks, Pontian Greeks, Pontians or Greeks of Pontus (Greek: or , Turkish: ) can refer to Greeks specifically from the area of Pontus in the region of the former Empire of Trebizond on the Black Sea coast of Eastern Turkey, or in other cases more generally all Greeks from... This article is about the Turkish nationalist constitutionalist movement. ...

[citation needed]
June 16-17, 1919 Menemen massacre 200-1000 Turkey

Massacre of the Turkish population of Menemen by the Greek Army of occupation. is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Menemen massacre occurred on June 16-17, 1919, during the Greek occupation of the town of Menemen, in western Turkey near Ä°zmir. ... Menemen is a district of Turkeys Ä°zmir Province as well as the districts central town. ... The Hellenic Army, (Greek: Ελληνικός Στράτος) is the land force of Greece (The Hellenic Republic). ...

[citation needed]
April 13, 1919 Jallianwallah Bagh or
Amritsar massacre
379-1,000+ British India

British troops led by Brigadier General Reginald Dyer fire 1650 rounds of ammunition into a crowd of 20,000. is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Jallianwala Bagh Massacre, also known as the Amritsar Massacre, was named after the Jallianwala Bagh (Garden) in Amritsar, where, on April 13, 1919, British Indian Army soldiers under the command of Brigadier-General Reginald Dyer opened fire on an unarmed gathering of men, women and children. ... The Amritsar massacre The Jallianwala Bagh massacre, also known as the Amritsar massacre, was named after the Jallianwala Bagh (Garden) in Amritsar, where, on April 13, 1919, British Indian Army soldiers opened fire on an unarmed gathering of men, women and children. ... Anthem God Save The Queen/King British India, circa 1860 Capital Calcutta (1858-1912), New Delhi (1912-1947) Language(s) Hindi, Urdu, English and many others Government Monarchy Emperor of India  - 1877-1901 Victoria  - 1901-1910 Edward VII  - 1910-1936 George V  - January-December 1936 Edward VIII  - 1936-1947 George... Reginald Dyer : The Butcher of Amritsar by Nigel Collett Brigadier-General Reginald Edward Harry Dyer CB (October 9, 1864 – July 23, 1927) was a British Indian Army officer responsible for the Amritsar massacre. ...

[174]
1919-1920 Extermination of the Don Cossacks Hundreds of thousands Soviet Union

According to historian Michael Kort, "During 1919 and 1920, out of a population of approximately 1.5 million Don Cossacks, the Bolshevik regime killed or deported an estimated 300,000 to 500,000". Don Cossacks refers to cossacks that settled along the Don River, Russia it its lower and middle parts. ... Don Cossacks refers to cossacks that settled along the Don River, Russia it its lower and middle parts. ... For other uses, see Bolshevik (disambiguation). ... Not by Their Own Will. ...

[175][176]
1921 Kronstadt rebellion 1,200 to 2,168 Russian SFSR

1,200 to 2,168 rebels executed after the unsuccessful uprising of Soviet sailors against the Bolshevik government. Combatants Soviet Sailors Red Army Commanders Stepan Petrichenko Marshal Mikhail Tukhachevsky Strength c. ... State motto: Russian: Пролетарии всех стран, соединяйтесь! Translation: Workers of the world, unite! Capital Moscow Official language Russian Established In the USSR:  - Since  - Until November 7, 1917 November 7, 1917 December 12, 1991 (dissolution) Area  - Total  - Water (%) Ranked 1st in the USSR 17,075,200 km² 13% Population  - Total   - Density Ranked 1st in the... For other uses, see Bolshevik (disambiguation). ...

[177]
August, September 1922 Greek scorched earth policy Tens of thousands Turkey, Western Anatolia

The Greek army systematically burns and destroys Turkish villages after its defeat in the Greco–Turkish War of 1919–1922. On its retreat route, the Greek army massacres Turkish inhabitants. Combatants Greece Turkish Revolutionaries Commanders Gen Leonidas Paraskevopoulos, Gen Anastasios Papoulas, Gen Georgios Hatzianestis Ali Fethi Okyar, Ä°smet Ä°nönü, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, Fevzi Çakmak Strength 200,000 men 120,000 men (plus village protectors) Casualties 23,500 dead; 20,820 captured 20,540 dead; 10,000 wounded The... Combatants Greece Turkish Revolutionaries Commanders Gen Leonidas Paraskevopoulos, Gen Anastasios Papoulas, Gen Georgios Hatzianestis Ali Fethi Okyar, Ismet Inonu, Mustafa Kemal Strength 120,000 men 450,000 men [1] Casualties 30,000 dead; 20,820 captured 20,000 dead; 10,000 wounded The Greco–Turkish War of 1919–1922, also...

[citation needed]
January 1923 Rosewood massacre 26-150 Rosewood, Florida, USA

This African-American town is burned and residents are killed by white mobs. The burning of Rosewood Rosewood was a small community of 25 to 30 mostly black families in Levy County in central Florida, USA. Today, it is best known for the racially driven attack on African Americans by whites in January 1923, known as the Rosewood massacre. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami metropolitan area Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ...

[citation needed]
1923 Kantÿ massacre c.2,700 to 6,415 Kantÿ region, Japan

Korean and Okinawan immigrants, blamed for looting and arson in the wake of the Great Kanto earthquake, are killed by mobs

[citation needed]
1924 Napalpí massacre 200-450 Chaco, Argentina

An uprising of Toba Indians, due to poor treatment by the authorities and European colonizers, is savagely put down by police and white farmers There are things that have the name Chaco: South America: Gran Chaco, a region in South America Chaco Province, Argentina in the northeastern part of the country Chaco, a region in Paraguay Chaco Department, historical in Paraguay and proposed in Bolivia Gran Chaco Province, Bolivia (in Tarija Department) Chaco War... Toba may refer to: T. O. B. A., the Theater Owners Booking Association, a major black vaudeville circuit. ...

[citation needed]
1925 Marusia massacre over 500 Antofagasta Region, Chile

Chilean government's response, then headed by Arturo Alessandri, to a strike by the workers of a saltpeter mine, that ended with more than 500 deaths. The Marusia massacre (Spanish: Masacre de Marusia) (March, 1925) was the Chilean governments response, then headed by Arturo Alessandri, to a strike by the workers of a saltpeter mine, that ended with more than 500 deaths. ... Antofagasta is Chiles second administrative region from north to south. ... Arturo Fortunato Alessandri Palma (December 20, 1868–August 24, 1950) was a Chilean political figure and reformer. ... Salt peter( a. ...

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1927 Malaita massacre c. 75 Malaita, Solomon Islands

Kwaio attack on the British Solomon Islands Protectorate authority William R. Bell and deputies, and subsequent punitive expedition The Malaita massacre inflicted a large number of deaths on the island of Malaita in the Solomon Islands in late 1927. ... Malaita Province is one of the largest provinces of the Solomon Islands. ... Languages Kwaio Religions traditional ancestor worship Related ethnic groups Other Malaitan peoples Kwaio is an ethnic group found in central Malaita, in the Solomon Islands. ... Motto To Lead is to Serve Anthem God Save Our Solomon Islands Royal anthem God Save the Queen Capital (and largest city) Honiara Official languages English Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Governor-General Nathaniel Waena  -  Prime Minister Manasseh Sogavare Independence  -  from the UK 7 July 1978  Area  -  Total 28... William Robert Bell (August 7, 1876 – October 4, 1927) was an Australian-born official in the British Solomon Islands Protectorate, who served as the District Officer of Malaita from 1915 until 1927. ...

[citation needed]
1929 Hebron massacre c.67 Palestine

An Arab mob wipes out Hebron's old Jewish settlement. The Hebron massacre of 1929 was the murder by Arab rioters of 67 Jews in Hebron, then part of the Palestine under the British mandate. ... Flag The approximate borders of the British Mandate circa 1922. ... Arabic الخليل Government City Also Spelled al-Khalil (officially) al-Halil (unofficially) Governorate Hebron Population 166,000 (2006) Jurisdiction  dunams Head of Municipality Mustafa Abdel Nabi Hebron (Arabic:   al-ḪalÄ«l or al KhalÄ«l; Hebrew:  , Standard Hebrew: Ḥevron, Tiberian Hebrew: Ḥeḇrôn) is a city in the southern Judea...

[citation needed]
1931-1945 Japanese biological warfare program 3,000 to 200,000[178] East Asia

An official program of medical experimentation on humans that results in thousands of deaths during the Second Sino-Japanese War and World War II.[179] Body disposal at Unit 731 Unit 731 was a covert biological warfare research and development unit of the Imperial Japanese Army that undertook lethal human experimentation during the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937–1945) and World War II. It was responsible for some of the most notorious war crimes carried... East Asia Geographic East Asia. ... Human experimentation involves medical experiments performed on human beings. ... Combatants China  United States1 Soviet Union2  Empire of Japan Collaborationist Chinese Army3 Commanders Chiang Kai-shek, Chen Cheng, Yan Xishan, Feng Yuxiang, Li Zongren, Xue Yue, Bai Chongxi, Peng Dehuai, Joseph Stilwell, Claire Chennault, Aleksandr Vasilevsky Hirohito, Fumimaro Konoe, Hideki Tojo, Kotohito Kanin, Matsui Iwane, Hajime Sugiyama, Shunroku Hata... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...

[citation needed]
1932 La Matanza c.30,000 El Salvador

Having crushed a peasants' rebellion, the military government sanctions the massacre of indigenous peoples. The Salvadoran Peasant Uprising of 1932, also known as La matanza, was a brief peasant-led uprising in January of 1932. ... In a detail of Brueghels Land of Cockaigne (1567) a soft-boiled egg has little feet to rush to the luxuriating peasant who catches drops of honey on his tongue, while roast pigs roam wild: in fact, hunger and harsh winters were realities for the average European in the... The term indigenous people has no universal, standard or fixed definition, but can be used about any ethnic group who inhabit the geographic region with which they have the earliest historical connection. ...

[citation needed]
1932 - 1933 Holodomor c.1,000,000 Ukraine and many other parts of the Soviet Union

As a result of collectivization policy in the Soviet Union, many peasants died of famine, and many were killed as the governmental troops prevented them from escaping to cities. Child victim of the Holodomor The Ukrainian famine (1932-1933), or Holodomor (Ukrainian: Голодомор), was one of the largest national catastrophes of the Ukrainian nation in modern history with direct loss of human life in the range of millions (estimates vary). ... Collective farming is an organizational unit in agriculture in which peasants are not paid wages, but rather receive a share of the farms net output. ...

[citation needed]
1933 Simele massacre c.3,000 Iraq

The first ever massacre conducted by the Iraqi government takes place in the North, targeting Assyrian Christians. The Simele massacre was the first massacre commited by the Iraqi government as Assyrian Christians of Sumail (Simele) were systematically being targeted. ...

[citation needed]
1934 Ranquil massacre 477 Bío-Bío Region, Chile

A massacre of forestry workers made by the Chilean Army in the upper Bio-Bio River in 1934. The worked had previously rebelled and killed the lumbermill administrators they worked for. The Ranquil massacre (Spanish: ) was a massacre of forestry workers by the Chilean Army in the upper Bio-Bio River in 1934. ... Bío-Bío is Chiles eighth administrative region from north to south. ... The Chilean Army (Ejército de Chile in Spanish) is the land arm of the Military of Chile. ... The Bío-Bío River (alternate spellings Biobío or Bio Bio) is the second largest river in Chile. ...

[citation needed]
1936 Badajoz massacre 1,800-4,000 Spain On August 14, after taking Badajoz during the Spanish Civil War, Nationalist troops executed Republican supporters or sympathizers. Many were herded into the town's bull ring for execution. [180]
1936 Jarama Valley massacre over 1,000 Spain

On November 11, during the Siege of Madrid in the Spanish Civil War, Republican troops took Nationalist prisoners from Madrid and killed them in the Jarama valley, outside the city. Combatants Second Spanish Republic Nationalist Spain Commanders Ildefonso Puigdendolas Juan Yagüe Carlos Asensio Antonio Castejón Strength 6,000 militia 3,000 regulars 30 guns Casualties 750 dead 3,500 wounded, captured or missing 285 dead or wounded The Battle of Badajoz was one of the first major Nationalist... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Location Badajoz, Spain location Coordinates : Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Badajoz (Spanish) Spanish name Badajoz Founded 875 Area code 34 (Spain) + 924 (Badajoz) Website http://www. ... Not to be confused with the Spanish Civil War of 1820-1823. ... 2003 Bull Ring - St Martins church and Selfridges The Bull Ring market has been an important feature of Birmingham since the Middle Ages. ... Jarama River in Titulcia Jarama is a river in central Spain. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Siege of Madrid was a three year siege of the Spanish capital Madrid, during the Spanish Civil War of 1936-1939. ... Not to be confused with the Spanish Civil War of 1820-1823. ... Jarama River in Titulcia Jarama is a river in central Spain. ...

[181]
1937-1938 Great Purge 680,000 to 1.3 million Soviet Union

Stalinist purges aimed at ethnic minorities and perceived dissidents. The Great Purge (Russian: , transliterated Bolshaya chistka) refers collectively to several related campaigns of political repression and persecution in the Soviet Union orchestrated by Joseph Stalin during the 1930s, which removed all of his remaining opposition from power. ... Iosif (usually anglicized as Joseph) Vissarionovich Stalin (Russian: Иосиф Виссарионович Сталин), original name Ioseb Jughashvili (Georgian: იოსებ ჯუღაშვი&#4314... “Minority” redirects here. ... For the Pearl Jam song, see Dissident (song). ...

[182]
1938 Kristallnacht 36 to 200 Germany[183]

The major pre-war anti-Jewish pogrom. Kristallnacht, also known as Reichskristallnacht, Pogromnacht, Crystal Night and the Night of Broken Glass, was a pogrom[1] against Jews throughout Germany and parts of Austria on November 9–November 10, 1938. ... Pogrom (from Russian: ; from громить IPA: - to wreak havoc, to demolish violently) is a form of riot directed against a particular group, whether ethnic, religious or other, and characterized by destruction of their homes, businesses and religious centres. ...

[citation needed]

1939 to 1945 - World War II

Date Name Deaths Location Summary Claimants
1939 Bromberg Bloody Sunday up to 8,000 Bydgoszcz, Poland

As the revenge for death of up to 350 ethnic Germans killed during military action against Polish army in the Polish Defensive War Germans massacred of c.3,000 Polish civilians. Bromberg Bloody Sunday (German: ; Polish: ) is an event that took place at the beginning of World War II. On September 3, 1939, two days after the German invasion of Poland, there was a highly controversial massacre in and around the town of Bydgoszcz (German: Bromberg) in the Polish Voivodship of... Coordinates: , Country Poland Voivodeship Kuyavian-Pomeranian Powiat city county Gmina Bydgoszcz Established before 1238 City Rights 1346/1349 Government  - Mayor Konstanty Dombrowicz Area  - City 174. ... Ethnic Germans – often simply called Germans – are those who are considered, by themselves or others, to be ethnically German but do not live within the present-day Federal Republic of Germany, nor necessarily hold its citizenship. ... For the Soviet Unions military action against Poland under the same alliance, see Soviet invasion of Poland (1939). ...

[citation needed]
1940 Katyn massacre c. 15-20,000 Katyn Forest, Poland

Mass killing by Soviets of Polish prisoners of war. Katyn and KatyÅ„ redirect here. ... Look up Circa on Wiktionary, the free dictionary The Latin word circa, literally meaning about, is often used to describe various dates (often birth and death dates) that are uncertain. ... The Katyń Forest Massacre, also known as the Katyn massacre, occurred in the Soviet Union, in a forest near Gnezdovo village, a short distance from Smolensk, during World War II. Many Poles had become prisoners of war following the invasion and defeat of Poland by the Nazis and the... Soviet redirects here. ...

[citation needed]
1941 Białystok massacre 2,200 Poland

In one of the first massacres of Jews during World War II, the German reserve Police Battalion 309 herds the Jews of Białystok into the city's central synagogue and sets fire to it. Those trying to flee are shot. Coordinates: , Country Poland Voivodeship Podlachian Powiat city county Gmina BiaÅ‚ystok Established 14th century City Rights 1692 Government  - Mayor Tadeusz Truskolaski Area  - City 102 km²  (39. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...

[citation needed]
NKVD prisoner massacres 100,000 Poland,Lithuania

Before Red Army left the cities occupied in Poland and Lithuania, all prisoners waiting in the NKVD prisons were killed, including arrested for light charges. The massacre of prisoners refers to a series of mass executions committed by Soviet NKVD against prisoners in Poland and parts of the Soviet Union from which the Red Army was withdrawing after the German invasion in 1941 (see Operation Barbarossa). ...

[citation needed]
Jedwabne pogrom 380 to 1600 Poland

Jewish residents of Jedwabne and its environs are marched into the center of the village, where they are beaten and killed by a number of their fellow townsmen. Some sources suggest German police and/or military involvement. The Jedwabne Pogrom (or Jedwabne Massacre) was a massacre of Jewish people living in and near the town of Jedwabne in Poland that occurred during World War II, in July 1941. ...

[citation needed]
Wąsosz pogrom 400 to 600 Poland

Jewish residents of Wąsosz (Lomza voivodeship)are systematically killed by the Polish police force formed by the Germans after the German invasion. When Nazi Germany invaded Poland in 1939, WÄ…sosz (Lomza voivodeship) was conquered by the second week of war. ...

[citation needed]
Babi Yar 100,000 Ukraine

In reprisals for acts of sabotage they did not commit, the Jewish population of Kiev is marched in small groups to a ditch at Babi Yar and machine-gunned. Babi Yar (Ukrainian: Бабин яр, Babyn yar; Russian: Бабий яр, Babiy yar) is a ravine in Kiev, the capital of Ukraine, located between the Frunze and Melnykov streets and between the St. ...

[citation needed]
Ponaren c.100,000 Lithuania

Jewish and Polish citizens of Vilnius are marched to Ponary Woods and shot by Lithuanian police units (the "Ponary Rifles") are under German supervision. 40,000 are killed in 1941 alone. Paneriai (Polish: , German: ) is a suburb of Vilnius, situated about 10 kilometres away from the city centre. ... Look up Circa on Wiktionary, the free dictionary The Latin word circa, literally meaning about, is often used to describe various dates (often birth and death dates) that are uncertain. ... Not to be confused with Vilnius city municipality. ...

[citation needed]
Dnipropetrovsk 12,000 Ukraine

Most of the remaining Jews in the city are marched to a ravine and massacred by Einsatzkommando 6. Location Map of Ukraine with Dnipropetrovsk highlighted. ... Einsatzkommando is a German military term with the literal translation of mission commando, roughly equivalent to the English term task force. The Nazi-era Einsatzkommando refers to a subgroup of the four Einsatzgruppen, killing squads in Operation Barbarossa that were responsible for carrying out mass executions behind the German lines. ...

[citation needed]
Odessa massacre 36,000 Ukraine

Mass shootings of the Jews of Odessa. The Odessa Massacre was the extermination of Jews and Communists in Odessa during the autumn of 1941. ...

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Ninth Fort 9,000 Lithuania

Those Jews of Kaunas unable to work – including women and children – are marched to the Ninth Fort and shot. (Over 40,000 Jews will eventually be killed there.) Located outside of the Lithuanian city of Kaunas, the Ninth Fort was used as a Nazi prison camp, and site of the killing of thousands of Jews. ... Location Ethnographic region AukÅ¡taitija County Kaunas County Municipality Geographic coordinate system Number of elderates 11 General Information Capital of Kaunas County Kaunas city municipality Kaunas district municipality Population 361,274 in 2005 (2nd) First mentioned 1361 Granted city rights 1408 Kaunas ( (help· info), approximate English transcription [ˈkəʊ.nÉ™s...

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Rumbula forest 25,000 Latvia

Over the course of a week, the Jews of Riga are taken to Rumbula forest and shot. Rumbula Forest is a pine forest enclave in Riga, Latvia. ... For other uses, see Riga (disambiguation). ...

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Simferopol 10,000 Crimea

Mass shooting of Jews. Thereafter, Jews in the region are transported to extermination camps rather than shot. Simferopol (English pronunciation: /ˌsɪm. ... Motto Процветание в единстве(Russian) Protsvetanie v edinstve(transliteration) Prosperity in unity Anthem Нивы и горы твои волшебны, Родина(Russian) Nivy i gory tvoi volshebny, Rodina(transliteration) Your fields and mounts are wonderful, Motherland Location of Crimea (red) with respect to Ukraine (light blue). ... Extermination camps were one type of facility that Nazi Germany built during World War II for the systematic killing of millions of people in what has become known as the Holocaust. ...

[citation needed]
1941-1945 Ustashi Genocide ~600,000 Independent State of Croatia (Kingdom of Yugoslavia)

Pro-Nazi Ustaša movement conducts a wide-scale planned extermination of Serbs, Jews, Roms and political opponents. Most notably at Jasenovac concentration camp. The UstaÅ¡e (often spelled Ustashe in English; singular UstaÅ¡a or Ustasha) was a Croatian far-right organisation put in charge of the Independent State of Croatia by the Axis Powers in 1941. ... Capital Zagreb Language(s) Croatian Religion Roman Catholicism Political structure Puppet-state King  - 1941-1943 Tomislav II Poglavnik  - 1941-1945 Ante Pavelić Legislature None Historical era World War II  - Established April 10, 1941  - Disestablished May 8, 1945 Population  - 1941 est. ... Motto: One nation, one king, one country Anthem: Medley of Bože pravde, Lijepa naÅ¡a domovino, and Naprej zastava slave Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croato-Slovenian (see: Serbo-Croat and Slovenian) [1] Government Value specified for government_type does not comply King  - 1918-1921 Peter I  - 1921-1934 Alexander... The UstaÅ¡e (often spelled Ustashe in English; singular UstaÅ¡a or Ustasha) was a Croatian far-right organisation put in charge of the Independent State of Croatia by the Axis Powers in 1941. ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below (* many Serbs opted for Yugoslav ethnicity) [27] Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in... Languages Romani, languages of native region Religions Christianity, Islam Related ethnic groups South Asians (Desi) The Romani people (as a noun, singular Rom, plural Roma; sometimes Rrom, Rroma) or Romanies are an ethnic group living in many communities all over the world. ... “Jasenovac” redirects here. ...

[citation needed]
1942 Lidice massacre 435 Lidice, Czechoslovakia

German SS soldiers annihilate the whole village. Lidice (Liditz in German) is a village in former Czechoslovakia (now in the Czech Republic) which was completely destroyed by the Germans during World War II. About 340 men, women, and children from the village were murdered by the Germans. ... Lidice (Liditz in German) is a village in former Czechoslovakia (now in the Czech Republic) which was completely destroyed by the Germans during World War II. About 340 men, women, and children from the village were murdered by the Germans. ...

[citation needed]
1942 South Baãka massacre 3,809 Serbia

Mass executions of Serb, Jewish and Roma civilians are carried out by Hungarian fascist troops. Map showing occupation zones in Vojvodina from 1941 to 1944 The Occupation of Vojvodina (a region in modern Serbia) from 1941 to 1944 was carried out by Nazi Germany, Horthys Hungary and Independent State of Croatia. ... Not to be confused with Republika Srpska. ... Fascism is an authoritarian political ideology (generally tied to a mass movement) that considers individual and other societal interests subordinate to the interests of the state. ... A troop is a military unit. ...

[citation needed]
1942-1944 Warsaw Concentration Camp 200,000 Warsaw, Poland

Poles are systematically shot or gassed in provisional gas chambers by German Nazis. Warsaw concentration camp (German: , short KL Warschau) was the German concentration and extermination camp in Warsaw, in the ruins of the Warsaw Ghetto and in other parts of the city. ... For other uses, see Warsaw (disambiguation) and Warszawa (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Gas chamber (disambiguation). ...

[citation needed]
1943 Changjiao massacre more than 30,000 Hunan

Mass killing of Chinese civilians and mass rape of women. The Changjiao massacre (Chinese:厂窖惨案) was a massacre aiming the chinese civilians by Japanese China Expeditionary Army in Hunan,ChangJiao. ... Not to be confused with the unrelated provinces of Hainan, Henan, and Yunnan. ...

[citation needed]
1943 Pinsk 16,000 Belarus

Mass executions of Jews. For other uses, see Pinsk (disambiguation). ...

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1943 Khatyn ca. 300 Belarus

The village of Khatyn was totally burnt with its inhabitants by SS people from Oscar Dierlewanger's group with participation of Schutzmannschaft; later this and the next year tens of other Belarussian villages were annihilated together with their inhabitants. Statue of the only surviving man from Khatyn, holding his dead child. ... Non-German cooperation with Nazis during World War 2 existed in all the countries occupied by Germany during World War 2. ...

[citation needed]
1943 Bombing of Hamburg 40,000 Hamburg, Germany

On the night of July 27, shortly before midnight, 739 aircraft attacked Hamburg. The effects of the massive raids using a combination of Blockbuster bombs and incendiaries created firestorms in some cites. The most extreme example was caused by the bombing of Hamburg. The large port city of Hamburg, Germany, was very heavily bombed many times by the Royal Air Force (RAF) and the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) during World War II. During one of the attacks in July 1943 a firestorm was created that caused tens of thousands of mostly... This article is about the city in Germany. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A Lancaster drops bundles of incendiary bombs (left), incendiary bombs and a “cookie” (right) on Duisburg on 15 October 1944 Blockbuster or Cookie was the name given to several of the largest conventional bombs used in World War II by the Royal Air Force (RAF). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The large port city of Hamburg, Germany, was very heavily bombed many times by the Royal Air Force (RAF) and the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) during World War II. During one of the attacks in July 1943 a firestorm was created that caused tens of thousands of mostly...

[citation needed]
1944-1945 Chameria issue c.2,000 Chameria[184]

Greek royalist militias battle Pro-German Muslims during the liberation from the Nazi German occupation. Over 25,000 Muslims flee to Albania. The Chamerian issue is a dispute between Greece and Albania over the violent expulsion of Cham Albanians from the Greek province of Epirus between 1944–1945, during the World War II. // Chameria (or Çamëria) is the Albanian name for a region which was once part of ancient Greece and... Chameria (Albanian: Çamëria, often rendered in Greek as Τσαμουριά Tsamouriá) is the Albanian name for the coastal region of Epirus in southern Albania and northwestern Greece. ... German soldiers raising the Reich War Flag over the Acropolis. ...

[citation needed]
1944 Ardeatine massacre 335 Italy

As retaliation for an Italian Resistance roadside bomb, S.S. soldier Erich Priebke and his men rounded up and killed 330 innocent civilians, stacking the bodies in the Ardeatine caves. Five men had witnessed the event, so Priebke killed them as well since there were to be no witnesses [185] The massacre of Fosse Ardeatine took place in Italy during World War II. On 23 March 1944, 33 German soldiers were killed when members of the Italian Resistance set off a bomb close to a column of German soldiers who were marching on via Rasella. ... Partisans parading in Milan The Italian resistance movement was a partisan force during World War II. It became massive after the capitulation of the Italian Royal Army on September 8, 1943. ... SS or ss or Ss may be: The Schutzstaffel, a Nazi paramilitary force Steamship (SS) (ship prefix) The United States Secret Service A submarine not powered by nuclear energy (SS) (United States Navy designator), see SSN A Soviet/Russian surface-to-surface missile, as listed by NATO reporting name Shortstop... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

[citation needed]
1944 Bačka/Bácska killings c.20,000-34,500 Vojvodina, Serbia

Mass executions of Hungarian civilians by Yugoslav communist partisans. The 1944-1945 Killings in Bačka were the killings of certain number of ethnic Hungarians in Bačka allegedly organised by members of the Yugoslav Partisan Movement after they gained control over the area between 1944 and 1945. ... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ... Not to be confused with Republika Srpska. ... Communism is an ideology that seeks to establish a classless, stateless social organization based on common ownership of the means of production. ... Yugoslav Partisan Flag The Yugoslav Partisans were one of the two main resistance movements engaged in the fight against the Axis forces in the Balkans during World War II, alongside rival Chetniks, the Yugoslav Peoples Liberation War. ...

[citation needed]
February 23, 1945 Bombing of Pforzheim c.17,000 Pforzheim, Germany

About one fifth of the town's population, over 17,000 people, were killed in the air raid, and about 83% of the town's buildings were destroyed. Overall, Anglo-American bombing of German cities claimed up to 600,000 civilian lives. During the latter stages of World War II Pforzheim, a town in south west Germany was bombed on a number of times. ... Pforzheim is a town of 119,000 inhabitants in the state of Baden-Württemberg, south-west Germany at the gate to the Black Forest. ...

[186]
1945 Massacre in Trhová Kamenice 14 Czechoslovakia

German soldiers torture innocent villagers to death at the end of the war. Massacre in Trhová Kamenice happened in 8 May 1945. ...

[citation needed]
1945 Ústí massacre c.80 Czechoslovakia

Czech soldiers lynch ethnic Germans. Location of Ústí nad Labem in the Czech Republic The Ústí massacre (Czech: Ústecký masakr) was a mass lynching of ethnic Germans in Ústí nad Labem (Aussig an der Elbe), a city in northern Czechoslovakia in post-World War II Europe, on July 31, 1945. ... Ethnic Germans – often simply called Germans – are those who are considered, by themselves or others, to be ethnically German but do not live within the present-day Federal Republic of Germany, nor necessarily hold its citizenship. ...

[citation needed]
1945 Manila massacre c.100,000 Philippines

Filipino civilians were massacred by Japanese troops. Slain children in the ruins of Manila The Manila massacre, February 1945, refers to the atrocities conducted against Filipino civilians in Manila, Philippines by retreating Japanese troops during World War II. Various credible Western and Eastern sources agree that the death toll was at least 100,000 people. ...

[citation needed]
1945 Bombing of Dresden 35,000-300,000 Dresden, Germany

The bombing of Dresden was led by Royal Air Force (RAF) and followed by the United States Army Air Force (USAAF) between February 13 and February 15. Overall, Anglo-American bombing of German cities claimed up to 600,000 civilian lives. The bombing of Dresden, led by Royal Air Force (RAF) and followed by the United States Army Air Force (USAAF) between February 13 and February 15, 1945, remains one of the more controversial Allied actions of World War II. The exact number of casualties is uncertain, but most historians agree... For other uses, see Dresden (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Dresden (disambiguation). ... “RAF” redirects here. ... The United States Army Air Forces, or USAAF, was a part of the U.S. military during World War II. The direct precursor to the U.S. Air Force, the USAAF formally existed between 1941 and 1947. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

[187]
1945 Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki 220,000-500,000 Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan

The atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki follow six months of intense firebombing of 67 other Japanese cities. On August 6, 1945, the nuclear weapon "Little Boy" is dropped on the city of Hiroshima, followed on August 9, 1945 by the detonation of the "Fat Man" nuclear bomb over Nagasaki. These are the only officially acknowleged uses of nuclear weapons in warfare. The mushroom cloud over Hiroshima after the dropping of Little Boy. ... For other uses, see Hiroshima (disambiguation). ... Nagasaki ) ( ) is the capital and the largest city of Nagasaki Prefecture in Japan. ... For other uses, see Hiroshima (disambiguation). ... Nagasaki ) ( ) is the capital and the largest city of Nagasaki Prefecture in Japan. ... A post-war Little Boy casing mockup. ... For other uses, see Hiroshima (disambiguation). ... This article is about the nuclear weapon used in World War II. For other uses, see Fat Man (disambiguation). ... Nagasaki ) ( ) is the capital and the largest city of Nagasaki Prefecture in Japan. ...

[188][189]
August 14, 1945 Japanese Surrender “Grand Finale” Thousands Honshu, Japan After the Japanese government announced that it was surrendering, Henry H. Arnold (“Hap”) organized a “grand finale” bombing of Japan, dropping six thousand tons of conventional explosives from 1,014 planes onto civilian targets, which amounted to almost half of the explosive force that was dropped on Hiroshima. Leaflets were dropped with the bombs, announcing Japan’s surrender. [190]

todo mal de [ [ Shikoku ] ] a través del [ [ mar interior ] ], y noreste de [ [ Kyushu ] ] a través del [ [ estrecho de Kanmon ] ]. Es la séptima isla más grande, y la segunda isla populosa en el mundo después de [ [ Java (isla)|Java ] ] (véase [ [ lista de las islas de... General of the Air Force Henry Harley Hap Arnold GCB (June 25, 1886 – January 15, 1950) was an aviation pioneer and Chief of the United States Army Air Corps (from 1938), Commanding General of the U.S. Army Air Forces (from 1941 until 1945) and the first and only General... For other uses, see Hiroshima (disambiguation). ... Victory over Japan Day (V-J Day) is the celebration of the Surrender of Japan, which took place on August 15, 1945, ending the Second World War. ...

State-sponsored genocides

Date Name Deaths Location Summary Claimants
1994 Rwandan Genocide 937,000 Rwanda

Hutus massacre Tutsis and other Hutus. The Rwandan Genocide was the 1994 mass killing of the hundreds of thousands of ethnic Tutsis and moderate Hutu sympathizers in Rwanda and was the largest atrocity during the Rwandan Civil War. ... The Hutu are a Central African ethnic group, living mainly in Rwanda and Burundi. ... The Tutsi are one of three native peoples of the nations of Rwanda and Burundi in central Africa, the other two being the Twa and the Hutu. ...

[citation needed]
1995 Srebrenica massacre 8,000 Bosnia and Herzegovina

Massacre of male Bosniaks primarily by the Army of Republika Srpska; the largest massacre in Europe since World War II. Burial of 465 identified Bosniak civilians (July 11, 2007) Gravestone of a thirteen year old boy (July 11, 2007) A memorial to the victims of Srebrenica and other towns in Eastern Bosnia The Srebrenica Massacre, also known as Srebrenica Genocide,[1] was the July 1995 killing of an estimated 8... This article is about the country of Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Language(s) Bosnian Religion(s) Predominantly Islam Related ethnic groups Slavs (South Slavs) The Bosniaks or Bosniacs[1] (Bosnian: Bošnjaci, IPA: ) are a South Slavic people, living mainly in Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bosnia) and the Sandžak region of Serbia and Montenegro, with a smaller autochthonous population also present... Bosnian Serb Army, officially Army of the Republika Srpska (Serbian Војска Републике Српске/Vojska Republike Srpske, ВРС/VRS) is the military of the Bosnian Serb political entity of Republika Srpska. ...

[citation needed]
2003 Darfur conflict c.400,000 Sudan

Ongoing massacre and forced displacement of the Fur people of Western Sudan by government-sponsored Janjaweed militia. Combatants JEM factions NRF alliance Janjaweed SLM (Minnawi)  Sudan African Union Mission in Sudan (AMIS) United Nations African Union Mission in Darfur (UNAMID) Commanders Ibrahim Khalil Ahmed Diraige Omar al-Bashir Minni Minnawi Luke Aprezi Strength N/A N/A 7,000 The Darfur conflict is a crisis in the... Flag of the Fur national movement The Fur (fòòrà in Fur, فور in Arabic) are a people of the western Sudan, numbering about 0. ... A Janjaweed miltiaman mounted The Janjaweed (Arabic: جنجويد; variously transliterated Janjawid, Janjawed, Jingaweit, Jinjaweed, Janjawiid, Janjiwid, Janjaweit, etc. ...

[citation needed]

Pogroms and religious massacres

To be in this section, the primary motive for the massacre must have been ethnic or religious hatred.

Date Name Deaths Location Summary Claimants
1941 Pro-Nazi pogrom in Baghdad 180 Baghdad, Iraq

Following Rashid Ali's pro-Axis coup, the Farhud ("violent dispossession") pogrom of June 1 and 2, 1941, broke out in Baghdad. Armed Muslim mobs slaughtered 180 Jews and wounded almost 1,000. Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Governorate. ... Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Governorate. ... El-Gaylani Rashid Ali was the Pro-Axis leader of Iraq who fled to Iran when the Allies invaded Iraq. ... This article is about the independent states that comprised the Axis powers. ... Farhud (translation from Arabic: pogrom, violent dispossession) was a violent pogrom against the Jews of Iraq on June 1-2, 1941. ... Pogrom (from Russian: ; from громить IPA: - to wreak havoc, to demolish violently) is a form of riot directed against a particular group, whether ethnic, religious or other, and characterized by destruction of their homes, businesses and religious centres. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ...

[191]
1945 Pogrom in Tripoli 140 Tripoli, Libya

Anti-Jewish riots by Muslims break out in Tripoli. Tripoli (Arabic: طرابلس Tarābulus) is the capital city of Libya. ... Tripoli (Arabic: طرابلس Tarābulus) is the capital city of Libya. ...

[192]
1946 Kielce pogrom 37 Poland

Jewish residents of Kielce, most of them returning survivors of the Holocaust, are killed by their Polish neighbors, prompting an exodus of the Jewish population from Poland. Kielce pogrom refers to the events on July 4, 1946, in the Polish town of Kielce, when forty Polish Jews were massacred and eighty wounded out of about two hundred Holocaust survivors who returned home after World War II. Among victims were also two Gentile Poles. ... For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ...

[citation needed]
1946 Direct Action Day c.4,000 British India

Riots are perpetrated by the Muslim League against Hindus in Calcutta which spread to other regions and are followed by the Noakhali Massacre. Direct Action Day, also known as the Affirmative Action Plan, the Calcutta Riots, the Great Calcutta killings, and The Week of the Long Knives [1][2], started on August 16, 1946. ... Anthem God Save The Queen/King British India, circa 1860 Capital Calcutta (1858-1912), New Delhi (1912-1947) Language(s) Hindi, Urdu, English and many others Government Monarchy Emperor of India  - 1877-1901 Victoria  - 1901-1910 Edward VII  - 1910-1936 George V  - January-December 1936 Edward VIII  - 1936-1947 George... The All India Muslim League (Urdu: مسلم لیگ), founded at Dhaka in 1906, was a political party in British India that developed into the driving force behind the creation of Pakistan as a Muslim state from British India on the Indian subcontinent. ... This article is on Calcutta/Kolkata, the city. ... Direct Action Day, also known as the Affirmative Action Plan, the Calcutta Riots, the Great Calcutta killings, and The Week of the Long Knives [1][2], started on August 16, 1946. ...

[citation needed]
1947 India c.1,000,000 India

After the partition of United India and the British withdrawal, about 1 million to 4 million Hindus, Sikhs, and Muslims are killed in the aftermath.

[citation needed]
1962 Oran massacre 2,000 to 3,500 Algeria

Arabs lynch European, Jewish and pro-French Algeria Harkis Muslim civilians. The Oran massacre of 1962 was a massacre in Oran, Algeria on July 5, 1962, after the end of the Algerian War of Independence (1954–62). ... French rule in Algeria, 1830–1962 Most of Frances actions in Algeria, not least the invasion of Algiers, were propelled by contradictory impulses. ... Harki (from the Arabic Harka: troop or band of warriors) was the generic Algerian term for Muslim Algerians serving as auxiliaries with the French Army, during the Algerian War of Independence from 1954 to 1962. ...

[citation needed]
1964 Zanzibar massacre c.5,000 to 20,000 Zanzibar

The Zanzibar Revolution of January 12, 1964 put an end to the local Arab dynasty. As many as 20,000 Arabs were massacred by the descendants of black African slaves. Look up Circa on Wiktionary, the free dictionary The Latin word circa, literally meaning about, is often used to describe various dates (often birth and death dates) that are uncertain. ... Map of Zanzibars main island Zanzibar is part of Tanzania Coordinates: , Country Tanzania Islands Unguja and Pemba Capital Zanzibar City Settled AD 1000 Government  - Type semi-autonomous part of Tanzania  - President Amani Abeid Karume Area  - Both Islands  637 sq mi (1,651 km²) Population (2004)  - Both Islands 1,070... The Zanzibar revolution of January 12, 1964 was the rebellion that overthrew Sultan Jamshid bin Abdullah, and led to the proclamation of Zanzibar as a republic, and three months later, to Zanzibars uniting with Tanganyika to form Tanzania. ... Languages Arabic other minority languages Religions Predominantly Sunni Islam, as well as Shia Islam, Greek Orthodoxy, Greek Catholicism, Roman Catholicism, Alawite Islam, Druzism, Ibadi Islam, and Judaism Footnotes a Mainly in Antakya. ...

[193][194][195]
1969 Kilvenmani massacre c.35 Tamil Nadu, India

Farm laborers and their families are burnt alive by their higher-caste landlords. The Kilvenmani massacre was an incident in Tamil Nadu in 1969 in which a group of c. ... Tamil Nadu (தமிழ் நாடு, Land of the Tamils) is a state at the southern tip of India. ... Caste systems are traditional, hereditary systems of social classification, that evolved due to the enormous diversity in India (where all three primary races met, not by forced slavery but by immigration). ...

[citation needed]
1984 Anti-Sikh riots[196] c.2,733 to 4,000 Delhi, India

Mobs massacre Sikhs following the assassination of Prime Minister Indira Gandhi by her Sikh bodyguards. 1984 Anti-Sikh riots took place in India after the assassination of Indira Gandhi on October 31, 1984. ... For other uses, see Delhi (disambiguation). ... A young Indira Nehru and Mahatma Gandhi, during one of the latters fasts Indira Priyadarshini Gandhi (Hindi: ) (19 November 1917 - October 31, 1984) She was the Prime Minister of India for three consecutive terms from 1966 to 1977 and for a fourth term from 1980 until her assassination in...

[citation needed]
1985 Ras Burqa massacre 7 Ras Burqa, Egypt

Egyptian policeman machine-gun 12 Israeli tourists, including 9 children. The Ras Burqa massacre was the killing of seven Israeli tourists, including four children, by an Egyptian policeman near the town Ras Burqa, in the district of Nuwaiba in Sinai. ...

[citation needed]
1988 Sumgait pogrom at least 32 Sumgait, Azerbaijan

Azerbaijanis launch a three-day pogrom against Armenians in the city of Sumgait. 26 Armenians and 6 Azeris perish. Sumgait (Sumqayit) is located about 30 kilometers (approximiately 20 miles) northwest of Azerbaijans capital Baku, near the Caspian Sea. ... Categories: Caucasus geography stubs | Cities in Azerbaijan ... Categories: Caucasus geography stubs | Cities in Azerbaijan ...

[citation needed]
1993 Sivas Massacre 35 Sivas, Turkey

35 Alevis were incinerated in Turkey

[citation needed]
1998 May 1998 massacre hundreds maybe thousand of Indonesian born Chinese Jakarta,Surakarta,Medan,Indonesia

Indonesia-born ethnic Chinese killed in riots Chinese Indonesians (Mandarin: Yìndùníxīyà Huárén (Traditional: 印度尼西亞華人, Simplified: 印度尼西亚华人) Hakka: Thong ngin, Min: Teng lang, Indonesian: Tionghoa Indonesia, or (derisively) Cina totok) are ethnically Chinese people living in Indonesia, as a result of centuries of overseas Chinese migration. ... Jakarta (also DKI Jakarta), is the capital and largest city of Indonesia. ... Surakarta (its formal name; locally it is referred to as Solo) is an Indonesian city of approximately 500,000 people located in Central Java. ... For other uses, see Medan (disambiguation). ...

[197][198]
1999 Reçak/Račak incident over 39 Kosova/Kosovo

Massacre by Serbian forces The Račak incident (also called the Račak massacre or Račak operation) was a clash in the village of Račak, Kosovo, (known as Reçak in Albanian) on January 15, 1999 between Yugoslav security forces and Kosovo Liberation Army guerillas, in which 45 Albanian civilians died. ... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ...

[citation needed]
2001 Yakaolang massacre c.300 Yakaolang, Afghanistan

The Taliban executes civilian members of the Shia Sadat and Hazara clans. The Taliban (Pashto: , also anglicized as Taleban) are a Sunni Muslim Pashtun movement [2] that ruled most of Afghanistan from 1996 until 2001, when their leaders were removed from power by a cooperative military effort between the Northern Alliance, United States, and the United Kingdom. ... Shiʻa Islam (Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite) makes up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%–35% of all Muslim. ... Field Marshal Mohammed Anwar Al Sadat (Arabic:محمد أنورالسادات) in (December 25, 1918 – October 6, 1981) was an Egyptian soldier and politician, who served as the third President of Egypt from October 15, 1970 until his assassination on October 6, 1981. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

[citation needed]
2002 Kaluchak massacre 31 Jammu, India

31 civilians and military personnel are killed by Islamic terrorists from Pakistan. The Kaluchak Massacre refers to an incident on May 14, 2002 near the town of Kaluchak in the Indian state of Jammu when three terrorists attacked a tourist bus from the Indian state of Himachal Pradesh. ... Jammu   (Hindi: जम्मू, Urdu: جموں) is one of the three regions comprising the disputed state of Jammu and Kashmir. ... This article is becoming very long. ...

[citation needed]
2002 Godhra Train Burning 60 Godhra, Gujarat, India

A Muslim mob burns alive Hindu men, women, and children traveling in the S-6 compartment of a Sabarmati Express train. The Godhra Train Burning Incident occurred in the town Godhra in the Indian state of Gujarat at 0630 hrs on 27 February 2002. ... , Godhra is a city and the Originally the name came from Gou means Cow and Dhara means Flow. The Cow are Flowing in the Panchmahal District, a municipality in Panchmahal district in the Indian state of Gujarat. ... This article is for the Indian state. ...

[citation needed]
2002 Gujarat violence c.800 to 2,000 Gujarat, India

Sectarian violence occurs following the Godhra Train Burning. The skyline of Ahmedabad filled with smoke as buildings and shops are set on fire by rioting mobs. ... This article is for the Indian state. ... The Godhra Train Burning Incident occurred in the town Godhra in the Indian state of Gujarat at 0630 hrs on 27 February 2002. ...

[citation needed]
2004 Yelwa massacre c.630 Nigeria

Muslim nomads are killed by Christians during ongoing violence in Nigeria. In the Yelwa massacre, May 2, 2004, in Yelwa, Nigeria, more than 630 nomad Muslims were killed by Christians, according to Red Cross reports. ...

[citation needed]
2004 2004 unrest in Kosovo 19 Kosova/Kosovo

Ethnic Albanians go on a rampage against ethnic Serbs Violent unrest in Kosovo (a United Nations-administered province of Serbia) broke out on March 17, 2004. ... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ...

[citation needed]
2004 Gatumba massacre 152 Burundi

Congolese Tutsis are shot, hacked and burned to death during an attack on a refugee camp by Hutu extremists. The village of Gatumba lies on the western side of Burundi, near to the border with the Democratic Republic of the Congo. ... DRC redirects here. ... The Tutsi are one of three native peoples of the nations of Rwanda and Burundi in central Africa, the other two being the Twa and the Hutu. ... The Hutu are a Central African ethnic group, living mainly in Rwanda and Burundi. ...

[citation needed]
2005 Muhuta Church massacre 6 Bujumbura, Burundi [citation needed] [citation needed]
2005 Turbi Village massacre c.73 Turbi, Kenya

Gunmen, believed to be Borana, open fire on Gabra children making their way to the village's primary school. Bujumbura, estimated population 300,000 (1994), is the capital of Burundi. ... The Turbi Village Massacre was staged by a fueding clan in Kenya. ... The Borana are an East African ethnic group living in northern Kenya and southern Ethiopia. ... A primary school in Český Těšín, Poland Primary education is the first stage of compulsory education. ...

[citation needed]

Massacres during armed conflicts

Prior to 1939

Date Name Deaths Location Summary Claimants
1520 Stockholm bloodbath c.100 Stockholm, Sweden

Danish forces invading Sweden under the command of Christian II decapitate around 100 people, mostly nobility and clergy. Stockholm Bloodbath - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Look up Circa on Wiktionary, the free dictionary The Latin word circa, literally meaning about, is often used to describe various dates (often birth and death dates) that are uncertain. ... For other uses, see Stockholm (disambiguation). ... Christian II (July 2, 1481 – January 25, 1559) was a Danish monarch and King of Denmark, Norway (1513 – 1523) and Sweden (1520 – 1521), under the Kalmar Union. ... Decapitation (from Latin, caput, capitis, meaning head), or beheading, is the removal of a living organisms head. ... Nobility is a traditional hereditary status (see hereditary titles) that exists today in many countries (mainly present or former monarchies). ... Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. ...

[citation needed]
1552 Siege of Kazan 20,000-40,000 Kazan, Khanate of Kazan

Civil population of Kazan was massacred just after the fall of the city. St. ... This article is about the capital city of Tatarstan. ... Map of Kazan Khanate, early 1500s The Kazan Khanate (Tatar: Qazan xanlığı; Russian: Казанское ханство) (1438-1552) was a Tatar state on the territory of former Volga Bulgaria with its capital in Kazan. ...

[citation needed]
1570 Cyprus massacre c.30,000 Cyprus, Republic of Venice

The Turkish forces massacre thousands of Christians (mostly Greeks and Armenians) following the capture of the island. The Cyprus massacre occurred on 1570, resulting in the massacre of c. ... Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin, Italian Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ...

[199][200]
1580 Siege of Smerwick 600 Smerwick, Ireland

English forces under Elizabeth I behead some 600 Spanish, Italian and Irish men and women during the Desmond Rebellions. The Second Desmond rebellion was the more significant and widespread of the two Desmond Rebellions launched by the Fitzgerald dynasty of the Desmond area of Munster, Ireland in the 1560s. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 52. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about Elizabeth I of England. ... The Desmond Rebellions occurred in the 1569- 1573 and 1579-1583 in Munster in southern Ireland. ...

[citation needed]
1631 Sack of Magdeburg 20,000 Magdeburg, Germany

Troops of the Holy Roman Empire besiege then storm Magdeburg during the Thirty Years' War, massacring nearly all its inhabitants. During the Thirty Years War the city of Magdeburg was besieged by the Holy Roman Empires Imperial Army from November 1630 to 20 May 1631 in the Sack of Magdeburg. ... This article is about the German city. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... Combatants Sweden  Bohemia Denmark-Norway (Until 1643) Dutch Republic France Scotland England Saxony  Holy Roman Empire ( Catholic League) Spain Austria Bavaria Commanders Frederick V Buckingham Leven Gustav II Adolf â€  Johan Baner Cardinal Richelieu Louis II de Bourbon Turenne Christian IV of Denmark Bernhard of Saxe-Weimar Johann Georg I of...

[citation needed]
1644 Massacre of Aberdeen 118 Aberdeen, Scotland

Royalist troops under Montrose kill civilians after the fall of the city. For other uses, see Aberdeen (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... James Graham, 1st Marquess of Montrose James Graham, 1st Marquess of Montrose (1612 - 21 May 1650), was a Scottish nobleman and soldier, who initially joined the Covenanters in the Wars of the Three Kingdoms, but subsequently supported King Charles I as the English Civil War developed. ...

[citation needed]
1644 Bolton Massacre 1,500 Bolton, England Number of defenders and citizens killed by Royalist forces of Prince Rupert of the Rhine after town stormed. [citation needed]
1644 Massacre of Argyll 900 Aberdeen, Scotland

Royalist troops under Montrose kill civilians across the area. The Bolton Massacre, sometimes recorded as the Storming of Bolton was an episode in the English Civil War, on May 28, 1644, in which it was alleged that up to 1,600 of the towns defenders and citizens were slaughtered during and after its storm and capture by the... For the larger local government district, see Metropolitan Borough of Bolton. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Anthonis Van Dyck Prince Rupert, Count Palatine of the Rhine Rupert, Count Palatine of the Rhine, Duke of Bavaria (German: Ruprecht Pfalzgraf bei Rhein, Herzog von Bayern), commonly called Prince Rupert of the Rhine, (17 December 1619 – 19 November 1682), soldier, inventor and amateur artist in mezzotint, was a younger... For other uses, see Aberdeen (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... James Graham, 1st Marquess of Montrose James Graham, 1st Marquess of Montrose (1612 - 21 May 1650), was a Scottish nobleman and soldier, who initially joined the Covenanters in the Wars of the Three Kingdoms, but subsequently supported King Charles I as the English Civil War developed. ...

[citation needed]
1649 Fall of Drogheda at up to 1,000 Drogheda, Ireland Some of the city's non-combatants are massacred by Oliver Cromwell's New Model Army [201]
1651 Sack of Dundee 200-800 Dundee, Scotland

Oliver Cromwell's army under the command of George Monck sack the city. Drogheda, a town in eastern Ireland, was besieged twice in the 1640s, during the Irish Confederate Wars, the Irish theatre of the Wars of the Three Kingdoms. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference O088754 Statistics Province: Leinster County: Elevation: 1 m Population (2006)  - Proper  - Environs    28,973[1]  6,117[1] Website: www. ... For other uses, see Oliver Cromwell (disambiguation). ... For the band, see New Model Army (band). ... For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Oliver Cromwell (disambiguation). ... George Monck, 1st Duke of Albemarle by Sir Peter Lely, painted 1665–1666. ...

[202]
1678 Burning of Örkened parish 20+ Örkened, Sweden

Charles XI of Sweden orders the parish burnt to ground in order to deal with rebels (snapphane) Charles XI, or Karl XI, (November 24, 1655 - April 5, 1697) was a King of Sweden (1660 - 1697). ... The Snapphane Movement was a pro-Danish guerilla organization that fought against the Swedes in the Scanian War of the 17th century. ...

[citation needed]
1757 Fort William Henry massacre 70-180 Lake George, New York, USA After surrendering to the French and being promised safe passage to Fort Edward, British and Colonial troops plus civilian camp followers (2000 men, women, and children) are attacked while leaving the fort by France's Indian allies. [citation needed]
1768 Massacre at St. George's Fields 6 St. George's Fields (in Southwark, South London), England

British soldiers clashed with angry supporters of John Wilkes, a popular member of Parliament who had just received a prison sentence for seditious libel. Six Wilkes supporters were killed and fifteen wounded in the carnage. The British Fort William Henry on the shores of Lake George, New York (NY), was built during the French and Indian War (1754-1763) by Sir William Johnson as a staging ground for attacks against the French Fort Carillon (later renamed Fort Ticonderoga). ... Lake George is the name of: A lake A town A village This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Fort Edward can refer to at least two places: Fort Edward (village), New York Fort Edward (town), New York a temporary fort in South Africa, ca. ... Obelisk at St. ... For other places with the same name, see Southwark (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The House of Representatives Chamber of the Parliament of Australia in Canberra. ...

[citation needed]
1778 Wyoming Valley massacre at least 180 to 227 Wyoming Valley, Pennsylvania, USA

An encounter between Patriot and Loyalist Americans, after which thirty or more Patriots are massacred by Iroquois mercenaries. Combatants Britain United States Commanders Colonel John Butler Colonel Zebulon Butler Strength 900 regulars and Native American warriors 360 milita Casualties 3 killed 8 wounded 300+ killed and captured (164+6 known dead) The Wyoming Valley battle and massacre was an encounter during the American Revolutionary War between American Patriots... A lesser-known Wyoming Valley exists in western New York in Wyoming County, where the valley of Oatka Creek is commonly known as the Wyoming Valley and includes the villages of Wyoming and Warsaw. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Largest metro area Delaware Valley Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Patriots (also known as Americans, Whigs, Congress-Men or Rebels) were colonists of the British Thirteen Colonies who rebelled against the British control during the American Revolution and declared themselves an independent nation, the United States of America in July 1776. ... Britannia gives a heros welcome to returning American Loyalists. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ...

[citation needed]
1794 Praga massacre 10,000 to 20,000 Praga, WarsawPoland Kościuszko Uprising: Russian troops massacre civilians as they loot and burn Praga following their victory in battle. [citation needed]
1798 Gibbet Rath massacre 350 Kildare, Ireland Irish Rebellion of 1798: Rebels surrender but are massacred by British troops. [citation needed]
1832 Bad Axe River c.Unknown Bad Axe River, Wisconsin [US] Illinois militia under the command of General Henry Atkinson attack a Sauk camp at the mouth of Bad Axe River where many Sauk women and children are killed in the fighting. Shortly after, the Winnebago will abandon Black Hawk, forcing him and the Sauk to surrender several weeks later ending the Black Hawk War. [citation needed]
1836 Goliad massacre 342 Goliad, Texas the Mexican army executes Texan prisoners of war. [citation needed]
1842 Massacre of Elphinstone's army 16,000 Afghanistan Massacre of Elphinstone's British army including some 12,000 civilian dependents and camp followers by hostile Afghan tribes. Dr William Brydon was reportedly the sole survivor. [203][204]
1847 San Patricios 50 Chapultepec, Mexico Irish Catholic prisoners of war who fought for the Mexican Army are executed by the United States Army for desertion and treason. [citation needed]
1857 Cawnpore c.200 Cawnpore, India During the Sepoy Rebellion the British garrison agrees to a safe passage out of Cawnpore organized by Nana Sahib, but are attacked and killed. The 200 remaining women and children are held in the Bibi-Ghar where they are killed on July 15, 1857. [citation needed]
1863 Lawrence Massacre c.150 Lawrence, Kansas Confederate raiders under William Quantrill loot and burn the town killing over 150 men and boys. [citation needed]
1864 Fort Pillow c.354 Fort Pillow, Tennessee

Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest assaults Fort Pillow, continuing to fire after a white flag is flown by the Union defenders. Combatants Poland Russia Commanders Józef ZajÄ…czek Aleksandr Suvorov Strength <20,000 16,000[1]-22,000 104 cannons Casualties 10,000[2] through 15,000[1], 20,000[3] to 23,000[4] out of those, 6,000 soldiers KIA, rest civilians Unknown The Battle of Praga or... Praga Północ and Praga PoÅ‚udnie Pragas market, Jan Piotr Norblin, 1791. ... For other uses, see Warsaw (disambiguation) and Warszawa (disambiguation). ... KoÅ›ciuszko Uprising 1794 The KoÅ›ciuszko Uprising took place in Poland in 1794. ... Praga Północ and Praga PoÅ‚udnie Pragas market, Jan Piotr Norblin, 1791. ... Gibbet Rath massacre, Curragh, Co. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Naas Code: KE Area: 1,693 km² Population (2006) 186,075 Website: www. ... Combatants United Irishmen French First Republic Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Commanders Local leaders, General Humbert Cornwallis Lake Strength  ? Various, at peak mid-June c. ... The Battle of Bad Axe, one of the last major battles during the Black Hawk War, was fought between the combined forces of the Sauk (Sac) and Fox tribes and United States troops under Gen. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Henry Atkinson (1782 - 1842) was a U.S. army officer. ... For the abbreviation or acronym SAC, please see SAC. The Sauks or Sacs (Asakiwaki in their own language) are a group of Native Americans whose original territory may have been along the St. ... The Bad Axe River is a short tributary of the Mississippi River in southwestern Wisconsin in the United States. ... The Ho-Chunk or Winnebago (as they are commonly called) are a tribe of Native Americans, native to what are now Wisconsin and Illinois. ... For other uses of Blackhawk/Black Hawk, see Black Hawk. ... For other uses, see Black Hawk War (disambiguation). ... The Goliad Campaign was a series of battles that took place in Texas in 1836, which ultimately led to the Goliad massacre. ... Goliad is a city in Goliad County, Texas, United States. ... Combatants Afghan tribesmen British Empire Commanders Akbar Khan William Elphinstone Strength unknown 4,500 regular troops, 12,000 civilian refugees Casualties unknown total annihilation The massacre of Elphinstones army was a victory of Afghan forces, led by Akbar Khan, the son of Dost Mohammad Khan, over a combined British... Major-General William Elphinstone Major-General William George Keith Elphinstone, CB, (1782–April 23, 1842) was an officer of the British Army during the 19th Century. ... Lady Butlers 1879 painting The Remnants of an Army depicts Dr Brydons arrival at Jalalabad Dr William Brydon (October, 1811 - March 20, 1873) was an English army surgeon in the service of the East India Company. ... The Saint Patricks Battalion (Spanish: Batallón de San Patricio) was a unit of several hundred Irishmen, Germans, Scotsmen and other European Catholics who deserted the United States Army and fought as part of the Mexican Army against the United States in the Mexican-American War of 1846 to... Chapultepec Park with Polanco at the right, as seen from Torre Mayor observation deck. ... Irish population density in the United States, 1872. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... K&#257;npur (known as Cawnpore before 1948) is the most populous city in the north Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. ... An engraving titled Sepoy Indian troops dividing the spoils after their mutiny against British rule gives a contemporary view of events from the British perspective. ... For Peshwa Balaji Bajirao of Pune, see Nanasaheb Peshwa. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders No Union commander William C. Quantrill Strength Lawrence Union Militia, Unknown number Redlegs, 21 U.S. soldiers 14th Kansas Infantry Regt, 20 2nd Kansas Colored Infantry Regt Quantrill’s Raiders and other guerrillas (400) Casualties 164 40 The Lawrence Massacre... Lawrence is a river city in and the seat of Douglas County, Kansas, United States, 41 miles (66 km) west of Kansas City, along the banks of both the Kansas (Kaw) and Wakarusa Rivers. ... William Clark Quantrill of Quantrills Raiders William Clarke Quantrill (July 31, 1837 – June 6, 1865), was a Confederate guerrilla leader during the American Civil War. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Lionel F. Booth William F. Bradford Nathan Bedford Forrest James R. Chalmers Strength Detachments from three units (approx. ... Fort Pillow is a fort in Henning, Tennessee on the Mississippi River that was used by both sides in the American Civil War. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... For the World War II general, see Nathan Bedford Forrest III. Nathaniel Bedford Forrest (July 13, 1821–October 29, 1877) was a Confederate Army general during the American Civil War. ... German troops after surrendering to the U.S. Third Army carry the white flag (WW2 photo). ...

[citation needed]
1869 Battle of Acosta Ñu c. 2000 Paraguay The last major battle of the War of the Triple Alliance. Paraguayan forces had 6,000 soldiers, many of them children. The Allied forces suffered only 26 dead. [citation needed]
1873 Canby massacre c.4 Four of seven Americans as part of a peace delegation led by General E. R. S. Canby, under the pretext of peace negotiations, are killed by Modoc leader Captain Jack during the Modoc War. [citation needed]
1890 Wounded Knee massacre 153–300 Wounded Knee, South Dakota The last confrontation of US troops and the Great Sioux Nation [citation needed]
1901 Samar campaign Samar,Philippines During the Philippine-American War, while the Philippines are a colonial possession of the USA, Filipinos armed with machetes kill all American soldiers from the garrison of the port of Balangiga on the island of Samar (see Balangiga massacre). [citation needed]
1918 March Days 3,000–12,000 Baku, Azerbaijan Armenian Revolutionary Federation and Bolshevik forces massacre ethnic Azerbaijanis. [citation needed]
1918 September Days c.10,000–20,000 Baku, Azerbaijan Enver Pasha's Army of Islam supported by local Azeri forces recaptures Baku and subsequently massacres ethnic Armenians in retaliation for the March Days. [citation needed]
1936-1939 Spanish Civil War c.50,000-100,000 Spain At least 50,000 persons were executed during the civil war. Atrocities were committed on both sides. [205][206]
February 19-21, 1937 Graziani massacre 3,000 Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Three day massacre ordered by Guido Cortese, Secretary-General of Fascist Party in occupied Ethiopia, committed by Italian Fascist soldiers against Ethiopian citizens, in response to an attempt on the life of Viceroy Rodolfo Graziani. [207][208]
1937-1938 Nanjing massacre (Rape of Nanking) c.200,000-350,000 China Committed by the Japanese Imperial Army in the aftermath of the Battle of Nanking. Reports indicate that six-weeks of murder, rape and looting follow the seizure of the city by the Japanese Imperial Army. [209][210]

This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... Look up Circa on Wiktionary, the free dictionary The Latin word circa, literally meaning about, is often used to describe various dates (often birth and death dates) that are uncertain. ... Combatants Paraguay Uruguay, Argentina, Empire of Brazil Commanders Francisco Solano López † José E. Díaz Pedro II of Brazil Duke of Caxias Bartolomé Mitre Venancio Flores Strength at the beginning of the war ca. ... Major General E.R.S Canby Major General Edward Richard Sprigg Canby (November 9, 1817&#8211;April 11, 1873) graduated from West Point in 1839. ... For other uses, see Modoc (disambiguation). ... Captain Jack in 1864 Kintpuash, better known as Captain Jack (circa 1837 - October 3, 1873), was a chief of the Native American Modoc tribe of California and Oregon, and was their leader during the Modoc War. ... The Modoc War, or Modoc Campaign (also known as the Lava Beds War), was an armed conflict between the Native American Modoc tribe and the United States Army in southern Oregon and northern California from 1872–1873 . ... Combatants Sioux United States Commanders Big Foot† James W. Forsyth Strength 120 men 230 women and children 500 men Casualties 178 killed 89 wounded 150 missing For other uses, see Wounded Knee (disambiguation). ... Wounded Knee (Lakhota Cankpe Opi) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Shannon County, South Dakota, United States. ... The Great Sioux Nation is a general term sometimes applied to the Sioux generally or the Lakota specifically. ... Combatants Samareno Rebels United States Commanders General Vicente Lukban Captain Thomas W. Connell Strength 180-200 Samareno bolomen 78 Company C. 9th U.S. Infanty Casualties 20-25 killed, 22 wounded; plus thousands of Samar civilians killed in reprisals 54 killed, 18 wounded 100 rifles and 25,000 rounds of... Samar, formerly Western Samar, is a province of the Philippines located in the Eastern Visayas region. ... Combatants United States Philippines several groups post-1902 Commanders William McKinley Theodore Roosevelt Wesley Merritt Elwell Stephen Otis J. Franklin Bell Henry Ware Lawton† John J. Pershing Joseph Wheeler Emilio Aguinaldo Miguel Malvar Pio del Pilar Manuel Tinio Gregorio del Pilar† Licerio Geronimo Vicente Lukban Juan Cailles Maximino Hizon Antonio... Balangiga is a municipality in the province of Eastern Samar in the Philippines. ... Combatants Samareno Rebels United States Commanders General Vicente Lukban Captain Thomas W. Connell Strength 180-200 Samareno bolomen 78 Company C. 9th U.S. Infanty Casualties 20-25 killed, 22 wounded; plus thousands of Samar civilians killed in reprisals 54 killed, 18 wounded 100 rifles and 25,000 rounds of... The March Massacre or March Days refers to a period during the Russian Civil War from March to early April 1918 when ethnic Azerbaijanis were massacred by Armenian nationalist Dashnak party and Soviet Bolsheviks forces in the city of Baku and other areas of former Baku governorate (present-day Azerbaijan). ... Coordinates: , Country Government  - Mayor Hajibala Abutalybov Area  - City 260 km²  (100. ... Foundation: 1890 Founders: Christapor Mikaelian, Stepan Zorian, Simon Zavarian Head: Hrant Markarian Ideology: Socialism,[1] Nationalism,[2] United Armenia International alignment: Socialist International[1] Colours: Red Seats: Armenia – 16 seats out of 131 Nagorno-Karabakh – 3 seats out of 33 Lebanon – 2 seats out of 128 Website: Partys Official... For other uses, see Bolshevik (disambiguation). ... The September Days refers to a period during the Russian Civil War during September 1918 when ethnic Armenians were massacred by Enver Pashas Army of Islam in the city of Baku, Azerbaijan. ... Coordinates: , Country Government  - Mayor Hajibala Abutalybov Area  - City 260 km²  (100. ... Ä°smail Enver (Ottoman Turkish: اسماعيل انور) , known to Europeans during his political career as Enver Pasha (Turkish: Enver PaÅŸa) or Enver Bey was a Turkish military officer and a leader of the Young Turk revolution. ... Army of Islam was a Field Army of the Ottoman Empire established between March 1918 - August 1918, the creation of a this military force was ordered by the Enver Pasha, War Minister. ... Not to be confused with the Spanish Civil War of 1820-1823. ... For the long-distance runner, see Addis Abebe. ... Rodolfo Graziani, Marchese di Neghelli (August 11, 1882—January 11, 1955), was an Italian military officer who led expeditions in Africa before and during World War II and a war criminal responsible for thousands of Libyan and Ethiopian civilian deaths. ... The Nanking Massacre (Chinese: &#21335;&#20140;&#22823;&#23648;&#27578;, pinyin: Nánj&#299;ng Dàtúsh&#257;; Japanese: &#21335;&#20140;&#22823;&#34384;&#27578;, Nankin Daigyakusatsu), also known as the Rape of Nanking and sometimes in Japan as the Nanking Incident (&#21335;&#20140;&#20107;&#20214;, Nankin Jiken), refers to what... The Imperial Japanese Army (&#22823;&#26085;&#26412;&#24093;&#22269;&#38520;&#36557; Dai-Nippon Teikoku Rikugun) was in existence from the Meiji Reformation to the end of World War II. It was created to replace the traditional Japanese samurai with a modern Western-style conscript army. ... The Imperial Japanese Army (&#22823;&#26085;&#26412;&#24093;&#22269;&#38520;&#36557; Dai-Nippon Teikoku Rikugun) was in existence from the Meiji Reformation to the end of World War II. It was created to replace the traditional Japanese samurai with a modern Western-style conscript army. ...

During World War II (1939-1945)

Date Name Deaths Location Summary Claimants
1939 Wawer 107 Poland 120 men caught in a Łapanka are shot as a reprisal for the death of two German soldiers, 13 of them survive the massacre under the pile of bodies. [citation needed]
1939-1940 Palmiry massacre c.2,000 Poland The Gestapo systematically murders members of the Polish intelligentsia, sportsmen, politicians and common people. [citation needed]
1940 Katyn massacre 25,700 Poland Members of the Polish intelligentsia, POWs and reserve officers are massacred by the Soviets. [citation needed]
1940 Treznea massacre c.93 Treznea, N. Transylvania, Hungary The Hungarian army massacres Romanian and Jewish civilians. [citation needed]
1940 Ip massacre c.100 Ip, N. Transylvania, Hungary The Hungarians massacre Romanian civilians in Northern Transylvania. [citation needed]
1941 NKVD prisoner massacres c.100,000 Soviet Union The Soviet NKVD massacres tens of thousands of Polish and Ukrainian political prisoners at the initial stages of Operation Barbarossa. [211]
1941 Fântâna Albă massacre c.200 Soviet Union The Soviets massacre Romanian civilians in Northern Bukovina. [citation needed]
1941 Bombing of Belgrade in World War II 17,000 Yugoslavia The Germans bomb Belgrade, killing 17,000 people. Belgrade is bombed again in 1944, this time by the Allies. [citation needed]
June, 1941 Rainiai massacre 79 Soviet Union Soviet soldiers and members of the NKVD torture to death 78-79 Lithuanian civilians (former public servants, rich people, Boy Scouts, non-communists). [citation needed]
1941 massacre of Lwów professors 45 Lwów, Poland Part of the AB Action, forty-five university professors are executed by an Einsatzkommando unit following the German capture of the city on June 30. [citation needed]
1941 Kragujevac massacre 10,000 Serbia Reprisal killings are committed by German forces after the death of 10 soldiers at the hands of partisans. [citation needed]
1942 Sook Ching massacre c.50,000-100,000 (Singapore only) Malaya & Singapore Japanese troops execute ethnic Chinese Malayans and Singaporeans suspected of being hostile. [citation needed]
1942 Bataan Death March 5,650 Philippines American and Philippine POWs are marched to prison camps and killed if they fall behind. [citation needed]
1942 Lidice 340 Lidice, Czechoslovakia After Czech agents assassinate Nazi Protector of Bohemia-Morovia Reinhard Heydrich, German SS execute the men of the Czech village Lidice. The remaining women and children are sent to concentration camps and the village is destroyed. [citation needed]
1942-45 Sandakan POW/Labour Camp 6,000 North Borneo Indonesian romusha (forced labourers), as well as Australian and British POWs are forced to construct an airfield at Sandakan. All of the Indonesians are dead by 1945. In addition to deprivation and physical abuse, including summary executions, the surviving POWs are forced to March 260 kilometres (160 miles) to another camp. Only six of those sent on these marches survive the war. [citation needed]
1943 Khatyn massacre 100+ Belarus The entire village in Belarus is burnt with all its inhabitants by the German Nazis and their Ukrainian collaborators; one of hundreds of Belarusian, Ukrainian and Russian villages to share a similar fate. [212]
1943 massacres of Poles in Volhynia c.100,000 Ukraine By Ukrainian nationalists [citation needed]
1943 Canicatti Slaughter 12 Sicily US Troops kill unarmed civilians at a soap factory. [citation needed]
1943 Biscari massacre 76 Sicily US Troops massacre German and Italian POWs. [citation needed]
1943 Foiba massacre 5,000-10,000 Istria and Dalmatia in Italy Communist troops under Tito's command purge Italian fascists and collaborators until 1947. [citation needed]
1943 Kalavryta massacre 696 Greece The male residents of the town are slaughtered by German troops in revenge for partisan activities. [citation needed]
1944 Manila massacre 100,000 Philippines Retreating Japanese troops slaughter at least 100,000 Filipino civilians. Manila is razed, making it the 2nd most devastated city in World War II after Warsaw. [citation needed]
1944 Koniuchy massacre 38-300 Poland The civilians of Koniuchy are murdered by 120-150 members of Soviet partisan groups. [citation needed]
1944 Ascq massacre c.86 France After two railway cars are derailed, presumably by the French Underground, soldiers of the 12th SS Panzer Division under the command of SS Obersturmführer Walter Hauck murder 86 men in the surrounding area of the Ascq railway station. [citation needed]
1944 Kakolyri (of Kyme) massacre 30 Greece 24 male residents of the village are slaughtered by German troops, who suspect them of helping partisan activities. The partisans previously killed one soldier who was guarding a bridge. 6 male residents of the nearby villages are slaughtered too. [citation needed]
1944 Abbey Ardennes c. 11-20 France Canadian POWs who were captured during the battle are marched out into a garden and interrogated before being shot by members of the 12th SS Panzer Division. [citation needed]
1944 Tulle Murders c. 99 France In response to French Underground activities the 2nd Waffen-SS Panzer Division, upon finding the mutilated remains of 64 German soldiers of the 95th Security Regiment garrison, hangs 99 men and the remaining population of Tulle is sent to labor camps in Germany. Of the 149 townspeople only 48 survive the war. [213]
June 10, 1944 Oradour-sur-Glane massacre 642 France Responding to recent French Resistance activity (e.g. Tulle Murders) in which German soldiers were killed, 120 SS soldiers of the 2nd Waffen-SS Panzer Division, commanded by SS Sturmbannführer Adolf Diekmann, execute 642 civilians mostly women and children refuged in the church in the town of Oradour-sur-Glane. [citation needed]
1944 Distomo massacre est. 228-600 Greece More than 200 residents of the village of Distomo are massacred by the Germans. The exact number of the victims remains unknown. [citation needed]
1944 San Polo di Arezzo massacre 48 Italy In reprisal for Italian partisan attacks, German soldiers beat and torture the men of San Polo, before burying them alive with 3 captured partisans and explosives. [citation needed]
1944 Wola massacre up to 50,000 Warsaw, Poland German troops systematically slaughter most of the civilians in the borough of Wola during the early stage of the Warsaw Uprising. [citation needed]
1944 Meligala massacre 1,500 Greece ELAS communist fighters attack the village of Meligalas and massacre 1,500 men, women and children. Their bodies are thrown into a large well, known as the "Pigada of Meligala". Many of the victims were collaborators with the Germans (see Greek Civil War). [citation needed]
1944 Putten atrocity 39 Netherlands General Heinz Helmuth von Wuhlisch orders the execution of 39 Dutch civilians and the village burned after an attack by the Dutch resistance results in the capture of a German soldier despite the later release of the hostage. The remaining men in the village are sent to labor camps and out of 589 only 49 survive at the end of the war. [citation needed]
1944 Amsterdam reprisal 29 Netherlands 29 Dutch civilians are executed and several buildings are set on fire after the assassination of S.D. officer Herbert Oelschagel by the Dutch resistance the previous day. [citation needed]
1944 Malmedy massacre 72-84 Belgium Executions of surrendered American POWs during the Battle of the Bulge. [citation needed]
1944 Marzabotto massacre 728-1,800 Italy In reprisal of the local support given to the partisans and the resistance movement, as many as 1,800 Italian civilians were massacred by the SS forces. [214]
1945 Chenogne massacre 60 Belgium In reprisal for the Malmedy massacre, sixty German soldiers are executed by a unit of the U.S. 11th Armored Division outside the town of Chenogne. [citation needed]
1945 Bleiburg massacre 55,000-300,000 Yugoslavia Partisans retaliate against Ustashe, Domobrans, and many Croat civilians. [citation needed]
May 3, 1945 SS Cap Arcona sinking 7,000-8,000 Germany British RAF aircraft sink the SS Cap Arcona, Deutschland, and Thielbek, which were carrying POWs from the Neuengamme concentration camp. Hawker Typhoons, then Nazis kill survivors as they attempt to make it ashore. [215]
1945 Setif massacre 150 pied-noirs
1,500–45,000 Algerians
Algeria Immediately following the end of WW2 hostilities in Europe, Algerians demonstrating for independance are massacred by colonial government troops. [citation needed]
1945 Sado atrocity 387 Sado, Japan Japanese soldiers under Lieutenant Yoshiro Tsuda set off an explosion in a nearby gold mine, killing the 387 British, American, Australian and Dutch prisoners of war who had been working in the mine since 1942. [citation needed]
1945 Treuenbrietzen c.1000 Germany Red army soldiers execute German civilians. [citation needed]

Area 79,71 km² Population 62 656 (2003) Population density 786/km² Mayor Dariusz Godlewski Notable landmarks Wawer Website Wawer is one of the Warsawian districts, located in southern-eastern part of city. ... A Å‚apanka in Warsaws Å»oliborz district, 1941. ... Cemetery in Palmiry Tomb of Janusz KusociÅ„ski Tomb of Maciej Rataj Palmiry (pronounce: ) is a small village in Poland in Mazovian Voivodship, near Nowy Dwór Mazowiecki, north of Warsaw. ... The notion of an intellectual elite as a distinguished social stratum can be traced far back in history. ... Katyn and KatyÅ„ redirect here. ... The Treznea massacre was an incident that occurred in the village of Ördögkút (now Treznea, Sălaj) in north-western Transylvania on 9 September 1940, during the handing over of Northern Transylvania from Romania to Hungary after the Second Vienna Award. ... Treznea is a village in Sălaj County, Romania. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Ip is a village in Sălaj County. ... The massacre of prisoners refers to a series of mass executions committed by Soviet NKVD against prisoners in Poland and parts of the Soviet Union from which the Red Army was withdrawing after the German invasion in 1941 (see Operation Barbarossa). ... The NKVD (Narodny Komissariat Vnutrennikh Del  ) (Russian: , ) or Peoples Commissariat for Internal Affairs was the leading secret police organization of the Soviet Union that was responsible for political repressions during Stalinism. ... Combatants Germany Romania Finland Italy Hungary Slovakia  Soviet Union Commanders Adolf Hitler Wilhelm Ritter von Leeb Fedor von Bock Gerd von Rundstedt Heinz Guderian Günther von Kluge Franz Halder Maresal Ion Antonescu C.G.E. Mannerheim Giovanni Messe, CSIR Italo Garibaldi, ARMIR Joseph Stalin Kliment Voroshilov Semyon Timoshenko Fyodor... The Fântâna Albă massacre took place April 1, 1941, in Northern Bukovina when a large number of people attempted to cross the border from the Soviet Union to Romania near the village of Fântâna Albă (White Fountain), (today Bila Krynytsya, Ukraine). ... Bukovina (Bucovina in Romanian; &#1041;&#1091;&#1082;&#1086;&#1074;&#1080;&#1085;&#1072;, Bukovyna in Ukrainian; Buchenland or Bukowina in German; Bukowina in Polish), on the slopes of the Carpathian Mountains, comprises an historic province now split between Romania and Ukraine. ... he bombing of Belgrade occurred in the initial phases of World War II when German forces bombed the city in preperation for the invasion of Yugoslavia. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in the Latin alphabet, Југославија in Cyrillic; English: South Slavia, or literary The Land of South Slavs) describes three political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... The Rainiai massacre (Lithuanian: ) was the mass murder of 78 or 79 Lithuanian political prisoners perpetrated by the Red Army in a forest near TelÅ¡iai, Lithuania during the night of June 24-25 1941. ... The NKVD (Narodny Komissariat Vnutrennikh Del  ) (Russian: , ) or Peoples Commissariat for Internal Affairs was the leading secret police organization of the Soviet Union that was responsible for political repressions during Stalinism. ... Polish Boy Scouts fighting in the Warsaw Uprising Boy Scouts originally denoted the organization that developed and rapidly grew up during 1908 in the wake of the publication by Lord Robert Baden-Powell of his book Scouting for Boys. ... Monument to the victims in WrocÅ‚aw, Poland The murder of the Lwów professors was the mass execution of approximately 45 Polish professors of the University of Lwów (a. ... Motto: Semper fidelis Oblast Lviv Oblast Municipal government City council (Львівська міська рада) Mayor City chairman Lyubomyr Bunyak Area 171,01 km² Population  - city  - urban  - density 808,900 ? 4786/km² Founded City rights 13th century 1353 Latitude Longitude 49°51′ N 24°01′ E Area code +0322 Car plates  ? Twin towns Corning, Freiburg... AB-Aktion was a campaign to kill leaders of the Polish resistance and cause fear among the Polish population. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The massacre The Kragujevac massacre was the massacre of over 6,000 civilians, mostly Serbs, Jews, communist and Gypsys — men, women and schoolchildren — in Kragujevac, Serbia, then Yugoslavia, by the soldiers of Nazi Germany, on 20 October 1941. ... Not to be confused with Republika Srpska. ... The Sook Ching massacre (肅清大屠殺) was a systematic extermination of perceived hostile elements among the Chinese in Singapore by the Japanese military during the Japanese Occupation of Singapore, after the British colony surrendered in the Battle of Singapore on 15 February 1942 during World War II. Sook Ching was later extended... Map of Peninsular Malaysia Peninsular Malaysia (Malay: Semenanjung Malaysia) is the part of Malaysia which lies on the Malay Peninsula, and shares a land border with Thailand in the north. ... Map of Peninsular Malaysia Peninsular Malaysia (Malay: Semenanjung Malaysia) is the part of Malaysia which lies on the Malay Peninsula, and shares a land border with Thailand in the north. ... The Bataan Death March (aka The Death March of Bataan) was a Japanese war crime involving the forcible transfer of prisoners of war -- with wide-ranging abuse and high fatalities -- by Japanese forces in the Philippines in 1942. ... Lidice (Liditz in German) is a village in former Czechoslovakia (now in the Czech Republic) which was completely destroyed by the Germans during World War II. About 340 men, women, and children from the village were murdered by the Germans. ... Reinhard Tristan Eugen Heydrich (7 March 1904 – 4 June 1942) was an SS-Obergruppenführer, chief of the Reich Security Main Office (including the Gestapo, SD and Kripo Nazi police agencies) and Reichsprotektor (Reich Protector) of Bohemia and Moravia. ... Lidice (Liditz in German) is a village in former Czechoslovakia (now in the Czech Republic) which was completely destroyed by the Germans during World War II. About 340 men, women, and children from the village were murdered by the Germans. ... A concentration camp is a large detention centre created for political opponents, aliens, specific ethnic or religious groups, civilians of a critical war-zone, or other groups of people, often during a war. ... October 24, 1945. ... Motto: Pergo et Perago (Latin: I undertake and I achieve”) British North Borneo Capital Jesselton Language(s) Malay, English Government Monarchy Monarch  - 1882 - 1901 Victoria  - 1952 - 1963 Elizabeth II Governor  - 1896 - 1901 Robert Scott Historical era New Imperialism  - North Borneo Company May, 1882  - British protectorate 1888  - Japanese invasion January 1... Romushas were Indonesian forced laborers during the Japanese occupation in World War II. The word is Japanese and (reportedly) translates to wood log, indicating the disposable nature of the Indonesian labor force. ... Location in Sabah and Malaysia Country Malaysia State Sandakan Establishment Government  - Council President Dr Yeo Boon Hai Area  - City 2,266 km²  (875 sq mi) Population (2006)  - City 427,200  - Density 184/km² (488/sq mi) Time zone MST (UTC+8)  - Summer (DST) Not observed (UTC) Website: http://www. ... Statue of the only man from Khatyn to survive the massacre, holding his dead child, by Josef Kaminski (1969). ... The Massacre of Poles in Volhynia was an ethnic cleansing conducted in Volhynia (Polish: ) during World War II. In the course of it, up to 80,000 Poles are thought to have been massacred by the nationalist Ukrainian Insurgent Army (Ukrainska Povstanska Armiya, or UPA). ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... The Biscari massacre was a war crime committed by U.S. troops during World War II, where unarmed German and Italian prisoners of war were supposedly killed at Biscari in 1943. ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Simple scheme of a foiba. ... Istria (Croatian and Slovenian: Istra, Venetian and Italian: Istria), formerly Histria (Latin), is the largest peninsula in the Adriatic Sea. ... Dalmatia, highlighted, on a map of Croatia. ... Kalalvryta or Kalavrita (Greek: Καλάβρυτα) is a town, a province and a municipality in the eastcentral part of the prefecture of Achaia. ... Slain children in the ruins of Manila The Manila massacre, February 1945, refers to the atrocities conducted against Filipino civilians in Manila, Philippines by retreating Japanese troops during World War II. Various credible Western and Eastern sources agree that the death toll was at least 100,000 people. ... The KaniÅ«kai massacre is a massacre that took place during the World War II in lithuanian village of KaniÅ«kai (Koniuchy in polish), in the Å alčininkai region of Lithuania. ... Belorussian guerrillas liquidated, injured and took prisoner some 1. ... The abbaye dArdenne (Ardenne Abbey) is a site in Saint-Germain-la-Blanche-Herbe, near Caen, France containing a chapel built in 1121 and other medieval buildings. ... The 12. ... Tulle Murders refers to two related events, taking place in June 1944 in the town of Tulle, France. ... Waffen-SS recruitment poster; Volunteer to the Waffen-SS The Waffen-SS was the armed wing of the Schutzstaffel. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Oradour-sur-Glane was a village in the Limousin région of France that was destroyed on 10 June 1944, when 642 of its inhabitants — including men, women and children — were murdered by a German Waffen-SS company. ... Tulle Murders refers to two related events, taking place in June 1944 in the town of Tulle, France. ... Waffen-SS recruitment poster; Volunteer to the Waffen-SS The Waffen-SS was the armed wing of the Schutzstaffel. ... Distomo also may refer to a work by Frederico Garcia Lorca, see Distomo (literature) Distomo (Greek, Modern: Δίστομο), older forms: Distomon is a municipality in the Boeotia Prefecture, Greece. ... Eugenio Calò is an official hero of Italy. ... The Warsaw Uprising began with simultaneous pre-arranged attacks at 17:00 hours August 1, 1944. ... For other uses, see Warsaw (disambiguation) and Warszawa (disambiguation). ... Area 19,26 km² Population 143 996 (2003) Population density 7476/km² Mayor ZdzisÅ‚aw Sipiera Notable landmarks PowÄ…zki Cemetery Wola Website For other meanings of the word, see WOLA. Wola is a district in western Warsaw, Poland, formerly the village of Wielka Wola, incorporated into Warsaw in 1916. ... For other uses, see Warsaw Uprising (disambiguation). ... Ethnikos Laikos Apeleftherotikos Stratos (ELAS) (Greek Εθνικός Λαϊκός Απελευθερωτικός Στράτος (ΕΛΑΣ) National Popular Liberation Army) was the military arm of the Ethniko Apeleftherotiko Metopo (ELAM) during the period of the Greek Resistance and the Greek Civil War. ... Meligalas (Μελιγαλάς) is a municipality in Messenia, Greece. ... Combatants Hellenic Army, Royalist forces, Republicans United Kingdom Communist Party of Greece (ELAS, DSE) Commanders Alexander Papagos, Thrasyvoulos Tsakalotos, James Van Fleet Markos Vafiadis Strength 150,000 men 50,000 men and women Casualties 15,000 killed 32,000+ killed or captured The Greek Civil War (Ελληνικός εμφύλιος πόλεμος [ellinikos emfilios polemos]) was... United States soldiers discover the aftermath of the Malmedy Massacre. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... For the 1965 film, see Battle of the Bulge (film). ... The Marzabotto massacre was a World War II massacre that took place in the small Italian town of Marzabotto. ... Look up partisan in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Partisans parading in Milan The Italian resistance movement was a partisan force during World War II. // After Italys capitulation on 8 September 1943, the Italian resistance movement became massive. ... The Chenogne massacre refers to an alleged killing of German prisoners of war near the town of town of Chenogne (also spelled Chegnogne), Belgium, on New Years day, January 1, 1945, during World War II. Accounts of the massacre In December 1944, during the Battle of the Bulge, German... United States soldiers discover the aftermath of the Malmedy Massacre. ... Shoulder sleeve patch of the United States Army 11th Armored Division. ... The Chenogne massacre refers to an alleged war crime, the killing of German prisoners of war by American forces near the town of Chenogne (also spelled Chegnogne), Belgium, on New Years day, January 1, 1945, during World War II. On December 17, 1944, during the Battle of the Bulge... Bleiburg memorial in Zagrebs Mirogoj cemetery The Bleiburg massacre, (also known in a more emotional context as the Bleiburg tragedy[1]) is a generalising name that encompasses events that took place during May 1945, after the formal end of World War II in Europe, but at a time when... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in the Latin alphabet, Југославија in Cyrillic; English: South Slavia, or literary The Land of South Slavs) describes three political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ... Yugoslav Partisan Flag The Yugoslav Partisans were one of the two main resistance movements engaged in the fight against the Axis forces in the Balkans during World War II, alongside rival Chetniks, the Yugoslav Peoples Liberation War. ... The Usta&#353;e (often spelled Ustashe in English; singular Usta&#353;a or Ustasha) was a Croatian right-wing organisation put in charge of the Independent State of Croatia by the Axis Powers in 1941. ... Croatian Home Guard (Croatian: Hrvatsko domobranstvo, often abbr. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Memorial of Cap Arcona victims, Neustadt in Holstein. ... RAF is an three letter acronym for: Royal Air Force -- the Air Force of the United Kingdom (see also Air Ministry) Red Army Faction (Rote Armee Fraktion) -- a German terror organisation Rigas Autobusu Fabrika -- a factory making buses in Riga, Latvia Rapid Action Force in India Računarski Fakultet RAF... Memorial of Cap Arcona victims, Neustadt in Holstein. ... The Thielbek was a 2,815 register ton freighter sunk with the Cap Arcona and the Deutschland on May 3, 1945 in the Bay of Lubeck with the loss of 2,750 lives. ... Neuengamme was a concentration camp near Hamburg, Germany during World War 2 [1]. The site is one of the few concentration camps in Germany where most of the buildings have been conserved and serves as a memorial today. ... The Typhoon was a British single-seat fighter-bomber, produced by Hawker Aircraft starting in 1941. ... SS or ss or Ss may be: The Schutzstaffel, a Nazi paramilitary force Steamship (SS) (ship prefix) The United States Secret Service A submarine not powered by nuclear energy (SS) (United States Navy designator), see SSN A Soviet/Russian surface-to-surface missile, as listed by NATO reporting name Shortstop... Setif is a city and wilaya in Algeria in which an uprising occurred against the French colonizers. ... Pied-noir is a term for the former French colonists of North Africa, especially Algeria. ... German soldiers at the Battle of Stalingrad World War II was the most extensive and costly armed conflict in the history of the world, involving the great majority of the worlds nations, being fought simultaneously in several major theatres, and costing tens of millions of lives. ... Sado can refer to: Sado, a city in Niigata Prefecture, Japan Sado province (&#20304;&#28193;&#22269;), an old province of Japan. ... Treuenbrietzen is a town in the Bundesland of Brandenburg, Germany. ... For other organizations known as the Red Army, see Red Army (disambiguation). ...

After 1945

Date Name Deaths Location Summary Claimants
1947 228 Incident 10,000-30,000 Taiwan Kuomintang government (Chinese) troops massacre Taiwanese civilians after an uprising. [citation needed]
1948 Hadassah medical convoy massacre c.77 Mandate for Palestine Jewish medical convoy was attacked by Arab irregulars. Approximately 77 Jews killed, mostly doctors, nurses and medical students by Arab machine gun fire and by burning. [citation needed]
1948 Deir Yassin massacre 107 Mandate for Palestine 107 Arab civilians are killed by Irgun and Lehi. [citation needed]
1950 Capture of Seoul c.100,000 Korea Civilians are executed after the communist capture of Seoul. [citation needed]
1968 My Lai massacre 347–504 South Vietnam USA soldiers executed 504 unarmed South Vietnamese villagers ranging in ages from 1 to 81 years, mostly women and children. [citation needed]
1971 1971 East Pakistan Intellectuals massacre c.100 East Pakistan Pakistan Army and local collaborators kill a large number of doctors, engineers, educators, journalists, and other intellectuals during the flag end of the Bangladesh War of 1971. [citation needed]
January 18, 1976 Karantina massacre c.1,000 Karantina, Lebanon Lebanese Christian Militia massacres Kurds and Armenians, as well as some Lebanese and Palestinians in Karantina a district in Beirut Lebanon during the 1975-1990 Lebanese Civil War. [citation needed]
1976 Damour massacre c.330 Damour, Lebanon Palestinian militants massacre the population of the Christian town of Damour. [citation needed]
1982 Plan de Sánchez massacre c. 250 Plan de Sánchez, Guatemala Government army troops and militias raid Mayan indigenous village, rape women, raze village, and murder unarmed residents, mostly women and children during Guatemalan civil war. [citation needed]
1982 Sabra and Shatila massacre 800–3,000 Beirut, Lebanon Lebanese Christian Militia massacres Palestinian Refugees following Israeli invasion of Beirut. [citation needed]
1985 Massacre near Kandahar, Soviet war in Afghanistan c. 350 Afghanistan In three villages near Kandahar, the Soviets killed women and children in retaliation for a rebel attack in the vicinity. [216]
1991 Lovas massacre 51 Lovas, Croatia Serb paramilitaries kill civilians. [citation needed]
1991 Gospić massacre c. 100 Gospić, Croatia Croat paramilitaries kill civilians. [citation needed]
1991 Vukovar massacre c. 260 Vukovar, Croatia Yugoslav army and Serb paramilitaries massacre POWs and wounded civilians. [citation needed]
1991 Škabrnja massacre 86 Škabrnja, Croatia Serb paramilitaries kill civilians and POWs. [citation needed]
1991 Voćin massacre 32-45 Voćin, Croatia "White Eagles" a Serb paramilitary group massacres civilians. [citation needed]
1992 Khojaly massacre 613 Khojali, Nagorno-Karabakh, Azerbaijan Armenian irregulars massacre Azerbaijani civilians. [citation needed]
1992 Maraghar massacre 145 Maraghar, Nagorno-Karabakh, Azerbaijan Azerbaijani forces massacre Armenian civilians. [citation needed]
1992 Višegrad massacre 3,000 Višegrad, Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnian Serb army takes over the town and massacres many. [citation needed]
1993 Sukhumi massacre 1,200 Abkhazia, Georgia Abkhaz separatists and their allies committed wide spread atrocities and massacres of Georgian civilians in Sukhumi. The massacre of civilians in Sukhumi lasted one week. [citation needed]
1994 First Markale massacre 68 Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnian Serb army shells a crowded civilian marketplace in downtown Sarajevo. [citation needed]
1995 Second Markale massacre 37 Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnian Serb army shells a crowded civilian marketplace in downtown Sarajevo. [citation needed]
2001 Dasht-i-Leili massacre 250–3,000 Afghanistan Taliban prisoners are shot and/or suffocated to death in metal truck containers while being transferred between prisons by Northern Alliance soldiers during the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan. [citation needed]
2005 Haditha Massacre 24 Iraq US marines shoot and kill 24 Iraqi non-combattants, although an early Marine Corps communique reported that 15 civilians were killed by an "insurgent" roadside bombing. [citation needed]
2007 al Ahamir massacre 10 - 14 Iraq Alleged members of al-Qaeda shoot and kill between 10 and 14 Iraqi non-combattants. [citation needed]

The 228 Monument located near the Presidential Office in Taipei The 228 Incident (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; Peh-ōe-jÄ«: JÄ«-jÄ«-pat sÅ«-kiāⁿ) also known as the 228 Massacre (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) was an uprising in Taiwan that began on February 28, 1947 and was suppressed by the... The Kuomintang of China (abbreviation KMT) [1], also often translated as the Chinese Nationalist Party, is a political party in the Republic of China (ROC), now on Taiwan, and is currently the largest political party in terms of seats in the Legislative Yuan, and the oldest political party in the... This article is about the people of Taiwan. ... The Hadassah medical convoy massacre was an event that took place during the 1948 Arab-Israeli war, on April 13, 1948, when a Jewish medical convoy was attacked by Arab forces. ... Palestine and Transjordan were incorporated (under different legal and administrative arrangements) into the Mandate for Palestine issued by the League of Nations to Great Britain on 29 September, 1923. ... The Deir Yassin massacre (Deir Yassin is also transliterated from Arabic as Dayr Yasin and frequently (mis)transliterated from Hebrew writings as Dir Yassin) refers to the killing of scores of Arab civilians at the village of Deir Yassin just east of Jerusalem in Palestine by Jewish irregular forces between... Palestine and Transjordan were incorporated (under different legal and administrative arrangements) into the Mandate for Palestine issued by the League of Nations to Great Britain on 29 September, 1923. ... For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ... Irgun emblem. ... Lehi refers to: Lehi, a prophet in the Book of Mormon Lehi, a city in Utah Lehi, a Zionist paramilitary group in Palestine/Israel Lehi, a location in southwest Palestine/Israel Lehi, a traditionally Mormon agricultural neighborhood in northern Mesa, Arizona This is a disambiguation page &#8212; a navigational aid... Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders... This article is about the Korean peninsula and civilization. ... The My Lai Massacre ( , approximately ) (Vietnamese: thảm sát Mỹ Lai) was the mass murder of 347 to 504 defenseless Vietnamese civilians, mostly women and children, conducted by U.S. Army forces on March 16, 1968, in the hamlet of My Lai, during the Vietnam War. ... This is false story,never been established by any scientific survey. ... East Pakistan was a former province of Pakistan which existed between 1955 and 1971. ... The Pakistan Army (Urdu: پاک فوج) is the largest branch of the Pakistan military, and is mainly responsible for protection of the state borders, the security of administered territories and defending the national interests of Pakistan within the framework of its international obligations. ... The Bangladesh Liberation War (two other names are also used occasionally) refers to an approximately nine month long armed conflict between current day Bangladesh. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Karantina massacre took place during the Lebanese Civil War on January 18, 1976. ... Karantina (Arabic: القرنطينة al-qarantÄ«na) is a residential area in eastern Beirut, named so after having been an old immigration quarantine area. ... Karantina (Arabic: القرنطينة al-qarantÄ«na) is a residential area in eastern Beirut, named so after having been an old immigration quarantine area. ... This article is about the Lebanese city. ... Combatants Lebanese Front Syria LNM PLO Israel Commanders Bachir Gemayel Dany Chamoun Kamal Jumblatt Yasser Arafat Ariel Sharon The Lebanese Civil War (1975–1990) was a multifaceted civil war whose antecedents trace back to the conflicts and political compromises reached after the end of Lebanons administration by the Ottoman... The Damour massacre took place on 20 January 1976 during the 1975–1990 Lebanese Civil War. ... Damour (Arabic: دامور) is a Lebanese Christian town that is 12 miles south of Beirut. ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Damour (Arabic: دامور) is a Lebanese Christian town that is 12 miles south of Beirut. ... The Republic of Guatemala Guatemalas Plan de Sánchez massacre took place in the village of Plan de Sánchez, Rabinal municipality, department of Baja Verapaz, on 18 July 1982. ... Plan de Sánchez is a village in the municipality of Rabinal, Baja Verapaz department, Guatemala. ... The Maya people are a Native American people of southern Mexico and northern Central America. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... The Sabra and Shatila massacre (or Sabra and Chatila massacre; Arabic: مذبحة صبرا وشاتيلا) was an attack carried out in September 1982 by a Lebanese Forces militia group against Palestinian refugee camps in Beirut. ... This article is about the Lebanese city. ... This article is about the city in Afghanistan. ... Combatants USSR DRA Mujahideen of Afghanistan Commanders Soviet forces: Sergei Sokolov Valentin Varennikov Boris Gromov DRA: Babrak Karmal Mohammad Najibullah Abdul Haq Jalaluddin Haqqani Gulbuddin Hekmatyar Ismail Khan Ahmad Shah Massoud Strength Soviet forces: 80,000-104,000 Afghan forces: 329,000 (in 1989)[1] 45,000 (in 1983) 150... Soviet redirects here. ... Lovas on the map of Croatia Lovas is a village and seat of municipality in the Vukovar-Srijem county of eastern Croatia, located on the slopes of FruÅ¡ka Gora, a few kilometers south of the main road connecting Vukovar with Ilok. ... Lovas (Croatia) Lovas is a village and seat of municipality in the Vukovar-Srijem county of eastern Croatia, located on the slopes of FruÅ¡ka Gora, a few kilometers south of the main road connecting Vukovar with Ilok. ... Serbs (in the Serbian language &#1057;&#1088;&#1073;&#1080;, Srbi) are a south Slavic people living chiefly in Serbia and Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... The Gospić massacre was an incident that took place between 16 October-18 October 1991 in the town of Gospić, a mixed Serb/Croat community in the district of Lika in Croatia. ... Gospić is a town in the mountainous and sparsely populated region of Lika, Croatia. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a south Slavic people mostly living in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina (where theyre one of the constitutive nations). ... Ovčara massacre memorial The Vukovar massacre was a war crime that took place between November 18 and November 21, 1991 near the city of Vukovar, a mixed Croat/Serb community in northeastern Croatia. ... Vukovars main street Vukovar Vukovar (Serbian: Вуковар, Croatian: Vukovar, Hungarian: Vukovár) is a city and municipality in eastern Croatia, and the biggest river port in Croatia located at the confluence of the Vuka river into the Danube. ... The Yugoslav Peoples Army (Jugoslavenska/Jugoslovenska narodna armija, JNA, Slovene Jugoslovanska ljudska armada, JLA) was the army of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia prior to its dissolution. ... Serbs (in the Serbian language &#1057;&#1088;&#1073;&#1080;, Srbi) are a south Slavic people living chiefly in Serbia and Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... According to the census of 1991, Å kabrnja was inhabited by 1,953 people in 397 households, and the vast majority of them were Croats, there wasnt a single Serb resident. ... Å kabrnja is a village in northern Dalmatia, Croatia, located halfway between Zadar and Benkovac in the lowland region of Ravni Kotari. ... Serbs (in the Serbian language &#1057;&#1088;&#1073;&#1080;, Srbi) are a south Slavic people living chiefly in Serbia and Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... Voćin massacre was a massacre of between 45 and 55 Croatian civilians [1] in the village of Voćin, perpetuated by Serb paramilitary units in December 1991 during the Croatian War of Independence. ... Voćin is a village in western Slavonia, Croatia, located southwest of Slatina and east of Daruvar. ... Sholder patch of the paramilitary group the White Eagles. ... A photo of a child who survived Khojaly. ... Khojali (Azerbaijani: Xocalı), also called Khojaly, Khodjaly and Hojaly, is a town and a rayon in the Nagorno-Karabakh region of Azerbaijan, now under the control of ethnically Armenian separatists. ... Nagorno-Karabakh (Azerbaijani: Da&#287;l&#305;q Qaraba&#287; or Yuxar&#305; Qaraba&#287;, literally mountainous black garden or upper black garden; Russian: &#1053;&#1072;&#1075;&#1086;&#1088;&#1085;&#1099;&#1081; &#1050;&#1072;&#1088;&#1072;&#1073;&#1072;&#1093;, translit. ... Nagorno-Karabakh (Azerbaijani: Da&#287;l&#305;q Qaraba&#287; or Yuxar&#305; Qaraba&#287;, literally mountainous black garden or upper black garden; Russian: &#1053;&#1072;&#1075;&#1086;&#1088;&#1085;&#1099;&#1081; &#1050;&#1072;&#1088;&#1072;&#1073;&#1072;&#1093;, translit. ... The ViÅ¡egrad massacre was an act of ethnic cleansing and mass murder of Bosniak civilians that occurred in the town of ViÅ¡egrad in eastern Bosnia and Herzegovina, committed by Bosnian Serb paramilitary forces of Milan Lukić at the start of the Bosnian War during the spring of 1992. ... The bridge on the Drina (around 1890) ViÅ¡egrad (Cyrillic: Вишеград) is a town and municipality in the eastern part of Republika Srpska, Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Bosnian Serb Army, officially Army of the Republika Srpska (Serbian Војска Републике Српске/Vojska Republike Srpske, ВРС/VRS) is the military of the Bosnian Serb political entity of Republika Srpska. ... Georgian civilians hiding from Abkhaz separatist militants near Sukhumi The Sukhumi Massacre took place on September 27, 1993, during the Georgian-Abkhaz conflict. ... Capital Sokhumi Official languages Abkhaz, Georgian Government  -  Chairman, Cabinet of Ministers  -  Chairman, Supreme Council Temur Mzhavia Autonomous republic of Georgia  -  Georgian independence Declared Recognised 9 April 1991 25 December 1991  Currency Georgian lari (GEL) Anthem Aiaaira Capital Sukhumi Official languages Abkhaz, Russian1 Government  -  President Sergei Bagapsh  -  Prime Minister Alexander Ankvab... The Abkhazians or Abkhaz (Abkhaz: , Georgian: აფხაზები, Turkish: Abhazlar) are a Caucasian ethnic group, mainly living in Abkhazia, de jure an autonomous republic of Georgia. ... Photograph from the scene, shortly after one of the massacres. ... Map of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Sarajevo) Coordinates: , Country Entity Canton Sarajevo Canton Government  - Mayor Semiha Borovac (SDA) Area [1]  - City 141. ... Bosnian Serb Army, officially Army of the Republika Srpska (Serbian Војска Републике Српске/Vojska Republike Srpske, ВРС/VRS) is the military of the Bosnian Serb political entity of Republika Srpska. ... Photograph from the scene, shortly after one of the massacres. ... Map of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Sarajevo) Coordinates: , Country Entity Canton Sarajevo Canton Government  - Mayor Semiha Borovac (SDA) Area [1]  - City 141. ... Bosnian Serb Army, officially Army of the Republika Srpska (Serbian Војска Републике Српске/Vojska Republike Srpske, ВРС/VRS) is the military of the Bosnian Serb political entity of Republika Srpska. ... The Dasht-i-Leili massacre occurred in December 2001 during the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan where between 250 and 3,000 (depending on sources) Taliban prisoners were shot and/or suffocated to death in metal truck containers, while being transferred by U.S. and Northern Alliance soldiers from Kunduz... The Taliban (Pashto: , also anglicized as Taleban) are a Sunni Muslim Pashtun movement [2] that ruled most of Afghanistan from 1996 until 2001, when their leaders were removed from power by a cooperative military effort between the Northern Alliance, United States, and the United Kingdom. ... The Northern Alliance is a term used by the western media, Taliban and Al Qaida to identify the military coalition of various Afghan groups fighting the Taliban. ... For other uses of War in Afghanistan, see War in Afghanistan (disambiguation). ... The Haditha massacre is a massacre of civilians reportedly committed by United States Marines on November 19, 2005 in the town of Haditha in Iraq. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is the second smallest of the five branches of the United States armed forces, with 170,000 active and 40,000 reserve Marines as of 2002. ... The al Ahamir massacre refers to the incident where between 10 and 14 Iraqis were killed by Al Queda on or around the date of June 29th 2007 in al Ahamir, a city on the outskirts of Baquba, Iraq. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: &#1575;&#1604;&#1602;&#1575;&#1593;&#1583;&#1577;, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ...

State-sponsored or state-condoned massacres during peacetime

Date Name Deaths Location Summary Claimants
1570 Massacre of Novgorod 2,500 - 12,000 Novgorod, Russia Ivan the Terrible slaughters the population of Novgorod. [citation needed]
1692 Massacre of Glencoe 78 Scotland

The order is signed by King William III The Massacre of Novgorod was a State-sponsored genocide that occoured in the city of Novgorod, Russia in 1570. ... Velikiy Novgorod (Russian: ) is the foremost historic city of North-Western Russia. ... Tsar Ivan the Terrible, by Viktor Vasnetsov Ivan IV Vasilyevich (Russian: ) (August 25, 1530, Moscow â€“ March 18, 1584, Moscow) was the Grand Prince of Moscow from 1533 to 1547 and Czar of Russia from 1547 until his death. ... Glencoe The Massacre of Glencoe occurred in Glen Coe, Scotland, in the early morning of 13 February 1692, during the era of the Glorious Revolution and Jacobitism. ... This article is about the country. ... William III of England, II of Scotland and III of Orange (The Hague, 14 November 1650 – Kensington Palace, 8 March 1702) was a Dutch aristocrat, the Prince of Orange from his birth, Stadtholder of the main provinces of the Dutch Republic from 28 June 1672, King of England and King...

[citation needed]
1770 Boston massacre 5 British colony, now US state of Massachusetts Pre- American Revolution, British soldiers open fire upon a hostile crowd. The soldiers are later acquitted by an all American colonist jury. [citation needed]
1846 Kot massacre 85-90 Kathmandu, Nepal Queen's secret lover is murdered. She orders Jung Bahadur Rana for the investigation who kills every top nobleman and ultimately seizes the absolute power of Nepal establishing Rana autocracy. [citation needed]
1848 Massacre in Běchovice min.100 Běchovice, Bohemia Austrian army massacred unarmed civilians [citation needed]
1905 Bloody Sunday 100-1000 Saint Petersburg, Russia Tsarist soldiers fire on unarmed demonstrators in front of the Winter Palace. [citation needed]
August 16, 1819 Peterloo massacre 11 Manchester, England Cavalry attack civil rights protestors and 11 are killed, 500 are injured (including women and children) [citation needed]
1909 Adana massacre >2,000 Adana, Ottoman Empire Abdul Hamid loyalists massacre Armenians. [citation needed]
1918 Romanov Massacre c.10 Yekaterinburg, Russia Bolshevik execution of Nicholas II and the Russian royal household. [citation needed]
1919 Amritsar massacre c.>379 India British troops led by Brigadier General Reginald Dyer fires 1650 rounds of ammunition into a crowd of 20,000 people gathered in a garden with its sole exit blocked to prevent people from escaping. [citation needed]
1921 Tulsa Race Riot 39-300 Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA White mobs invade and burn the segregated black Greenwood district, 1,256 homes. The governor declares martial law, black citizens are rounded up by the National Guard and put into internment camps. [citation needed]
1922 18 of the Copacabana Fort revolt 8 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil The first event of the tenentist revolt. At the end, ten men, one of them a civilian, marched to the encounter of the loyalist troops, and were massacred. [citation needed]
1930 Qissa Khwani bazaar massacre c.200 Peshawar British troops fire on hundreds of non-violent protesters in Peshawar. [citation needed]
1932 MMDC 5 São Paulo, Brazil Five students in a protest died in result of a clash with Getúlio Vargas' federal troops, triggering the Constitutionalist Revolution. The last of them died only a few months after being wounded. [citation needed]
1932 Bonus March 4-5 Washington, D.C., United States Federal cavalry troops with rifles and tear gas evict World War I veterans and their families in protest camps around Washington. Hundreds of veterans are injured, several are killed. [citation needed]
1937 Purge of the Red Army 30,000 Soviet Union With 50% of all army officers executed on Stalin's order, including 3 of 5 marshals, 13 of 15 army commanders and 8 of 9 admirals, the result was that the Red Army officer corps in 1941 had many inexperienced senior officers. [217][218]
1937 Parsley Massacre 17,00 - 35,000 Dominican Republic Dominican dictator Rafael Leonidas Trujillo ordered the execution of the Haitian population living within the borderlands with Haiti. [citation needed]
1937-1941 Kurapaty 30,000-200,000 Soviet Union During the Stalinist period in the Soviet Union, it was one of the sites where the NKVD had buried thousands of executed. [219]
1939 Mass executions after the Spanish Civil War Tens of thousands Spain Franco's victory was followed by thousands of summary executions. [220][221]
1948 Babrra massacre c.100 Charsadda district of Pakistan Unarmed workers of the Khudai Khidmatgar movements were fired upon by the provincial government of North-West Frontier province on the orders of the then Chief Minister Khan Abdul Qayyum Khan [citation needed]
1948 Jeju massacre 30,000 Korea South Korean troops execute people in Jeju after the communist uprising has been crushed [citation needed]
1949-1953 Annihilation of "class enemies" 700,000[222]-5,000,000[223] People’s Republic of China Mao’s first political campaigns of mass repression targeted former officials, businessmen, former employees of Western companies, intellectuals, and significant numbers of rural gentry. There was a policy to select "at least one landlord, and usually several, in virtually every village for public execution". [224]
1950 Taejon massacre 7,000 Korea South Korean troops execute North Korean POWs [citation needed]
1953 Qibya massacre c.60 West Bank Israeli soldiers raid Palestinian village, killing at least 60 civilians. [citation needed]
1954 Kengir massacre 700 Soviet Union Forty days of Gulag prisoner resistance ending in a bloody massacre of prisoners by Soviet forces. [citation needed]
1955 6 - 7 September massacres > 28 killed, 30 injured, 300 raped Istanbul, Turkey Killing of members of the Greek community by Turkish civilians during riots against Christianity. [citation needed]
1954-1962 Algerian massacre >500,000 Algeria Killing of Algerian civilians by French Army and the FLN during the Algerian War of Independence. [citation needed]
1956 Kafr Qasim massacre 48 + 1 unborn child Israel Israeli Border Police kill 48 people including a 9-month pregnant woman in the Arab village of Kafr Qasim. [citation needed]
1959 Suppression of the Lhasa Uprising 87,000[225] Tibet The Chinese PLA massacres thousands of Tibetans in the Lhasa region during the rebellion against Chinese rule. [citation needed]
1960 Sharpeville massacre 69 South Africa Police open fire on a crowd of black protesters, 69 people killed and more than 180 injured. [citation needed]
1961 Paris massacre of 1961 32-200[226] Paris, France Killing of Algerian demonstrators [citation needed]
1962 Massacre of Harkis 50,000-150,000 Algeria Algerians who remained loyal to France and their families were massacred by the National Liberation Front (Algeria) and by lynch mobs. [227][228]
1962 Novocherkassk massacre 24 killed, 39 injured Novocherkassk, Soviet Union police open fire on a crowd of protesters demonstrating against inflation [citation needed]
1962 Palma Sola massacre "thousands"[229] Dominican Republic The Dominican military destroys the town of Palma Sola, the base of the (mostly Afro-Dominican) political and religious dissident movement known as the Liboristas [citation needed]
1965-1966 September 30th massacre and aftermath 500,000-1 million Indonesia The Suharto regime massacres ethnic Chinese communists and dissidents in rural areas [230]
1968 Orangeburg massacre 3 South Carolina State University, USA Local police officers fire into a crowd of violent protestors, killing 3 men [citation needed]
1968 Tlatelolco massacre 200–300 Tlatelolco, Mexico Troops open fire on student demonstrators. [citation needed]
1968-1979 Masie Nguema Biyogo Ñegue Ndong 80,000 Equatorial Guinea Out of a population of 300,000, an estimated 80,000 have been killed. Nguema acted as chief judge who sentenced thousands to death. [231][232] [233]
1970 Kent State massacre 4 killed, 9 wounded Kent State University, Ohio, USA 29 members of the Ohio National Guard open fire on unarmed students protesting against the expansion of the Vietnam War into Cambodia on the Kent State University college campus, killing 4 and wounding 9, one of whom is permanently paralyzed. [234][235][236]
1971 Massacre of Bangladesh c.250,000-3,000,000[237] Bangladesh Starting with Operation Searchlight in March, the Pakistani Army kills c.250,000-3,000,000 Bangladeshis [citation needed]
1971 Corpus Christi massacre c.25 Mexico City, Mexico Special forces open fire on student demonstrators. [citation needed]
1971-1979 Idi Amin Dada 300,000[238]-500,000[239] Uganda The Idi Amin regime massacres other ethnic groups, religious leaders, journalists, senior bureaucrats, judges, lawyers, students and intellectuals [240]
1972 Bloody Sunday 14 Derry, Northern Ireland Shooting of 28 unarmed Irish Catholic Civilians, 14 of whom die, by a Paratroop Regiment of the British Army following a protest march at the introduction of internment without trial. [citation needed]
1973 Caravan of Death 71 to 97 Chile A death squad flew though the country shortly after the 1973 Chilean coup d'état, aiming potential political opponents. [citation needed]
1973 Ezeiza massacre at least 13 Argentina Snipers fired at a large crowd gathered near the airport at Perón's return from exile. [citation needed]
1974-1991 Marxist regime of Mengistu Haile Mariam 150,000[241]-500,000[242] Ethiopia During Mengistu's rule it was not uncommon to see students, suspected government critics or rebel sympathisers hanging from lampposts each morning. Amnesty International estimates that up to 500,000 people were killed during the Mengistu's so-called red terror. [243][244]
1975 Operation Colombo 119 Chile Disappearance of political dissidents undertaken by the Chilean secret Police during the dictatorship. [citation needed]
1975-1979 Cambodia under Pol Pot 2,000,000 Cambodia 2 million Cambodians were killed, political executions, starvation, and forced labor, about 25% to 30% of the entire population. [citation needed]
1975-1983 Operation Condor c. 50,000 Southern South America Murders that followed kidnappings and tortures of dissident citizens, journalists and professors by the military governments in South America. The number of deaths include c. 30,000 in Argentina's Dirty War). [citation needed]
1980 Gwangju massacre 191–250–2000 Gwangju, South Korea Government troops attack protesting students and civilians in Gwangju. [citation needed]
1981 Tula massacre 13 Atotonilco de Tula, Mexico

13 people are tortured and killed by order of Arturo Durazo Moreno Engraving by Paul Revere that sold widely in the colonies The Boston Massacre was an incident involving the deaths of five American civilians at the hands of British troops on March 5, 1770, the legal aftermath of which helped spark the American Revolutionary War. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... This article is about the U.S. state. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... The Kot Massacre was a bloodbath in in 1846 in which the royals of Nepal and the military clashed, ensuring in the death of thousands of noblemen. ... For the retail store chain, see Kathmandu (company). ... Jung Bahadur (or Jang Bahadur) was a ruler of Nepal and founder of the Rana dynasty of Nepal (originally descended from the family of Udaipur, the House of Mewar). ... After the death of Jang Bahadur, his eldest surviving brother, Ranoddip Singh, became prime minister (1877-85). ... Massacre in BÄ›chovice happened on 17 June 1848 at the train station in the village near Prague, Bohemia (now Czech Republic). ... Flag of Bohemia Bohemia (Czech: ; German: ) is a historical region in central Europe, occupying the western and middle thirds of the Czech Republic. ... Demonstrators march to the Winter Palace. ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: &#1057;&#1072;&#1085;&#1082;&#1090;-&#1055;&#1077;&#1090;&#1077;&#1088;&#1073;&#1091;&#769;&#1088;&#1075;, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as &#1055;&#1080;&#1090;&#1077;&#1088; (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (&#1051;&#1077;&#1085;&#1080;&#1085;&#1075;&#1088;&#1072;&#769;&#1076;, 1924&#8211;1991) and... &#1056;&#1086;&#1089;&#1089;&#1080;&#769;&#1081;&#1089;&#1082;&#1072;&#1103; &#1048;&#1084;&#1087;&#1077;&#769;&#1088;&#1080;&#1103;, (also Imperial Russia) covers the period of Russian history from the expansion of Russia under Peter the Great into the Russian Empire stretching from the Baltic to the Pacific Ocean, to... Located between the Palace Embankment and the Palace Square, the Winter Palace (Russian: Зимний Дворец) in Saint Petersburg, Russia was built between 1754 and 1762 as the winter residence of the Russian tsars. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Print of the Peterloo Massacre published by Richard Carlile Peterloo Massacre of August 16, 1819 was the result of a cavalry charge into the crowd at a public meeting at St Peters Fields, Manchester, England. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Adana massacre occurred in Adana Province, in the Ottoman Empire, in April 1909. ... Adana (Turkish: }) (the ancient Antioch in Cilicia or Antioch on the Sarus)) is the capital of Adana Province in Turkey. ... Ottoman redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Nicholas II redirects here. ... Snow-covered statue of Sverdlov in Yekaterinburg Yekaterinburgs Church on the Blood built on the spot where the Tsar and his family were executed. ... For other uses, see Bolshevik (disambiguation). ... Nicholas II redirects here. ... The Amritsar massacre The Jallianwala Bagh massacre, also known as the Amritsar massacre, was named after the Jallianwala Bagh (Garden) in Amritsar, where, on April 13, 1919, British Indian Army soldiers opened fire on an unarmed gathering of men, women and children. ... Reginald Dyer : The Butcher of Amritsar by Nigel Collett Brigadier-General Reginald Edward Harry Dyer CB (October 9, 1864 – July 23, 1927) was a British Indian Army officer responsible for the Amritsar massacre. ... Buildings burning during the Tulsa race riot of 1921. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Oklahoma Coordinates: , Country State Counties Tulsa, Osage, Wagoner, Rogers Government  - Mayor Kathy Taylor (D) Area  - City  186. ... Greenwood is a black neighborhood that first flourished in Tulsa, Oklahoma during the oil boom of the early 1900s. ... For other uses, see Martial law (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that National Guard Bureau be merged into this article or section. ... Picture of the revolt members in their march to death. The 18 of the Copacabana Fort revolt happened in July, 5 of 1922, in the city of Rio de Janeiro, then Federal Distric of Brazil. ... This article is about the Brazilian city. ... The Lieutenants Revolution, known in Brazil as Revolução Tenentista. ... The massacre of the Qissa Khawani Bazaar (the story tellers market) in Peshawar, British India (modern day Pakistan) on April 23, 1930 is considered a defining moment in the non violent struggle to drive the British out of India. ...   (Urdu: پشاور; Pashto: پښور) literally means City on the Frontier in Persian and is known as Pekhawar in Pashto. ... The poster symbol of the revolution M.M.D.C. is the acronym by wich became known the paulista uprising. ... This article is about the city. ... Getúlio Dornelles Vargas (pron. ... The Constitutionalist Revolution of 1932 is the name given to the uprising of the state of São Paulo against the federal government Brazil. ... Federal troops destroy the encampments The Bonus Army or Bonus March or Bonus Expeditionary Force was a collection of 15,000 World War I veterans, their families, and other affiliated groups, who demonstrated in Washington, DC during June, 1932 seeking immediate payment of a bonus that had been promised by... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... The Great Purge (Russian: , transliterated Bolshaya chistka) refers collectively to several related campaigns of political repression and persecution in the Soviet Union orchestrated by Joseph Stalin during the 1930s, which removed all of his remaining opposition from power. ... Iosif (usually anglicized as Joseph) Vissarionovich Stalin (Russian: &#1048;&#1086;&#1089;&#1080;&#1092; &#1042;&#1080;&#1089;&#1089;&#1072;&#1088;&#1080;&#1086;&#1085;&#1086;&#1074;&#1080;&#1095; &#1057;&#1090;&#1072;&#1083;&#1080;&#1085;), original name Ioseb Jughashvili (Georgian: &#4312;&#4317;&#4321;&#4308;&#4305; &#4335;&#4323;&#4326;&#4304;&#4328;&#4309;&#4312;&#4314... The rank of Marshal of the Soviet Union (Russian: Marshal Sovietskovo Soyuza [Маршал Советского Союза]) was in practice the highest military rank of the Soviet Union. ... In October of 1937, Dominican dictator Rafael Leonidas Trujillo Molina ordered the execution of the Haitian population living within the borderlands with Haiti. ... This article is about Rafael L. Trujillo, former president of the Dominican Republic. ... Kurapaty (Belarusian: Курапаты) is a wooded area on the outskirts of Minsk, Belarus, where in 1941 a vast number of people were executed. ... Stalinism is a brand of political theory, and the political and economic system implemented by Joseph Stalin in the Soviet Union. ... The NKVD (Narodny Komissariat Vnutrennikh Del  ) (Russian: , ) or Peoples Commissariat for Internal Affairs was the leading secret police organization of the Soviet Union that was responsible for political repressions during Stalinism. ... Not to be confused with the Spanish Civil War of 1820-1823. ... // Franco may refer to: Franco is a common surname in Portuguese and Spanish which derives from the word Frank, in reference to the Germanic tribe of the Franks, who invaded the modern-day France during the Migration period[1]. Political figures Francisco Franco, Spanish head of state. ... The Babrra massacre occurred in 1948 in the Charsadda district of Pakistan, when unarmed workers of the Khudai Khidmatgar movements were fired upon by the provincial government of North-West Frontier province on the orders of the then Chief Minister Khan Abdul Qayyum Khan. ... Charsadda چارسڈّہ is a a town in the Charsadda District, in the North-West Frontier Province of Pakistan. ... An old red shirt activist, picture taken by Mukulika Banerjee: The Pathan Unarmed Khudai Khidmatgar (Pashto: خدای خدمتگر) literally translates as the servants of God. ... Abdul Qayyum Khan Khan Abdul Qayyum Khan (nicknamed the Lion of the Frontier by his supporters) was a major figure in Pakistan politics, in particular in the North West Frontier Province where he served as deputy speaker, Chief Minister and Minister in the Central Government as well as Federal Interior... The Jeju massacre or the Cheju April 3rd massacre happened as a result of suppression against armed rebellion in Jeju island, South Korea, during the period of April 3, 1948 to September 21, 1954. ... This article is about the Korean peninsula and civilization. ... People on the stairs to the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago In general, the English word people refers to a specific group of humans, or to persons in a general sense. ... Mao could refer to: Mao Zedong, (Mao Tse-Tung in Wade-Giles) leader of the Communist Party of China from 1935 to 1976. ... This article is about the Korean peninsula and civilization. ... The Qibya massacre was carried out in October 1953 by Israeli troops on the Jordanian West Bank village of that name. ... Kengir was a Soviet prison labor camp whose members went on strike in the 1950s. ... Gulag ( , Russian: ) was the government body responsible for administering prison camps across the former Soviet Union. ... The Istanbul Pogrom (also known as Istanbul Riots; Greek: (Events of September); Turkish: (Events of September 6-7)), was a pogrom directed primarily at Istanbuls 100,000-strong Greek minority on September 6 and 7, 1955. ... Istanbul (Turkish: , Greek: , historically Byzantium and later Constantinople; see other names) is Turkeys most populous city, and its cultural and financial center. ... The National Liberation Front , (Arabic: Jabhat al-TaḩrÄ«r al-WaÅ£anÄ«, French: Front de Libération Nationale aka FLN) is a socialist political party in Algeria. ... Combatants FLN (1954-62) MNA (1954-62) France (1954-62) FAF (1960-61) OAS (1961-62) Commanders Mostefa Benboulaïd Ferhat Abbas Hocine Aït Ahmed Ahmed Ben Bella Krim Belkacem Larbi Ben MHidi Rabah Bitat Mohamed Boudiaf Messali Hadj General Jacques Massu General Maurice Challe Bachaga Said Boualam... Memorial at Kafr Qasim The Kafr Qasim massacre took place in the Israeli Arab village of Kafr Qasim situated on the Green Line, at that time, the de facto border between Israel and Jordan (Arabic: كفر قاسم, also known as Kafr Qassem, Kufur Kassem and Kafar Kassem) on October 29, 1956. ... The Israel Border Police (Hebrew: משמר הגבול, Mishmar HaGvul) is the combat branch of the Israeli Police. ... Arab citizens of Israel, Arabs of Israel or Arab population of Israel are terms used by Israeli authorities and Israeli Hebrew-speaking media to refer to non-Jewish Arabs who are citizens of the State of Israel. ... Kafr Qasim (Arabic: كفر قاسم, also known as Kafr Qassem, Kufur Kassem and Kafar Kassem), is a hill-top Israeli Arab town located about 20 km east of Tel Aviv, on the Green Line separating Israel and the West Bank, on the southern part of the Little Triangle of Arab-Israeli villages. ... This article is about historical/cultural Tibet. ... Peoples Liberation Army redirects here. ... For other uses, see Lhasa (disambiguation). ... The Sharpeville massacre, also known as the Sharpeville shootings, occurred on March 21, 1960, when South African police opened fire on a crowd of black protesters. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Harki (from the Arabic Harka: troop or band of warriors) was the generic Algerian term for Muslim Algerians serving as auxiliaries with the French Army, during the Algerian War of Independence from 1954 to 1962. ... The National Liberation Front , (Arabic: Jabhat al-TaḩrÄ«r al-WaÅ£anÄ«, French: Front de Libération Nationale aka FLN) is a socialist political party in Algeria. ... The Novocherkassk riots or massacre began on the June 2, 1962 in the city Novocherkassk, Soviet Union (now Russia). ... Roads leading to Novocherkassk are graced by triumphal arches, erected to commemorate the Cossack victory over Napoleon. ... The term Afro-Dominican refers to descendants of African slaves in the Dominican Republic, or black dominicans also known as moreno. ... Indonesias Transition to the New Order occurred over 1965-67. ... Suharto GCB (born June 8, 1921) is a former Indonesian military and political leader. ... Languages various Religions Predominantly Taoism, Mahayana Buddhism, traditional Chinese religions, and atheism. ... Pre-dating the Kent State shootings and Jackson State killings, the Orangeburg massacre was marked by the killing of three students by local policemen who fired into a crowd of people who were protesting segregation in 1968 at a bowling alley in Orangeburg, South Carolina. ... South Carolina State University (also known as SCSU, State College among the older alumni members, or simply State), is a Historically black university located in Orangeburg, South Carolina. ... A 1978 silkscreen poster by Rini Templeton and Malaquías Montoya created to commemorate the ten-year anniversary of the massacre. ... Tlaltelolco is an area in Mexico City, centered on the Plaza de las Tres Culturas, a square surrounded on three sides by an excavated Aztec pyramid, the 17th century church Templo de Santiago, and the modern office complex of the Mexican foreign ministry. ... Francisco Macías Nguema This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Mary Ann Vecchio kneels over the body of Jeffrey Miller The Kent State shootings occurred at Kent State University, Ohio, and involved the shooting of students by the National Guard on May 4, 1970. ... For the events of May 4, 1970, see Kent State shootings Kent State University (also known as Kent, Kent State or KSU) is one of America’s largest university systems, the third largest university in Ohio after Ohio State University (57,748) and the University of Cincinnati (35,364), and... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Greater Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... This is false story,never been established by any scientific survey. ... Combatants Bengali units of Pakistan Army and civilian volunteers Pakistan Armed Forces Commanders Prime Minister Tajuddin Ahmed (April 17 -December 16) Col(ret). ... Nickname: Motto: Capital en movimiento Location of Mexico City in south central Mexico Coordinates: , Country Federal entity Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded c. ... Idi Amin Dada (mid-1920s[1] – 16 August 2003) was an army officer and president of Uganda. ... Idi Amin Dada (mid-1920s[1]–16 August 2003) was an army officer and president of Uganda. ... // The Bogside area viewed from the city walls Bloody Sunday (Irish: Domhnach na Fola) is the term used to describe an incident in Derry[1], Northern Ireland, on 30 January 1972 in which 26 civil rights protesters were shot by members of the 1st Battalion of the British Parachute Regiment... For other places with similar names, see Derry (disambiguation) and Londonderry (disambiguation). ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... Long Kesh Internment Camp was the main location for Operation Demetrius internees. ... Generals Sergio Arellano Stark and Augusto Pinochet a few hours before the departure of the Caravan of Death (September 1973) The Caravan of Death was a Chilean Army squad that, following the Chilean coup of 1973, flew by helicopter from south to north of Chile between September 30 and October... // A death squad is an armed squad of men that kills civilians. ... Prisoners outside the La Moneda Palace after their surrender during the coup (1973). ... Book cover of Horacio Verbitskys book on the massacre. ... Juan Domingo Perón (October 8, 1895 – July 1, 1974) was an Argentine military officer and the President of Argentina from 1946 to 1955 and from 1973 to 1974. ... Mengistu Haile Mariam (IPA: //) (born 1937[3][4]) was the most prominent officer of the Derg, the military junta that governed Ethiopia from 1974 to 1987, and the president of the Peoples Democratic Republic of Ethiopia. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Amnesty international Amnesty International (commonly known as Amnesty or AI) is an international non-governmental organization which defines its mission as to undertake research and action focused on preventing and ending grave abuses of the rights to physical and mental integrity, freedom of conscience... Operation Colombo design a disinformation plan by the DINA ,chileans secret police, in july 1976, to cover up the murder of 119 leftist opponents. ... Flag Capital Phnom Penh Language(s) Khmer language Government Socialist republic Leader Pol Pot Historical era Cold War  - Civil War 1967-1975  - Established April 17, 1975  - Fall of Phnom Pehn January 7, 1979  - Monarchy restored 1993-09-24 Democratic Kampuchea (Khmer: Khmer: , French:Kampuchea démocratique, Vietnamese:Kampuchea Dân... For other uses of Operation Condor, please see Operation Condor (disambiguation) Operation Condor (Spanish: Operación Cóndor, Portuguese: Operação Condor) was a campaign of political repressions involving assassination and intelligence operations officially implemented starting in 1975 by the right-wing dictatorships that dominated the Southern Cone in South... Look up Circa on Wiktionary, the free dictionary The Latin word circa, literally meaning about, is often used to describe various dates (often birth and death dates) that are uncertain. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... Look up Circa on Wiktionary, the free dictionary The Latin word circa, literally meaning about, is often used to describe various dates (often birth and death dates) that are uncertain. ... Poster by the Madres de la Plaza de Mayo NGO with photos of disappeared. This article especially refers to the Argentine dirty war; however, the term has been used in other contexts, for example in Morocco; see also lead years. ... The Gwangju Massacre refers to the atrocities comitted in the city of Gwangju, South Korea from May 18 to May 27, 1980. ... This article is about Gwangju Metropolitan City. ... This article is about Gwangju Metropolitan City. ... 13 men were found on the borders of the drainage of the municipality of atotonilco de Tula which presented tracks of wildly to be tortured,some of them still conserved plastic bags on the head. ...

[citation needed]
1981 El Mozote massacre c.900 El Mozote, El Salvador Government troops torture and kill the residents of El Mozote. [citation needed]
1982 Hama massacre 5000-20,000 Syria Government troops attack the rebel town of Hama, poison gas is used in some areas. [citation needed]
1983 Black July 1,000-3,000 Sri Lanka Government soldiers along with Sinhalese mobs massacred Tamil civilians. [citation needed]
1983, 1989 The Gukurahundi c.25,000 Zimbabwe Genocide, and suppression of dissident tribal areas by Robert Mugabe's Zimbabwean Fifth Brigade. [citation needed]
1986-89 Al-Anfal Campaign 50,000-100,000 Iraq Ethnic cleansing of Kurds by Saddam Hussein. [citation needed]
1988 Halabja poison gas attack 3,000-5,000 Iraq Gas attack on the Kurdish town by Saddam Hussein. [citation needed]
1988 1988 Massacre of Iranian Prisoners 5,000 + Iran Political prisoners are gathered in special prison quarters. They are then retried on orders from Ayatollah Khomeini by three member judging committees. Between 5000 to 30000 are murdered and buried in secret places. [citation needed]
1988 8888 Uprising 3,000 + Burma Burmese citizens took to the streets and demanded democracy after 26 years of military dictatorship and economic mismanagement. The army cracked down the protests and killed at least three thousand people. [citation needed]
1989 April 9 tragedy c.20 Soviet Union Soviet military troops attack Georgian demonstrators in Tbilisi, Georgia [citation needed]
1989 Tiananmen massacre up to 2,600 Beijing, China Chinese PLA troops open fire on students and civilians gathered in Beijing. [citation needed]
1990 Black January 133 Soviet Union Soviet military troops attack Azeri protesters, passers-by and emergency squad members in Baku, Azerbaijan [citation needed]
1991 Vilnius massacre 13 Vilnius, Lithuania Soviet military troops attacked Lithuanian independence supporters. [citation needed]
1991 Medininkai massacre 7 Medininkai, Lithuania Soviet military troops attacked Lithuanian customs building. [citation needed]
1991 Dili massacre 271 Dili, East Timor Timorese protesting Indonesian rule are killed by Indonesian soldiers. [citation needed]
1991 Barrios Altos massacre 15 Lima, Peru A mistaken attack by the death squad Grupo Colina, originally aimed at a Shining Path meeting. [citation needed]
1992 La Cantuta massacre 10 Lima, Peru Nine students and a teacher from La Cantuta University, were abducted by a death squad two days after a bombing by Sendero Luminoso. [citation needed]
1992 Carandiru massacre 111 São Paulo, Brazil Prison rebellion. [citation needed]
1993 Candelária massacre 8 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Police retaliate against street children at an orphanage, leading to worldwide criticism. [citation needed]
1993 Vigário Geral massacre 21 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Police death squad retaliate the death of 4 officers at a favela. [citation needed]
1994 13 de Marzo 41 Cuba Refugees drown after a confrontation with the Cuban Navy. [citation needed]
1995 Aguas Blancas massacre 17 Guerrero, Mexico Motorized Police kill protesters who demand some rights and the release of a prisoner. [citation needed]
1996 Eldorado dos Carajás massacre 19 Pará, Brazil Police killed landless peasents in a demonstration. [citation needed]
1997 Japanese embassy hostage crisis 17 Lima, Peru After 126 of seizure by the MRTA, government troops invaded the embassy building. One hostage, two commandos and all 14 MRTA members die, some of them executed. [citation needed]
1997 Acteal massacre 45 Chiapas, Mexico Allegedly government-linked paramilitaries attack a prayer meeting professing support for the goals of the EZLN rebels. [citation needed]
1997 Naharaim Peace Island massacre 7 Naharim, Israel A Jordanian soldier of Palestinian origin, shoots and kills 7 girls on a school trip on Jordanian Peace Island. King Hussein comes to Bet Shemesh to ask for forgiveness. [citation needed]
1999 Liquica Church massacre Over 200 East Timor Pro-Indonesian Militia group attacks East Timorese civilians at the Liquica Roman Catholic Church. Using machetes and automatic rifles, over 200 are killed. [citation needed]
1999 Račak massacre 45 Kosovo, Serbia A Serbian Special Forces (JSO) attacks Racak village and kills 45 KLA rebels and civilians. [citation needed]
2002 Itaba massacre 173 to 267 Itaba, Burundi The Burundian Army massacres between 173 and 267 Hutu villagers in reprisal for rebel attacks. [citation needed]
2005 Andijan massacre 200 - 1000 Andijan,Uzbekistan Uzbek Interior Ministry troops fire into a crowd of protesters in May 2005. [citation needed]
2007 2007 Burmese anti-government protests;Saffron Revolution 100 + Burma Buddhist monks took to the streets demonstrating against mistreatment of monks by military authorities. Thousands of civilians joined in. Military troops and riot police killed hundreds of people; Thousands were imprisoned. [citation needed]

The memorial at El Mozote The El Mozote Massacre took place in the village of El Mozote, in Morazán department, El Salvador, on December 11, 1981, when Salvadoran armed forces killed an estimated 900 civilians in an anti-guerrilla campaign. ... El Mozote is a village in Morazán department in El Salvador. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Location of Sri Lanka Black July is the commonly used name of the pogroms starting in Sri Lanka on July 23, 1983. ... Gukurahundi is a traditional term in Shona (one of Zimbabwes native languages), which means the early rain which washes away the chaff before the spring rains. The chaff, i. ... For other uses, see Genocide (disambiguation). ... Mugabe redirects here. ... The Fifth Brigade was an elite unit of specially-trained Zimbabwean soldiers. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (28 April 1937 – 30 December 2006) was the fifth President of Iraq and Chairman of the Iraqi Revolutionary Command Council from 1979 until his overthrow by US forces in 2003. ... Photo said to have been taken in the aftermath of the attack. ... Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (28 April 1937 – 30 December 2006) was the fifth President of Iraq and Chairman of the Iraqi Revolutionary Command Council from 1979 until his overthrow by US forces in 2003. ... In the summer on 1988, immediately after Iran accepted the cease-fire in the Iran-Iraq war, the Iranian government carried out a systematic slaughter of the political prisoners across the country especially those the government called hypocrites (Monafeghs). ... Ayatollah Khomeini founded the first modern Islamic republic Ayatollah Seyyed Ruhollah Khomeini (&#1570;&#1740;&#1578;&#8204;&#1575;&#1604;&#1604;&#1607; &#1585;&#1608;&#1581;&#8204;&#1575;&#1604;&#1604;&#1607; &#1582;&#1605;&#1740;&#1606;&#1740; in Persian) (May 17, 1900 &#8211; June 3, 1989) was an Iranian Shia cleric and the political... 8888 Uprising (Burmese: ; MLCTS: ) was a national uprising demanding democracy that took place on 8 August 1988 in Burma (now Myanmar). ... The April 9 Tragedy (or the Tbilisi Massacre of 9 April 1989) refers to the bloody events in Tbilisi, Georgia on April 9, 1989, when peaceful anti-Soviet and pro-independence demonstrations were brutally dispersed by the Soviet army using entrenching spades and toxic gas. ... Location of Tbilisi in Georgia Coordinates: , Country Georgia Established c. ... The Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, commonly referred to as the Tiananmen Square Massacre,[1] were a series of demonstrations led by students, intellectuals, and labor activists in the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) between April 15 and June 4, 1989. ... Peking redirects here. ... Soviet government troops arrest several Azeris in a clash with Popular Front protesters in Baku in January 1990. ... Coordinates: , Country Government  - Mayor Hajibala Abutalybov Area  - City 260 km²  (100. ... January Events (Lithuanian: Sausio įvykiai) is a series of events that occurred on January 11-13, 1991 in Vilnius, Lithuania. ... Not to be confused with Vilnius city municipality. ... Several Soviet OMON assaults on Lithuanian border posts occured in 1991, after Lithuania declared its independence from the Soviet Union, and began establishing control of its borders. ... Castle walls and tower drawn in the 19th century by Napoleon Orda Medininkai Castle is a medieval castle in Vilnius district, Lithuania built in the late 13th century or the first quarter of the 14th century. ... The Dili Massacre was the shooting of East Timorese protesters, in the Santa Cruz cemetery in the capital, Dili, on 12th November, 1991. ... Dili, also spelled Díli, Dilli or Dilly, is the capital of East Timor. ... The Barrios Altos massacre took place on 3 November 1991, in the Barrios Altos neighborhood of Lima, Peru. ... For other uses, see Lima (disambiguation). ... Grupo Colina is a paramilitary death squad created in Peru under the administration of Alberto Fujimori. ... The Communist Party of Peru (Spanish: El Partido Comunista del Perú), more commonly known as the Shining Path (Sendero Luminoso), is a Maoist guerrilla organization in Peru that launched the internal conflict in Peru in 1980. ... The La Cantuta massacre, in which a university professor and nine students from Limas La Cantuta University were abducted and disappeared by a military death squad, took place in Peru on 18 July 1992 during the presidency of Alberto Fujimori. ... For other uses, see Lima (disambiguation). ... Destruction on Tarata Street The Tarata Bombing was a terrorist attack against civilian population in Peru on July 16, 1992. ... Shining Paths Flag Sendero Luminoso or Shining Path is a Maoist guerrilla organization in Peru; it calls itself the Communist Party of Peru (Partido Comunista del Perú). Its stated goal is to replace Peruvian bourgeois institutions with a communist peasant revolutionary regime. ... The Carandiru Massacre took place on October 2, 1992 in Carandiru Penitentiary in São Paulo, Brazil, and is considered to be an example of a major human rights violation in the History of Brazil. ... This article is about the city. ... The Candelaria massacre was an event in Rio de Janeiro, beside the Candelaria church, on the night of July 23, 1993. ... This article is about the Brazilian city. ... The Vigário Geral massacre happened in August 29, 1993 at the Vigário Geral favela in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. ... This article is about the Brazilian city. ... // A death squad is an armed squad of men that kills civilians. ... Vidigal, a Rio de Janeiro favela A favela is the Brazilian equivalent of a shanty town, which are generally found on the edge of the city. ... On July 13, 1994, 72 Cubans attempted to leave the island of Cuba on a World War II era tugboat from the town of Regla near Havana. ... The Aguas Blancas Massacre is a massacre that took place on the 28th of July, 1995, in Aguas Blancas, Guerrero where, according to the official version, seventeen farmers were killed and 21 injured. ... Guerrero is a state in the United Mexican States. ... The Eldorado dos Carajás massacre happened in April 17, 1996 in Eldorado dos Carajás, in southern Pará, Brazil. ... Flag of Pará See other Brazilian States Capital Belém Largest City Belém Area 1. ... The Japanese embassy hostage crisis refers to a period of 126 days between 1996 and 1997 when 14 members of the Túpac Amaru Revolutionary Movement (MRTA) took hostage hundreds of people who were attending a party at the official residence of Japans ambassador to Peru in Lima. ... For other uses, see Lima (disambiguation). ... MRTA stands for: Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement of Peru Mass Rapid Transit Authority of Thailand Note: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transport Authority (MARTA) ... The Acteal Massacre was a massacre of 1400 people (although some sources claim 1500 or more and still others claim the number of deaths was 45) attending a prayer meeting of Roman Catholic activists for indigenous causes in the small village of Acteal in the Mexican state of Chiapas. ... Location within Mexico Country  Mexico Capital Tuxtla Gutiérrez Municipalities 118 Largest City Tuxtla Gutiérrez Government  - Governor Juan José Sabines Guerrero ( PRD)  - Federal Deputies PRI: 7 PRD: 5  - Federal Senators PRI: 1 PRD: 1 PVEM: 1 Area Ranked 8th  - State 74,211 km²  (28,653 sq mi) Population (2005... The flag of the EZLN. The Zapatista Army of National Liberation (Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional, EZLN) is an armed revolutionary group based in Chiapas, one of the poorest states of Mexico. ... Peace Island is a Jordanian park on land which was previously occupied and tilled by Israel. ... Hussein I bin Talal, King of Jordan (Arabic: ‎ ; November 14, 1935 – February 7, 1999). ... Beth-shemesh is the name of several ancient Biblical towns. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... Lebanese Kataeb militia A Militia is an army composed of ordinary [1] citizens to provide defense, emergency or paramilitary service, or those engaged in such activity. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... The Račak incident (also called the Račak massacre or Račak operation) was a clash in the village of Račak, Kosovo, (known as Reçak in Albanian) on January 15, 1999 between Yugoslav security forces and Kosovo Liberation Army guerillas, in which 45 Albanian civilians died. ... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Republika Srpska. ... ... Ushtria Çlirimtare e Kosovës. ... The Hutu are a Central African ethnic group, living mainly in Rwanda and Burundi. ... In May 2005 unrest in Uzbekistan reached a head when Uzbek troops fired into a crowd of protesters in the eastern city of Andijan, killing an estimated 400 to 1000 people on 13 May, in what has been termed the Andijan massacre. ... Andijan is the capital of the Andijon province, which includes the Ferghana Valley Andijan (Andijon in Uzbek; also Andizhan, Andizan, Андижан) is the fourth-largest city in Uzbekistan, and the capital of the Andijan Province. ... Protesters in Yangon with a banner that reads non-violence: national movement in Burmese, in the background is Shwedagon Pagoda The 2007 Burmese anti-government protests are a wave of anti-government protests that started in Burma (also known as Union of Myanmar) on August 15, 2007. ... A wave of anti-government protests started in Myanmar (Burma) on August 15, 2007, and has been ongoing since then. ...

Politically motivated non-governmental massacres

Date Name Deaths Location Summary Claimants
1856 Pottawatomie massacre 5 Franklin County, Kansas, United States Radical abolitionist John Brown murders pro-slavery men with swords in "Bleeding Kansas" [citation needed]
1872 Going Snake massacre 22 Oklahoma Territory, United States Ten US Marshals are ambushed by over thirty Cherokee men during their attempt to arrest a murder suspect. Eight of the Marshals are killed. Fourteen Cherokee men are also killed. [citation needed]
1873 Colfax massacre 100+ Colfax, Louisiana, United States A group of white members of "The White League", a KKK-like organization, attack members of Louisiana's almost all-black post-Civil War militia, initially over an election dispute, culminating in the massacre of over 100 black men, at least half of whom had already surrendered and were murdered in cold blood. [245]
1927 Bath School disaster 45 Bath Township, MI Andrew Kehoe sets off three bombs, including two at the Bath Consolidated School, due to anger over property taxes. 38 of the dead were students. [citation needed]
1929 1929 Hebron massacre 67 Hebron, then part of the British Mandate of Palestine Arabs kill 67 Jews in Hebron. [citation needed]
1929 1929 Safed massacre 18 Safed, then part of the British Mandate of Palestine Arabs kill 18 Jews in Safed. [citation needed]
March 17, 1954 Ma'ale Akrabim massacre 11 Ma'ale Akrabim, Israel Palestinians from Jordan ambush a bus traveling from Eilat to Tel Aviv, shooting the driver and all aboard. [citation needed]
1963 16th Street Baptist Church bombing 4 16th Street Baptist Church, Birmingham, AL Ku Klux Klan members Bobby Frank Cherry and Robert Edward Chambliss planted dynamite in the basement of the church. [citation needed]
1972 Lod Airport massacre 26 Ben-Gurion Airport, Israel Japanese terrorists open fire on civilians in the Ben-Gurion Airport near Lod, Israel. 26 are killed and 78 more are injured. [citation needed]
1972 Bloody Friday 9 Belfast, Northern Ireland Explosion of 22 bombs in 90 minutes by the Provisional Irish Republican Army in and around central Belfast in an attempt to bring normal life in the City to an end. The bombings kill seven civilians, two British soldiers and seriously injure 130 other people. [citation needed]
1972 Munich massacre 17 Munich, Germany At the Olympic Games, eight Palestinian terrorists kidnapped eleven Israeli athletes. After a stand-off at an airstrip, the terrorists killed the hostages and a counter-terrorist police officer before five of the terrorists were shot dead, and three others captured. [citation needed]
1972 Claudy bombing 9 Claudy, Northern Ireland Detonation of three car bombs in Claudy village. The Provisional Irish Republican Army and a local Catholic priest are implicated in the attack. [citation needed]
1974 Kiryat Shmona massacre 18 Kiryat Shmona, Israel Palestinian terrorists kill Israeli residents in Kiryat Shmona. [citation needed]
1974 Ma'alot massacre 21 Ma'alot, Israel Palestinian terrorists kill 21 elementary school students in Ma'alot. [citation needed]
1974 Dublin and Monaghan bombings 33 Dublin and Monaghan, Ireland. Three bombs planted in the Republic of Ireland by the Ulster Volunteer Force. Worst number of casualties in any single day of The Troubles. [citation needed]
1974 Birmingham Pub bombings 21 Birmingham, England The Provisional IRA explodes two bombs in busy public houses killing 21 civilians, more than half of whom were under the age of 25. Until the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 in 1988, this is Britain's worst act of mass murder. [citation needed]
1976 6 October massacre 46 Bangkok, Thailand University Students from Bangkok demonstrate against the return to Thailand of ousted prime minister, Thanom Kittikachorn. [citation needed]
1977 Atocha massacre 5 Madrid, Spain Far-right activists kill 5 left-wing lawyers during the Spanish transition to democracy. [citation needed]
1978 La Mon restaurant bombing 12 Outside Belfast, Northern Ireland Provisional Irish Republican Army firebomb attack at a Belfast hotel. [citation needed]
1979 Greensboro massacre 5 Greensboro, North Carolina, United States Ku Klux Klansmen and American Nazis open fire on an anti-Klan demonstration. [citation needed]
1979 Warrenpoint ambush 18 Warrenpoint, Northern Ireland Provisional Irish Republican Army attack on a British Army convoy. [citation needed]
1986 Plaza de la Republica Dominicana massacre 12 Madrid, Spain Iñaki de Juana Chaos, an ETA terrorist, sets up a car bomb in the Dominican Republic Square, killing 12 people and injuring 45. [citation needed]
1987 Remembrance Day massacre 11 Enniskillen, Northern Ireland The Provisional IRA explodes a bomb targeted at a civilian war commemoration ceremony in the centre of Enniskillen, Northern Ireland. [citation needed]
1988 The Strijdom Square massacre 8 Pretoria, South Africa 8 people are shot and killed (16 are wounded) by right wing extremist Barend Strydom. [citation needed]
1992 Tarata bombing 40 Lima, Peru Car bomb attack by Sendero Luminoso. It triggered the La Cantuta massacre. [citation needed]
1992 Boipatong massacre 46 Boipatong, South Africa Zulu hostell dwellers go on rampage through township. [citation needed]
1993 St James Church massacre 11 Cape Town, South Africa Azanian People's Liberation Army (APLA) kills 11 and wounds 58 people in church during Sunday church service. [citation needed]
1993 Shankill Road bombing 9 Belfast, Northern Ireland The Provisional IRA kills eight civilians and one of its own by exploding a bomb in a fish shop on the Shankill Road. The bombing sparks a series of reprisals by Loyalist paramilitaries. [citation needed]
1993 Greysteel massacre 8 Greysteel, Northern Ireland Ulster Freedom Fighters revenge attack for the Shankill Road bombing. [citation needed]
1994 Second Hebron massacre 29 Hebron, West Bank Israeli extremist Baruch Goldstein opens fire on a group of Palestinian Muslims praying at the Cave of the Patriarchs site. [citation needed]
1994 Shell House massacre 3 - 19 Johannesburg, South Africa ANC security guards open fire on IFP supporters approaching the ANC headquarters. [citation needed]
1995 Oklahoma City bombing 168 Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, United States Anti-government extremists Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols destroy the 9-story Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building with a truck bomb, killing 168 and injuring 800. [citation needed]
1995 Atiak massacre 170 – 220 Gulu District, Uganda Civilians are killed by the Lord's Resistance Army. [citation needed]
1996 Acholpii massacre c.100 Pader District, Uganda Sudanese refugees in a refugee settlement are killed by the Lord's Resistance Army . [citation needed]
1997 Lokung/Palabek massacre c.412 Kitgum District, Uganda Civilians are bludgeoned or hacked to death by the Lord's Resistance Army. [citation needed]
1997 Thalit massacre 52 Thalit, Algeria 52 out of the 53 inhabitants of Thalit were killed on April 3-4, having their throats slit by armed guerrillas who burned their houses afterwards. Smaller-scale massacres took place the same day at Amroussa, Sidi Naamane, Moretti, and Beni Slimane, killing another 30-odd people. The attack was blamed on Islamist guerrillas such as the Armed Islamic Group(GIA). [citation needed]
1997 Haouch Khemisti massacre 93 Haouch Mokhfi Khemisti, Algeria 93 villagers were killed in 3 hours on April 22. It was followed the next day by the Omaria massacre near Medea. [citation needed]
1997 Dairat Labguer massacre c.50 Dairat Labguer, Algeria About 50 people were killed on June 16 by some 30 guerrillas, who also kidnapped women, killed the livestock, and stole jewels. Five days earlier, another 17 had been killed at a village some 5 km away. The massacre was attributed to Islamist groups such as the GIA. [citation needed]
1997 Souhane massacres 64 Souhane, Algeria 64 people were killed, and 15 women kidnapped on August 20-21; the resulting terror provoked a mass exodus, bringing the town's population down from 4000 before the massacre to just 103 in 2002. Smaller-scale massacres later took place on November 27, 1997 (18 men, 3 women, 4 children killed) and 2 March 2000, when some 10 people from a single household were killed by guerrillas. The massacres were blamed on Islamist groups such as the GIA. [citation needed]
1997 Rais massacre c.200 Rais, Algeria [citation needed]
1997 Bentalha massacre >200 Bentalha, Algeria On September 22-23, 1997, more than 200 villagers (according to Amnesty International) were killed by armed guerrillas. The number of deaths reported ranged from 85 (initial official estimate) to 400 (The Economist). [citation needed]
1997 Wilaya of Relizane massacres of 30 December 1997 412 4 villages near Souk El Had, Algeria [citation needed]
1997 Mapiripán Massacre Unknown Mapiripán, Colombia AUC killed an unknown number of civilians with chainsaws, machetes and gunfire, throwing the bodies into the Guaviare River[citation needed] [citation needed]
1998 Wandhama massacre 24 Wandhama, India 24 Kashmiri Pandits are brutally murdered by Pakistani militants . [citation needed]
1998 Sidi Hamed massacre 103 Sidi Hamed, Algeria [citation needed]
1998 Omagh bombing 29 Omagh, Northern Ireland Car bomb attack carried out by Irish republicans opposed to the Northern Ireland Peace Process. This is the biggest massacre in any single incident in Northern Ireland related to The Troubles. [citation needed]
1998 Tadjena massacre 42 Algeria [citation needed]
2001 Sbarro restaurant massacre 15 Jerusalem, Israel Suicide bombing committed by a Palestinian terrorist in a crowded restaurant in Jerusalem, Israel. [citation needed]
2001 September 11, 2001 attacks 2,973 New York, Virginia, Pennsylvania (United States) Al-Qaeda hijacks 4 U.S. commercial airliners for use in a suicide bombing attack on major American targets. Two planes strike the twin towers at the World Trade Center in New York, causing the majority of the deaths; one hits the Pentagon; another plane is downed in a Pennsylvania field by its hijackers when passengers rush the cockpit. [citation needed]
2002 Bojaya massacre 119 Bojayá, Colombia FARC guerrillas launch an explosive into a church that is sheltering civilians, killing 119 and wounding 98. [citation needed]
2002 Passover massacre 30 Netanya, Israel An Arab suicide bomber kills civilians. [citation needed]
2002 2002 Bali Bombing 202 Bali,Indonesia The 2002 Bali Bombing occurrs in the town of Kuta on the Indonesian island of Bali, killing 202 people and injuring a further 209. [citation needed]
2003 Jerusalem bus 2 massacre 23 Jerusalem, Israel Suicide bombing committed by a Palestinian terrorist in a crowded bus in Jerusalem, Israel. [citation needed]
2003 Maxim restaurant massacre 21 Haifa, Israel [citation needed]
2004 Barlonyo massacre >200 Barlonyo, Lira District, Uganda Civilians at an IDP camp are murdered by the Lord's Resistance Army. [citation needed]
2004 Ashoura massacre c.170 Karbala, Baghdad, Iraq [citation needed]
2004 11 March 2004 Madrid train bombings 191 Madrid, Spain Islamic terrorists plant several bombs aboard four commuter trains in Madrid. [citation needed]
2004 Beslan school massacre 344 Beslan, Russia Muslim pro-Chechen armed rebels kill 344 children and parents after a three-day standoff with Russian police. [citation needed]
2005 2005 Bali Bombings 23 Bali, Indonesia Al-Qaeda linked groups explode several bombs at two sites in Jimbaran and Kuta, both in south Bali. Twenty-three people are killed, including three bombers. [citation needed]
2005 7 July 2005 London bombings 55 London, United Kingdom Four alleged Islamic suicide bombers strike London's public transportation system during the morning rush hour. [citation needed]
2006 Hay al Jihad massacre 40 Baghdad, Iraq Shia militants execute Sunni civilians. [citation needed]

The Pottawatomie massacre occurred during the night of May 24 to the morning of May 25, 1856. ... Franklin County (standard abbreviation: FR) is a county located in the state of Kansas. ... Official language(s) English[2] Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  Ranked 15th  - Total 82,277 sq mi (213,096 km²)  - Width 211 miles (340 km)  - Length 417 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the abolition of slavery. ... John Brown, ca. ... Slave redirects here. ... Division of the states during the Civil War:  Union states  Union territories  Border states  Bleeding Kansas  The Confederacy  Confederate territories (not always held) Bleeding Kansas, sometimes referred to in history as Bloody Kansas or the Border War, was a sequence of violent events involving Free-Staters (anti-slavery) and pro... Oklahoma Territory was an organized territory of the United States from May 2, 1890 until November 16, 1907, when Oklahoma became the 46th state. ... The United States Marshals Service, part of the United States Department of Justice, is the United States oldest federal law enforcement agency. ... For other uses, see Cherokee (disambiguation). ... On April 13, 1873, in Colfax, Louisiana, a group of white men (including members of the White League and the Ku Klux Klan) clashed with members of Louisianas almost all-black state militia at the local courthouse. ... Colfax is a town located in Grant Parish, Louisiana. ... The Bath School disaster is the name given to not one (as the name implies) but three bombings in Bath Township, Michigan, USA, on May 18, 1927, which killed 45 people and injured 58. ... Bath Township is a township located in Clinton County in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... The Bath School Disaster was an incident on May 18, 1927, in which a dynamite blast rocked the Bath Consolidated School in Bath Township, about 10 miles northeast of Lansing, in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... The Hebron massacre of 1929 was the murder by Arab rioters of 67 Jews in Hebron, then part of the Palestine under the British mandate. ... Arabic الخليل Government City Also Spelled al-Khalil (officially) al-Halil (unofficially) Governorate Hebron Population 166,000 (2006) Jurisdiction  dunams Head of Municipality Mustafa Abdel Nabi Hebron (Arabic:   al-ḪalÄ«l or al KhalÄ«l; Hebrew:  , Standard Hebrew: Ḥevron, Tiberian Hebrew: Ḥeḇrôn) is a city in the southern Judea... Flag The approximate borders of the British Mandate circa 1922. ... Sign directing to the section in Safeds cemetery where the Jews murdered in 1929 are buried . The 1929 Safed massacre took place on 29 August during the 1929 Palestine riots. ... Safed (Hebrew: צְפַת, Tiberian: , Israeli: Tsfat, Ashkenazi: Tzfas; Arabic: صفد ; KJV English: Zephath) is a city in the North District in Israel. ... Flag The approximate borders of the British Mandate circa 1922. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Arab violence was rampant during wave of anti-Jewish riots in 1920-21, during the pogroms of 1929 (which included the massacre of the Jewish community in Hebron and Safed), during the Arab Revolt of 1936-39 (which included the massacre of Jewish community in Tiberias), and in many other... The 16th Street Baptist Church bombing was a racially motivated terrorist incident at 16th Street Baptist Church, Birmingham, Alabama, in the United States. ... 16th Street Baptist Church in 2005 16th Street Baptist Church is a large, predominantly African American Baptist church in Birmingham in the U.S. state of Alabama. ... Birmingham is the largest city in the U.S. state of Alabama and the county seat of Jefferson County. ... Members of the second Ku Klux Klan at a rally during the 1920s. ... Bobby Frank Cherry (June 20, 1930 in Mineral Springs, Alabama - November 18, 2004 at Kilby Correctional Facility, Montgomery) was convicted in 2002 for the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing, which killed four African-American girls. ... The 16th Street Baptist Church Bombing was a terrorist incident that proved to be a turning point of the US civil rights movement of the 1960s. ... On May 30, 1972 three members of the Japanese Red Army undertook a terrorist attack in Lod Airport in Tel Aviv on behalf of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine. ... Front view of Terminal 1 at Ben Gurion International Airport Ben Gurion International Airport or Ben Gurion Airport, (named after David Ben-Gurion), located near Lod and once known as Lod Airport, is 15 km southeast of Tel Aviv, and is the largest international airport in Israel. ... The Belfast Bomb Blitz and Bloody Friday are among the names given to the bombings by the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) in and around Belfast, Northern Ireland on July 21, 1972. ... This article is about the city in Northern Ireland. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... The Provisional Irish Republican Army (Irish: Óglaigh na hÉireann) (IRA; also referred to as the PIRA, the Provos, or by some of its supporters as the Army or the RA.[2]) is an Irish Republican, left wing[3] paramilitary organisation that, until the Belfast Agreement, sought to end Northern... The Munich massacre occurred during the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany, when members of the Israeli Olympic team were taken hostage by the Palestinian terrorist group Black September, a group with ties to Yasser Arafat’s Fatah organization. ... For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Memorial to the victims of the Bombings. ... Claudy (from the Irish: Clóidigh meaning Washing river) is a village in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland, six miles southeast of Derry. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... The Provisional Irish Republican Army (Irish: Óglaigh na hÉireann) (IRA; also referred to as the PIRA, the Provos, or by some of its supporters as the Army or the RA.[2]) is an Irish Republican, left wing[3] paramilitary organisation that, until the Belfast Agreement, sought to end Northern... On April 11, 1974, a three members of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine - General Command crossed the Israeli border from Lebanon. ... Qiryat Shemona (&#1511;&#1512;&#1497;&#1514; &#1513;&#1502;&#1493;&#1504;&#1492;; unofficially also spelled Kiryat Shmona) is a city in the North District in Israel. ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Qiryat Shemona (&#1511;&#1512;&#1497;&#1514; &#1513;&#1502;&#1493;&#1504;&#1492;; unofficially also spelled Kiryat Shmona) is a city in the North District in Israel. ... The Maalot massacre was a school massacre in Maalot, Israel by Islamist members of the Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine, that occurred on May 15, 1974, the 26th anniversary of Israeli independence. ... Maalot (hebrew &#1502;&#1506;&#1500;&#1493;&#1514;) is a town in northern Israel, about 20 km east of Nahariyya. ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Maalot (hebrew &#1502;&#1506;&#1500;&#1493;&#1514;) is a town in northern Israel, about 20 km east of Nahariyya. ... The Dublin and Monaghan Bombings on May 17, 1974 were a series of terrorist attacks on Dublin and Monaghan in the Republic of Ireland which left 33 people dead, and almost 300 injured, the largest number of casualties in any single day in The Troubles. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Monaghan (disambiguation). ... The Ulster Volunteer Force (more commonly referred to as the UVF) is a Loyalist group in Northern Ireland. ... For other uses, see Troubles (disambiguation) and Trouble. ... The Birmingham pub bombings were two pub bombings by the Provisional IRA in Birmingham, England on November 21, 1974 which killed 21 people. ... This article is about the British city. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA) is a paramilitary group which aimed, through the use of violence, to achieve three goals: (i) British withdrawal from Ireland, (ii) the political unification of Ireland through the merger of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland , and (iii) the creation of an all... PA 103 redirects here. ... The Massacre of 6 October 1976 was a violent crackdown on students and protestors that occured in the grounds of Thammasat University and Sanam Luang in Thailand. ... Location within in Thailand Coordinates: , Country Settled Ayutthaya Period Founded as capital 21 April 1782 Government  - Type Special administrative area  - Governer Apirak Kosayothin Area  - City 1,568. ... Thanom Kittikachorn Field Marshal Thanom Kittikachorn (August 11, 1912 -June 16, 2004, Thai &#3606;&#3609;&#3629;&#3617; &#3585;&#3636;&#3605;&#3605;&#3636;&#3586;&#3592;&#3619;) was a Thai military leader and former prime minister of Thailand. ... The 1977 Massacre of Atocha was a neo-fascist attack during the Spanish transition to democracy after Francos death in 1975, killing five and injuring four. ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ... The Spanish transition to democracy or new Bourbon restoration was the era when Spain moved from the dictatorship of Francisco Franco to a liberal democratic state. ... The La Mon Restaurant Bombing was a terrorist attack by the Provisional Irish Republican Army in 1978. ... This article is about the city in Northern Ireland. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... The Greensboro massacre occurred on November 3, 1979 in Greensboro, North Carolina, United States. ... Greensboro redirects here. ... Members of the second Ku Klux Klan at a rally during the 1920s. ... This article is about the party formed in 1959, later renamed the National Socialist White Peoples Party. ... The Warrenpoint ambush, also known as the Narrow Water attack or the Warrenpoint massacre,[1] on 27 August 1979 was a guerrilla action by the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) that resulted in the British Armys greatest loss of life in a single incident during the Troubles in Northern... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Ulster County: District: Newry and Mourne UK Parliament: South Down European Parliament: Northern Ireland Dialling Code: 028, +44 28 Post Town: Newry Postal District(s): BT34 Population (2001) 7,000 Warrenpoint (from the Irish: An Phointe meaning the point - alternatively Rinn Mhic Giolla Rua... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... The Provisional Irish Republican Army (Irish: Óglaigh na hÉireann) (IRA; also referred to as the PIRA, the Provos, or by some of its supporters as the Army or the RA.[2]) is an Irish Republican, left wing[3] paramilitary organisation that, until the Belfast Agreement, sought to end Northern... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ... José Ignacio de Juana Chaos, better known as Iñaki de Juana Chaos (born 1955 in Legazpia,[1] Guipuzcoa) is a member of the Basque terrorist group Euskadi Ta Askatasuna (often styled as ETA, or Eta). ... For other uses, see ETA (disambiguation). ... This article is becoming very long. ... The Remembrance Day Massacre, Enniskillen One of the IRAs most notorious acts of violence during Northern Irelands Troubles. ... , Enniskillen (from the Irish: Inis Ceithleann meaning Kathleens Island) is the county town (and largest town) in County Fermanagh and the west of Northern Ireland. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... The Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA) is a paramilitary group which aimed, through the use of violence, to achieve three goals: (i) British withdrawal from Ireland, (ii) the political unification of Ireland through the merger of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland , and (iii) the creation of an all... , Enniskillen (from the Irish: Inis Ceithleann meaning Kathleens Island) is the county town (and largest town) in County Fermanagh and the west of Northern Ireland. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... Motto: Praestantia Praevaleat Pretoria (May Pretoria Be Pre-eminent In Excellence) Country South Africa Province Gauteng Established 1855 Area  - City 1,644 km²  (634. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Destruction on Tarata Street The Tarata Bombing was a terrorist attack against civilian population in Peru on July 16, 1992. ... For other uses, see Lima (disambiguation). ... Shining Paths Flag Sendero Luminoso or Shining Path is a Maoist guerrilla organization in Peru; it calls itself the Communist Party of Peru (Partido Comunista del Perú). Its stated goal is to replace Peruvian bourgeois institutions with a communist peasant revolutionary regime. ... The La Cantuta massacre, in which a university professor and nine students from Limas La Cantuta University were abducted and disappeared by a military death squad, took place in Peru on 18 July 1992 during the presidency of Alberto Fujimori. ... The Boipatong massacre took place on 17 June 1992 in Boipatong, South Africa when mainly-Zulu dwellers from the KwaMadala Hostel for migrant workers went on a rampage through the township, killing 46 people. ... Boipatong is a township near Vanderbijlpark, Gauteng, South Africa. ... Languages Zulu Religions Christian, African Traditional Religion Related ethnic groups Bantu Nguni Basotho Xhosa Swazi Matabele Khoisan The Zulu (South African English and isiZulu: amaZulu) are a South African ethnic group of an estimated 17-22 million people who live mainly in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. ... The St James Church massacre was a massacre perpetrated at St James Church, Cape Town by the Azanian Peoples Liberation Army (APLA). ... Nickname: Motto: Spes Bona (Latin for Good Hope) Location of the City of Cape Town in Western Cape Province Coordinates: , Country Province Municipality City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality Founded 1652 Government [1]  - Type City council  - Mayor Helen Zille  - City manager Achmat Ebrahim Area  - City 2,499 km²  (964. ... The Azanian Peoples Liberation Army (APLA) was the military wing of the Pan Africanist Congress in South Africa. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the city in Northern Ireland. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... The Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA) is a paramilitary group which aimed, through the use of violence, to achieve three goals: (i) British withdrawal from Ireland, (ii) the political unification of Ireland through the merger of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland , and (iii) the creation of an all... UVF mural in Shankill Road, Belfast UDA mural in Shankill, Belfast. ... UFF redirects here; they are also the initials of the United Freedom Front, a radical left-wing organisation in the US. The Ulster Defence Association (UDA) is a loyalist paramilitary organization in Northern Ireland, outlawed as a terrorist group in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, and which aim... The Greysteel massacre occurred on the evening of the October 30, 1993 when three members of the Ulster Freedom Fighters, an Ulster Loyalist organisation headed by Johnny Adair, entered the Rising Sun Bar in Greysteel, County Londonderry. ... Greysteel (Irish translation is forgotten) is a village in County Derry, Northern Ireland, 14 kilometres to the east of Derry and 11 kilometres to the west of Limavady, on the main A2 coast road between Limavady and Derry overlooking Lough Foyle. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... The Ulster Defence Association (UDA) is a Northern Irish Loyalist paramilitary organisation outlawed as a terrorist group in the UK and Republic of Ireland, which is perceived by its supporters as defending the unionist community from Irish nationalism. ... The facade and minarets of the Ibrahimi Mosque (Cave of the Patriarchs). ... Arabic الخليل Government City Also Spelled al-Khalil (officially) al-Halil (unofficially) Governorate Hebron Population 166,000 (2006) Jurisdiction  dunams Head of Municipality Mustafa Abdel Nabi Hebron (Arabic:   al-ḪalÄ«l or al KhalÄ«l; Hebrew:  , Standard Hebrew: Ḥevron, Tiberian Hebrew: Ḥeḇrôn) is a city in the southern Judea... Baruch Kappel Goldstein (December 9 or December 12, 1956–February 25, 1994, ‎) was an American-Israeli physician who perpetrated the 1994 Cave of the Patriarchs massacre in the city of Hebron, murdering 29 Arab attendants of the Ibrahimi Mosque (within the Cave of the Patriarchs) and wounding another 150 in... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... The Enclosure of the Cave of the Patriarchs The Cave of the Patriarchs is a religious compound located in the ancient city of Hebron (which lies in the southwest part of the West Bank, in the heart of ancient Judea), and is generally considered by Jews, Christians, and Muslims, to... On March 28, 1994, a short time before the first democratic elactions in South Africa, 20 000 Inkatha Freedom Party supporters marched past the ANC headquater in Plein Street, Johannesburg, called Shell House. ... // This article is about the city in South Africa. ... The Oklahoma City bombing was an attack on April 19, 1995 aimed at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, a U.S. government office complex in downtown Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. ... Downtown Oklahoma City The State Capitol of Oklahoma From The South Motto: Nickname: Capital of the New Century Founded 1889 Incorporated County Oklahoma County Cleveland County Canadian County Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor Mick Cornett Area  - Total  - Water 1,608. ... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Largest metro area Oklahoma City metro area Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,898 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... For the Navy sailor, see Timothy R. McVeigh. ... Terry Lynn Nichols (born April 1, 1955) was convicted of being an accomplice of Timothy McVeigh, the man convicted of murder in the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA, April 19, 1995), which claimed 168 lives. ... Alfred P. Murrah building four days before its demolition Alfred P. Murrah building during demolition Aerial view of Alfred P. Murrah building after bombing The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building was a United States Federal Government complex located at 200 N.W. 5th Street in downtown Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. ... The Atiak massacre (April 17, 1995) led by a group of three hundred LRA soldiers they entered the trading center and town of Atiak, in the Gulu district [1] . It was the largest single massacre by the Lords Resistance Army. ... Gulu is a district in northern Uganda, taking its name from its commercial centre, the town of Gulu. ... Combatants Uganda Peoples Defence Force Lords Resistance Army Commanders Yoweri Museveni Joseph Kony The Lords Resistance Army (LRA),[1] formed in 1987, is a rebel guerrilla army operating mainly in northern Uganda and parts of Sudan. ... Pader is a district in northern Uganda with a population of 325,885 (2002 census). ... Combatants Uganda Peoples Defence Force Lords Resistance Army Commanders Yoweri Museveni Joseph Kony The Lords Resistance Army (LRA),[1] formed in 1987, is a rebel guerrilla army operating mainly in northern Uganda and parts of Sudan. ... Kitgum is a district in northern Uganda of 9,773. ... Combatants Uganda Peoples Defence Force Lords Resistance Army Commanders Yoweri Museveni Joseph Kony The Lords Resistance Army (LRA),[1] formed in 1987, is a rebel guerrilla army operating mainly in northern Uganda and parts of Sudan. ... The Thalit massacre took place in Thalit village (Médéa, near Ksar el Boukhari; see map), some 70 km from Algiers, on April 3-4 1997. ... Thalit was a small hamlet in Algeria all but one of whose 53 inhabitants were slaughtered in 1997 in the Thalit massacre. ... The Armed Islamic Group (GIA, from French Groupe Islamique Armé; Arabic al-Jamaah al-Islamiyah al-Musallaha) is a Khawarij terrorist organization that wants to overthrow the Algerian government and replace it with an Islamic state. ... The Haouch Khemisti massacre took place before dawn on 22 April 1997 in the Algerian village of Haouch Mokhfi Khemisti (also spelled Boughelef Khemisti, Haouch Boughlef-Khemisti, Haouch Boukhelef-Khemisti, Haouch Boughfi el-Khemisti, Haouch Boughelaf, or Haouch Khmisti Bougara), some 25 km south of Algiers near Bougara. ... The Dairat Labguer massacre took place on June 16, 1997 - less than two weeks after parliamentary elections - in the hamlet of Dairat Labguer (also (mis)spelled Dairat Labguar, Dairat Lebguar, Daïat Labguer, Daïret Lebguer, Dairet Lebguer) near Msila, 300 km southeast of Algiers. ... The largest of the Souhane massacres took place in the small mountain town of Souhane (about 25 km south of Algiers, between Larbaa and Tablat) on the 20-21 August 1997. ... Souhane is a small mountain town between Larbaa and Tablat in the wilaya of Blida, Algeria, along the RN 8 highway about 25 km south of Algiers. ... On August 29, 1997, one of Algerias bloodiest massacres of the 1990s occurred at the village of Rais, near Larbaa and south of Algiers. ... Rais (Urdu: رئیس ) is a Baloch tribe in Balochistan, Pakistan. ... At the village of Bentalha, west of Algiers (Algeria), on the night of September 22-23, 1997, more than 200 villagers were killed by armed guerrillas. ... The Wilaya of Relizane massacres of 30 December 1997 were probably the single bloodiest day of killing in the Algerian conflict of the 1990s. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Location of the municipality and town of Mapiripán in Meta Department. ... The AUCs logo The United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (Autodefensas Unidas de Colombia, or AUC, in Spanish), were formed in April 1997 as an umbrella paramilitary federation seeking to consolidate many local and regional paramilitary groups in Colombia, each intending to protect different local economic, social and political... The Guaviare is a tributary of the Orinoco located in Colombia. ... The Hindu temple in Wandhama after it was desecrated and destroyed by the terorists . ... Original Kashmiri Pandit (Hindi: ) refers to a person who belongs to a sect of Hindu Pandits who originate from the Kashmir region. ... The Sidi-Hamed massacre took place on the night of January 11, 1998 (the last day of Ramadan), in the town of Sidi-Hamed (or Sidi-Hammad), 30 km south of Algiers. ... The Omagh bombing was a paramilitary car bomb attack carried out by the Real IRA (RIRA), a splinter group of former Provisional Irish Republican Army members opposed to the Belfast Agreement, on August 15, 1998, in Omagh, County Tyrone, Northern Ireland. ... , Omagh (from the Irish: An Ómaigh meaning The Sacred (or Virgin) Plain) is the county town of County Tyrone in Northern Ireland, situated where the rivers Drumragh and Camowen meet to form the Strule. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... The peace process describes efforts by interested parties to effect a lasting solution to long-running conflicts, such as the Northern Ireland peace process see Belfast Agreement, Arab-Israeli conflict and Peace process in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... For other uses, see Troubles (disambiguation) and Trouble. ... On December 8-9, 1998, 81 villagers (45 according to the initial reports) were killed by armed groups (presumably the GIA) in three mountain villages near Tadjena, some 170 km west of Algiers, in the Chlef region of western Algeria. ... The Sbarro restaurant suicide bombing took place on August 9, 2001 in Jerusalem, Israel. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... A suicide bombing is an attack using a bomb in which the individual(s) carrying the explosive materials composing the bomb intend(s) and expect(s) to die upon detonation (see suicide). ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... This article is about the state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Largest metro area Delaware Valley Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: &#1575;&#1604;&#1602;&#1575;&#1593;&#1583;&#1577;, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... A suicide bombing is an attack using a bomb in which the individual(s) carrying the explosive materials composing the bomb intend(s) and expect(s) to die upon detonation (see suicide). ... For other uses, see World Trade Center (disambiguation). ... This article is about the state. ... This article is about the United States military building. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Largest metro area Delaware Valley Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... The Bojayá massacre occurred on May 2, 2002 in the Colombian town of Bojayá (with its urban centre also referred to as Bellavista), in Chocó department. ... Bojayá is a town in Chocó Department, Colombia. ... The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia–Peoples Army, in Spanish Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia–Ejército del Pueblo, also known by the acronym of FARC or FARC-EP is a communist revolutionary and armed guerrilla organization in Colombia. ... The Netanya suicide attack (also known as the Netanya bombing and the Passover massacre) was a Palestinian suicide bombing in Park Hotel at Netanya on March 27, 2002. ... Early morning in Netanya, Israel Netanya (Hebrew: נְתַנְיָה, Standard Hebrew NÉ™tanya) is a city in the Center District of Israel and is the capital of the Sharon plain. ... The 2002 Bali bombing occurred on October 12, 2002 in the tourist district of Kuta on the Indonesian island of Bali. ... This article is about the Indonesian island. ... The Jerusalem bus 2 massacre was a suicide bombing in a crowded bus in Jerusalem, Israel on August 19, 2003, which killed 23 people and wounded over 130. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... A suicide bombing is an attack using a bomb in which the individual(s) carrying the explosive materials composing the bomb intend(s) and expect(s) to die upon detonation (see suicide). ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... The Maxim restaurant suicide bombing occurred on October 4, 2003, when a 29-year-old female Palestinian suicide bomber, Hanadi Jaradat, exploded inside the Maxim restaurant in Haifa. ... Hebrew Arabic حَيْفَا Founded in 3rd century CE Government City District Haifa Population 267,000 1,039,000 (metropolitan area) Jurisdiction 63,666 dunams (63. ... Barlonyo is a village housing an IDP (Internally Displaced Person) camp in northern Uganda near Lira town, where a number of IDPs from parts of the north and east of Uganda used to live as a result of an 18-year insurgency. ... Lira is a district in northern Uganda. ... Tailor in Labuje IDP camp in Uganda An internally displaced person (IDP) is someone who has been forced to leave their home for reasons such as religious or political persecution or war, but has not crossed an international border. ... Combatants Uganda Peoples Defence Force Lords Resistance Army Commanders Yoweri Museveni Joseph Kony The Lords Resistance Army (LRA),[1] formed in 1987, is a rebel guerrilla army operating mainly in northern Uganda and parts of Sudan. ... The Ashoura Massacre was a series of planned terrorist explosions, that killed 170 and injured 500 Iraqi Shiite Muslims commemorating the Ashoura festival. ... // Karbala (Arabic: ; BGN: Al-Karbalā’; also spelled Karbala al-Muqaddasah) is a city in Iraq, located about 100 km southwest of Baghdad at 32. ... Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Governorate. ... The 2004 Madrid train bombings (also known as 11-M, 3/11, 11/3 and M-11) were a series of coordinated bombings against the commuter train system of Madrid, Spain on the morning of 11 March 2004, which killed 191 people and wounded over 1700. ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ... The Republic of North Ossetia in Russia The Beslan school hostage crisis (also referred to by the media as the Beslan school siege) began when armed multinational terrorists took hundreds of schoolchildren and adults hostage on September 1, 2004 at School Number One in the Russian town of Beslan in... Map of North Ossetia Beslan (Russian: ; Ossetic: Беслӕн) is a town located in the Republic of North Ossetia-Alania, Russia and is the administrative center of Pravoberezhny District. ... Wikinews has news related to: Fatal explosions hit Bali The 2005 Bali bombings were a series of explosions that occurred on October 1, 2005, in Bali, Indonesia. ... This article is about the Indonesian island. ... The 7 July 2005 London bombings (also called the 7/7 bombings) were a series of coordinated terrorist bomb blasts that hit Londons public transport system during the morning rush hour. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Hay al Jihad massacre occurred on July 9, 2006 in the Hay al Jihad neighborhood of the Iraqi capital, Baghdad. ... Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Governorate. ...

Labour conflicts

Date Name Deaths Location Summary Claimants
1854 Eureka Stockade 28 Ballarat, Victoria Uprising by miners against repression and taxes is put down by soldiers. [citation needed]
1885 Rock Springs massacre 28 Rock Springs, Wyoming Racially and economically motivated attack by white coal miners on Chinese miners. [citation needed]
1886 Haymarket Riot 12 Chicago, Illinois May 4, 1886: A bomb is tossed amongst striking workers and police, who open fire on the crowd. [citation needed]
1886 Bay View Massacre 7 Milwaukee, Wisconsin One day after the Haymarket Riot in Chicago, Wisconsin National Guard troops open fire on striking workers. [citation needed]
1892 Homestead lockout/strike 35 Homestead, Pennsylvania Pinkerton guards are deployed against striking US Steel laborers in the bloodiest labor conflict in the US. [citation needed]
1897 Lattimer massacre 19 Hazleton, Pennsylvania Luzerne County Sheriff's posse fires on strikers at the request of mining companies [citation needed]
1907 Iquique Massacre 500 - 2,000 Iquique, northern Chile (formerly Peru)

Forces under Gen. Roberto Silva-Renard fire on thousands of saltpeter miners, their wives and children, protesting working conditions and wages. The Eureka Flag The Eureka Stockade was a gold miners revolt in 1854 in Ballarat, Victoria, Australia, against the officials supervising the mining of gold in the region of Ballarat. ... A view of Ballarat East and Eureka from Sovereign Hill. ... // The Rock Springs Massacre or Rock Springs Riot (sometimes known as the Rock Springs Attack) occurred on September 2, 1885 in the town of Rock Springs, Wyoming, in present day Sweetwater County. ... Rock Springs is a city in Sweetwater County, Wyoming, United States. ... The Haymarket Riot on May 4, 1886 in Chicago is generally considered to have been an important influence on the origin of international May Day observances for workers. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Wisconsin Historical Marker The Bay View Tragedy (often referred to locally, and by labor rights activists, as the Bay View Massacre) was the culmination of events that began on Saturday May 1, 1886 when 7,000 building-trades workers joined with 5,000 Polish laborers who had organized at St. ... For other places with the same name, see Milwaukee (disambiguation). ... The Homestead Strike was a labor lockout and strike which began on June 30, 1892, culminating in a battle between strikers and private security agents on July 6, 1892. ... Homestead is a borough in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, USA, in the Mon Valley, seven miles (11 km) southeast of downtown Pittsburgh. ... The Lattimer massacre was an incident in which a sheriffs posse killed nineteen unarmed immigrant miners and wounded scores more. ... For other places with the same name, see Hazleton (disambiguation). ... Luzerne County is a county located in the state of Pennsylvania. ... Walk Baquedano Iquique (IPA /ikike/) is a city in northern Chile, capital of Tarapacá Region, on the Pacific coast, just west of the Atacama Desert. ... Salt peter( a. ...

[citation needed]
1914 Ludlow massacre 20 Ludlow, Colorado Suppression of a strike by twelve thousand Colorado coal miners. [citation needed]
1920 Matewan massacre 10 Matewan, West Virginia Confrontation between agents of the Baldwin-Felts Detective Agency, hired by mine owners, and Matewan police chief Sid Hatfield leading a group of temporarily deputized mine workers attempting to serve warrants. [citation needed]
1928 Banana massacre c.47 to 2,000 Santa Marta, Colombia

Workers of the United Fruit Company killed by military forces to end a month long union strike. Ludlow massacre monument The Ludlow massacre was the death of about 20 people during an attack by the Colorado National Guard on a tent colony of 1,200 striking coal miners and their families, at Ludlow, Colorado on April 20, 1914. ... Ludlow is a ghost town located in Colorado. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Coal Coal (IPA: ) is a fossil fuel formed in swamp ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... The Matewan massacre was the stand-off that resulted from the attempt of coal miners to unionize in Matewan, West Virginia on May 19, 1920. ... Aerial view of Matewan, West Virginia A section of the floodwall along the Tug Fork in Matewan, West Virginia, constructed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, depicts the Hatfield-McCoy feud. ... The Baldwin-Felts Detective Agency was a private detective agency in the United States, founded in 1900 by William Gibboney Baldwin and Thomas Lafayette Felts and based in Bluefield, West Virginia. ... Sid Hatfield was sheriff of Matewan, West Virginia during the Battle of Matewan, a shootout that followed a series of evictions carried out by detectives from the Baldwin-Felts agency. ... The Banana massacre, in Spanish, Matanza de las bananeras[1] or Masacre de las bananeras was a massacre of workers for the United Fruit Company that occurred on December 6, 1928 in the town of Ciénaga near Santa Marta, Colombia. ... This article is about the Colombian city. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Chiquita Brands International. ...

[citation needed]
1927 Columbine Mine massacre at least 6 Serene, Colorado 500 striking coal miners, some with their families, are attacked with machine guns by a detachment of state police dressed in civilian clothes [citation needed]
1931 Ådalen shootings 5 Sweden Swedish military forces open fire on labor demonstrators, killing 5 people [citation needed]
1988 CSN strike 3 Volta Redonda, Brazil Historical strike in Brazilian history, repressed by police and army. [citation needed]

The Columbine Mine Massacre occurred in 1927 when striking coal miners in Colorado were attacked with machine guns. ... Serene, Colorado no longer exists. ... Coal Coal (IPA: ) is a fossil fuel formed in swamp ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... The El Chino Mine located near Silver City, New Mexico is an open-pit copper mine Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth, usually (but not always) from an ore body, vein, or (coal) seam. ... A machine gun is a fully-automatic firearm that is capable of firing bullets in rapid succession. ... In times of armed conflict a civilian is any person who is not a combatant. ... The Ådalen shootings, also known as the Ådalen riots (in Swedish: Skotten i Ådalen) was a series of events in and around the Swedish town of Ådalen, in Kramfors Municipality, in May 1931. ... A demonstration is the public display of the common opinion of a activist group, often economically, political, or socially, by gathering in a crowd, usually at a symbolic place or date, associated with that opinion. ... Companhia Siderúrgica Nacional (CSN) is the second major steel-maker company in Brazil. ... Volta Redonda is the name of a city in the Rio de Janeiro state of Brazil with 182,81 km² of area, located from 350m to 707m from the sea level (22º3123 S, 44º0615 W) and with a population of 258. ... The 1988 strike was an historical strike at the Companhia Siderúrgica Nacional. ...

Criminal and non-political massacres

See also school massacres and "going postal".
Date Name Deaths Location Summary Claimants
1929 St. Valentine's Day massacre 7 Chicago, Illinois, United States Members of Bugs Moran's gang are murdered by Al Capone's men. [citation needed]
1938 Teigin Bank poisoning 12 Tokyo, Japan During a robbery, painter Sadamichi Hirasawa inoculated a liquid with cyanide poisoning, giving it to twelve bank employees, immediately killing eleven while another required hospitalization. [citation needed]
1938 Tsuyama massacre 31 Tsuyama, Okayama, Japan Mutsuo Toi rampaged through a village near Tsuyama armed with Katanas and a rifle, killing 30 including his grandmother. Toi took his life after the massacre. [citation needed]
1941 Stanley Graham killings 7 Hokitika, New Zealand Farmer Stanley Graham kills seven people during a 12-day rampage which ends when he is shot dead by police. [citation needed]
1949 Howard Unruh Massacre 13 Camden, New Jersey, United States World War II veteran Howard Unruh, armed with a Luger, randomly opens fire inside shops and at pathways, killing thirteen. Unruh was believed to suffer from mental illnesses and required psychiatric needs. [citation needed]
1966 University of Texas Tower Shooting 15 Austin, Texas, United States After killing his mother and wife the night before, Charles Whitman goes on a shooting rampage atop the University of Texas at Austin's observation tower, killing 15 people and injuring 30 before being killed by police. [citation needed]
1975 St. Pius X High School shooting 3 Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 18-year-old Robert Poulin opened fire on his class with a shotgun at St. Pius X High School, killing one injuring a further five. Poulin earlier had raped then stabbed his ex-girlfriend, 17-year old Kim Rabot. [citation needed]
1977 Neptune massacre 6 New Rochelle, New York, United States Frederick Cowan killed 5 people, wounded 5 others and killed himself at the Neptune Moving Company in New Rochelle, New York where he worked. [citation needed] [citation needed]
1978 Jonestown massacre 913 Jonestown, Guyana Peoples Temple cult attacks Rep. Leo Ryan and delegation. After 5 are killed in shootout, Jim Jones led mass suicide. [citation needed]
1982 Woo Bum-Kon 58 Gyeongsangnam-do, South Korea Dispirited police officer rampaged through 5 villages in rural South Korea, killing 57 (and himself) and wounding 35. [citation needed]
1982 George Banks Massacre 13 Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, United States Former state prison guard George Banks kills thirteen in a shooting rampage, including five of his children. [citation needed]
1983 Wah Mee massacre 13 Seattle, Washington, United States Fourteen people are shot and 13 killed at a gambling club in Seattle's International District. [citation needed]
1984 McDonald's massacre 22 San Diego, California, United States Twenty-one killed, 19 injured in a shooting rampage at a McDonald's restaurant before the gunman is shot dead. [citation needed]
1984 Milperra massacre 7 Sydney, NSW, Australia Seven were killed and 19 injured in a clash between outlaw motorcycle gangs, in a suburb of Sydney on Father's Day. [citation needed]
1984 Dorothy Mae Apartment Hotel Blaze 25 Los Angeles, California, United States, 25 people died in a blaze when 21-year old Humberto de la Torre torched the Dorothy Mae Apartment Hotel after a dispute with his uncle who managed the building. [citation needed]
1986 Edmond Postal massacre 15 Edmond, Oklahoma, United States Fired postman Patrick Sherrill shot twenty-one former fellow employees in the Post Office, killing fourteen of them before committing suicide. Between 1986 and 1997, more than 40 people were killed in more than 20 separate incidents involving the United States Postal Service. [citation needed]
1987 Winn-Dixie massacre 6 Palm Bay, Florida, United States William B. Cruse opens fire in a Winn-Dixie supermarket, killing six people and wounding several including police who attempted to confront him. [citation needed]
1987 Hoddle Street massacre 7 Melbourne, Victoria, Australia 19-year-old Julian Knight shoots seven people dead and wounded another nineteen in thirty minutes before surrendering to police. [citation needed]
1987 Hungerford massacre 17 Hungerford, Berkshire, England Michael Ryan went a rampage in a small rural town in England, shooting people at random (including his own mother) with an array of firearms before killing himself. [citation needed]
1987 Queen Street massacre 9 Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Frank Vitkovic kills eight and injures five in an Australia Post building before jumping 12 stories to his death. [citation needed]
1987 Ronald Gene Simmons Massacre 16 Russellville, Arkansas, United States Retired United States Air Force sergeant Ronald Gene Simmons Jr. strangled and fatally shot fourteen family members four days prior to rampaging through offices and store outlets that left two dead and several injured. [citation needed]
1988 ESL massacre 7 Sunnyvale, California, United States Former employee Richard Farley returns to Electromagnetic Systems Labs (ESL) with guns and explosives, killing seven people and injuring three others, including Laura Black, a woman he had been stalking for four years. [citation needed]
1989 Stockton massacre 6 Stockton, California, United States Patrick Purdy, armed with a semi-automatic rifle, opened fire at an elementary school that killed 5 schoolchildren and wounded nearly 30 others before taking his own life. [citation needed]
1989 École Polytechnique massacre 15 Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada Saying "I hate feminists", Marc Lépine kills 14 women and wounds 10 women and 4 men at an engineering school, before killing himself. [citation needed]
1989 Standard Gravure shooting 9 Louisville, Kentucky, United States Employee Joseph Wesbecker went on a rampage and killed eight other employees and himself, while wounding twelve others. He was off work on disability leave due to mental illness at the time of the shootings. [citation needed]
1990 Happy Land Fire 87 New York City, New York, United States Julio González starts an arson at a social club entitled "Happy Land" that kills 87 people. [citation needed]
1990 Aramoana massacre 13 Aramoana, New Zealand Gun collector David Gray opens fire on town residents before being shot dead by the Armed Offenders Squad. [citation needed]
1990 GMAC massacre 10 Jacksonville, Florida, United States James Edward Pough kills nine people and finally himself at a GMAC office after his car is repossessed. [citation needed]
1991 Strathfield massacre 8 Sydney, Australia Wade Frankum opens fire in a suburban shopping mall, killing seven people and wounding a further six before turning the assault rifle on himself. [citation needed]
1991 Luby's massacre 23 Killeen, Texas, United States George Hennard drove his pickup truck into a cafeteria and opened fire before taking his own life. [citation needed]
1991 Gang Lu Massacre 6 Iowa City, Iowa, United States Gang Lu, a Chinese University of Iowa student enrolled in a Ph.D physics program fatally shot three faculty members, a fellow female Ph.D student from China and an advisor before turning the gun on himself. [citation needed]
1992 Ratima killings 7 Masterton, New Zealand Raymond Ratima bludgeons or stabs to death four acquaintances before killing his own three children, aged 7, 5 and 2. [citation needed]
1992 Central Coast massacre 7 Central Sydney, NSW, Australia A gunman shoots his son, an ex-girlfriend, her heavily pregnant sister, the girl's father and another couple with a sawn-off shotgun before finally handing himself in. [citation needed]
1992 Olivehurst High massacre 4 Olivehurst, California,United States Armed with a pistol, 20-year-old Eric Houston took hostages at his former high school, killing four people and wounding 10. [citation needed]
1993 101 California Street shootings 9 San Francisco, California, United States Gian Luigi Ferri kills eight people and injures six with three handguns before turning a concealed fourth handgun on himself. [citation needed]
1993 Brown's Chicken massacre 7 Palatine, Illinois, United States Seven people were slain at the Brown's Chicken and Pasta in Palatine. [citation needed]
1993 Long Island Rail Road massacre 6 Nassau County, New York, United States Colin Ferguson shoots 25 passengers on a commuter train, killing 6. [citation needed]
1994 The Bain killings 5 Dunedin, New Zealand Five members of the Bain family were shot dead at their home, which was later torched. David Bain spent 12 years in prison before being released on appeal. [citation needed]
1994 Toulon town square massacre 14 Toulon, France 16-year old Eric Borel arms himself with a .22-caliber hunting rifle and opens fire in the village town square, killing ten and wounding several others before turning the gun onto himself. Earlier that day he had killed his stepfather, mother and brother using a baseball bat. [citation needed]
1996 Dunblane massacre 18 Dunblane, Scotland Thomas Hamilton opened fire at a primary school, killing sixteen children and one teacher before killing himself. [citation needed]
1996 Port Arthur massacre 35 Tasmania, Australia Martin Bryant shoots 35 people dead and injures 37 at the tourist town of Port Arthur, Tasmania. At 35, this is the largest shooting incident of its type in Australian history. [citation needed]
1997 Sanaa massacre 8 Yemen School massacre in Yemen. [citation needed]
1998 Jonesboro massacre 5 Arkansas, United States Two middle school students attacked their school in a military style ambush. [citation needed]
1998 Thurston High School shooting 4 Springfield, Oregon, United States A day after being expelled from school, Kip Kinkel killed his parents and the next morning, killed two of his former classmates and injured 26 others with a Glock and a .22 semi-automatic rifle before being detained. [citation needed]
1998 Shaanxi Axe Massacre 9 Shaanxi, China After a dispute about stolen geese, farmer Yang Mingxin brutally kills nine villages with an axe, leaving another three in critical condition. [citation needed]
1999 Columbine High School massacre 15 Jefferson County, Colorado, United States Two students (Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold) executed a planned shooting rampage, killing 12 fellow students and a teacher before committing suicide. [citation needed]
1999 Atlanta shooting 10 Atlanta, Georgia On July 29, Mark O. Barton opens fire at two day trading firms, killing nine and injuring 13 before committing suicide . [citation needed]
1999 Wedgwood Baptist Church massacre 8 Fort Worth, Texas, United States Larry Gene Ashbrook shot dead 7 people and injured a further 7 at a concert by Christian rock group Forty Days in Fort Worth, Texas before killing himself. [citation needed]
1999 Xerox Massacre 7 Honolulu, Hawaii, United States Former Xerox employee Byran Uyesugi opens fire at the workplace building, killing his former supervisor, six co-workers and wounding another co-worker. [citation needed]
2000 Wendy's massacre 5 Flushing, New York, United States Craig Godineaux and John Taylor held a Wendy's outlet hostage where several employees were duct-taped and shot execution-style. [citation needed]
2000 Wichita Massacre 5 Wichita, Kansas, United States Two brothers go on a week-long murder/assault/rape/robbery spree, which culminated with the execution-style shooting of four naked victims on a soccer field. A fifth victim survived thanks to a hair clip that prevented the bullet from entering her skull. [citation needed]
2000 Wakefield massacre 7 Wakefield, Massachusetts, United States Software engineer Michael McDermott carries a shooting rampage at the Edgewater Technology, killing seven co-workers. [citation needed]
2001 Nepalese royal massacre 10 Katmandu, Nepal Prince Dipendra shoots his immediate family and himself at a royal dinner. [citation needed]
2001 Osaka school massacre 8 Ikeda, Osaka prefecture, Japan Former janitor Mamoru Takuma stabbed eight children to death and seriously wounded thirteen other children and two teachers. [citation needed]
2001 Zug massacre 15 Zug, Switzerland Friedrich Leibacher entered the Zug parliament and opened fire, killing three members of the cantonal government and 11 parliamentarians before turning the gun on himself. [citation needed]
2002 Nanterre massacre 8 Paris, France A man at a city council meeting in Nanterre opens fire, killing 8 city officials and wounding another 19. [citation needed]
2002 Erfurt massacre 17 Erfurt, Thuringia, Germany Robert Steinhäuser broke into his former high school and killed 13 teachers, 2 students and a police officer before finally turning a gun on himself. [citation needed]
2003 Lockheed Martin shooting 6 Meridian, Mississippi On July 8, Doug Williams, an employee at Lockheed Martin, opened fire, killing five and injuring nine, after which he commits suicide. [6] [citation needed]
2005 Living Church of God Massacre 8 Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States Terry Ratzmann opens fire at the Living Church of God during a congregation, killing seven before taking his own life. [citation needed]
2005 Red Lake High School massacre 10 Red Lake, Minnesota, United States Jeff Weise kills 9 people, consisting of his grandfather and his grandfather's girlfriend and five students, a security guard and a teacher at Red Lake High School. After exchanging fire with police, he took his own life. [citation needed]
2006 Goleta Postal massacre 8 Goleta, California, United States Female former postal worker goes on a rampage, shooting dead seven before killing herself. [citation needed]
2006 Capitol Hill massacre 7 Seattle, Washington, United States Aaron Kyle Huff entered a house party in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood and shot eight people, killing six of them. When confronted by police, Huff killed himself. [citation needed]
2006 Amish school shooting 6 Nickel Mines, Pennsylvania, United States Charles Carl Roberts IV entered a one-room Amish schoolhouse in Nickel Mines, a village in Lancaster County, took ten children hostage, and eventually shot and killed five girls aged 7 to 13 before killing himself. [citation needed]
2007 Trolley Square shooting 6 Salt Lake City, Utah, United States Sulejman Talović entered a shopping mall carrying a shotgun and a .38 caliber pistol as well as a backpack full of ammunition, shot five people dead as well as wounding four others before being fatally shot by police. [citation needed]
2007 Virginia Tech massacre 33 Blacksburg, Virginia, United States Gunman Seung-Hui Cho opens fire in a Virginia Tech university dormitory and a classroom building, killing and wounding many, then commits suicide. At 33 (including gunman's suicide), this is the largest shooting incident of its type in US history. [citation needed]
2007 Homecoming Massacre 7 Crandon, Wisconsin, United States Forest County Deputy Sheriff Tyler Peterson opens fire with an AR-15 assault rifle during a homecoming party killing 6 people including his ex-girlfriend and wounding 1 before committing suicide. [citation needed]
2007 Jokela school shooting 9 Jokela, Tuusula, Finland 18-year-old upper secondary school student Pekka-Eric Auvinen shot five boys, one girl, the school nurse and the principal. He also opened fire against police officers. No policemen were wounded. Auvinen was hospitalized with a head injury after an unsuccessful suicide attempt. Auvinen died later at night. [citation needed]

The Columbine High shooters caught on a security camera during their rampage. ... Memorial of the 1986 post office incident in Edmond, Oklahoma. ... Picture of The St. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... George Clarence Bugs Moran (August 21, 1891 – February 25, 1957) was a Chicago Prohibition-era gangster. ... “Capone” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... Sadamichi Hirasawa Sadamichi Hirasawa was a Japanese painter who was sentenced to death, convicted of mass cyanide poisoning. ... This article is about the chemical compound. ... The Tsuyama massacre was a murder spree that occurred on 21 May 1938 in the very rural village close to Tsuyama city in Okayama, Japan. ... Tsuyama (&#27941;&#23665;&#24066;; -shi) is a city located in Okayama, Japan. ... Okayama (&#23713;&#23665;&#24066;; -shi) is the capital city of Okayama Prefecture in the Chugoku region of Japan. ... Tsuyama (&#27941;&#23665;&#24066;; -shi) is a city located in Okayama, Japan. ... For other uses, see Katana (disambiguation). ... Eric Stanley Graham ( 1900&#8211;21 October 1941) was a mass murderer in New Zealand who killed seven people. ... Hokitika is a township on the West Coast of New Zealand, 38 kilometres south of Greymouth, and close to the mouth of the Hokitika River. ... Howard Unruh (also spelled Unrah) (born January 21, 1921, Camden, N.J) is regarded as one of the first of the lone gunmen to go on an indiscriminate shooting spree. ... The City of Camden is the county seat of Camden County, New Jersey in the United States. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Former crewmembers of the battleship Missouri pose for photos shortly after the Anniversary of the End of World War II ceremony, held aboard the famous ship. ... Howard Unruh (also spelled Unrah) (born January 21, 1921, Camden, N.J) is regarded as one of the first of the lone gunmen to go on an indiscriminate shooting spree. ... This article is about the tower sniper. ... Austin is the capital of the U.S. state of Texas and the seat of Travis County. ... This article is about the tower sniper. ... University of Texas redirects here. ... The St. ... This article is about the capital city of Canada. ... St. ... New Rochelle City Hall New Roc City New Rochelle (French: Nouvelle-Rochelle) is a city in the southeast portion of the U.S. state of New York in Westchester County, 16 miles (26 km) from Grand Central Terminal in New York City and 2 miles north of the border with... New Rochelle is a city located in Westchester County in the US state of New York. ... This article is about the state. ... This article is about the Peoples Temple settlement. ... This article is about the Peoples Temple settlement. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Leo Joseph Ryan, Jr. ... This article is about the cult leader. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Gyeongsangnam-do (South Gyeongsang) is a province in the southeast of South Korea. ... George Banks is a Pennsylvania mass murderer, given a death sentence but later declared by the court to be too psychotic to execute. ... Wilkes-Barre (IPA: , , or [1]) is the central city of the Wyoming Valley and county seat of Luzerne County in northeastern Pennsylvania. ... George Banks is a Pennsylvania mass murderer, given a death sentence but later declared by the court to be too psychotic to execute. ... The Wah Mee massacre was an incident on February 18, 1983, in which Kwan Fai (Willie) Mak, Wai-Chiu (Tony) Ng, and Benjamin Ng gunned down 14 people in the Wah Mee gambling club on Maynard Alley S. just south of S. King Street in Seattles Chinatown/International District... Seattle redirects here. ... City nickname Emerald City City bird Great Blue Heron City flower Dahlia City mottos The City of Flowers The City of Goodwill City song Seattle, the Peerless City Mayor Greg Nickels County King County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water   - % water 369. ... International District Uwajimaya Village The International District of Seattle, Washington (also known as Chinatown and the I.D.) has been called the only place in the continental United States where Chinese Americans, Japanese Americans, Filipino Americans, Vietnamese Americans, Korean Americans, Laotian Americans, Cambodian Americans, and other Asian Americans live in... Not to be confused with the Sydney River McDonalds Murders. ... San Diego redirects here. ... There are more than 30,000 McDonalds restaurants in 119 countries. ... For other uses, see Restaurant (disambiguation). ... The Milperra Massacre was the name of an incident which occurred on Fathers Day September 1984, in Milperra, New South Wales where 7 people were killed. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... NSW is a three-letter acronym that refers to: New South Wales, a state of the Commonwealth of Australia U.S. Naval Special Warfare Command This is a disambiguation page &#8212; a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For other uses, see Fathers Day (disambiguation). ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... It has been suggested that Settlers Crossing be merged into this article or section. ... Patrick Sherrill - first to go postal Patrick Henry Sherrill was a US Postal Service employee who, on August 20, 1986 in Edmond, Oklahoma, shot and killed 14 employees at his work place before turning one of his several guns on himself and committing suicide. ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ... USPS and Usps redirect here. ... Winn-Dixie Stores, Inc. ... Palm Bay is a city in Brevard County, Florida, United States. ... Winn-Dixie Stores, Inc. ... The Hoddle Street massacre is the name given to a tragedy that occurred on the evening of Sunday, August 9, 1987 in Hoddle Street, Clifton Hill, a suburb of Melbourne, Australia. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre. ... VIC redirects here. ... The Hungerford massacre occurred in Hungerford, Berkshire, England, on Wednesday, August 19, 1987. ... , Hungerford is a market town and civil parish in Berkshire, England, 10 miles (16 km) west of Newbury. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Michael Robert Ryan Michael Robert Ryan, on 19 August 1987, armed with several weapons including an AK-47 rifle, went on a mass murder spree that became known as the Hungerford massacre and led to major changes to firearms law in the United Kingdom following the Hungerford Report. ... Queen Street, facing north from Flinders St The Queen Street massacre was a tragedy that resulted in the deaths of 8 people, and serious injury to 5 more, as well as severely traumatising many many more individuals, on the afternoon of December 8, 1987. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre. ... VIC redirects here. ... Australia Post is the government-owned postal service of Australia. ... Ronald Gene Simmons (1940-25 June 1990) was a retired United States Air Force sergeant who killed sixteen people, 14 of whom were members of his family, and wounded three others. ... Russellville is a city in Pope County, Arkansas, United States. ... “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ... Picture of Richard Farley being escorted by two police officers Richard Wade Farley (b. ... Location in Santa Clara County and the state of California Coordinates: , Country State County Santa Clara Government  - Mayor Otto Lee Area  - City 22. ... Picture of Richard Farley being escorted by two police officers Richard Wade Farley (b. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Nickname: Motto: Stocktons Great, Take A Look! Location in San Joaquin County and the state of California Coordinates: , Country State County San Joaquin Incorporated 1850 Government  - Mayor Edward J. Chavez  - City Manager J. Gordon Palmer, Jr. ... Plaque on the exterior wall of École Polytechnique commemorating the victims of the massacre. ... The Université de Montréal (UdeM) (translated into English commonly as (the) University of Montreal) is one of six universities in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - Total 365. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Marc Lépine (October 26, 1964 – December 6, 1989), born Gamil Gharbi, was a 25-year-old man from the Province of Quebec, Canada. ... The Standard Gravure shooting occurred on September 14, 1989. ... Louisville redirects here. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Joseph Wesbecker (1942 - September 14, 1989) was a mentally disturbed American spree killer. ... The Happyland Fire killed 87 people trapped in an unlicensed social club called Happy Land in New York City, on March 25, 1990. ... New York, New York redirects here. ... Julio González (born circa 1954) is a Cuban-born warehouse worker and arsonist responsible for the Happy Land Fire that killed 87 people in the Bronx, New York City, on March 25, 1990. ... The current version of this article or section is written in an informal style and with a personally invested tone. ... Aramoana mudflats at the mouth of Otago Harbour Aramoana is a small coastal settlement, 27 kilometres north of Dunedin city, in the South Island of New Zealand. ... AOS officers The Armed Offenders Squad (AOS) is a specialist unit of the New Zealand Police designed to cordon, contain and appeal to armed and dangerous offenders. ... June 18, 1990, James Edward Pough walked into the General Motors Acceptance Corporation Office, Jacksonville, Florida and killed nine employees and customers. ... The Jacksonville skyline and the Acosta Bridge. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami metropolitan area Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... James Edward Pough was an American mass murderer. ... The Strathfield massacre was a shooting rampage in Sydney, Australia on August 17, 1991. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... Wade Frankum was a 33 year old mass murderer who killed seven people in Australia in 1991 in what is known as the Strathfield Massacre. ... Lubys massacre was a mass killing that took place on October 16, 1991, in Killeen, Texas, United States when George Hennard entered a Lubys Cafeteria and shot and killed 23 people, wounded 20 and then committed suicide by shooting himself. ... Killeen may refer to: Killeen, Texas Killeen Castle, Dunsany, a 12th century castle and estate in County Meath, Ireland Killeen, County Armagh, a small village in Northern Ireland Killeen, County Laois, Ireland Gretel Killeen, Australian television personality an anglicisation of the Irish word cillín. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Image:Http://www. ... Gang Lu (left). ... Iowa City is a city in Johnson County, Iowa, United States. ... Gang Lu (left). ... The University of Iowa, also commonly called Iowa or locally UI, is a major coeducational research university located on a 1,900 acre (8 km²) campus in Iowa City, Iowa, US, on the banks of the Iowa River in East Central Iowa. ... Masterton is a town (and local government district) in the Wellington region of New Zealand. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... NSW is a three-letter acronym that refers to: New South Wales, a state of the Commonwealth of Australia U.S. Naval Special Warfare Command This is a disambiguation page &#8212; a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Olivehurst is a census-designated place located in Yuba County, California. ... 101 California Street Shootings is the name given to a mass shooting that took place July 1, 1993 in San Francisco, California, claiming the lives of eight people and the shooter. ... San Francisco redirects here. ... The Browns Chicken massacre is the popular name for a mass murder which occurred at a Browns Chicken restaurant in Palatine, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago in the United States in 1993. ... Palatine is a village in Cook County, Illinois, United States. ... For the Canadian actor, see Colin Ferguson (actor) Colin Ferguson shot 25 people aboard a Long Island Rail Road train on December 7, 1993, killing six. ... Nassau County is a suburban city county in the New York Metropolitan Area east of New York City in the U.S. state of New York. ... Colin Ferguson For the Canadian actor, see Colin Ferguson (actor) Colin Ferguson (born January 14, 1958, Kingston, Jamaica) was convicted of murdering six people and injuring nineteen others on the Long Island Rail Road in Nassau County, New York on December 7, 1993. ... David Bain (born March 27, 1972 in Dunedin, New Zealand) was convicted in May 1995 for the murder of his parents and siblings on 20 June the previous year. ... Dunedin (ÅŒtepoti in Maori) is the second-largest city in the South Island of New Zealand, and the principal city of the region of Otago. ... David Bain (born March 27, 1972 in Dunedin, New Zealand) was convicted in May 1995 for the murder of his parents and siblings on 20 June the previous year. ... Toulon or Toulon-sur-mer (Tolon in Provençal) is a city in southern France, and préfecture (capital) of the Var département in the former province of Provence. ... Panorama of Toulon area. ... The Dunblane massacre was a multiple murder-suicide which occurred at Dunblane Primary School in the Scottish town of Dunblane on 13 March 1996. ... Dunblane (Gaelic: Dùn Bhlàthain) is a small town north of Stirling in the Stirling council area in Scotland. ... This article is about the country. ... For the 1894 massacre in Lüshunkou, see Port Arthur massacre (China). ... Slogan or Nickname: Island of Inspiration; The Apple Isle; Holiday Isle Motto(s): Ubertas et Fidelitas (Fertility and Faithfulness) Other Australian states and territories Capital Hobart Government Constitutional monarchy Governor William Cox Premier Paul Lennon (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 5  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product... Martin John Bryant (born 7 May 1967) murdered 35 people and injured 37 others in the Port Arthur massacre, a killing spree in Tasmania in 1996. ... The iconic view of the penitentiary originally built as a flour mill, across the water. ... The Sanaa massacre was a school massacre that occurred in Sanaa, Yemen, on March 30, 1997. ... The Jonesboro school massacre occurred on Tuesday, March 24, 1998, in Craighead County, Arkansas, near northwestern Jonesboro. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Largest metro area Little Rock Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... Location in Oregon Coordinates: , County Lane County Incorporated 1885 Government  - Mayor Sid Leiken Area  - City 37. ... Kipland Philip Kinkel (born August 30, 1982) is an American spree killer who became the youngest person in Oregon history to receive a de facto life sentence without parole. ...   (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ShÇŽnxÄ«; Wade-Giles: Shan-hsi; Postal map spelling: Shensi) is a north-central province of the Peoples Republic of China, and includes portions of the Loess Plateau on the middle reaches of the Yellow River as well as the Qinling Mountains across the... The Columbine High School massacre occurred on Tuesday, April 20, 1999, at Columbine High School in unincorporated Jefferson County, Colorado near Denver and Littleton. ... Jefferson County (IPA: //) is the fourth most populous of the 64 counties of the State of Colorado of the United States. ... Eric Harris (left) and Dylan Klebold (right) Eric David Harris (April 9, 1981 – April 20, 1999) and Dylan Bennet Klebold (September 11, 1981 – April 20, 1999) were the high school seniors who committed the Columbine High School massacre. ... Mark O. Barton Mark Orrin Barton (1955 - July 29, 1999) was a spree killer from Stockbridge, Georgia, who, on July 29, 1999, shot and killed nine people and injured 13 more. ... Atlanta redirects here. ... Mark O. Barton Mark Orrin Barton (1955 - July 29, 1999) was a spree killer from Stockbridge, Georgia, who, on July 29, 1999, shot and killed nine people and injured 13 more. ... Larry Gene Ashbrook was the spree killer who, in 1999, murdered 7 people at a concert at Wedgwood Baptist Church in Fort Worth, Texas. ... Nickname: Motto: Where the West Begins Location of Fort Worth in Tarrant County, Texas Coordinates: , Country State Counties Tarrant and Denton Government  - Mayor Michael J. Moncrief Area  - City  298. ... Larry Gene Ashbrook was the spree killer who, in 1999, murdered 7 people at a concert at Wedgwood Baptist Church in Fort Worth, Texas. ... Byran Koji Uyesugi (born 1959) was a former Xerox service technician in Honolulu, Hawaii who was convicted of killing seven of his co-workers on November 2, 1999, in what has been called the Xerox murders, the worst mass murder case in the history of Hawaii. ... For the city and county of Honolulu, see City & County of Honolulu. ... Xerox Corporation (NYSE: XRX) (name pronounced ) is a global document management company, which manufactures and sells a range of color and black-and-white printers, multifunction systems, photo copiers, digital production printing presses, and related consulting services and supplies. ... Byran Koji Uyesugi (born 1959) was a former Xerox service technician in Honolulu, Hawaii who was convicted of killing seven of his co-workers on November 2, 1999, in what has been called the Xerox murders, the worst mass murder case in the history of Hawaii. ... The Wendys Massacre was a brutal killing that took place in a Wendys fast-food restaurant at 40-12 Main Street in Flushing, Queens, New York, on May 24, 2000. ... Look up flushing in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the state. ... Wendys is an international chain of fast food restaurants founded by Dave Thomas in 1969 in Columbus, Ohio. ... Execution-style murder and execution-style killing are news media buzzwords applied to various acts of criminal murder where the perpetrator kills at close range a conscious victim who is under his complete physical control and who has been left with no course of resistance or escape. ... The Wichita Massacre, also known as The Wichita Horror[1], was a murder/assault/rape/robbery spree perpetrated by brothers Reginald and Jonathan Carr in the city of Wichita, Kansas in the winter of 2000. ... Wichita is the name of: Wichita (tribe), a Native American tribe Wichita language, the language of the tribe Wichita (film), a 1955 American Western movie directed by Jacques Tourneur Wichita Recordings, a London based independent record label A song by the band Soul Coughing A font replicating the hand writing... Official language(s) English[2] Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  Ranked 15th  - Total 82,277 sq mi (213,096 km²)  - Width 211 miles (340 km)  - Length 417 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... Execution-style murder and execution-style killing are news media buzzwords applied to various acts of criminal murder where the perpetrator kills at close range a conscious victim who is under his complete physical control and who has been left with no course of resistance or escape. ... The Wakefield massacre happened on December 26, 2000 when disgruntled software engineer Michael McDermott, born Michael Martinez, went on a shooting rampage, killing seven of his co-workers at Edgewater Technology in Wakefield, Massachusetts, north of Boston, USA. He was found by police sitting calmly and stated that he didn... Wakefield is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States located ten miles northeast of Boston. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Software engineering (SE) is the profession concerned with specifying, designing, developing and maintaining software applications by applying technologies and practices from computer science, project management, and other fields. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Rampage can refer to: A course of violence. ... The Nepalese royal massacre occurred on Saturday, June 1, 2001, at Narayanhity Royal Palace, the official residence of the Nepalese monarchy. ... Kathmandu (Nepali: &#2325;&#2366;&#2336;&#2350;&#2366;&#2337;&#2380;&#2306;) is the capital city of Nepal. ... Dipendra Bir Bikram Shah Dev, King of Nepal (June 27, 1971 – June 4, 2001) was King of Nepal from June 1 to June 4, 2001. ... The Osaka School Massacre took place on June 8, 2001, at Ikeda Elementary School, an elite primary school affiliated with Osaka Kyoiku University in Osaka Prefecture, Japan. ... Ikeda ) is a city located in Osaka, Japan. ... Osaka Prefecture (大阪府 ÅŒsaka-fu) is part of the Kinki region on Honshu island, Japan. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... The Zug massacre took place September 27, 2001 in the city of Zug (Canton of Zug, Switzerland) in the cantons parliment. ...  , capital of the Swiss canton of that name, is a picturesque little town at the northeastern corner of the lake of Zug, and at the foot of the Zugerberg (992 m (3255 ft. ... Friedrich Leibacher (July 21, 1944 – September 27, 2001) was a Swiss spree killer who killed 14 members of the Zug canton Parliament, injuring 15 others, before committing suicide. ... The Nanterre massacre occurred on March 27, 2002, in Nanterre, France, when Richard Durn, a 33-year-old local activist, stormed a late-night meeting of local councillors in Nanterres town hall, and began firing. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Société Générale twin towers, located in Nanterre in the district of La Défense. ... Location of Erfurt in Germany The Erfurt massacre was a school shooting that occurred on April 26, 2002 at the Johann Gutenberg Gymnasium in Erfurt, Germany. ... The cathedral Mariendom at night. ... The Free State of Thuringia (German: Freistaat Thüringen) is located in central Germany and is considered one of the smaller of Germanys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states), with an area of 16,200 km² and 2. ... Meridian is a city located in, and the county seat of, Lauderdale County in Mississippi, a state of the United States of America. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Lockheed/BAE/Northrop F-35 Lockheed Trident missile C-130 Hercules; in production since the 1950s, now as the C-130J Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) is an aerospace manufacturer formed in 1995 by the merger of Lockheed Corporation with Martin Marietta. ... Terry Ratzmann On March 12th 2005 44-year old Terry Ratzmann entered his Milwaukee Living Church of God with a 9mm handgun and fired 22 rounds into the congregation killing the minister and six others before killing himself - reportedly upset about a sermon the minister had given two weeks earlier. ... This article is about Milwaukee in Wisconsin. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Largest metro area Greater Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42° 30′ N to 47° 05′ N  - Longitude 86° 46′ W to... Terry Ratzmann On March 12th 2005 44-year old Terry Ratzmann entered his Milwaukee Living Church of God with a 9mm handgun and fired 22 rounds into the congregation killing the minister and six others before killing himself - reportedly upset about a sermon the minister had given two weeks earlier. ... The Living Church of God (LCG) is one of the largest church groups formed by followers of the teachings of the late Herbert W. Armstrong. ... Wikinews has related news: Ten dead on Minnesota Indian reservation after school shooting The Red Lake High School massacre was a school massacre that took place on Monday, March 21, 2005 in which Jeffrey Weise, a student at Red Lake High School in Red Lake, Beltrami County, Minnesota, killed seven... There is also a Red Lake County in Minnesota. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... Jeff Weise as a sophomore in a 2005 class photo. ... Red Lake High School is a public state-funded high school in Red Lake, in Beltrami County, northern Minnesota, USA. The high school is located on the Red Lake Indian Reservation on which members of the Red Lake Band of Chippewa (Ojibwe) Indians live, and has over 300 students [1... On January 30, 2006, a former postal employee, Jennifer Sanmarco, shot and killed seven people, including six employees, before committing suicide at the local postal-processing facility. ... Goleta is a city located in southern Santa Barbara County, California. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... The Capitol Hill massacre was a mass murder that occurred on the morning of Saturday, March 25, 2006, when 28-year-old Kyle Aaron Huff entered a rave afterparty in the southeast part of Seattles Capitol Hill neighborhood and opened fire, killing six and wounding two. ... Seattle redirects here. ... Capitol Hill Capitol Hill is the second most densely populated neighborhood in Seattle, Washington, United States, after Belltown (the north part of downtown). ... The Amish school shooting occurred on the morning of Monday, October 2, 2006, when a gunman took hostages and eventually killed five girls (aged 7–13) and then killed himself at West Nickel Mines School, a one-room Amish schoolhouse in Nickel Mines, a village in Bart Township of Lancaster... Location of Nickel Mines Nickel Mines, Pennsylvania is a hamlet in Bart Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. ... This article is about Old Order Amish, but also refers to other Amish sects. ... Lancaster County is the name of several counties in the United States: Lancaster County, Nebraska Lancaster County, Pennsylvania Lancaster County, South Carolina Lancaster County, Virginia This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Candlelight vigil at the Salt Lake City Public Library for victims of the Trolley Square shooting. ... Salt Lake City is the capital and the most populous city of the U.S. state of Utah. ... Sulejman Talović (October 6, 1988[1] – February 12, 2007) was a Bosniak[2][3] refugee[4] whose family[3] moved to the United States from the small town of Cerska in the Vlasenica municipality of Bosnia and Herzegovina[5] and who were living in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... The Virginia Tech massacre was a school shooting comprising two separate attacks about two hours apart on April 16, 2007, on the Virginia Tech campus in Blacksburg, Virginia, United States. ... Blacksburgs location within Virgina Virginias location within the United States Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Montgomery Founded 1798 Government  - Mayor Ron Rordam Area  - Town  19. ... Korean pronunciation (IPA) :   English pronunciation (IPA) : [1] Seung-Hui Cho[2] (January 18, 1984 – April 16, 2007) was a student at Virginia Tech who committed the mass murder of 32 people[3] and wounded 25 others[4] in the shooting rampage known as the Virginia Tech massacre. ... The Crandon, Wisconsin shooting was a mass murder that occurred at 2:45 a. ... Crandon is a city in Forest County, Wisconsin, United States; it is in the northeastern part of the state, about 100 miles (160 km) north of Green Bay. ... Forest County is a county located in the state of Wisconsin. ... Deputy may mean: A member of a Chamber of Deputies, National Assembly, etc. ... Look up Sheriff in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Tyler Peterson was a part time deputy Sheriff of the Crandon police department in northern Wisconsin who murdered 6 young people aged 20 and under on Sunday October 7th 2007 at approximately 3am in the morning. ... The AR-15 is a lightweight, air-cooled, magazine fed, autoloading, centerfire rifle. ... The AK-47 is the worlds most common assault rifle. ... The Jokela school shooting occurred on November 7, 2007 at Jokela High School (Finnish: ),[4] a public secondary school in the town of Jokela, Tuusula municipality, Finland. ... Tuusula (IPA: /ˈtuːsulÉ‘/), or Tusby in Swedish is a municipality of Finland. ... The Jokela school shooting occurred on November 7, 2007, at Jokela High School (Finnish: , Translation: Jokela School Center), a public secondary school in the village of Jokela, Tuusula municipality, Finland. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ The Holocaust (with a capital H) was the systematic persecution, exploitation and slaughter of Jews and other minorities in Europe by the Third Reich and its collaborators. The table below lists specific events that were massacres; the bulk of the slaughter occurred over a period of years in concentration and extermination camps such as Auschwitz and Treblinka.
  2. ^ Edicts_of_Ashoka
  3. ^ Ancient History
  4. ^ Punic Wars
  5. ^ Manius Aquillius and the First Mithridatic War
  6. ^ Helvetti
  7. ^ Julius Caesar The Conquest of Gaul
  8. ^ Matthew 2:16-18,Catholic Encyclopedia: Holy Innocents
  9. ^ Leaders and Battles: Teutoburg Forest
  10. ^ Jewish Antiquities 18.4.2
  11. ^ Jewish Antiquities 20.5.3, Jewish War 2.12.1
  12. ^ Jewish Wars 2.13.5, Jewish Antiquities 20.8.6, Acts 21:38
  13. ^ Boudicca
  14. ^ Dig uncovers Boudicca's brutal streak
  15. ^ Tacitus XV.44
  16. ^ The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, by Edward Gibbon
  17. ^ Seleucia - LoveToKnow 1911
  18. ^ Catholic Encyclopedia: Valerian
  19. ^ Catholic Encyclopedia: Diocletian
  20. ^ Muir William (Bengal Civil Service). Life of Mahomet Volume I. Smith, Elder, & Co., London, 1861.Section 5: Sketch of the Chief Nomad Tribes in the Centre of the Peninsula: Their conversion to Christianity in the 5th century
  21. ^ Conybeare F.C. Antiochus Strategos, The Capture of Jerusalem by the Persians in 614 AD English Historical Review 25 (1910) pp. 502-517;
    Horowitz, Elliott. "The Vengeance of the Jews Was Stronger Than Their Avarice": Modern Historians and the Persian Conquest of Jerusalem in 614 Jewish Social Studies Volume 4, Number 2
  22. ^ Irving M. Zeitlin (2007-01-29). The Historical Muhammad. Polity, 13. 978-0745639994. 
  23. ^ Islam and Fragmentation, to 1200 CE
  24. ^ A Brief History of al-Andalus
  25. ^ The Forgotten Refugees - Historical Timeline
  26. ^ Moroccan Jews
  27. ^ Granada by Richard Gottheil, Meyer Kayserling, Jewish Encyclopedia. 1906 ed.
  28. ^ present-day Uzbekistan.
  29. ^ The Destruction of Kiev
  30. ^ History of Russia, Early Slavs history, Kievan Rus, Mongol invasion
  31. ^ The Mongols
  32. ^ Sicilian Vespers
  33. ^ Hetoum II (1289‑1297)
  34. ^ History of Armenia by Vahan Kurkjian
  35. ^ Third Crusade: Siege of Acre
  36. ^ Now in England.
  37. ^ Crow Creek Massacre
  38. ^ Battle of Visby Burials, Sweden
  39. ^ Medieval times battle in Visby, Sweden
  40. ^ A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century. Author: Barbara Tuchman. Publisher: Ballantine Books; Reissue edition (July 12, 1987) ISBN-10: 0345349571
  41. ^ Timur's history
  42. ^ Tamerlane: Sword of Islam, Conqueror of the World by Justin Marozzi
  43. ^ Grant, R G. Battle a Visual Journey Through 5000 Years of Combat. London: Dorling Kindersley, 2005 pg 122
  44. ^ Sivas, Asia Minor
  45. ^ Tamerlane's Living Legacy
  46. ^ Timur (Tamerlane)
  47. ^ New Book Looks at Old-Style Central Asian Despotism
  48. ^ History of Central Europe
  49. ^ Vlad the Impaler
  50. ^ The Real Prince Dracula
  51. ^ Vlad Tepes - The Historical Dracula
  52. ^ The Treatment of Jews in Arab/Islamic Countries
  53. ^ Norman Stillman,The Jews of the Arab lands, (PA: The Jewish Publication Society of America, 1979), pp. 59, 284.
  54. ^ The Enigma of Aztec Sacrifice
  55. ^ Hassig, Ross (2003). "El sacrificio y las guerras floridas". Arqueología mexicana, p. 46-51.
  56. ^ Stannard, D., American Holocaust, p. 70.
  57. ^ Las Casas, B. A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies, p. 22.
  58. ^ Marrano History, The forgotten massacre
  59. ^ Las Casas, B, pp. 27-30; Stannard, D., American Holocaust, p. 71.
  60. ^ Varner and Varner, The Dogs of Conquest, pp. 36-39; Todorov, T., The Conquest of America, p. 141.
  61. ^ St Thomas More Studies
  62. ^ The Ottoman Conquest
  63. ^ Hernando Cortez
  64. ^ Thomas, H., Conquest: Montezuma, Cortés and the Fall of Old Mexico, pp. 241-250.
  65. ^ Cortés, H., Second Letter to King Charles V of Spain, Letter from Mexico, p. 73.
  66. ^ History of Sweden
  67. ^ History of Sweden, 1448-1523
  68. ^ Empires Past: Aztecs: Conquest
  69. ^ Thomas, H., Conquest: Montezuma, Cortés and the Fall of Old Mexico, pp. 383-393.
  70. ^ Thomas, H., Conquest: Montezuma, Cortés and the Fall of Old Mexico, pp. 261.
  71. ^ Peasants' War
  72. ^ The Catholic and the Lutheran Church
  73. ^ The Fall of The Medieval Kingdom of Hungary: Mohacs 1526 - Buda 1541
  74. ^ Ottoman Empire History Encyclopedia
  75. ^ The Sacking of Rome
  76. ^ Pope's guards celebrate 500 years
  77. ^ Duncan, E., Hernando de Soto, p. 136.
  78. ^ Hemming, J., The Conquest of the Incas, pp. 23-45.
  79. ^ The mysteries and majesties of the Aeolian Islands
  80. ^ Hernando de Soto Arrives and Explores Florida
  81. ^ Duncan, E., Hernando de Soto, pp. 285-291.
  82. ^ Biography - Hernando de Soto - by Dr. Lawrence A. Clayton
  83. ^ De Soto'S Trail: Courage and Cruelty Come Alive
  84. ^ Duncan, E., Hernando de Soto, pp. 376-384. Steele, I., Warpaths, p. 15.
  85. ^ Sauer, C. Sixteenth Century North America, p. 141.
  86. ^ Vieste
  87. ^ Hall of Heroes : Maharana Pratap Singh
  88. ^ Ivan The Terrible
  89. ^ Novgorod, Russia (Capital)
  90. ^ Massacre at Novgorod - Loyola University
  91. ^ The Heritage of Armenian Literature, A. J. (Agop Jack) Hacikyan, Nourhan Ouzounian, Gabriel Basmajian, Edward S. Franchuk, 2000, p.777
  92. ^ Change and Development in the Middle East: essays in honour of W.B. Fisher, John Innes Clarke, Howard Bowen-Jones, 1981, p.290
  93. ^ Moscow - Historical background
  94. ^ Vasily Klyuchevsky, The Course of Russian History, Vol. 2.
  95. ^ Muromachi Era: 1333-1587
  96. ^ Oda Clan Timeline
  97. ^ 1574
  98. ^ Brief mention of the massacre
  99. ^ John Sugden, "Sir Francis Drake", Touchstone-book, published Simon+Schuster, New York, ISBN 0-671-75863-2
  100. ^ Conquistador Statue Stirs Hispanic Pride and Indian Rage
  101. ^ Weber, D., The Spanish Frontier in North America, pp. 85-86.
  102. ^ Around 347 people were massacred in the attack
  103. ^ Steele, I., Warpaths, p. 47.
  104. ^ Cave, A., The Pequot War, pp. 144-154.
  105. ^ Churchill, W., A Little Matter of Genocide, p. 198.
  106. ^ Steele, I., Warpaths, p. 116.
  107. ^ The curse of Cromwell - BBC
  108. ^ Resistance and Accommodation in New Mexico
  109. ^ [1]
  110. ^ [2]
  111. ^ [3]
  112. ^ [4]
  113. ^ Iran in the Age of the Raj
  114. ^ NUPI - Centre for Russian Studies
  115. ^ Kalmyks History and Cultural Relations
  116. ^ Kalmucks
  117. ^ The Treatment of Jews in Arab/Islamic Countries
  118. ^ Three State and Counterrevolution in France by Charles Tilly
  119. ^ Vive la Contre-Revolution!
  120. ^ McPhee, Peter Review of Reynald Secher, A French Genocide: The Vendée H-France Review Vol. 4 (March 2004), No. 26
  121. ^ The Heart of Darkness: How Visceral Hatred of Catholicism Turns Into Genocide
  122. ^ Journal of a Tour in the Levant. Volume 3, William Turner, p.408
  123. ^ Economies méditerranéennes: équilibres et intercommunications, XIIIe-XIX siècles, Kentro Neoellēnikōn Ereunōn, 1985, p.425
  124. ^ A Brief History of Dessalines from 1825 Missionary Journal
  125. ^ Slave Revolt in St. Domingue
  126. ^ Execution of the Defenders of Madrid, 3rd May 1808
  127. ^ W.Alison Phillips, The War of Greek Independence, 1821 to 1833, New York, 1897 p.48
  128. ^ George Finlay, History of Greek Revolution, London, 1861, p. 187.
  129. ^ Jelavich, Barbara (1983). History of the Balkans, 18th and 19th Centuries. New York: Cambridge University Press, 204-205. ISBN 0-521 27458-3.
  130. ^ George Finlay, A History of Greece (Edited by H. F. Tozer), vol.VI. Oxford, 1877 p. 152
  131. ^ George Finlay, A History of Greece (Edited by H. F. Tozer), vol.VI. Oxford, 1877 p. 165
  132. ^ George Finlay, A History of Greece (Edited by H. F. Tozer), vol.VI. Oxford, 1877 p. 215
  133. ^ Bouboulina Museum, Spetses Greece. Greek Island Spetses. Retrieved on 2007-04-18.
  134. ^ Putnam's Home Cyclopedia, p.343
  135. ^ George Finlay, A history of Greece, 1877, p. 119.
  136. ^ Phillips, p. 32-33
  137. ^ The British and Foreign Review: Or, European Quarterly Journal, The late Revolution in Greece, p.244
  138. ^ Lord Aberdeen, Muriel Evelyn Chamberlain, 1983, p.199
  139. ^ A History of Greece: From Its Conquest by the Romans to the Present Time, B.C. 146 to A.D. 1864, George Finlay, 1877, p.190
  140. ^ a b c d e f Then part of the Ottoman Empire; now part of Greece.
  141. ^ La population des îles de la Grèce: essai de géographie insulaire en Méditerranée orientale, Émile Y Kolodny, 1974, p.128
  142. ^ Syria and Egypt Under the Last Five Sultans of Turkey, John Barker, 1973, p.19
  143. ^ Putnam's Home Cyclopedia, p.343
  144. ^ Statistics of Wars, Oppressions and Atrocities of the Nineteenth Century
  145. ^ Statistics of Wars, Oppressions and Atrocities of the Nineteenth Century
  146. ^ Moriori - The impact of new arrivals
  147. ^ New Zealand A to Z: Chatham Islands
  148. ^ The Statistics of Frontier Conflict
  149. ^ Doolette, Peter (1997) Murder, Mishap & Misfortune: A select history of the Coorong Coorong Publications ISBN 0 646 33895 1
  150. ^ Foster, Robert (2001) Fatal Collisions Wakefield Press ISBN 1 86254 533 2
  151. ^ Deadly attacks against the Assyrian Christians of Iraq
  152. ^ The Massacres of the Khilafah
  153. ^ New-York Weekly Tribune. January 2, 1847
  154. ^ Part of the Revolutions of 1848.
  155. ^ Taiping Rebellion: The destruction of the Chinese culture
  156. ^ Lessons from 1857
  157. ^ Indian mutiny was 'war of religion' - BBC
  158. ^ [5]
  159. ^ Damascus - LoveToKnow 1911
  160. ^ Lebanon - Religious Conflicts
  161. ^ Kunnen-Jones, Marianne (2002-08-21). Anniversary Volume Gives New Voice To Pioneer Accounts of Sioux Uprising. University of Cincinnati. Retrieved on 2007-06-06.
  162. ^ On Your Own In China
  163. ^ Cook, S., The Conflict between the California Indian and White Civilization.
  164. ^ Paraguay - The War of the Triple Alliance
  165. ^ War of the Triple Alliance
  166. ^ Andrist, R., The Long Death, pp. 157-162.
  167. ^ Terrell, J., Land Grab, pp. 4-10.
  168. ^ Then part of the Ottoman Empire; now in Bulgaria.
  169. ^ BATAK-muzey
  170. ^ Warfare and Armed Conflicts: A Statistical Reference to Casualty and Other Figures, 1500-1999, Michael Clodfelter, 2002, p.214
  171. ^ Then in Imperial Russia; now the capital of Moldova.
  172. ^ "Jewish Massacre Denounced", New York Times, April 28, 1903, p 6.
  173. ^ http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/History/Kishinev.html
  174. ^ http://scholars.nus.edu.sg/post/india/history/colonial/massacre.html
  175. ^ Kort, Michael (2001). The Soviet Colossus: History and Aftermath, p. 133. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe. ISBN 0-7656-0396-9.
  176. ^ Soviet order to exterminate Cossacks is unearthed
  177. ^ Pukhov, A. S. Kronshtadtskii miatezh v 1921 g. Leningrad, OGIZ-Molodaia Gvardiia.
  178. ^ Chinese, Korean and Allied civilians and POWs.
  179. ^ See also Unit 731.
  180. ^ http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4158/is_20020222/ai_n12599245
  181. ^ Anthony Beevor, Spanish Civil War (1999), p.133
  182. ^ What were the most important human rights violations committed by Stalin?
  183. ^ plus parts of Austria.
  184. ^ Part of Greece.
  185. ^ (Sam Donaldson, Primetime Live, 1994).
  186. ^ Germany's forgotten victims
  187. ^ Germany's forgotten victims
  188. ^ Hiroshima marks 62nd anniversary of atomic bombing
  189. ^ Morality, Reduced To Arithmetic
  190. ^ Craven and Cate, The Army Air Forces in World War II, Vol. V, pp. 732-733.
  191. ^ The Jews of Iraq
  192. ^ The Jews of Libya
  193. ^ Country Histories - Empire's Children
  194. ^ Heartman, Adam (2006-09-26). A Homemade Genocide. Who's Fault Is It?.
  195. ^ Zanzibar Revolution 1964
  196. ^ Also known as "Black November".
  197. ^ Anti-Chinese riots continue in Indonesia
  198. ^ Chinese diaspora: Indonesia
  199. ^ The Heritage of Armenian Literature, A. J. (Agop Jack) Hacikyan, Nourhan Ouzounian, Gabriel Basmajian, Edward S. Franchuk, 2000, p.777
  200. ^ Change and Development in the Middle East: essays in honour of W.B. Fisher, John Innes Clarke, Howard Bowen-Jones, 1981, p.290
  201. ^ http://www.louthonline.com/html/oliver_cromwell.html
  202. ^ http://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/usbiography/biographies/olivercromwell.html
  203. ^ Summary: the First Anglo-Afghan War, 1838-42
  204. ^ Massacre of Elphinstone's army
  205. ^ Spain torn on tribute to victims of Franco
  206. ^ Spanish Civil War: Casualties
  207. ^ Richard Pankhurst. The Graziani Massacre and Consequences. Addis Tribune/Ethiopia Online. Retrieved on 2007-11-10.
  208. ^ Michael B. Lentakis (2004). Ethiopia: Land of the Lotus Eaters. Janus, 60-61. ISBN 1857565584. 
  209. ^ Run Conference to Examine Nanking Massacre
  210. ^ The Nanjing Massacre in History and Historiography
  211. ^ Robert Gellately. Lenin, Stalin, and Hitler: The Age of Social Catastrophe. Knopf, 2007 ISBN 1400040051 p. 391
  212. ^ "Khatyn" - Genocide policy - Punitive operations
  213. ^ http://tvnz.co.nz/view/page/425822/219370
  214. ^ Italy convicts Nazis of massacre.
  215. ^ History of the tragedy.
  216. ^ Casualties and War Crimes in Afghanistan
  217. ^ Glantz, David M., Stumbling Colossus, p. 58.
  218. ^ Great Purges
  219. ^ Haunted By History's Horrors
  220. ^ A revelatory account of the Spanish civil war
  221. ^ Spain: Repression under Franco after the Civil War
  222. ^ Mao: The Unknown Story by Jung Chang and Jon Halliday, pg 337: "Mao claimed that the total number executed was 700,000, but this did not include those beaten or tortured to death in the post-1949 land reform, which would at the very least be as many again. Then there were suicides, which, based on several local inquiries, were very probably about equal to the number of those killed." Also cited in Mao Zedong, by Jonathan Spence, as cited here.
  223. ^ The Black Book of Communism: Crimes, Terror, Repression by Stephane Courtois, et al; China: A Long March into Night by Jean-Louis Margolin, pg 479
  224. ^ Twitchett, Denis; John K. Fairbank. The Cambridge history of China. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 052124336X. Retrieved on 2007-03-25. 
  225. ^ http://tibet.dharmakara.net/tibethistory.html#Invasion
  226. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/world/monitoring/media_reports/1604970.stm
  227. ^ Ex-minister sued over Algeria war
  228. ^ Unearthing betrayal in France's Algerian war
  229. ^ http://www.batayouvriye.org/English/Positions1/dr.html
  230. ^ Time to End the Silence on Imperiled Indonesian Chinese
  231. ^ Coup plotter faces life in Africa's most notorious jail
  232. ^ If you think this one's bad you should have seen his uncle
  233. ^ Equatorial Guinea - Country Profile
  234. ^ "These would be the first of many probes into what soon became known as the Kent State Massacre. Like the Boston Massacre almost exactly two hundred years before (March 5, 1770), which it resembled, it was called a massacre not for the number of its victims but for the wanton manner in which they were shot down." Philip Caputo. "The Kent State Shootings, 35 Years Later", NPR, 2005-05-04. Retrieved on 2007-11-09. 
  235. ^ Rep. Tim Ryan. "Congressman Tim Ryan Gives Speech at 37th Commemoration of Kent State Massacre", Congressional website of Rep. Tim Ryan (D-Ohio), 2007-05-04. Retrieved on 2007-11-09. 
  236. ^ John Lang. "The day the Vietnam War came home", Scripps Howard News service, 2000-05-04. Retrieved on 2007-11-09. 
  237. ^ White, Matthew, Death Tolls for the Major Wars and Atrocities of the Twentieth Century
  238. ^ Obituary: The buffoon tyrant
  239. ^ Idi Amin: 'Butcher of Uganda', CNN, August 16, 2003
  240. ^ 2003: 'War criminal' Idi Amin dies
  241. ^ Ethiopian Dictator Sentenced to Prison
  242. ^ Zimbabwe won't extradite former Ethiopian dictator
  243. ^ International Justice Tribune - Lettre d’information
  244. ^ Guilty of genocide: the leader who unleashed a 'Red Terror' on Africa by Jonathan Clayton, The Times Online, December 13, 2006
  245. ^ PBS American Experience

For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ... In sociology and in voting theory, a minority is a sub-group that is outnumbered by persons who do not belong to it. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933&#8211;1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... It has been suggested that Internment be merged into this article or section. ... The extermination camps were the facilities set up by Nazi Germany in World War II for the express purpose of killing the Jews of Europe. ... Auschwitz, in English, commonly refers to the Auschwitz concentration camp complex built near the town of O&#347;wi&#281;cim, by Nazi Germany during World War II. Rarely, it may refer to the Polish town of O&#347;wi&#281;cim (called by the Germans Auschwitz) itself. ... Treblinka is a small village in the Mazowieckie voivodship (province) of Poland. ... The Edicts of Ashoka are a collection of 33 inscriptions on the Pillars of Ashoka, as well as boulders and cave walls, made by the Emperor Ashoka of the Mauryan dynasty during his reign from 272 to 231 BCE. These inscriptions are dispersed throughout the areas of modern-day Pakistan... Antiquities of the Jews was a work published by the Jewish historian Flavius Josephus in the year A.D. 93. ... Jewish War is a book written by the historian Josephus as a description of Jewish history up to the events of the Destruction of Jerusalem. ... Jewish War is a book written by the historian Josephus as a description of Jewish history up to the events of the Destruction of Jerusalem. ... Antiquities of the Jews was a work published by the Jewish historian Flavius Josephus in the year A.D. 93. ... The Annals, or, in Latin, Annales, is a history book by Tacitus covering the reign of the 4 Roman Emperors succeeding to Caesar Augustus. ... The English Historical Review is an academic journal published by Oxford University Press. ... Richard James Horatio Gottheil, Ph. ... Meyer Kayserling Meyer Kayserling (born in Hanover, June 17, 1829; died at Budapest, April 21, 1905) was a German rabbi and historian. ... The Jewish Encyclopedia was an encyclopedia originally published between 1901 and 1906 by Funk and Wagnalls. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century, published in 1978, is a work by American historian Barbara Tuchman, focusing on life in 14th century Europe. ... Barbara Wertheim Tuchman (January 30, 1912 – February 6, 1989) was an American historian and author. ... Arqueología mexicana is a bimonthly publication edited by the Mexican Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia (National Institute of Anthropology and History). ... David Edward Stannard is a writer and professor of American stidies at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. ... There were millions of people living in the Americas when Christopher Columbus arrived in 1492. ... Bartolomé de las Casas This article is about a Spanish priest in the 16th century. ... A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies (Spanish: Brevísima relación de la destrucción de las Indias) is an account written by friar Bartolomé de las Casas in 1552 about the mistreatment of American Indians in colonial times and sent to King Philip II of Spain. ... Bartolomé de las Casas This article is about a Spanish priest in the 16th century. ... David Edward Stannard is a writer and professor of American stidies at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. ... There were millions of people living in the Americas when Christopher Columbus arrived in 1492. ... Tzvetan Todorov (Bulgarian: ) (born on March 1, 1939 in Sofia) is a Franco-Bulgarian philosopher. ... Hugh Thomas, Baron Thomas of Swynnerton (born October 21, 1931 in Windsor), is a British historian. ... For the Carlist claimant King Carlos V, see Infante Carlos, Count of Molina. ... Hugh Thomas, Baron Thomas of Swynnerton (born October 21, 1931 in Windsor), is a British historian. ... Hugh Thomas, Baron Thomas of Swynnerton (born October 21, 1931 in Windsor), is a British historian. ... Vasily Osipovich Klyuchevsky (January 16, 1841 - May 12, 1911) dominated the Russian historiography at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries. ... Although the Spanish did not yet have towns for themselves, in the late 1600s colonists began steadily entering the region, attracted by the recent discovery of deposits of silver around the Arizonac mining camp. ... The Pequot War was an armed conflict in 1637 between an alliance of Massachusetts Bay and Plymouth colonies, with American Indian allies (the Narragansett, and Mohegan Indians), against the Pequot Indians. ... Ward LeRoy Churchill (born October 2, 1947) is an American writer and political activist. ... Ottoman redirects here. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The European Revolutions of 1848, known in some countries as the Spring of Nations or the Year of Revolution, were a revolutionary wave which erupted in Sicily and then, further triggered by the revolutions of 1848 in France, soon spread to the rest of Europe and as far afield as... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ottoman redirects here. ... Imperial Russia is the term used to cover the period of history from the expansion of Russia under Peter the Great, through the expansion of the Russian Empire from the Baltic Sea to the Pacific Ocean, to the deposal of Nicholas II of Russia, the last tsar, at the start... This article is about the independent states that comprised the Allies. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... Body disposal at Unit 731 Unit 731 was a covert biological warfare research and development unit of the Imperial Japanese Army that undertook lethal human experimentation during the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937–1945) and World War II. It was responsible for some of the most notorious war crimes carried... Samuel Andrew Donaldson (born March 11, 1934 in El Paso, Texas) was a news anchor for ABC News, known for his persistence in questioning senior government officials up to and including the President of the United States. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Alfred A. Knopf ( September 12, 1892 &#8211; August 11, 1984) was a leading American publisher of the 20th century. ... Jonathan D. Spence (Chinese name: Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: , August 11, 1936– ) is a British-born historian and public intellectual specializing in Chinese history. ... The Black Book of Communism: Crimes, Terror, Repression is a book authored by several European academics and senior researchers from CNRS, and edited by Dr. Stéphane Courtois. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ...

See also

National motto: Peace, Unity, Freedom Official language English Capital Enugu Head of State Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu Area ?- Total ?- % water Population;- Total 13,500,000 (1967) Currency Biafran pound (BIAP) Created May 30, 1967 Dissolved January 15, 1970 Demonym Biafran The Republic of Biafra was a short-lived secessionist state in... This page lists mortalities from battles and other individual military operations or acts of violence, sorted by death toll. ... Germany committed war crimes in both World War I and World War II. The most notable of these is the Holocaust, where millions of people, about half of which were Jews, were murdered. ... For other uses, see Red Terror (disambiguation). ... Soviet war crimes gives a short overview about serious crimes, which probably offend against international law, committed by the Red Armys (1918-1946, later Soviet Army) leadership and an unknown number of single members of the Soviet armed forces during in 1919 - 1990 including those in Eastern Europe in... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The massacre of prisoners refers to a series of mass executions committed by Soviet NKVD against prisoners in Poland and parts of the Soviet Union from which the Red Army was withdrawing after the German invasion in 1941 (see Operation Barbarossa). ... During the Algerian Civil War of the 1990s, a variety of massacres occurred. ... This is a list of massacres committed during the 1948 Arab-Israeli war. ... List of massacres committed during the al-Aqsa Intifada This is all wrong info ... This is a list of massacres of Indigenous Australians. ... This is a list of wars and man-made disasters by death toll. ... In the long history of the English colonization of North America, the term Indian massacre was often used to describe mass killings of European-Americans (whites) by Native Americans (Indians), and, less frequently, mass killings of American Indians by whites. ... The Crow Creek Massacre occurred in the early 14th century between Native Americans in the South Dakota area. ... The Haditha massacre is a massacre of civilians reportedly committed by United States Marines on November 19, 2005 in the town of Haditha in Iraq. ... General Magnus Malan (b. ... KwaZulu-Natal (often referred to as KZN) is a province of South Africa. ... Harki (from the Arabic Haraka: movement) was the generic term for Muslim Algerians serving as auxiliaries with the French Army, during the Algerian War of Independence from 1954 to 1962. ... Combatants Afghan tribesmen British Empire Commanders Akbar Khan William Elphinstone Strength unknown 4,500 regular troops, 12,000 civilian refugees Casualties unknown total annihilation The massacre of Elphinstones army was a victory of Afghan forces, led by Akbar Khan, the son of Dost Mohammad Khan, over a combined British... Japanese war crimes occurred during the period of Japanese imperialism. ... German Nazism and the acts of the Nazi German state profoundly affected many countries, communities and peoples before, during and after World War II. While the attempt of Nazi Germany to exterminate several nations viewed as subhuman by Nazi ideology, was stopped by the Allies, Nazi aggression neverthless led to... Allied war crimes were violations of the laws of war committed by the Allies of World War II against civilian populations or military personnel of the Axis Armed Forces. ... The Great Purge (Russian: , transliterated Bolshaya chistka) refers collectively to several related campaigns of political repression and persecution in the Soviet Union orchestrated by Joseph Stalin during the 1930s, which removed all of his remaining opposition from power. ... Roma arrivals in the Belzec extermination camp await instructions The Porajmos (also Porrajmos) literally Devouring, or Samudaripen (Mass killing) is a term coined by the Roma (Gypsy) people to describe attempts by the Nazi regime to exterminate most of the Roma peoples of Europe during The Holocaust. ... For other uses, see Genocide (disambiguation). ... Genocide is the mass killing of a group of people, as defined by Article 2 of the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (CPPCG) as any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or... Democide is a term coined by political scientist R. J. Rummel for the murder of any person or people by a government, including genocide, politicide, and mass murder. Rummel created the term as an extended concept to include forms of government murder that are not covered by the legal definition... An atrocity (from the Latin atrox, atrocious, from Latin ater = matte black (as distinct from niger = shiny black)) is a term used to describe crimes ranging from an act committed against a single person to one committed against a population or ethnic group. ... Ethnic cleansing refers to various policies or practices aimed at the displacement of an ethnic group from a particular territory in order to create a supposedly ethnically pure society. ... The Columbine High shooters caught on a security camera during their rampage. ... Victims in the aftermath of the Beslan school hostage crisis This is a list of school-related attacks. ...

External links

  • The Historical Atlas of the 20th century listing of 20th century wars and battles. See also the listing of atrocities before the 20th century
  • Gerald Duncan's list of WWII atrocities
  • PBS Timeline of Nazi Abuses
  • Encarta Encyclopedia article on "Genocide"
  • Massacres and Atrocities of WWII in Eastern Europe
  • Soviet Prisoners of War: Forgotten Nazi Victims of World War II
  • The world's worst massacres Whole Earth Review

  Results from FactBites:
 
List of massacres: Information from Answers.com (3163 words)
Massacre has a number of meanings, but most commonly refers to individual events of deliberate and direct mass murder, especially of non-combatant civilians without any reasonable means of defense, that would qualify as war crimes or atrocities.
Massacres in this sense do not typically apply to combatants, except figuratively, although the deliberate mass killings of prisoners of war are often considered massacres.
Additionally, the word massacre is often used for political or propaganda purposes, and the choice of whether to label an event a massacre may become a sensitive one; see, for example, the Kent State shootings.
Article about "List of reference tables" in the English Wikipedia on 24-Apr-2004 (1294 words)
This is a list of reference tables, similar to the collection of reference tables found at the back of almanacs, dictionaries and encyclopedias (or an index of them, if they're scattered throughout the work).
List of mean centers of U.S. population during the 20th century
List of monasteries dissolved by Henry VIII of England
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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