FACTOID # 18: Alaska spends more money per capita on elementary and secondary education than any other state.
 
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Encyclopedia > List of legal topics

This page aims to list terms relating to law, including the titles of all Wikipedia articles on the subject. This is so that: See also Portal:Law The stela of King Hammurabi depicts the god Shamash revealing a code of laws to the king. ...

  • those interested in the subject can monitor changes to the pages by clicking on Related Changes in the sidebar and on the bottom of the page.
  • it can serve as a source of inspiration for the creation of new articles on legal topics

This list is not necessarily complete or up to date - if you see an article that should be here but isn't (or one that shouldn't be here but is), please update the page accordingly. The topics here attempt to develop an understanding of law as a system, that has a history which effects states and social institutions. See also Portal:Law The stela of King Hammurabi depicts the god Shamash revealing a code of laws to the king. ... A legal system is the mechanism for creating, interpreting and enforcing the laws in a given jurisdiction. ... Legal history is a term that has at least two meanings. ... A state is a set of institutions that possess the authority to make the rules that govern a society, having internal and external sovereignty over a definite territory. ... Civil society or civil institutions refers to the totality of voluntary civic and social organizations or institutions which form the basis of a functioning society as opposed to the force backed structures of a state (regardless of that states political system). ...


See other law lists at end (below) for additional categories, including case law lists. See also specific legislation articles at end (below), including proposed and actual legislation, but excluding charters, codes, constitutions and international treaties.


Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


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lists, law related (see below) -- Acts (see below) --


A

a fortiori -- a posteriori -- a priori -- a priori assumption -- A.K.A. -- ab extra -- ab initio -- Abandon -- Abandoned property -- Abandonment -- Abate -- Abatement -- Abduction -- Abet -- Abeyance -- Able-bodied -- Abolitionism -- Abortion -- Abortion, legal and moral issues -- Abrogate -- Abscond -- Absolute -- Abstention doctrine -- Abstract -- Abstract of judgment -- Abstract of title -- Abuse of discretion -- Abuse of process -- Abut -- Acceleration -- Acceleration clause -- Accept -- Acceptance -- Acceptance of service -- Access -- Accession -- Accessory -- Accommodation -- Accomplice -- Accord and satisfaction -- Account stated -- Accountability -- Accounting period -- Accounting reference date -- Accounts payable -- Accounts receivable -- Accretion -- Accrue -- Accusation -- Accused -- Acknowledge -- Acknowledgement of service -- Acknowledgment -- Acquis -- Acquit -- Acquittal -- Act -- Act of God -- Act of Parliament -- Action -- Actionable -- Actual controversy -- Actual malice -- Actual notice -- actus reus -- ad colligenda bona -- ad hoc -- ad idem -- ad infinitum -- ad litem -- ad quod damnum -- ad seriatim -- ad valorem -- Addendum -- Adeem -- Ademption -- Adequate remedy -- Adhesion contract -- Adjourn -- Adjourned generally or sine die -- Adjournment in contemplation of dismissal -- Adjudication -- Adjusted basis -- Adjuster -- Administer -- Administration -- administration order -- Administrative hearing -- Administrative law -- Administrative law judge -- Administrative procedure act -- Administrator -- Administrator -- Admiralty -- Admiralty actions -- Admiralty court -- Admiralty law -- Admissible evidence -- Admission -- Admission against interest -- Admission of evidence -- Admission of guilt -- Admission to bail -- Admission to the bar -- Admit -- Adopt -- Adoption -- Adultery -- Advance -- Advance directive -- Advancement -- Adversary system -- Adverse -- Adverse interest -- Adverse party -- Adverse possession -- Adverse witness -- Advisory opinion -- Advocate -- Affiant -- Affidavit -- Affiliation -- Affirm -- Affirmation -- Affirmative action -- Affirmative defense -- Affix -- Affreightment -- After-acquired property -- After-acquired title -- After-discovered evidence -- Age discrimination -- Age of consent -- Age of majority -- Agency -- Agency agreement -- Agent -- Agent for acceptance of service -- Aggravated assault -- Agreed statement -- Agreement -- Aid and abet -- Aleatory -- Alias -- Alibi -- Alien -- Alienation -- Alienation of affections -- Alimony -- Aliquot -- Aliunde -- All the estate I own -- Allegation -- Allege -- Allocation questionnaire -- Allocatur -- Allocution -- Allodial -- Alluvion -- Alodium -- alter ego -- Alternate director -- Alternative dispute resolution -- Alternative Minimum Tax -- Alternative pleading -- ALWD Citation Manual -- Ambiguity -- Amend -- Amended complaint -- Amended pleading -- American Academy of Appellate Lawyers -- American Arbitration Association -- American Bar Association -- American Civil Liberties Union -- American Civil Rights Movement -- American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man -- American Depositary Receipt -- American Law Institute -- amicus curiae -- Amnesty -- Amnesty International -- Amortization -- An eye for an eye -- Ancillary administration -- Ancillary jurisdiction -- Ancillary relief -- And -- Animal rights -- animus nocendi -- annual general meeting -- Annuity -- Annul -- Annulment -- Anomie -- Answer -- ante -- Antecedent (law) -- Antenuptial (prenuptial) agreement -- Anticipatory breach -- Antidisestablishmentarianism -- Antinomianism -- Antitrust -- Antitrust laws -- Apartheid -- Apparent authority -- Appeal -- Appeals court -- Appear -- Appearance -- Appellant -- Appellate court -- Appellate review -- Appellee -- Applicant -- Application -- Appraise -- Appraisement or appraisal -- Appraiser -- Appreciate -- Appreciation -- Apprenticeship -- Approach -- Approach the bench -- Approach the witness -- Appurtenances -- Appurtenant -- Arbiter -- Arbitrary -- Arbitration -- Arbitration award -- Arbitrator -- arguendo -- Argumentative -- Arm's length -- Arraign -- Arraignment -- Arrears -- Arrest -- Arrest warrant -- Arson -- Article I and Article III tribunals -- Articles of Association -- Articles of impeachment -- Articles of Incorporation -- Articles of War -- As is -- Asharite -- Assault -- Assault and battery -- Assess -- Asset -- Assign -- Assigned risk -- Assignee -- Assignment -- Assignment for benefit of creditors -- Assigns -- Assisted person -- Assize Court -- Associate justice -- Association -- Assume -- Assumption -- Assumption of risk -- Assured -- Asylum and Immigration Tribunal -- Asylum seeker -- At will -- At will employment -- Atrocity -- Attached -- Attachment -- Attachment of earnings -- Attempt -- Attest -- Attestation -- Attorney -- Attorney at law (or attorney-at-law) -- Attorney general -- Attorney of record -- Attorney's advertising -- Attorney's fee -- Attorney's work product -- Attorney-client privilege -- Attorney-in-fact -- Attractive nuisance doctrine -- Audit -- Auditor -- Australian Constitution -- Australian Constitutional History -- Australian copyright law -- Authorised share capital -- Authoritarianism -- Authorities -- Authority -- Authorize -- Autrefois acquit -- Avulsion -- Award -- Ayatollah -- This page lists direct English translations of common Latin phrases, such as veni vidi vici and et cetera. ... Empirical or a posteriori knowledge is propositional knowledge obtained by experience. ... A priori is a Latin phrase meaning from the former or less literally before experience. In much of the modern Western tradition, the term a priori is considered to mean propositional knowledge that can be had without, or prior to, experience. ... An a priori assumption is an assumption formulated without prior basis in empirical fact. ... Aka can refer to the following meanings: Aka is an initialism for Also Known As. ... Ab extra is a legal latin term, approximately translating to from without or from outside Concerning a case, a person may have recieved some funding from a 3rd party. ... The current version of the article or section reads like an advertisement. ... Abandon is an album by Deep Purple, released in 1998 on the CMC International Record Label. ... In the common law of property, personal belongings that have left the possession of their rightful owners without having directly entered the possession of another person are deemed to be lost, mislaid, or abandoned, depending on the circumstances under which they were found by the next party to come into... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... ABATE is a loose network of motorcycle enthusiasts in the United States best known for their opposition to mandatory motorcycle helmet laws. ... Abatement (derived through the French abattre, from the Late Latin battere, to beat), a beating down or diminishing or doing away with; a term used especially in various legal phrases. ... Kidnapper redirects here. ... The Accredition Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) is a non-profit organization that serves the public by making accreditations of the universities and scientific institutions which live up to certain qualities defined by the organization. ... Abeyance (from the Old French abeance meaning gaping), a state of expectancy in respect of property, titles or office, when the right to them is not vested in any one person, but awaits the appearance or determination of the true owner. ... In the context of legality, able-bodied refers to an individuals physical capacity for gainful employment or military service. ... This French poster depicting the horrific conditions on slave ships was influential in mobilizing public opinion against slavery. ... The morality and legality of abortion are controversial topics. ... The abrogation doctrine is a doctrine in United States constitutional law which permits the U.S. Congress to allow lawsuits seeking monetary damages against individual U.S. states, so long as this is usually done pursuant to a constitutional limitation on the power of the states. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... An abstention doctrine is any one of several doctrines that a United States federal court might (or in some cases must) apply to refuse to hear a case, when hearing the case would potentially intrude upon the powers of the state courts. ... An Abstract, in law, is a brief statement that contains the most important points of a long legal document or of several related legal papers. ... An abstract is a brief summary of a judicial judgment, usually written by a Barrister or academic for publication in law reports. ... In real estate, an Abstract of Title is the condensed history of title to a particular parcel of real estate, consisting of a summary of the original grant and all subsequent conveyances and encumbrances affecting the property and a certification by the abstractor that the history is complete and accurate. ... An appeal is the act or fact of challenging a judicially cognizable and binding judgment to a higher judicial authority. ... Abuse of process is a common law intentional tort. ... In property law, when two parcels abut it means they are adjacent to each other and up against each others borders. ... Acceleration is the time rate of change of velocity, and at any point on a v-t graph, it is given by the slope of the tangent to that point In physics or physical science, acceleration (symbol: a) is defined as the rate of change (or derivative with respect to... An acceleration clause, in the law of contracts, is a term that fully matures the performance due from a party upon a breach of the contract. ... Accept is a German heavy metal band from the town of Solingen, originally assembled in the early 1970s by Udo Dirkschneider. ... Acceptance, in spirituality, mindfulness, and human psychology, usually refers to the experience of a situation without an intention to change that situation. ... Service of process is the term given to legal notice of a court or administrative bodys exercise of its jurisdiction over a person (defendant etc. ... Look up Access in Wiktionary, the free dictionary This is a list of articles related to the notion of access: information transfer, computer storage, telecommunication and computer networks: ACCESS.bus access charge access method access time broadband Internet access broadband wireless access code division multiple access Common User Access dial... Accession (from Lat. ... An accessory is a person who assists in or conceals a crime, but does not actually participate in the commission of the crime. ... Accommodation is a term used in United States contract law under the Uniform Commercial Code to describes a delivery of nonconforming goods meant as a partial performance of a contract for the sale of goods, where a full performance is not possible. ... At law, an accomplice is a person who actively participates in the commission of a crime, even though they take no part in the actual criminal offence. ... Accord and satisfaction is the purchase of the release from a debt obligation. ... Account Stated is defined as a statement between a creditor or the person to whom money is owed and a debtor (the person who owes) that a particular amount is owed to the seller as of a certain date. ... Accountability is a concept in ethics with several meanings. ... Jim Callaghan was the Chancellor of the Exchequer who introduced United Kingdom corporation tax, and with it the concept of an accounting period in 1965. ... In accounting, the Accounting reference date is the date on which is the date financial year of a company ends (typically 31 December or 30 June, although there is no set date). ... Accounts payable is one of a series of accounting transactions covering payments to suppliers owed money for goods and services. ... Accounts receivable is one of a series of accounting transactions dealing with the billing of customers which owe money to a person, company or organization for goods and services that have been provided to the customer. ... Accretion, means any growth or increase in size by a gradual external addition or inclusion. ... Accrual is derived from the verb accrue, which describes the grouping or gathering of things together. ... In the common law legal system, an indictment is a formal charge of having committed a serious criminal offense. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Service of process is the term given to legal notice of a court or administrative bodys exercise of its jurisdiction over a person (defendant etc. ... Look up acknowledgment in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The French term acquis (or sometimes acquis communautaire) is used in European Union law to refer to the total body of EU law accumulated so far. ... In criminal law, an acquittal is the legal result of a verdict of not guilty, or some similar end of the proceeding that terminates it with prejudice without a verdict of guilty being entered against the accused. ... Look up Act on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Act may refer to: in law, a written document that attests the legality of the transaction. ... Act of God is a common legal term for events outside of human control, such as sudden floods or other natural disasters, for which no one can be held responsible. ... In Westminster System parliaments, an Act of Parliament is a part of the law passed by the Parliament. ... A lawsuit is a civil action brought before a court in order to recover a right, obtain damages for an injury, obtain an injunction to prevent an injury, or obtain a declaratory judgment to prevent future legal disputes. ... A lawsuit is a civil action brought before a court in which the party commencing the action, the plaintiff, seeks a legal remedy. ... The case or controversy clause of Article III of the United States Constitution has been deemed to impose a requirement that United States federal courts are not permitted to hear cases that do not pose an actual controversy - that is, an actual dispute between adverse parties which is capable of... Actual malice in US law is defined as knowledge that the information was false or that it was published with reckless disregard of whether it was false or not. ... Actual notice is a term at law, most frequently in civil procedure. ... Actus reus is the action (or inaction, in the case of criminal negligence and similar crimes which are sometimes called acts of omission) which, in combination with the mens rea (guilty mind), produces criminal liability in common law based criminal law jurisdictions such as the United States, United Kingdom. ... Ad colligenda bona is a latin phrase that approximately translates into to collect the goods. In cases involving something quid pro quo, a prosecutor may be eligible for certain goods. ... Ad hoc is a Latin phrase which means for this [purpose]. It generally signifies a solution that has been tailored to a specific purpose, such as a tailor-made suit, a handcrafted network protocol, and specific-purpose equation and things like that. ... As is often the case with lawyers in the United States, they bandy about Latin phrases without any real understanding as to what the Latin words mean, or whether the phrase used as such, really applies to the concept at hand. ... Look up Ad infinitum in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Ad litem is a term used in law to refer to a party appointed by a court to act in a lawsuit on behalf of another party – for instance, a child or an incapacitated adult – who is deemed incapable of representing themselves. ... According to the harm or appropriate to the harm. ... Ad seratim is a Latin expression meaning one after the other. In legal terminology it means that issues are to be discussed in logical order, one after the other. ... An Ad valorem tax is a tax based on the assessed value of real estate or personal property. ... Look up addendum in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Ademption is a term used in the law of wills to determine what happens when property bequested under a will is no longer in the testators estate when the testator dies. ... Ademption is a term used in the law of wills to determine what happens when property bequested under a will is no longer in the testators estate when the testator dies. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A standard form contract (sometimes referred to as a contract of adhesion or boilerplate contract) is a contract between two parties that does not allow for negotiation, i. ... To suspend until a later stated time. ... An Adjournment in Contemplation of Dismissal (or ACD) is a procedure in Criminal Law whereby a judge or other judicial official halts proceedings in a matter (most often a misdemeanor or traffic infraction) on the understanding it will be dismissed in a certain amount of time. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Dispute resolution. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Claims adjuster is a term used to describe someone who evaluates the damage caused to property or people when an insurance related accident occurs. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Look up Administration in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In English and Welsh insolvency law, an Administration Order is a method used to protect a company experiencing short or medium term financial problems from its creditors. ... In law, a hearing is a proceeding before a court or other decisionmaking body or officer. ... Administrative law is the body of law that arises from the activities of administrative agencies of government. ... An administrative law judge (ALJ) in the United States is an official who presides at an administrative trial-type hearing. ... The federal Administrative Procedure Act (APA) of 1946 governs the way in which administrative agencies of the United States federal government may propose and establish regulations. ... Look up Administration in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... An administrator is a person appointed by the court to handle the estate of someone who died without a will. ... Old Admiralty House, Whitehall, London, Thomas Ripley, architect, 1723-26, was not admired by his contemporaries and earned him some scathing couplets from Alexander Pope The Admiralty was historically the authority in the United Kingdom responsible for the command of the Royal Navy. ... Admiralty law (usually referred to as simply admiralty and also referred to as maritime law or Law of the Sea) is a distinct body of law which governs maritime questions and offenses. ... Admiralty courts, also known as maritime courts, are courts exercising jurisdiction over all maritime contracts, torts, injuries and offences. ... Admiralty law (usually referred to as simply admiralty and also referred to as maritime law or Law of the Sea) is a distinct body of law which governs maritime questions and offenses. ... Admissible evidence, in a court of law, is any testimonial, documentary, or tangible evidence that may be introduced to a factfinder - usually a judge or jury in order to establish or a bolster a point put forth by a party to the proceeding. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Hearsay in its most general and oldest meaning is a term used in the law of evidence to describe an out of court statement offered to establish the facts asserted in that statement. ... The law of evidence governs the use of testimony (e. ... Look up Admission in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In the United States, admission to the bar is permission granted to a lawyer to practice law. ... Adoption is the legal act of permanently placing a child with a parent or parents other than the birth parents. ... Adoption is the legal act of permanently placing a child with a parent or parents other than the birth parents. ... Man and woman undergoing public exposure for adultery in Japan, around 1860 Adultery is generally defined as consensual sexual intercourse by a married person with someone other than his or her lawful spouse. ... Advance may be the name of several places in the United States: Advance, Indiana Advance, Missouri Advance, North Carolina Advance Township, North Dakota An advance is the offensive push in sports, computer or video gaming, or military combat. ... A Living Will, also called Will to Live, Advance Health Directive, or Advance Health Care Directive, is a specific type of power of attorney or health care proxy or advance directive. ... Look up advance in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... ... Adverse or adverse interest, in law, is a anything that functions contrary to a partys interest. ... Adverse or adverse interest, in law, is an anything that functions contrary to a partys interest. ... An adverse party is an opposing party in a lawsuit under an adversary system of law. ... In real estate common law, adverse possession is a means of acquiring title to anothers real property without compensation, by, as the name suggests, holding the property in a manner that conflicts with the true owners rights. ... A hostile witness is a witness for the opposing party or a witness who offers adverse testimony to the calling party during direct examination. ... An advisory opinion, in civil procedure, is an opinion issued by a court that does not have the effect of resolving a specific legal case, but merely advises on the constitutionality or interpretation of a law. ... It has been suggested that Barrister#Advocates in Scotland be merged into this article or section. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... An affidavit is a formal sworn statement of fact, written down, signed, and witnessed (as to the veracity of the signature) by a taker of oaths, such as a notary public. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Affirm is a judgment of an appellate court where the court upholds the decision of the lower court. ... An affirmation (from Latin affirmare, to assert) is the declaration that something is true. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... An affirmative defense is a defense used in litigation between private parties in common law jurisdictions. ... Look up affix in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Affreightment (from freight) is a legal term used in shipping. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Ageism is discrimination against a person or group on the grounds of age. ... It has been suggested that Ages of consent in South America be merged into this article or section. ... In law, the age of majority is the age at which one acquires the full legal rights of an adult. ... Agency is an area of law dealing with a contractual or quasi-contractual relationship between at least two parties in which one, the principal, authorizes the other, the agent, to represent her or his legal interests and to perform legal acts that sometimes bind the principal. ... Agency is an area of law dealing with a contractual or quasi-contractual relationship between at least two parties in which one, the principal, authorizes the other, the agent, to represent her or his legal interests and to perform legal acts that bind the principal. ... Service of process is the term given to legal notice of a court or administrative bodys exercise of its jurisdiction over a person (defendant etc. ... Aggravated assault is a form of violent crime. ... Look up Agreement in Wiktionary, the free dictionary An agreement may be an agreement in beliefs, rules, practices (policies), or conduct. ... To assist the perpetrator of the crime while sharing in the requisite intent. ... Aleatory (or aleatoric) means pertaining to luck, and derives from the Latin word alea, the rolling dice. ... Look up Alias in Wiktionary, the free dictionary The term alias may refer to— an assumed name, or pseudonym. ... For alibi used in the sense of a legal defense, see the Wiktionary entry Alibi. ... In law, an alien is a person who is not a citizen of the land where he or she is found. ... Look up alienation, alienate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In United States law, alienation of affections is a tort action brought by a deserted spouse against a third party alleged to be responsible for the failure of the marriage. ... In many countries alimony, maintenance or spousal support is an obligation established by law that is based on the premise that both spouses have an absolute obligation to support each other during the marriage (or civil union) unless they are legally separated, though in some instances the obligation to support... An aliquot part (or simply aliquot), in the context of mathematics, is an integer that is an exact divisor of a quantity. ... An allegation is a statement of a fact by a party in a pleading, which he or she claims they will prove. ... An allegation is a statement of fact by a party in a pleading, which he or she expects to prove. ... Allocatur (from med. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Allodial land, or allodium, is literally land which has no lord. ... Alluvion a legal term which describes the increase in the area of land due to sediment (alluvium) which is deposited by a river. ... Allodial land, or allodium, is literally land which has no lord. ... Alter Ego has multiple meanings: Alter Ego is a game for the Commodore 64 computer. ... An alternate director is a person who is appointed to attend a board meeting on behalf of the director of a company where the principle director would be otherwise unable to attend. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) system is part of the federal taxation income tax system in the United States. ... Alternative pleading is a legal fiction permitting a party to argue multiple possibilities that may be mutually exclusive. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Look up ambiguity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Amendment has at least two meanings: An amendment is a formal alteration to any official document or record, typically with the aim of improving it for the better. ... In general use, a complaint is an expression of displeasure, such as poor service at a store, or from a local government, for example. ... In the law, a pleading is one of the papers filed with a court in a civil action, such as a complaint, a demurrer, or an answer. ... The American Academy of Appellate Lawyers is a non-profit organization consisting of the Fellows who have been elected to the Academy. ... The American Arbitration Association (AAA) is one of several arbitration organizations that administers arbitration of disputes brought to it by members of the public. ... American Bar Associations Washington, DC office The American Bar Association (ABA) is a voluntary bar association of lawyers which is not specific to any jurisdiction in the United States. ... The ACLU logo The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is a major national non-profit organization with headquarters in New York City, whose stated mission is to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed to every person in this country by the Constitution and laws of the United... The civil rights movement in the United States has been a long, primarily nonviolent struggle to bring full civil rights and equality under the law to all citizens of United States. ... American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man Place signed Bogotá, Colombia Date signed April 1948 Date entered into force April 1948 Conditions for entry into force Parties The American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man was the worlds first international human rights instrument of a... An American Depositary Receipt (ADR) is how the stock of most foreign companies trades in United States stock markets. ... The American Law Institute (ALI) was established in 1923 to promote the clarification and simplification of American common law and its adaptation to changing social needs. ... Amicus curiae (plural amici curiae) is a legal Latin phrase, literally translated as friend of the court, that refers to a person or entity that is not a party to a case that volunteers to offer information on a point of law or some other aspect of the case to... Amnesty (from the Greek amnestia, oblivion) is an act of justice by which the supreme power in a state restores those who may have been guilty of any offence against it to the position of innocent persons. ... Amnesty International (commonly known as Amnesty or AI) is an international non-governmental organization with the stated purpose of promoting all the human rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international standards. ... Amortization may refer to: Amortization (business), the allocation of a lump sum amount to different time periods. ... The phrase an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth expresses a form of retributive justice also known as lex talionis (Latin, law of retaliation). It may have originated in ancient near-Eastern and Middle Eastern law, such as Babylonian law. ... A party to a marriage in the England and Wales, on divorce, nullity or judicial separation, may present claims to a court in England and Wales for ancillary relief, for resolution of financial issues. ... AND Logic Gate In logic and mathematics, logical conjunction (usual symbol and) is a two-place logical operation that results in a value of true if both of its operands are true, otherwise a value of false. ... The logo of the Great Ape Project, which is campaigning for a Declaration on Great Apes. ... In jurisprudence, Animus nocendi (Latin animus, mind + gerund of noceo, to harm) is the subjective state of mind of the author of a crime, with reference to the exact knowledge of illegal content of his behaviour, and of its possible consequences. ... An Annual General Meeting, commonly abbreviated as AGM, also known as the annual meeting, is a meeting that official bodies and associations involving the public are often required by law (In what country?) to hold. ... An annuity (from Latin annus, a year), is an investment that provides a defined series of payments in the future in exchange for an up-front sum of money. ... Annulment is a legal procedure for declaring a marriage null and void. ... 210. ... For the band, see Anomie (band) Anomie, in contemporary English, means a condition or malaise in individuals, characterized by an absence or diminution of standards or values. ... In the common law, an answer is the first pleading by a defendant, usually filed and served upon the plaintiff within a certain strict time limit after a civil complaint or criminal information or indictment has been served upon the defendant. ... The game of poker as played today requires that players agree before play on allowable amounts for betting (called limits), and the use and amount of forced bets. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... A prenuptial agreement or antenuptial agreement, commonly abbreviated to prenup, is a contract entered into by two people prior to marriage or civil union. ... Anticipatory repudiation (or anticipatory breach) is a term in the law of contracts that describes a declaration by one party (the promissing party) to a contract that they do not intend to live up to their obligations under the contract. ... Yeah, you fucking suck cunt. ... Antinomianism (Koine Greek αντι, against, νομος, law), or lawlessness (ανομια), in theology is the idea that members of a particular religious group are under no obligation to obey the laws of ethics or morality as presented by religious authorities. ... Antitrust is also the name of a movie, see Antitrust (film) Antitrust or competition laws are laws whose stated purpose is the promotion of economic and business competition by prohibiting anti-competitive behavior and unfair business practices. ... Antitrust is also the name for a movie, see Antitrust (movie) Antitrust or competition laws legislate against trade practices that undermine competitiveness or are considered to be unfair. ... A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ... Apparent authority is a term used in the law of agency to describe a situation in which a principal leads a third party to believe that an agent has authority to bind the principal, even where the agent lacks the actual authority to bind the principal. ... An appeal is the act or fact of challenging a judicially cognizable and binding judgment to a higher judicial authority. ... In the court system of a state or of a subordinate regional entity, an appeals court is a court of second instance where a party to a case on which judgment has been entered can ask to have their case reheard if they suspect an error of law, fact, or... Appearance (from Lat. ... Variation in the physical appearance of humans is believed by anthropologists to be an important factor in the development of personality and social relations in particular physical attractiveness. ... In law, an appellant is the party who after eating a vagina, having lost their claim in a lower court decision, is appealing to a higher court to have their case reconsidered. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Appeal. ... Appellate review is the general term for the process by which courts with appellate jurisdiction take jurisdiction of matters decided by lower courts. ... An appellee, or respondent, is the party to an appeal of a lower court judgment its favor. ... Look up application in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Appraisal is the act of estimating the monetary value of real, personal, or intangible property, usually performed as a service by someone recognized as an expert or certified by an organization or government agency. ... Appraiser (from Latin appretiare, to value), one who sets a value upon property, real or personal. ... Appreciation is a term used in accounting relating to the increase in value of an asset. ... Appreciation is a term used in accounting relating to the increase in value of an asset. ... Apprenticeship is a traditional method, still popular in some countries, of training a new generation of skilled crafts practitioners. ... Appurtenances (from late Latin appertinentia, from appertinere, to appertain) is a legal term for what belongs to and goes with something else, the accessories or things usually conjoined with the substantive matter in question. ... Appurtenances (from late Latin appertinentia, from appertinere, to appertain) is a legal term for what belongs to and goes with something else, the accessories or things usually conjoined with the substantive matter in question. ... Arbitration, in the law, is a form of alternative dispute resolution — specifically, a legal alternative to litigation whereby the parties to a dispute agree to submit their respective positions (through agreement or hearing) to a neutral third party (the arbitrator(s) or arbiter(s)) for resolution. ... Look up arbitrary in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Arbitration is a final and binding dispute resolution process. ... An arbitration award (or arbitral award) is a determination on the merits by an arbitration tribunal in an arbitration, and is analogous to a judgment in a court of law. ... Arbitration, in the law, is a form of alternative dispute resolution — specifically, a legal alternative to litigation whereby the parties to a dispute agree to submit their respective positions (through agreement or hearing) to a neutral third party (the arbitrator(s) or arbiter(s)) for resolution. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with List of legal Latin terms. ... Argumentative is an evidentiary objection raised in response to a question which prompts a witness to draw inferences from facts of the case. ... An arms length financial market is a market where there is less interaction between the one who is being financed and the one who does the financing. ... Arraignment is a common law term for the formal reading of a criminal complaint, in the presence of the defendant, to inform him of the charges against him. ... Arraignment is a common law term for the formal reading of a criminal complaint, in the presence of the defendant, to inform him of the charges against him. ... Arrears, or arrearages is a legal term for the type of debt accrued after missing an expected payment. ... The Chicago Police Department arrests a man A protester is arrested during a demonstration. ... An arrest warrant is a warrant issued by a public officer which authorizes the arrest and detention of an individual. ... Arsonists redirects here. ... In the United States, federal courts or tribunals can be classified as either Article I tribunals or Article III tribunals. ... The Articles of Association was a petition of grievances against Great Britain by the American colonies, and a compact among them to collectively impose economic sanctions to pressure a resolution. ... The articles of impeachment are the set of charges drafted against a public official to initiate the impeachment process. ... The Articles of Incorporation (sometimes also referred to as the Certificate of Incorporation or the Charter) are the primary rules governing the management of a corporation, and are filed with a state or other regulatory agency. ... The Royal Navys Articles of War were used to govern British ships at sea in the Napoleonic Wars and have been used as models for later marshal and maritime law. ... As/Is is live album by John Mayer, available for download from iTunes and also available as a double-CD release. ... The Asharite (Arabic الأشعرية al-ash`aryah) is a school of early Muslim philosophy that wasinstrumental in drastically changing the direction of Islamic philosophy, separating its development radically from that of philosophy in the Christian world. ... Assault and battery is the combination of two violent crimes: assault (the threat of violence) and battery (actual physical violence). ... Assessment is the process of documenting, usually in measurable terms, knowledge, skills, attitudes and beliefs. ... In business and accounting an asset is anything owned which can produce future economic benefit, whether in possession or by right to take possession, by a person or a group acting together, e. ... An assignment is a term used with similar meanings in the law of contracts and in the law of real estate. ... An assignment is a term used with similar meanings in the law of contracts and in the law of real estate. ... In computer programming, an assignment is the defining of a variable. ... An assignment is a term used with similar meanings in the law of contracts and in the law of real estate. ... The Courts of Assize, or Assizes, is the name of criminal courts in several countries. ... Associate Justice or Puisne (pronounced puny) Justice is the title for a member of a judicial panel who is not the Chief Justice. ... A voluntary association (also sometimes called just an association) is a group of individuals who voluntarily enter into an agreement to form a body (or organization) to accomplish a purpose. ... Look up assumption in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... An assumption is a proposition that is assumed, i. ... This is a defense in the law of torts. ... The Asylum and Immigration Tribunal(AIT) is a tribunal constituted in the United Kingdom with jurisdiction to hear appeals from many immigration decisions. ... At-will employment is an employment relationship in which either party can terminate the employment relationship at-will with no liability if there was not an express contract for a definite term governing the employment relationship. ... In most common law jurisdictions of the United States, contracts of employment without a definite term of service (for example, those employment contracts that are not in writing or part of a collective bargaining agreement) are held to be at will which means that the employer may dismiss the employee... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Attached is a seventh season episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation, first broadcast on November 8, 1993. ... The term attachment has multiple meanings: An email attachment Psychological attachment: see Attachment theory Attachment as a vice in Buddhism; see Buddhism This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The crime of attempt occurs when a person does an act amounting to more than mere preparation for a criminal offense, with specific intent to commit a crime, if that act tends but fails to effect the commission of the offense intended. ... An attorney is someone who represents someone else in the transaction of business: For attorney-at-law, see lawyer, solicitor, barrister or civil law notary. ... A lawyer is a person licensed by the state to advise clients in legal matters and represent them in courts of law (and in other forms of dispute resolution). ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... Attorneys fees or attorneys fees are the costs of legal representation that an attorneys client or a party to a lawsuit incurs. ... Attorneys work product is a term used in American civil procedure to describe documents developed by one partys attorney in preparation for or anticipation of a lawsuit. ... Attorney-client privilege is a legal concept that protects communications between a client and his or her attorney and keeps those communications confidential. ... A power of attorney or letter of attorney in common law systems or mandate in civil law systems is an authorization to act on someone elses behalf in a legal or business matter. ... Under the attractive nuisance doctrine of the law of torts, a landowner may be held liable for injuries to children trespassing on the land if the injury is caused by a hazardous object or condition on the land that is likely to attract children, who are unable to appreciate the... An audit is an evaluation of an organization, system, process, or product. ... Audit can refer to: Telecommunication audit Financial audit Performance audit Completion of a course of study for which no assessment is completed or grade awarded; especially audit is awarded to those who have elected not to receive a letter grade for a course in which letter grades typically awarded. ... The Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act 1900 (in full, An Act to constitute the Commonwealth of Australia) is the primary constitutional text of the Commonwealth of Australia. ... Emergence of the Commonwealth of Australia Main article: Australian federation After European settlement in 1788, Australia was politically organized as a number of separate British colonies, eventually six in all. ... Australian Copyright Law is based on the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works and defines copyright in Australia. ... Authorised share capital From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. ... World map Authoritarianism (red) Authoritarianism describes a form of government characterized by strict obedience to the authority of the state, which often maintains and enforces social control through the use of oppressive measures. ... In politics, authority generally refers to the ability to make laws, independent of the power to enforce them, or the ability to permit something. ... In politics, authority (Latin auctoritas, used in Roman law as opposed to potestas and imperium) is often used interchangeably with the term power. However, their meanings differ. ... In security engineering and computer security, authorization, is a part of the operating system that protects computer resources by only allowing those resources to be used by resource consumers that have been granted authority to use them. ... In the common law legal system, a plea of autrefois acquit (French for previously acquitted) means the defendant claims to have been previously acquitted of the same offence, on substantially the same evidence, and that hence he or she cannot be tried again. ... the loss or seperation of a bodypart. ... An award is something given to a person or group of people to recognize excellence in a certain field. ... Ayatollah (Arabic: آية الله; Persian: آيت‌الله) is a high rank given to major Shia clerics. ...


B

B.C.L. -- Babylonian law -- Bachelor of Civil Law -- Bachelor of Laws -- Bachelor of Legal Letters -- Back-to-back life sentences -- Bad debt -- Bad faith -- Bail -- Bail bond -- Bail bondsman -- Bail schedule -- Bailee -- Bailiff -- Bailment -- Bailor -- Bait and switch -- Balance due -- Balance sheet -- Ban -- Bank -- Bankrupt -- Bankruptcy -- Bankruptcy court -- Bankruptcy proceedings -- Bar -- Bar association -- Bar council -- Bar examination -- Bargain -- Bargain and sale deed -- Barratry -- Barrister -- Basic Law of various jurisdictions -- Basis -- Battery -- Beach bum trust provision -- Bearer -- Bearer paper -- Belief -- Bench -- Bench trial -- Bench warrant -- Beneficial interest -- Beneficial use -- Beneficiary -- Benefit -- Benefit of counsel -- Bequeath -- Bequest -- Berne three-step test -- Best evidence rule -- Best Interests of the Child -- Bestiality -- Beyond a reasonable doubt -- BFP -- Bias -- Biculturalism -- Bid -- Bifurcate -- Bifurcation -- Bigamy -- Bilateral contract -- Bill -- Bill of attainder -- Bill of costs -- Bill of exchange -- Bill of indictment -- Bill of lading -- Bill of particulars -- Bill of rights -- Bill of sale -- Bind over -- Bind over for sentence -- Binder -- Binding arbitration -- Bioethics -- Black's Law Dictionary -- Blackmail -- Blank endorsement -- Blood libel -- Blue law -- Blue laws -- Blue ribbon jury -- Blue Sky Laws -- Bluebook -- Board of directors -- Boiler room -- Boilerplate -- bona fide -- Bona fide purchaser -- bona vacantia -- Bond -- Bond for deed -- Bondsman -- Booby trap -- Book account -- Book value -- Booking -- Bootleg -- Border control -- Bottomry -- Boycott -- Breach -- Breach of contract -- Breach of promise -- Breach of the peace -- Breach of trust -- Breach of warranty -- Breaking and entering -- Bribery -- Bride price -- Brief -- Brief -- British constitution -- British constitutional law -- British nationality law -- Brocard -- Broker -- Brought to trial -- Bucket shop -- Building and loan -- Bulk sale -- Bulk sales acts -- Bulk transfer -- Burden -- Burden of proof -- Burgage -- Burglary -- Business -- Business assets -- Business ethics -- Business invitee -- But for rule -- Buy-sell agreement -- Bylaw -- Bylaws -- Bypass trust --Bypassing law Bachelor of Civil Law or B.C.L. is the name of the degree given in civil law jurisdictions to graduates of a faculty of law in a university. ... The material for the study of Babylonian law is singularly extensive. ... Bachelor of Civil Law or BCL is the name of various degrees in law in English-speaking countries. ... The degree of Bachelor of Laws is the principal academic degree in law in most common law countries other than the United States, where it has been replaced by the Juris Doctor degree. ... The degree of Bachelor of Laws is the principal academic degree in law in most common law countries. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... In accounting and finance, bad debt is the portion of receivables that can no longer be collected, typically from accounts receivable or loans. ... Bad faith (Latin: male fides) is a legal concept that can be found in many areas of the law. ... The word bail as a legal term means: Security, usually a sum of money, exchanged for the release of an arrested person as a guarantee of that persons appearance for trial. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... A bail bondsman is any person or corporation which will act as a surety and pledge money or property as bail for the appearance of a criminal defendant in court. ... Bailment describes a legal relationship where physical possession of personal property (chattels) is transferred from one person (the bailor) to another person (the bailee) who subsequently holds possession of the property. ... A Bailiff in a United States courtroom Bailiff (from Late Latin bajulivus, adjectival form of bajulus) is a governor or custodian (cf. ... Bailment describes a legal relationship where physical possession of personal property (chattels) is transferred from one person (the bailor) to another person (the bailee) who subsequently holds possession of the property. ... Bailment describes a legal relationship where physical possession of personal property (chattels) is transferred from one person (the bailor) to another person (the bailee) who subsequently holds possession of the property. ... A bait and switch is a form of fraud in which the fraudster lures in customers by advertising a good at an unprofitably low price, then reveals to potential customers that the advertised good is not available but that a substitute good is. ... A balance sheet, in formal bookkeeping and accounting, is a statement of the book value of a business or other organization or person at a particular date, often at the end of its fiscal year, as distinct from an income statement, also known as a profit and loss account (P... A ban is, generally, any decree that prohibits something. ... The First Provincial Bank of Taiwan in Taipei, Republic of China was formerly the central bank of Taiwan Province and issued the New Taiwan dollar. ... Bankruptcy is a legally declared inability or impairment of ability of an individual or organization to pay their creditors. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... In the United States, federal courts have exclusive jurisdiction over bankruptcy cases. ... Notice of closure stuck on the door of a computer store the day after its parent company, Granville Technology Group Ltd, declared bankruptcy (strictly, administration - see text) in the UK. Bankruptcy is a legally declared inability or impairment of ability of an individual or organization to pay their creditors. ... A bar association is a body of lawyers who, in some jurisdictions, are responsible for the regulation of the legal profession. ... A bar association is a professional body of lawyers who, in some jurisdictions, are responsible for the regulation of the legal profession. ... A bar council in a Commonwealth country is a professional body that regulates the profession of barristers together with the Inns of Court. ... A bar examination is a lengthy examination (two or more days) conducted at regular intervals to determine whether a candidate is qualified to practice law in a given jurisdiction. ... Bargain could mean some of the following: The process whereby buyer and seller agree the price of goods or services. ... Two legal concepts go by the name barratry: one in criminal and civil law, the other in admiralty law. ... English barrister A barrister is a lawyer found in most common law jurisdictions who principally, but not exclusively, represents litigants as their advocate before the courts of that jurisdiction. ... This is a list of articles about the fundamental constitutional laws, known as Basic Laws, of various jurisdictions. ... In mathematics, a basis or set of generators is a collection of objects that can be systematically combined to produce a larger collection of objects. ... In many common law jurisdictions, the crime of battery involves an injury or other contact upon the person of another in a manner likely to cause bodily harm. ... A beach bum trust provision, in the law of trusts, ties the ability of a trust beneficiary to take from the trust to the beneficiarys own earnings. ... A hierarchy (in Greek hieros = sacred, arkho = rule) is a system of ranking and organizing things. ... A bearer instrument is a document that indicates that the bearer of the document has title to property, such as shares or bonds. ... Wiktionary has related dictionary definitions, such as: belief Belief is usually defined as a conviction to the truth of a proposition. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Benches Snow covered park bench Classic garden bench Bench may refer to several things: A long backless seat, typically used for sitting at an outdoor table for casual eating. ... A bench trial in the U.S. is a trial before a judge in which the defendant has waived his/her right to a jury trial. ... A bench warrant is a variant of an arrest warrant which authorizes the immediate arrest on sight of the individual in question who is in contempt of court possibly for failing to appear at the appointed time and date for a scheduled court appearance. ... A beneficiary in the broadest sense is a natural person or other legal entity who receives money or other benefits from a benefactor. ... For use in social policy, see the article social welfare. ... A bequest is the disposition of property by will. ... The text or formatting below is generated by a template which has been proposed for deletion. ... The Berne three-step test is a set of constraints on the limitations and exceptions to exclusive rights under national copyright laws. ... The best evidence rule is a rule of evidence in the United States that requires that when writings are introduced as evidence in a trial, the original writing must be produced unless the party can account satisfactorily for its absence. ... Best interests or best interests of the child is the doctrine used by most courts to determine a wide range of issues relating to the well being of children. ... Look up Bestiality in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Beyond a reasonable doubt is the highest level of burden of persuasion typically employed in the criminal procedure. ... A bona fide purchaser (BFP)—or bona fide purchaser for value without notice (BFPFVWN)—in the law of real property, is an innocent party who purchases property for value, without notice of any other partys claim to the title of that property. ... For Wikipedias policy on avoiding bias, see Wikipedia:Neutral point of view. ... A policy of biculturalism is typically adopted in nations that have emerged from a history of national or ethnic conflict in which neither side has gained complete victory. ... Bid (Medical) (a medical abbreviation commonly seen on prescriptions) Bid price (a financial term) Efforts to get any thing or to get the right to celebrate an event. ... Bifurcate means to divide into two parts. ... The noun bifurcation (from latin bifurcare, to split (fork) into two), has several related meanings. ... Polygamy, literally many marriages in ancient Greek, is a marital practice in which a person has more than one spouse simultaneously (as opposed to monogamy where each person has a maximum of one spouse at any one time). ... A contract is any legally-enforceable promise or set of promises made by one party to another and, as such, reflects the policies represented by freedom of contract. ... A bill can refer to: Look up bill in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A bill of attainder (also known as an act or writ of attainder) is an act of legislature declaring a person or group of persons guilty of some crime, and punishing them, without benefit of a trial. ... A bill of costs is, in short, what a client needs to pay for services procured from a lawyer for a lawsuit or action. ... A negotiable instrument is a specialized type of contract which obligates a party to pay a certain sum of money on specified terms. ... In the common law legal system, an indictment is a formal charge of having committed a serious criminal offence. ... A bill of lading is a document issued by a carrier, e. ... A bill of rights is a statement of certain rights which, under a societys laws, citizens and/or residents either have, want to have, or ought to have. ... A bill of sale is a legal document made by a seller to a purchaser, reporting that on a specific date, at a specific locality, and for a particular sum of money or other value received, the seller sold to the purchaser a specific item of personal, or parcel of... See: Binder (material), a material used to bind other materials together Reaper-binder, a farm equipment Ring binder, a device for holding together a stack of papers with punched-in holes Microsoft Binder, a rather unsuccessful Microsoft Office application Binder clip, a primitive device for holding together sheets of paper... Arbitration, in the law, is a form of alternative dispute resolution — specifically, a legal alternative to litigation whereby the parties to a dispute agree to submit their respective positions (through agreement or hearing) to a neutral third party (the arbitrator(s) or arbiter(s)) for resolution. ... Bioethics is the ethics of biological science and medicine. ... link title Blacks Law Dictionary, 7th edition Blacks Law Dictionary has traditionally been regarded as the definitive legal dictionary for the law of the United States. ... For other uses, see Blackmail (disambiguation). ... Blood libels are allegations that a particular group kills people as a form of human sacrifice, and uses their blood in various rituals. ... A blue law, in the United States and Canada, is a type of law restricting certain activities, particularly shopping hours, on Sunday. ... Title Page of New-Havens settling in New-England (The Blue Laws of Connecticut) (1656) The Blue Laws of the Colony of Connecticut, as opposed to any blue law in particular, usually refers to the initial standard setup by the Gov. ... Blue Ribbon Juries are a juries selected from prominent, well-educated citizens, sometimes to investigate a particular problem such as civic corruption. ... Blue-sky laws are regulations enforced by state governments. ... The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation is a style guide and a widely used legal citation system in the United States. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A boiler room is a room where a boiler is kept. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... In law, good faith (in Latin, bona fides) is the mental and moral state of honest, even if objectively unfounded, conviction as to the truth or falsehood of a proposition or body of opinion, or as to the rectitude or depravity of a line of conduct. ... A bona fide purchaser (BFP)—or bona fide purchaser for value without notice (BFPFVWN)—in the law of real property, is an innocent party who purchases property for value, without notice of any other partys claim to the title of that property. ... Bona vacantia (Latin for vacant goods) is a common law doctrine in the United Kingdom under which ownerless property passes by law to the Crown. ... A surety bond is a contract between at least three parties: (i) the principal, (ii) the obligee, and (iii) the surety. ... A bond for deed is a contract to sell real property in which the purchase price is to be paid by the buyer to the seller in installments and in which the seller, after payment of a stipulated sum, agrees to deliver title to the buyer. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about an antipersonnel trap designed for use against humans. ... The book value of an asset or group of assets is sometimes the price at which they were originally acquired (historic cost), in many cases equal to purchase price. ... Look up booking in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up bootleg in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Border control is a term that describes how a country polices its borders. ... In cases where the ship needs urgent repairs during the course of its voyage or some other emergency arises and it is not possible for the master to contact the owner to arrange funds he may borrow money on the security of the ship or the cargo by executing a... A boycott is an action undertaken to abstain from using, buying, or dealing with someone or some organisation as an expression of protest or as a means of coercion. ... The article refers to the comic book series. ... Breach of contract is a legal concept in which a binding agreement or bargained-for exchange is not honored by one of the parties to the contract by non-performance or interference with the other partys performance. ... Breach of promise is a former tort. ... Breach of the peace is a legal term used in constitutional law in English-speaking countries, and in a wider public order sense in Britain. ... In business law, a warranty is a promise that something sold is in good condition. ... Breaking and entering is defined as the crime of illegally entering a residence or other enclosed property using any amount of force (even pushing open an unlocked door). ... Bribery is a crime defined by Blacks Law Dictionary as the offering, giving, receiving, or soliciting of any item of value to influence the actions as an official or other person in discharge of a public or legal duty. ... Bride price also known as bride wealth or a dower is an amount of money or property paid to the parents of a woman for the right to marry their daughter. ... Brief redirects here. ... Brief redirects here. ... This article is part of the series Politics of the United Kingdom Parliament Crown House of Lords    Lord Chancellor House of Commons    Speaker Prime Minister Cabinet Government Departments Scottish Parliament    Scottish Executive National Assembly for Wales    Welsh Assembly Government Northern Ireland Assembly    Northern Ireland Executive Local government Greater London Authority... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Constitution of the United Kingdom. ... British nationality law is the law of the United Kingdom concerning British citizenship and other categories of British nationality. ... A Brocard is a juridical principle usually expressed in Latin (and often derived from juridical works of the past), traditionally used to concisely express a wider legal concept or rule. ... In commerce, a broker is a party that mediates between a buyer and a seller. ... This a colloquial phrase with at least three definitions: Definition 1: A bucket shop is a heraldry company that will sell one a Coat of Arms associated with the same surname as the customer. ... A bulk sale is a sale of goods by a business that represents all or substantially all of its inventory to a single buyer unless such a sale would be common in the ordinary course of its business. ... A bulk transfer, such as is governed by Article Six of the Uniform Commercial Code, usually refers to a series of contracts for transferring the ownership of a business which has a physical inventory of merchandise and fixed capital such as equipment, plumbing, large tools, and so forth. ... A burden is a heavy weight that is difficult to carry. ... In the common law, burden of proof is the obligation to prove allegations which are presented in a legal action. ... a tenure under which property in England and Scotland was held under the king or a lord of a town was maintained for a yearly rent or for rendering a service such as watching and warding This article is a stub. ... Wall Street, Manhattan is the location of the New York Stock Exchange and is often used as a symbol for the world of business. ... Business ethics is a form of applied ethics that examines ethical rules and principles within a commercial context; the various moral or ethical problems that can arise in a business setting; and any special duties or obligations that apply to persons who are engaged in commerce. ... In the law, a proximate cause is an event sufficiently related to a legally recognizable injury to be held the cause of that injury. ... A buy/sell agreement preserves continuity of ownership in a business and insures that everyone is fairly treated, buyers as well as sellers. ... A bylaw (sometimes also seen as by-law or Byelaw) was originally the Viking town law in the Danelaw. ... A Bylaw (sometimes also seen as By-Law or ByLaw) is a rule governing the internal management of an organization, such as a business corporation. ... A bypass trust is typically created as part of an A/B Living trust estate plan after the death of the first spouse to die. ...


C

C.I.F. -- Cadastral map -- cadit quaestio -- Calendar -- Calendar call -- Caliphate -- Call -- Call to the bar -- Calumny -- Campaign finance reform -- Canadian Bill of Rights -- Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms -- Cancel -- Cancellation -- Caning -- Cannabis: Legal issues -- Canon -- Canon law -- Cap -- capital -- Capital account -- Capital assets -- Capital expenditure -- Capital gain -- Capital gain tax -- Capital gains -- Capital investment -- Capital loss -- Capital offense -- Capital punishment -- Capital punishment in the United States -- Capital stock -- Capitalization -- Capitalized value -- Capricious -- Caption -- Care -- Careless -- Carjacking -- Carnal knowledge -- Carrier -- Carryback -- Carrying for hire -- Carrying on business -- Carryover -- Cartel -- Case -- Case conference -- Case law -- Case law in the United States -- Case number -- Case of first impression -- Case system -- Case-based reasoning -- Cashier's check -- Casual -- Casualty -- Casualty loss -- Casuistry -- Catechism -- Categorical Imperative -- Catholic Emancipation -- cause -- Cause of action -- Caution -- caveat -- caveat emptor -- Cease and desist order -- Censorship -- Certificate of deposit -- Certificate of incorporation -- Certificate of legal aid costs -- Certificate of title -- Certified check -- certiorari -- Writ of Certiorari -- Cessate -- Cestui que trust -- Cestui que use -- ceteris paribus -- Chain of title -- Chairman -- Challenge (law) -- Challenge for cause -- Chambers -- Champerty -- Chancellor -- Chancery -- Chancery division -- Change of circumstances -- Change of venue -- Character witness -- Charge -- Charging lien -- Charging order -- Charitable contribution -- Charitable organization -- Charitable remainder trust -- Charitable trust -- Charter -- Chattel -- Chattel mortgage -- Check -- Checks and balances -- Cherem -- Chief Justice -- Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada -- Chief Justice of the United States -- Child -- Child abuse -- Child custody -- Child endangerment -- Child neglect -- Child pornography -- Child sexual abuse -- Child support -- Chinese law -- Churning -- Circuit courts -- Circuit judge -- Circumcision -- Circumstantial evidence -- Citation -- Cite -- Citizen -- Citizen's dividend -- Citizenship -- Civil -- Civil action -- Civil and social disobedience -- Civil calendar -- Civil code -- Civil Code of Quebec -- Civil commitment -- Civil death -- Civil disobedience -- Civil disorder -- Civil justice reforms -- civil law -- Civil law notary -- Civil liability -- Civil liberties -- Civil penalties -- Civil procedure -- Civil rights -- Civil union -- Claim -- Claim against a governmental agency -- Claim against an estate -- Claim form -- Claim in bankruptcy -- Claimant -- Class -- Class action -- Class action suit -- Clean hands doctrine -- Cleanup clause -- Clear and convincing evidence -- Clear and present danger -- Clear title -- Clerk -- Close corporation -- Closed shop -- Closing -- Closing argument -- Cloud on title -- Co -- Co-trustee -- Code -- Code of Hammurabi -- Code of professional responsibility -- Codefendant -- Codex -- Codicil -- Codification -- Codify -- Coercion -- Cohabitation -- Cohabitation agreement -- Coinsurance -- Collateral -- Collateral attack -- Collateral descendant -- Collateral estoppel -- Collateral Warranty -- Collective agreement -- Collective bargaining agreement -- Collective rights -- Collective trade marks -- Collusion -- Collusive action -- Color of law -- Color of title -- Comaker -- Comity -- Commencement of action -- Comment -- Commentaries on the Laws of England -- Commercial frustration -- Commercial law -- Commingling -- Commission -- Commissioner of oaths -- Commitment -- Committal -- Common area -- Common carrier -- Common counts -- Common law -- Common property -- Common stock -- Common-law marriage -- Commons -- Community Patent -- Community property -- Commutation -- Company -- Company seal -- Comparative law -- Comparative negligence -- Comparative responsibility -- Compensation -- Compensatory damages -- Competent -- Complainant -- Complaint -- Complete contract -- compos mentis -- Compound interest -- Compound question -- Compounding a felony -- Compounding treason -- Compromise -- Compromise verdict -- Concealed weapon -- Concealment -- Conciliation -- Conclusion -- Conclusion of fact -- Conclusion of law -- Concubinage -- Concurrent sentence -- Concurrent sentences -- Concurrent writ -- Condemn -- Condemnation -- Condemnation action -- Condition -- Condition precedent -- Condition subsequent -- Conditional bequest -- Conditional discharge -- Conditional dismissal -- Conditional sale -- Condominium -- Condone -- Conduct money -- Confederate States Constitution -- Confess -- Confession -- Confession and avoidance -- Confession of judgment -- Confidence game -- Confidential communication -- Confidential information -- Confidential relation -- Confidentiality -- Confiscate -- Conflict of interest -- Conflict of law -- Conflict of laws -- Confrontation -- Confucianism -- Confusingly similar -- Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith -- Congressional-executive agreement -- Conjugal rights -- Conscientious objector -- Conscious parallelism -- Conscription -- Consecutive sentence -- Consecutive sentences -- Conseil d'État -- Consensu -- Consensual crime -- Consensus -- Consensus ad idem -- Consensus decision-making -- Consent -- Consent decree -- Consent judgment -- Consequential damages -- Consequentialism -- Conservatee -- Conservative Judaism -- Conservative responsa -- Conservator -- Consideration -- Consign -- Consignee -- Consignment -- Consortium -- Conspiracy -- Conspirator -- Constable -- Constitution -- Constitution of France -- Constitution of Spain -- Constitutional amendment -- Constitutional charter -- Constitutional convention -- Constitutional Convention (Australia) -- Constitutional Convention (United States) -- Constitutional law -- Constitutional monarchy -- Constitutional rights -- Construction -- Constructive -- Constructive dismissal -- Constructive eviction -- Constructive fraud -- Constructive notice -- Constructive possession -- Constructive trust -- Construe -- Consuetudinary law -- Consultancy -- Consultant -- Consumer protection -- Contemplation of death -- Contempt of court -- contiguous -- Contingency -- Contingency fee -- Contingent -- Contingent beneficiary -- Contingent fee -- Contingent interest -- Contingent remainder -- Continuance -- Continuing objection -- Continuing trespass -- contra -- contra bonos mores -- contra legem -- Contraband -- Contract -- Contract of adhesion -- Contract of sale -- Contract theory -- Contracted-out -- Contractor -- Contribution -- Contributory negligence -- Control -- Controlled substance -- Controlling law -- Controversy -- Conversion -- Convey -- Conveyance -- Conveyancing -- Convict -- Conviction -- Cooperative -- Cooperative housing -- Cop a plea -- Copartner -- Copyhold -- Copyleft -- Copyright -- Copyright infringement -- Copyright law of the European Union -- Copyright misuse -- coram nobis -- coram non judice -- Coroner -- Corporate governance -- Corporate haven -- Corporate opportunity -- Corporate personhood -- Corporate state -- Corporation -- Corporations law -- corpus -- corpus delicti -- corpus juris -- corpus juris civilis -- corpus juris secundum -- Corroborate -- Corroborating evidence -- Corroboration -- Cosign -- Cost bill -- Cost of completion -- Costs -- Cotenancy -- Cotenant -- Council Tax -- Counsel -- Counsellor -- Count -- Counter offer -- Counterclaim -- Counterfeit -- Counterpart -- County court -- Coup d'état -- Cour de cassation -- Course -- Course of employment -- Court -- Court calendar -- Court costs -- Court docket -- Court of appeal -- Court of Appeal of England and Wales -- Court of Appeals -- Court of customs and patent appeals -- Court of equity -- Court of first instance -- Court of last resort -- Court of law -- Court of protection -- Court of record -- Court of Session -- Court order -- Court room -- Court trial -- Court-martial -- Courts of England and Wales -- Courts of the United Kingdom -- Covenant -- Covenant not to compete -- Covenant that runs with the land -- Covenants, conditions and restrictions -- Creature of statute -- Credibility -- Credible witness -- Creditor -- Creditor's claim -- Creditor's rights -- Crime -- Crime against humanity -- Crime against nature -- Crime against peace -- Crime of passion -- Criminal -- Criminal attorney -- Criminal calendar -- Criminal conversion -- Criminal justice -- Criminal law -- Criminal negligence -- Criminal procedure -- Critical legal studies -- Cross examination -- Cross-complaint -- Cross-examination -- Crown copyright -- Crown corporation -- Crown Court -- Crown land -- Crown-Owned Companies -- Cruel and unusual punishment -- Cruelty -- Cruelty to animals -- cui bono -- cuius regio, eius religio -- Culpability -- Culpable -- Cumis counsel -- Cumulative sentence -- Cumulative voting -- Curfew -- Curtesy -- Custodian -- Custody -- Custom -- Customary estate -- Customs -- Customs and Excise -- Customs court -- custos morum -- Cut a check -- Cy pres doctrine -- Cyber law -- Cybersquatting -- The California Interscholastic Federation (abbreviated CIF) is the governing body for high school sports in the state of California. ... A cadastral map is a map showing boundaries and ownership of land. ... Cadit quaestio, Latin for the question falls, is a legal term used to indicate that a settlement to a dispute or issue has been reached, and is now resolved. ... A calendar is a system for naming periods of time, typically days. ... A calendar call is an occasion where a court requires attorneys representing different matters to appear before the court so that trials and other proceedings before the court can be scheduled so as not to conflict with one another. ... An Anglicized/Latinized version of the Arabic word خليفة or Khalīfah, Caliph (  listen?) is the term or title for the Islamic leader of the Ummah, or community of Islam. ... In computer science and telecommunications, calling is: Any attempt to set up a communications circuit. ... In England and Wales, many Commonwealth jurisdictions, and Hong Kong SAR, barristers (, lawyers who are licensed to argue cases in superior courts, as opposed to those licensed for other forms of legal practice outside of the courtrooms, such as providing legal advice to lay clients) are those who have been... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ... Campaign finance reform is the common term for the political effort in the United States to change the involvement of money in politics, primarily in political campaigns. ... This article is about the Canadian Bill of Rights, which should not be confused with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms or the Canadian Human Rights Act. ... The Charter, signed by Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau in 1981. ... The term cancel has the following meanings: 1. ... A machine cancellation On mail, a cancellation (or cancel for short) is a postal marking applied to a postage stamp or postal stationery indicating that the item has been used. ... Rattan cane Caning is a physical punishment (see that article for generalities and alternatives) consisting of a beating with a cane, generally applied on the bare or clad buttocks (see spanking), shoulders, hand(s) (palm, rarely knuckles) or even the soles of the feet (see falaka). ... Many countries have laws regarding the possession or use of cannabis. ... Canon law is the term used for the internal ecclesiastical law which governs various churches, most notably the Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Churches and the Anglican Communion of churches. ... Canon law is the term used for the internal ecclesiastical law which governs various churches, most notably the Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Churches and the Anglican Communion of churches. ... The initialism CAP, when used by itself, can refer to: California Assessment Program, a California standards test replaced by the California Learning Assessment System, which was in turn replaced by the STAR system. ... In politics, a capital (also called capital city or political capital — although the latter phrase has an alternative meaning based on an alternative meaning of capital) is the principal city or town associated with its government. ... The capital account is one of two primary components of the balance of payments. ... In accounting, a capital asset is an asset that is recorded as capital - that is, property that creates more property, e. ... Capital expenditures (CAPEX) are expenditures used by a company to acquire or upgrade physical assets such as equipment, property, industrial buildings. ... In finance, a capital gain is profit that is realized from the sale of an asset that was previously purchased at a lower price. ... In many jurisdictions, including the United States and the United Kingdom, a capital gains tax or CGT is charged on capital gains, that is the profit realised on the sale of an asset that was previously purchased at a lower price. ... In finance, a capital gain is profit that is realized from the sale of an asset that was previously purchased at a lower price. ... // Definition Investment or investing is a term with several closely-related meanings in finance and economics. ... In finance, a capital loss is a financial loss incurred when an asset is sold for less than its original purchase price. ... Capital punishment, also referred to as the death penalty, is the judicially ordered execution of a prisoner as a crime, often called a capital offense or a capital crime. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the State as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offenses. ... Capital punishment in the United States is officially sanctioned by 36 of the 50 states, as well as by the federal government and the military. ... the economys total quantity of capital goods is called the capital stock This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... For any word written in a language with whose alphabet or alphabet equivalent has two cases, such as those using the Latin, Greek, Cyrillic, or Armenian alphabet, capitalization (or capitalisation) is the writing of that word with its first letter in majuscules (uppercase) and the remaining letters in minuscules (lowercase). ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Look up care in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Torino is an album by the UK band Cinerama. ... A Carjacking scene from the film Reservoir Dogs. ... DVD cover Carnal Knowledge is a 1971 American drama film. ... A common carrier is an organization that transports a product or service using its facilities, or those of other carriers, and offers its services to the general public. ... A cartel is a group of legally independent producers whose goal it is to fix prices, limit supplies and limit competition. ... Categories: Stub | Software engineering | Data management ... Case law (precedential law) is the body of judge-made law and legal decisions that interprets prior case law, statutes and other legal authority -- including doctrinal writings by legal scholars such as the Corpus Juris Secundum, Halsburys Laws of England or the doctinal writings found in the Recueil Dalloz... U.S. Supreme Court Tory v. ... A case of first impression is a case or controversy over an interpretation of law never before reported or decided by that court. ... In linguistics, declension is a paradigm of inflected nouns and adjectives. ... Case-based reasoning (CBR), broadly construed, is the process of solving new problems based on the solutions of similar past problems. ... A estate transfers, tax payments and the like. ... In the European tradition, casual is the dress code which emphasizes comfort and personal expression over presentation and uniformity. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Casuistry (argument by cases) is an attempt to determine the correct response to a moral problem, often a moral dilemma, by drawing conclusions based on parallels with agreed responses to pure cases, also called paradigms. ... Codex Manesse, fol. ... The categorical imperative is the philosophical concept central to the moral philosophy of Immanuel Kant and to modern deontological ethics. ... Catholic Emancipation was a process in Great Britain and Ireland in the late 18th century and early 19th century which involved reducing and removing many of the restrictions on Roman Catholics which had been introduced by the Act of Uniformity, the Test Acts and the Penal Laws. ... In the law, a cause of action is a recognized kind of legal claim that a plaintiff pleads or alleges in a complaint to start a lawsuit. ... A police caution is an alternative to prosecution available to be administered by the police in the United Kingdom. ... Caveat, the third-person singular present subjunctive of the Latin cavere, means warning (or more literally, let him beware); it can be shorthand for Latin phrases such as Caveat lector Caveat emptor Caveat venditor More narrowly, caveat can also refer to CAVEAT, a Canadian lobby group; The Paulette Caveat about... It has been suggested that caveat venditor be merged into this article or section. ... Cease-and-desist is a legal term meaning essentially stop: It is used in demands for a person or organization to stop doing something (to cease and desist from doing it). ... The Rhodesia Herald of September 21, 1966. ... A certificate of deposit or CD is, in the United States, a time deposit, a familiar financial product, commonly offered to consumers by banks, thrift institutions, and credit unions. ... A certificate of incorporation is a legal document relating to the formation of a company or corporation. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: it contains no useful content If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ... This law-related article does not cite its references or sources. ... This law-related article does not cite its references or sources. ... The word trustee (sometimes referred to as a cestui que trust in the formal legal French) is a legal term that refers to a holder of property on behalf of some other beneficiary. ... Cestui que use, a term in Law French, refers to the person for whose benefit property is held by another person. ... Ceteris paribus is a Latin phrase, literally translated as with other things [being] the same, and usually rendered in English as all other things being equal. ... A chain of title is the sequence of historical transfers of title to a property. ... A chairman is the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... Chambers may refer to Chambers, Nebraska Chambers County, Alabama Chambers Dictionary of the English Language Chambers of parliament Chambers, a judges office where motions concerning procedure are heard. ... In law, champerty is the practice of participating in a lawsuit in order to share in the proceeds by a person not naturally a party to the lawsuit, that is, buying into someone elses lawsuit. ... Various governments have a Chancellor who serves as some form of junior or senior minister. ... Court of Chancery, London, early 19th century The Court of Chancery was one of the courts of equity in England and Wales. ... A change of venue is the legal term for moving a trial to a new location. ... Character evidence is a term used in the law of evidence in the United States to describe any testimony or document submitted for the purpose of proving that a person acted in a particular way on a particular occasion based on the character or disposition of that person. ... In the common law legal system, an indictment is a formal charge of having committed a serious criminal offence. ... Charging order, in English law, an order obtained from a court or judge by a judgment creditor under the Judgment Acts 1838 and 1840, by which the property of the judgment debtor in any stocks or funds stands charged with the payment of the amount for which judgment shall have... Charitable contribution deductions for United States Federal Income Tax purposes are defined in section 170(c) of the Internal Revenue Code as contributions to or for the use of certain listed nonprofit enterprises. ... // Legal definitions A charity is a trust, company or unincorporated association established for charitable purposes only. ... A charitable trust (or charity) is a trust organized to serve private or public charitable purposes. ... Alternate use, see charter airline, yacht charter, bare-boat charter or Charter Communications. ... Personal property is a type of property. ... A chattel mortgage is a mortgage where a loan is granted against the value of movable personal property, as opposed to real estate. ... The word check has these meanings: In finance, a cheque (spelt check in American English) is an order for transfer of money. ... The doctrine and practice of dispersing political power and creating mutual accountability between political entities such as the courts, the president or prime minister, the legislature, and the citizens. ... Cherem (or Herem), is the highest ecclesiastical censure in the Jewish community. ... The Chief Justice in many countries is the name for the presiding member of a Supreme Court in Commonwealth- or other countries with an Anglosaxon type of justice, such as the Supreme Court of the United States, the Supreme Court of Canada, the Supreme Court of New Zealand, the Supreme... The Supreme Court of Canada consists of the Chief Justice of Canada (French: Juge en chef du Canada) and eight puisne Justices appointed by the Governor in Council (Governor General of Canada) from among superior court judges or from among barristers of at least ten years standing at the Bar... The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ... A child (plural: children) is a young human,or an individual who has not yet reached puberty. ... Child abuse is the physical or psychological maltreatment of a child by an adult often synonymous with the term child maltreatment or the term child abuse and neglect. ... Child custody and guardianship are legal terms which are sometimes used to describe the legal and practical relationship between a parent and his or her child, such as the right of the parent to make decisions for the child, and the parents duty to care for the child. ... Child abuse is physical or psychological mistreatment of a child by its parents, guardians, or other adults. ... Child abuse is physical or psychological mistreatment of a child by its parents, guardians, or other adults. ... Generally, child pornography is an illegal form of pornography, featuring minors. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In many countries, child support is the ongoing obligation for a periodic payment made by a non-custodial parent to a custodial parent, caregiver or guardian, for the care and support of children of a relationship or marriage that has broken down. ... The Law of China, for most of the history of China, was rooted in the Confucian philosophy of social control. ... Churning is the practice of executing trades for an investment account by a salesman or broker in order to generate commissions from the account. ... Circuit courts previously were United States federal courts established in each federal judicial district. ... A Circuit judge is a position in British Law, in which a Judge moves to different Crown Courts within a certain area. ... It has been suggested that Circumcision advocacy be merged into this article or section. ... Circumstantial evidence is indirect evidence. ... A citation is a credit or reference to another document or source which documents both influence and authority. ... Cite sources (citation): provide references that help the reader to check the veracity of the article and to find more information. ... The word citizen may refer to: A person with a citizenship Citizen Watch Co. ... Citizens dividend is a proposed state policy based upon the principle that the natural world is the common property of all persons (see Georgism). ... Citizenship is membership in a political community (originally a city but now usually a state) and carries with it rights to political participation; a person having such membership is a citizen. ... Look up Civil in Wiktionary, the free dictionary The word Civil is derived from the Latin word civilis, from civis (citizen). Used as an adjective, it may describe several fields, concepts, and people: Civil death Civil defense Civil disobedience Civil engineering Civil law Civil liberties Civil libertarianism Civil marriage Civil... A lawsuit is a civil action brought before a court in order to recover a right, obtain damages for an injury, obtain an injunction to prevent an injury, or obtain a declaratory judgment to prevent future legal disputes. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Civil disobedience. ... A civil code is a systematic compilation of laws designed to comprehensively deal with the core areas of private law. ... The Civil Code of Québec (CcQ) is the legal text defining civil laws in the province of Quebec, Canada. ... Involuntary commitment is the practice of using legal means or forms as part of a mental health law to commit a person to a mental hospital, insane asylum or psychiatric ward without their informed consent, against their will or over their protests. ... Civil death is a term that refers to the loss of all or almost all civil rights by a person due to a conviction for a felony or due to an act by the government of a country that results in the loss of civil rights. ... It has been suggested that Civil and social disobedience be merged into this article or section. ... Civil disorder is a broad term that is typically used by law enforcement to describe one or more forms of disturbance caused by a group of people. ... In the common law, civil law refers to the area of law governing relations between private individuals. ... Civil law notaries are trained jurists who often receive the same training as advocating jurists — those with a legal education who become litigators such as barristers in England and Wales and Northern Ireland or avocats in France. ... In the most general sense, a liability is anything that is a hindrance, or puts one at a disadvantage. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A civil penalty or civil fine is a term used to describe when the state seeks monetary relief against an individual as restitution for wrongdoing by the individual. ... Civil procedure is the body of law that sets out the process that courts will follow when hearing cases of a civil nature (a civil action). These rules govern how a lawsuit or case may be commenced, what kind of service of process is required, the types of pleadings or... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... A civil union is one of several terms for a civil status similar to marriage, typically created for the purposes of allowing same-sex couples access to the benefits enjoyed by married opposite-sex peoples (see also same-sex marriage); it can also be used by opposite-sex couples who... Ther word claim has several uses: a right; an insurance claim; a patent claim; a logical assertion of truth. ... A Claim in Bankruptcy is a formal document sent to the Trustee in Bankruptcy notifying the bankrupt estate that a person has a lawful claim against the assets of the bankrupt. ... The plaintiff, claimant, or complainant is the party initiating a lawsuit, (also known as an action). ... Social class refers to the hierarchical distinctions between individuals or groups in societies or cultures. ... In law, a class action is an equitable procedural device used in litigation for determining the rights of and remedies, if any, for large numbers of people whose cases involve common questions of law and fact. ... In law, a class action is an equitable procedural device used in litigation for determining the rights of and remedies, if any, for large numbers of people whose cases involve common questions of law and fact. ... Unclean hands, sometimes clean hands doctrine, is an equitable defense in which the defendant argues that the plaintiff is not entitled to obtain an equitable remedy on account of the fact that the plaintiff is acting unethically or has acted in bad faith with respect to the subject of the... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Clear and convincing evidence is the intermediate level of burden of persuasion sometimes employed in the civil procedure. ... Clear and present danger is a term used in the case Schenck v. ... Clear title is the phrase used to state that the owner of real property owns it free and clear of encumbrances. ... The word clerk, derived from the Latin clericus meaning cleric, i. ... A corporation is a legal entity which, while being composed of natural persons, exists completely separately from them. ... A closed shop is a business or industrial establishment whose employees are required to be union members or to agree to join the union within a specified time after being hired. ... Closing is a sales term which refers to the process of making a sale. ... A closing argument, summation, or summing up is the concluding statements of both parties counsel reiterating the important arguments for the trier of fact, often the jury, in a court case. ... WHEN A DOCUMENT HAS BEEN RECORDED IN PUBLIC RECORD IN THE COUNTY THAT THE REAL PROPERTY IS LOCATED THAT ENABLES THE SALE OF SUCH PROPERTY UNTIL RESOLVED. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... CO can stand for: Carbon monoxide, molecular formula Central office, in telecommunications and telephony Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad Colombia, in various country codes Colorado, U.S. postal abbreviation Commanding officer, military Conscientious objector, military Continental Airlines, IATA airline designator Collaborative Browsing Chinese Orchestra Correctional Officer, Correctional Officer Co can stand... A legal code is a moral code enforced by the law of a state. ... An inscription of the Code of Hammurabi The Code of Hammurabi (also known as the Codex Hammurabi and Hammurabis Code), created ca. ... Professional responsibility is the area of legal practice that encompasses the duties of attorneys to act in a professional manner, obey the law, avoid conflicts of interest, and put the interests of clients ahead of their own interests. ... A defendant or defender is any party who is required to answer the complaint of a plaintiff or pursuer in a civil lawsuit before a court, or any party who has been forhotnessmally charged or accused of violating a criminal statute. ... first page of the Codex Argenteus A codex (Latin for block of wood, book; plural codices) is a handwritten book, in general one produced from Late Antiquity through the Middle Ages. ... Codicil can refer to: An addition made to a will Any addition or appendix, such as a corollary to a theorem A poem by Derek Walcott This is a disambiguation page—a list of articles associated with the same title. ... In law, codification is the process of collecting and restating the law of a jurisdiction in certain areas, usually by subject, forming the legal code. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Coercion is the practice of compelling a person to act by employing threat of harm (usually physical force, sometimes other forms of harm). ... Cohabitation is defined as an emotional, physical, and intellectually intimate relationship which includes a common living place and which exists without the benefit of legal, cultural, or religious sanction. ... The examples and perspective in this article may not represent a worldwide view. ... In the US insurance market, coinsurance is the joint assumption of risk between the insurer and the insured. ... Collateral is a word used for assets that secure a debt obligation. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... Collateral estoppel, also sometimes known as issue preclusion, is a common law estoppel doctrine that prevents a person from relitigating an issue. ... A Collateral Warranty is a form of contract that runs alongside, and is usually supplemental to, another contract. ... The Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) is the contract between the NHL and the NHLPA that defines the structure of procedural, financial, and disciplinary relationships between the NHL, its teams, and its players. ... The term collective rights refers to the putative rights of peoples to be protected from attacks on their group identity and group interests. ... Definition Collective trade marks are trade marks owned by an organisation (such as an association), whose members use them to identify themselves with a level of quality or accuracy, geographical origin, or other characteristics set by the organisation. ... In the study of economics, collusion takes place within an industry when rival companies cooperate for their mutual benefit. ... Color of is a legal term meaning pretense or appearance of some right. ... Color of is a legal term meaning pretense or appearance of some right. ... Comity is a term used in international law (and in the law governing relations between U.S. states) to describe an informal principle that nations will extend certain courtesies to other nations, particularly by recognizing the validity and effect of their executive, legislative, and judicial acts. ... Look up Comment on Wiktionary, the free dictionary In computer programming, comments are parts of the source code which, together with its layout, are used to explain the code. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Commercial law or business law is the body of law which governs business and commerce and is often considered to be a branch of civil law and deals both with issues of private law and public law. ... Commingling, which literally means mixing together, is a breach of trust in which a fiduciary mixes funds that he holds in the care of a client with his own funds, making it difficult to determine which funds belong to the fiduciary and which belong to the client. ... In law a commission is a patent which allows a person to take possession of a state office and carry out official acts and duties. ... Look up commitment in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A common carrier is an organization that transports a product or service using its facilities, or those of other carriers, and offers its services to the general public. ... This article concerns the common-law legal system, as contrasted with the civil law legal system; for other meanings of the term, within the field of law, see common law (disambiguation). ... Common stock, also referred to as common shares, are, as the name implies, the most usual and commonly held form of stock in a corporation. ... Common-law marriage (or common law marriage), sometimes called informal marriage or marriage by habit and repute is, historically, a form of interpersonal status in which a man and a woman are legally married. ... In England and Wales, a common is a piece of land over which other people -- often neighbouring landowners -- could exercise one of a number of traditional rights, such as allowing their cattle to graze upon it. ... The Community Patent, also known as the European Community Patent or EC patent, is a patent law measure being debated within the European Union, which would allow individuals and companies to obtain a unitary patent throughout the European Union. ... Community property is a marital property regime that originated in civil law jurisdictions, and is now also found in some common law jurisdictions. ... In Law, a commutation of sentence occurs when an executive head of government reduces a sentence for a criminal action. ... A company is, in general, any group of persons, which are known as its members, united to pursue a common interest. ... A company seal (sometimes referred to as the corporate seal or common seal) is an official seal used by a company. ... Comparative law has increased enormously in importance in the present age of internationalism, economic globalisation and democratisation. ... Comparative negligence is a system of apportioning recovery for a tort based on a comparison of the plaintiffs negligence with the defendants. ... Comparative responsibility is a doctrine of tort law that compares the fault of each party in a law suit for a single injury. ... Compensation has several different meanings as indicated below. ... Compensatory damages are damages awarded for civil cases, it is awarded to the succesful party, in the case of the plaintiff, it is awarded as a compensation for the pain undegone and also in most cases is included the legal services payment, however if it is the defendant that wins... Look up competence in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The plaintiff, claimant, or complainant is the party initiating a lawsuit, (also known as an action). ... In general use, a complaint is an expression of displeasure, such as poor service at a store, or from a local government, for example. ... A complete contract is an important concept from contract theory. ... Compos Mentis can refer to: Adjective: Of sound mind, memory, and understanding. ... In finance, interest has three general definitions. ... A compound question is one that actually asks several things which might require different answers. ... Compounding a felony was an offence under common law in England. ... Compounding a felony was an offence under common law in England. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... A concealed carry is the right to carry a handgun or other weapon in public in a concealed manner. ... Look up hiding in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Conciliation is an alternative dispute resolution process whereby the parties to a dispute (including future interest disputes) agree to utilize the services of a conciliator, who then meets with the parties separately in an attempt to resolve their differences. ... A conclusion can have various specific meanings depending on the context. ... A finding of fact is a determination on the evidence regarding a issue of fact raised by one party to case made by the fact finder, usually a judge or a jury. ... Conclusion of law is a statement of law as it applies to the specific facts of the case before the court. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... In law, a sentence forms the final act of a judge-ruled process, and also the symbolic principal act connected to his function. ... In law, a sentence forms the final act of a judge-ruled process, and also the symbolic principal act connected to his function. ... Look up condemnation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In property law, condemnation is identical to eminent domain. ... Eminent domain (US), compulsory purchase (United Kingdom, New Zealand, Republic of Ireland), compulsory acquisition (Australia) or expropriation (Canada, South Africa) in common law legal systems is the lawful power of the state to expropriate private property without the owners consent, either for its own use or on behalf of... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... An event of state of affairs that is required before something else will occur. ... An event of state of affairs such that its occurrence will bring an end to something else. ... In Canada, a conditional discharge is a sentence passed in criminal court in which an individual is found guilty of an offence but is deemed not to have been convicted. ... A condominium is a form of housing tenure. ... Condoning is a concept with a ususal present meaning to allow or overlook something. ... Conduct money is money paid to a person under the compulsion of a summons to witness (subpoena) to pay for their expenses to attend in court. ... The Confederate States Constitution The Constitution of the Confederate States of America was the supreme law of the Confederate States of America, as adopted on March 11, 1861 and in effect through the conclusion of the American Civil War. ... In criminal proceedings, a confession is a document in which a suspect admits having committed a crime. ... Confession of sins is an integral part of the Christian faith and practice. ... CONFESSION AND AVOIDANCE, in pleading, the plea admitting that facts alleged in a declaration are true, but showing new facts by which it is hoped to destroy the effect of the allegations admitted. ... Confession of Judgment is a practice of the United States Solicitor General when, in his personal considered opinion, the U. S. Government (which he represents in the Supreme Court of the United States) has taken the wrong side of a case. ... A confidence trick, confidence game, or con for short, (also known as a scam) is an attempt to intentionally mislead a person or persons (known as the mark) usually with the goal of financial or other gain. ... Confidentiality has been defined by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as ensuring that information is accessible only to those authorized to have access and is one of the cornerstones of Information security. ... A trade secret is a confidential practice, method, process, design, or other information used by a company to compete with other businesses. ... Confidentiality has been defined by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as ensuring that information is accessible only to those authorized to have access and is one of the cornerstones of Information security. ... Confiscation, from the Latin confiscatio joining to the fiscus, i. ... A conflict of interest is a situation in which someone in a position of trust, such as a lawyer, a politician, or an executive or director of a corporation, has competing professional and/or personal interests. ... International private law, private international law or conflict of laws is the branch of private law which regulates lawsuits involving foreign laws or jurisdictions. ... The term Conflict of Laws descibes generally the body of law that aspires to provide solutions to international or interstate legal disputes between persons or entities other than countries or states as such. ... Confrontation is a tactical tabletop fantasy wargame in which the combatants are represented by metal figures in 28-30mm scale. ... Confucianist temple Thian Hock Keng in Singapore Confucianism (Chinese: å„’å­¦, Pinyin: Rúxué‚ [ ] , literally The School of the Scholars; or, less accurately, 孔教 Kŏng jiào, The Religion of Confucius) is a Chinese ethical and philosophical system originally developed from the teachings of the early Chinese sage Confucius. ... In trademark law, confusingly similar is a test used during the examination process to determine whether a trademark conflicts with another, earlier mark, and also used in infringement proceedings to determine whether the use of a mark infringes a registered trade mark. ... The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) (Congregatio pro Doctrina Fidei) is the oldest of the nine congregations of the Roman Curia. ... A congressional-executive agreement is an agreement with a foreign power that has been approved by U.S. Congress and the United States. ... A conjugal visit is a scheduled visit during which an inmate of a penal institution is permitted to have sexual intercourse with a visitor in a closely controlled setting. ... A conscientious objector is a person whose beliefs are incompatible with military service - perhaps with any role in the armed forces (in which case he or she is either pacifist or antimilitarist) - or who objects to a particular war. ... Conscious parallelism is a term used in antitrust law to describe price-fixing between competitors in an oligopoly that occurs without an actual spoken agreement between the parties. ... In law, a sentence forms the final act of a judge-ruled process, and also the symbolic principal act connected to his function. ... In law, a sentence forms the final act of a judge-ruled process, and also the symbolic principal act connected to his function. ... In France, the Conseil dÉtat (English: Council of State and sometimes Counsel of State) is an organ of the French national government. ... It has been suggested that Victimless crime be merged into this article or section. ... Consensus has two common meanings. ... The Meeting of the Minds (also referred to as mutual assent or consensus ad idem) is a term in contract law used to describe the intentions of the parties forming the contract. ... Consensus decision-making is a decision process that not only seeks the agreement of most participants, but also to resolve or mitigate the objections of the minority to achieve the most agreeable decision. ... Consent (as a term of jurisprudence) is a possible justification against civil or criminal liability. ... DECREE - The judgment or sentence of a court of equity which corresponds to the judgment of a court of law. ... A consent judgment is a final, binding judgment in a case in which both parties agree, by stipulation, to a particular outcome. ... Consequential damages are one kind of damages that may be awarded to plaintiff in a civil action who claims that terms of an agreement were not honored. ... Consequentialism refers to those moral theories that hold that the consequences of a particular action form the basis for any valid moral judgement about that action. ... This article refers to Conservative (Masorti) Judaism in the United States. ... The Conservative responsa is the body of responsa literature of Conservative Judaism (also known as Masorti Judaism). ... A Conservator (From Latin conservare) is a judge delegated by the pope to defend certain privileged classes of persons — as universities, religious orders, chapters, the poor — from manifest or notorious injury or violence, without recourse to a judicial process. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Consideration under English law. ... Consignment is the act of consigning, which is placing a person or thing in the hand of another, but retaining ownership until the goods are sold or person is transferred. ... This article may be too technical for most readers to understand. ... Consignment is the act of consigning, which is placing a person or thing in the hand of another, but retaining ownership until the goods are sold or person is transferred. ... A consortium is an association of two or more individuals, companies, organisations or governments (or any combination of these entities) with the objective of participating in a common activity or pooling their resources for achieving a common goal. ... Look up Conspiracy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Conspiracy, as a legal term, is an agreement of two or more people either to commit a crime or to achieve a lawful end by unlawful means: see conspiracy (crime), and conspiracy (civil). ... In the criminal law, a conspiracy is an agreement between two or more natural persons to break the law at some time in the future, and, in some cases, with at least one overt act in furtherance of that agreement. ... A constable is a person holding a particular office, most commonly in law enforcement. ... The current Constitution of France was adopted on October 4, 1958, and has been amended 17 times, most recently on March 28, 2003. ... Due to its turbulent history, Spain has had many constitutions since the first one was drafted in 1812. ... A constitutional amendment is an alteration to the constitution of a nation or a state. ... For the entry on the naval ship U.S.S. Constitution, see: USS Constitution. ... ... In Australian history, the term Constitutional Convention refers to four distinct gatherings. ... This article discusses the history of the United States Constitution. ... Constitutional law is the study of foundational laws that govern the scope of powers and authority of various bodies in relation to the creation and execution of other laws by a government. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A constitutional right is a right granted by a governments constitution (on the national or sub-national level), and cannot be legally denied by that government. ... Cranes are essential in large construction projects, such as this skyscraper In project architecture and civil engineering, construction is the building or assembly of any infrastructure. ... In employment law, constructive dismissal is where an employee resigns due to their employers behaviour. ... Constructive eviction is a term used in the law of real estate to describe a circumstance in which a landlord is deemed to have evicted a tenant by making conditions on the property so bad that the tenant can not continue living there. ... Constructive notice is a legal fiction used in the law of both common law and civil law systems to signify that a person or entity is legally presumed to have knowledge of something, even if they have no actual knowledge of it. ... Constructive possession is a legal fiction to describe a situation where an individual has actual control over chattels or real property without actually having physical control of the same assets. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Consuetudinary (Med. ... Management consulting is the process of helping companies to improve or transform themselves. ... A consultant (from the latin consultus meaning legal expert) is a professional who provides expert advice in a particular domain or area of expertise such as accountancy, technology, the law, human resources, marketing, medicine, finance, public affairs, communication, or more esoteric areas of knowledge, for example engineering of different kinds... Consumer protection is government regulation to protect the interests of consumers, for example by requiring businesses to disclose detailed information about products, particularly in areas where safety or public health is an issue, such as food. ... Contempt of court is a court ruling which, in the context of a court trial or hearing, deems an individual as holding contempt for the court, its process, and its invested powers. ... In philosophy and logic, contingency is the status of facts that are not logically necessary. ... A contingent fee in the United States or conditional fee in the United Kingdom is any fee for services provided where the fee is only payable if there is a favourable result. ... Modal logic, or (less commonly) intensional logic is the branch of logic that deals with sentences that are qualified by modalities such as can, could, might, may, must, possibly, and necessarily, and others. ... A contingent fee is any fee for services provided where the fee is only payable if there is a favourable result. ... Continuance is an United States legal term meaning the postponement of a hearing, trial, or other scheduled court proceeding at the request of either or both parties in the dispute, or by the judge without consulting them. ... The Contras (Spanish contrarrevolucionario, counter-revolutionary) were the armed opponents of Nicaraguas Sandinista National Liberation Front Government Junta of National Reconstruction following the July 1979 overthrow of Anastasio Somoza Debayle and the ending of the Somoza familys 43-year rule. ... This page lists direct English translations of common Latin phrases, such as veni vidi vici and et cetera. ... This page lists direct English translations of common Latin phrases, such as veni vidi vici and et cetera. ... Contraband consists of items of which possession may be illegal, depending on the variety and the country or the age or sex of the possessor. ... A contract is a promise or an agreement that is enforced or recognized by the law. ... ... A contract of sale is a legal act that involves an exchange of goods, services or property to be exchanged from seller (or vendor) to buyer (or purchaser) for an agreed upon value in money (or money equivalent) paid or the promise to pay same. ... Contract theory is the body of legal thought that investigates normative and conceptual problems in contract law. ... A contract is a promise or an agreement that is enforced or recognized by the law. ... Fundraising is the term referring to the process of soliciting and gathering money by requesting donations from individuals, businesses, charitable foundations, or governmental agencies. ... Contributory negligence is a common law defence to a claim or action in tort. ... Look up Control in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Controlling law is a legal term used in contracts, trusts, or other legal documents. ... Look up Controversy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In general, conversion is the transformation of one thing into another. ... Conveyancing - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Conveyancing is the act of transferring the ownership of a property from one person to another. ... Conveyancing is the act of transferring the ownership of a property from one person to another. ... A cooperative (also co-operative or co-op) is an association of persons who join together or co-operate, to carry on an economic activity of mutual benefit. ... A housing co-operative is a legal entity, usually a corporation, that owns real estate, one or more residential buildings. ... In legal terminology, a plea is simply an answer to a claim made by someone in a civil or criminal case under common law using the adversary system. ... At its origin in mediaeval England, Copyhold tenure was tenure of land according to the custom of the manor, the title deeds being a copy of the record of the manor court. ... The reversed c is the copyleft symbol. ... Copyright symbol. ... Copyright infringement is the unauthorized use of copyrighted material in a manner that violates one of the copyright owners exclusive rights, such as the right to reproduce or perform the copyrighted work, or to make derivative works that build upon it. ... The European Union has made various directives on copyright law which member states are obliged to implement. ... Copyright misuse is an equitable defense against copyright infringement in the United States based on the unreasonable conduct of the copyright owner. ... In law, a motion Coram Nobis (from the Latin in our presence, usually translated in context as the error before us) is a petition to the court in its capacity of a Court of Equity to correct a previous error of the most fundamental character to achieve justice where no... Coram non judice, Latin for not in the presence of a judge, is a legal term typically used to indicate either a legal proceeding without a judge or improper venue or jurisdiction. ... A coroner is either the presiding officer of a special court, a medical officer or an officer of law responsible for investigating deaths, particularly those happening under unusual circumstances. ... Corporate governance is the set of processes, customs, policies, laws and institutions affecting the way a corporation is directed, administered or controlled. ... A corporate haven is a jurisdiction with laws friendly to corporations thereby encouraging them to choose that jurisdiction as a legal domicile. ... Corporate personhood is a term used to describe the legal fiction used within United States law that a corporation has a limited number or subset of the same constitutional rights as a human being. ... The concept of the corporate state developed under the context of Fascism in Mussolinis Italy as a means of regulating industrial relations. ... A corporation is a legal person which, while being composed of natural persons, exists completely separately from them. ... Corporations law or corporate law is the law concerning the creation and regulation of corporations. ... Corpus (plural corpora) is Latin for body. ... Corpus delicti (Latin: body of crime) term from Western jurisprudence which refers to the principle that it must be proven that a crime has occurred, before a person can be convicted of committing the crime. ... The legal term Corpus Juris means body of law. It was originally used by the Romans for several of their collections of all the laws in a certain field. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The Corpus Juris Secundum (C.J.S.) with subtitle: Corpus Juris Secundum: Complete Restatement Of The Entire American Law As Developed By All Reported Cases (1936- ) 101 volumes. ... Corroborating evidence is evidence that tends to support a proposition that is already supported by some evidence. ... Corroborating evidence is evidence that tends to support a proposition that is already supported by some evidence. ... Corroborating evidence is evidence that tends to support a proposition that is already supported by some evidence. ... Cosign may mean: Co-signing, promise to pay another persons debt arising out of contract if that person fails to do so CoSign single sign on, an open-source project originally designed to provide a secure single sign-on web authentication system. ... The law of costs is typical of common law jurisdictions. ... A concurrent estate or co-tenancy is a concept in property law, particularly derived from the common law of real property, which describes the various ways in which property can be owned by more than one person at a given time. ... A concurrent estate or co-tenancy is a concept in property law, particularly derived from the common law of real property, which describes the various ways in which property can be owned by more than one person at a given time. ... The Council Tax is the main form of local taxation in England, Scotland and Wales. ... A counsel or a counselor gives advice, more particularly in legal matters. ... A Counselor is a general definition for a person who advises. ... Look up Count in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Countess redirects here. ... Offer and acceptance analysis is a traditional approach in contract law used to determine whether an agreement exists between two parties. ... A Counterclaim is made by the defendant to a civil procedure, in a main actions against the plaintiff or against the plaintiff and other persons. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Counterparts can refer to: Counterparts (album), an album by Rush Counterparts, a short story from Dubliners by James Joyce Counterparts, a jazz & pop a cappella group at the University of Pennsylvania website Counterpartivity the theory created on the basis that everyone has several similar counterparts. ... The County Court is the workhorse of the civil justice system in England and Wales. ... A coup détat (pronounced ), or simply a coup, is the sudden overthrow of a government through unconstitutional means by a part of the state establishment that mostly replaces just the top power figures. ... The Cour de cassation is the main court of last resort in France. ... The word course has several meanings: course is the direction of travel in navigation in sailing, a course is the principal sail on a mast course is a regime of study in education in restaurant language, a course is a single dish in a row of subsequently served dishes, constituting... A court is an official, public forum which a sovereign establishes by lawful authority to adjudicate disputes, and to dispense civil, labour, administrative and criminal justice under the law. ... A court calendar is a calendar, or schedule, of the docket or appearances scheduled for a court. ... The word docket can mean: Look up docket in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Court of Appeals is the title of certain appellate courts in various jurisdictions. ... Her Majestys Court of Appeal is the second most senior court in the English legal system (with only the judges of the House of Lords above it). ... Court of Appeals is the title of certain appellate courts in various jurisdictions. ... One of the courts of equity in England and Wales. ... The Court of First Instance, created in 1989, is a court of the European Union. ... The supreme court in some countries, provinces, and states, is the highest court in that jurisdiction and functions as a court of last resort whose rulings cannot be appealed. ... This article is about courts of law. ... The Court of Protection in English law is a part of the High Court of Justice of England and Wales that acts in the best interests of persons mentally incapable of managing their own affairs with respect to estates. ... In common law jurisdictions, a court of record is a court that keeps permanent records of its proceedings. ... The Court of Session is the supreme civil court in Scotland. ... A court order is an official proclamation by a judge (or panel of judges) that defines the legal relationships between the parties before the court and requires or authorizes the carrying out of certain steps by one or more parties to a case. ... A courtroom is the actual enclosed space in which a judge regularly holds court. ... A court-martial (plural courts-martial) is a military court that determines punishments for members of the military subject to military law. ... Schematic of court system for England and Wales The United Kingdom does not have a single unified judicial system—England and Wales have one system, Scotland another, and Northern Ireland a third. ... The United Kingdom does not have a single unified judicial system: England and Wales have one system, Scotland another, and Northern Ireland another. ... Covenant, in its most general sense, is a word for a solemn promise or similar undertaking. ... A non-compete clause, or covenant not to compete (CNC), is a term used in contract law under which one party (usually an employee) agrees to not pursue a similar profession or trade in competition against another party (usually the employer). ... A covenant running with the land, in the law of real property, is a nonpossessory interest in land in the form of an agreement between adjoining landowners to do or not do something with relation to the land that they respectively occupy - to maintain a fence, for example, or not... A creature of statute is an entity such as a corporation created by statute. ... Credibility is the believability of a statement, action, or source, and the ability of the observer to believe that statement. ... A creditor is a party (e. ... Creditors Rights is a legal term used to describe a lawyers specialized practice area focused on the collection of debts on behalf of creditors. ... A crime against humanity is a term in international law that refers to acts of murderous persecution against a body of people, as being the criminal offence above all others. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... A crime against peace, in international law, consists of starting or waging a war against the territorial integrity, political independence or sovereignty of a state, or in violation of international treaties, agreements or (legally binding) assurances. ... A crime of passion, in popular usage, refers to a crime in which the perpetrator commits a crime, specially assault or murder, against a spouse or other loved one due to sudden jealous rage or heartbreak rather than as a premeditated crime. ... for other uses please see Crime (disambiguation) A crime is an act that violates a political or moral law. ... A lawyer is a person licensed by the state to advise clients in legal matters and represent them in courts of law (and in other forms of dispute resolution). ... Criminal conversion, in criminal law, is usually defined as the crime of exerting unauthorised use or control of someone elses property. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Criminal law (also known as penal law) is the body of statutory and common law that deals with crime and the legal punishment of criminal offenses. ... Criminal negligence, in the realm of criminal common law, is a legal term of art for a state of mind which is careless, inattentive, neglectful, willfully blind, or reckless; it is the mens rea part of a crime which, if occurring simultaneously with the actus reus, gives rise to criminal... Criminal procedure refers to the legal process for adjudicating claims that someone has violated the criminal law. ... Critical legal studies refers to a movement in legal thought that applied methods similar to those of critical theory (the Frankfurt School) to law. ... In law, cross-examination is the interrogation of a witness called by ones opponent. ... In general use, a complaint is an expression of displeasure, such as poor service at a store, or from a local government, for example. ... In law, cross-examination is the interrogation of a witness called by ones opponent. ... Crown copyright is a form of copyright claim used by the governments of the United Kingdom and a number of other Commonwealth realms. ... In Commonwealth countries a Crown corporation is a state-controlled company or enterprise (a public corporation). ... Crown Court and County Court in Oxford. ... Crown land is a designated land belonging to the Crown, the equivalent of an entailed estate that passed with the monarchy and could not be alienated from it. ... Crown-Owned Companies (CROCs) are a subtype of crown entities in New Zealands state sector. ... The statement that the government shall not inflict cruel and unusual punishment for crimes is found in the English Bill of Rights signed in 1689 by William of Orange and Queen Mary II who were then the joint rulers of England following the Glorious Revolution of 1688. ... Look up cruelty in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Cruelty to animals refers to treatment which causes unacceptable suffering or harm to nonhuman animals (nonhuman is assumed in the rest of the article). ... Cui bono (Good for whom, or Who obtains a benefit) is a latin adage used in criminal investigation. ... Cuius regio, eius religio is a phrase in Latin that means, Whose the region is, his religion. ... Culpability (Blameworthiness) is the state of deserving to be blamed for a crime or offence. ... Culpability descends from the Latin concept of fault (culpa), which is still found today in the phrase mea culpa (literally, my fault). The concept of culpability is intimately tied up with notions of agency, freedom and free will. ... In law, a sentence forms the final act of a judge-ruled process, and also the symbolic principal act connected to his function. ... A points method ballot design like this one is the most common for governmental elections using cumulative voting. ... A curfew can be one of the following: An order by the government for certain persons to return home before a certain time. ... Curtesy, in law, is the life interest which a husband has in certain events in the lands of which his wife was in her lifetime actually seised for an estate of inheritance. ... A custodian is a person that cleans and maintains large buildings. ... Child custody and guardianship are the legal terms used to describe the legal and practical relationship between a parent and child, including e. ... In law, custom, or customary law consists of established patterns of behaviour that can be objectively verified within a particular social setting. ... At its origin in medieval England, Copyhold tenure was tenure of land according to the custom of the manor, the title deeds being a copy of the record of the manor court. ... Customs duty is a tariff or tax on the import or export of goods. ... Customs and Excise refers to customs duties and excise duties. ... This page lists direct English translations of common Latin phrases, such as veni vidi vici and et cetera. ... The English cy pres doctrine (pronounced as see-pray) is a legal doctrine of the Court of equity. ... Cyber law encompasses a wide variety of legal issues related to use of communications technology. ... Cybersquatting is a term used to describe the practice of registering and claiming rights over Internet domain names that are, arguably, not for the taking. ...


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D.A. -- D.B.A. -- D.U.I. -- D.W.I. -- Damages -- Damnation -- Dangerous -- Dangerous weapon -- Data protection -- Date rape -- Daubert Standard -- Day in court -- de bonis asportatis -- de bonis non administratis -- de die in diem -- de facto -- De facto corporation -- de futuro -- de integro -- de jure -- De jure corporation -- de lege ferenda -- de lege lata -- de minimis -- de novo -- Deadlock -- Deadly weapon -- Dealer --Death tax -- Death penalty -- Death row -- Death duty -- Debenture -- Debt -- Debt bondage -- Debtor -- Debtor in possession -- Decapitation -- Deceased -- Deceit -- Deception -- Decide -- Decision -- Declarant -- Declaration -- Declaration of Arbroath -- Declaration of independence -- Declaration of mailing -- Declaration of the Independence of New Zealand -- Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen -- Declaration of trust -- Declaration of war -- Declaration of war by the United States -- Declaratory judgment -- Declaratory relief -- Decree -- Decree absolute -- Decree nisi -- Decriminalization -- Dedication -- Deduction -- Deed -- Deed of trust -- Deed poll -- defalcation -- Defamation -- Default -- Default judgment -- Default rule -- Defeasance -- Defect -- Defective -- Defective title -- Defendant -- Defense -- Defense attorney -- Defense of infancy -- Deficiency judgment -- Deficit -- Defined benefit plan -- Defined contribution plan -- Deforce -- Defraud -- Degree of kinship -- Delayed exchange -- Delegate -- deleterious -- Deliberate -- Deliberation -- Deliberative body -- Delict -- Delinquent -- Deliver -- Delivery -- Demand -- Demand note -- Demesne -- Demise -- Democracy -- Demonstrative evidence -- Demurrer -- Denial -- Deobandi -- Deontology -- Department for Constitutional Affairs -- Dependent -- Depletion -- Deponent -- Deportation -- Depose -- Deposition -- Deposition -- Depreciate -- Depreciation -- Depreciation reserve -- Derelict -- Dereliction -- Derivative action -- Derivative work -- Descent -- Descent and distribution -- Desert -- Desertion -- Designated civil judge -- Detailed assessment -- Determinable -- Determination -- Deuce -- Devi -- Devil's Advocate -- Devise -- Devisee -- Devolution -- Devolve -- Devolved government -- dicta -- dictum -- Digital signature -- Diligence -- Diminished capacity -- Diminished responsibility -- Diminished responsibility in English law -- Diminution in value -- Diplomatic immunity -- Diplomatic recognition -- Direct and proximate cause -- Direct evidence -- Direct examination -- Directed verdict -- Director -- Directors -- Directors register -- Disability -- Disbar -- Disbarment -- Disbursements -- Discharge -- Discharge in bankruptcy -- Disciplinary procedure -- Disclaimer -- Discontinuance -- Discount -- Discovery -- Discovery of documents -- Discretion -- Discrimination -- Disembowelment -- Disfigure -- Dishonor -- Disinherit -- Disinheritance -- Disjunctive allegations -- Dismiss -- Dismissal -- Dismissal with prejudice -- Dismissal without prejudice -- Disobbedienti -- Disorderly conduct -- Disorderly house -- Disposing mind and memory -- Disposition -- Dispossess -- Dispute resolution -- Dissent -- Dissenting opinion -- Dissolution (law) -- Dissolution of corporation -- Dissolution of the Monasteries -- Distinguish -- Distress -- Distribute -- Distribution -- Distributive justice -- District attorney -- District court -- District judge -- District registrar -- District registry -- Disturbing the peace -- Diversion -- Diversity of citizenship -- Divestiture -- Divestment -- Dividend -- Dividend tax -- Divine Right of Kings -- Division of property -- Divisional court -- Divorce -- DNA -- Dock -- Docket -- Document -- Documentary evidence -- Doing business -- doli incapax -- Domestic partner -- Domestic partners -- Domestic relations -- Domestic violence -- Domicile -- Dominant estate -- Dominant tenement -- Dominium -- Donation -- Donative intent -- Donee -- Donor -- Double jeopardy -- Double taxation -- Dower -- Dowry -- Draft document -- Dram shop rule -- Draw -- Drawee -- Drawer -- Drawing and quartering -- Dreyfus affair -- Driver's license -- Driving under the influence -- Driving while intoxicated -- Droit de seigneur -- Drop dead date -- Drug -- Dubitante -- duces tecum -- Due -- Due and owing -- Due care -- Due diligence -- Due process -- Due process of law -- Due, owing and unpaid -- Duress -- Duress in English law -- Duty -- Duty of care -- Duty of care in English law -- Duty to warn -- Dying declaration -- A district attorney is, in some U.S. jurisdictions, the title of the local public official who represents the government in the prosecution of criminals. ... The phrase doing business as (abbreviated DBA or d/b/a) is a legal term, meaning that the name of the business or operation does not include the legal name of its proprietor, the names of all partners, or the official registered name of the limited partnership or corporation that... Drunk driving is a serious offence. ... Drunk driving is a serious offence. ... In law, damages refers either to the harm suffered by a claimant in a civil action, or to the money paid or awarded to the plaintiff in compensation for such harm. ... // Religious In some forms of Western Christian belief, damnation to hell is the punishment of God for persons with unredeemed sin. ... Look up dangerous in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A deadly weapon, sometimes dangerous weapon, is a statutory defintion listing certain items which can inflict mortal or great bodily harm. ... We dont have an article called Data protection Start this article Search for Data protection in. ... The title Date Rape is a very general term which has come to represent some very different situations. ... The Daubert Standard is a legal precedent set in 1993 by the Supreme Court of the United States regarding the admissibility of expert witnesses testimony during legal proceedings. ... This page lists direct English translations of common Latin phrases, such as veni vidi vici and et cetera. ... De bonis non administratis, Latin for of goods not administered, is a legal term that refers to assets remaining in an estate after the death or removal of the estate administrator. ... De die in diem or de die ad diem is a Latin phrase which means from day to day. De die in diem often refers to a type of pay schedule. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... De facto corporation and corporation by estoppel are both terms that are used by courts to describe circumstances in which is a business organization that has failed to become a de jure corporation (a corporation by law) will nonetheless be treated as a corporation, thereby shielding shareholders from liability. ... This page lists direct English translations of common Latin phrases, such as veni vidi vici and et cetera. ... This page lists direct English translations of common Latin phrases, such as veni vidi vici and et cetera. ... Look up De jure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary The terms de jure and de facto are used instead of in principle and in practice, respectively, when one is describing political situations. ... De facto corporation and corporation by estoppel are both terms that are used by courts to describe circumstances in which is a business organization that has failed to become a de jure corporation (a corporation by law) will nonetheless be treated as a corporation, thereby shielding shareholders from liability. ... This page lists direct English translations of common Latin phrases, such as veni vidi vici and et cetera. ... This page lists direct English translations of common Latin phrases, such as veni vidi vici and et cetera. ... De Minimis is the contemporary a cappella group of the National Law School of Mauritania University, Nouakchott, Mauritania and consists entirely of undergraduate students of the B.A., LL.B. (Hons. ... In law, the expression trial de novo literally means new trial. It is most often used in certain legal systems that provide for one form of trial, then another if a party remains unsatisfied with the decision. ... A deadlock is a situation wherein two or more competing actions are waiting for the other to finish, and thus neither ever does. ... A deadly weapon is usually defined as a firearm or any object designed, made, or adapted for the purposes of inflicting death or serious physical injury. ... Dealer has a number of meanings: A person who sells on behalf of a company or organization, or who sells in bulk from a large common store. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the State as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offenses. ... Death Row is a term used in some countries, including the United States, which refers to the section of a prison that houses individuals awaiting execution. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... A debenture in finance, is a long term debt instrument used by governments and large companies to obtain funds. ... For other uses, see Debt (disambiguation). ... Debt bondage or bonded labor is a means of paying off a familys loans via the labor of family members or heirs. ... In economics a debtor (or a borrower) owes money to a creditor. ... A debtor in possession, in the United States bankruptcy law, is a person who is bankrupt, but remains in possession of property upon which a creditor has a lien or similar security interest. ... The Beheading of Cosmas and Damian, by Fra Angelico Decapitation (from Latin, caput, capitis, meaning head), or beheading, is the removal of a living organisms head. ... This page deals with the cessation of life. ... This article is about the telling of falsehoods. ... Deception (or mystification) is to intentionally distort the truth in order to mislead others. ... Look up decision in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up decision in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A declarant, generally speaking, is anyone who composes and signs a statement or declaration alleging that the information he has given therein is true. ... The Declaration of Arbroath was a declaration of Scottish independence, and set out to confirm Scotlands status as an independent, sovereign state and its use of military action when unjustly attacked. ... A declaration of independence is a proclamation of the independence of an aspiring state or states. ... The Flag of the United Tribes of New Zealand. ... Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen: Revolutionary patriotism borrows familiar iconography of the Ten Commandments Wikisource has original text related to this article: Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen The Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen (French: La... In law, a declaration ordinarily refers a judgment of the court or an award of an arbitration tribunal is a binding adjudication of the rights or other legal relations of the parties which does not provide for or order enforcement. ... President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs a declaration of war against the Empire of Japan on December 8, 1941, one day after the attack on Pearl Harbor. ... A declaration of war is a formal declaration issued by a national government indicating that a state of war exists between that nation, and one or more others. ... A declaratory judgment is a judgment of a court which declares what rights each party in a dispute should have, but does not order any action or result in any legal damages. ... Declaratory relief is a judges determination (called a declaratory judgment) of the parties rights under a contract or a statute, often requested (and highly desired) in a lawsuit over a contract. ... Decree is an order that has the force of law. ... A decree nisi is a ruling by a court that does not have any force until such time that a particular condition is met. ... A decree nisi (non-absolute ruling) is a ruling by a court that does not have any force until such time that a particular condition is met. ... Decriminalization is the reduction or abolition of criminal penalties in relation to certain acts. ... Dedication (Lat. ... There are several meanings for the word deduction: Natural deduction Deductive reasoning Deductions in terms of taxation, such as Itemized deductions Standard deduction See also: Logic Venn diagram Inductive reasoning Both statistics and the scientific method rely on both induction and deduction. ... A deed is a legal instrument used to grant a right. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A deed poll is a legal document binding only to a single person or several person acted jointly to express an active intention. ... Defalcation is a term used by the United States Bankruptcy Code to describe a category of bad acts that taint a particular debt such that it cannot be discharged in bankruptcy. ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ... Default is the name of a number of quite different concepts. ... Default judgment is a binding judgment in favor of the plaintiff when the defendant has not responded to a summons or has failed to appear before a court. ... In legal theory, a default rule is a rule of law that can be superseded by a contract, trust, will, or other legally effective agreement. ... Defeasance, or defeazance (Fr. ... Defect is the n00b of the animating world, everybody knows that he cannot and will not animate. ... A defendant or defender is any party who is required to answer the complaint of a plaintiff or pursuer in a civil lawsuit before a court, or any party who has been formally charged or accused of violating a criminal statute. ... In most litigation under the common law adversarial system the defendant, perhaps with the assistance of counsel, may allege or present defenses (or defences) in order to avoid liability, civil or criminal. ... A lawyer in the United States is technically called an attorney at law or an attorney-at-law. ... The defense of infancy is a form of defense known as an excuse so that defendants falling within the definition of an infant are excluded from criminal liability for their actions, if at the relevant time, they had not reached an age of criminal responsibility. ... A budget deficit occurs when an entity (often a government) spends more money than it takes in. ... The examples and perspective in this article do not represent a worldwide view. ... ... In the broadest sense, a fraud is a deception made for personal gain, although it has a more specific legal meaning, the exact details varying between jurisdictions. ... Consanguinity, literally meaning common blood, describes a family relationship between two individuals. ... A delegate is an individual (or a member of a group called a delegation) who represents the interests of a larger organization (e. ... This article refers to legal deliberation; for other meanings of the word refer to its Wiktionary entry. ... This article refers to legal deliberation; for other meanings of the word refer to its Wiktionary entry. ... A deliberative body (or deliberative assembly) is an organization which collectively makes decisions after debate and discussion. ... Delict is a French word and a legal term in civil law which signifies a wilfull wrong, similar to the common law concept of tort though differing in many substantive ways. ... Delinquent means one who fails to do that which is required by law or by duty and such failure is minor in nature. ... ... Childbirth in a hospital. ... The supply and demand model describes how prices vary as a result of a balance between product availability at each price (supply) and the desires of those with purchasing power at each price (demand). ... Top row: The distinctive green ink used on the backs of Demand Notes gave rise to the term greenbacks Bottom row: Prominent design elements used on the front of $5 and $20 Demand Notes (located respectively under their denomination); pictured in the middle is the front of a $10 Demand... The feudal concept of demesne is a form of manorial land tenure as conceived in Western Europe, initially in France but exported to England, during the Middle Ages. ... Demise is an Anglo-French legal term (from the Fr. ... Demonstrative evidence is evidence used to help the fact-finder gain context for the facts of the case. ... In common law civil procedure, a demurrer is a pleading by the defendant that contests the legal sufficiency of the complaint. ... Denial is a psychological defense mechanism in which a person faced with a fact that is uncomfortable or painful to accept rejects it instead, insisting that it is not true despite what may be overwhelming evidence. ... This article or section seems not to be written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia entry. ... In moral philosophy, deontology is the view that morality either forbids or permits actions, which is done through moral norms. ... The Department for Constitutional Affairs (DCA) is a United Kingdom government department. ... Dependency has a number of meanings: In project management, a dependency is a link amongst a projects terminal elements. ... Depletion is the process of running down or reducing the total resource available. ... Deponent has significance in two different reference frames: In law the deponent is the person making a Deposition (law) In grammar a deponent verb is a verb which is active in meaning while being passive or middle in its morphology (for example Latin sequor = I follow) ... Deportation is the expelling of someone from a country. ... Deposition is a word used in many fields to describe different processes: In law, deposition is the taking of testimony outside of court. ... Deposition is a word used in many fields to describe different processes: In law, deposition is the taking of testimony outside of court. ... In law, a deposition is evidence given under oath and recorded for use in court at a later date. ... Declining-balance depreciation of a $50,000 asset with $6,500 salvage value over 20 years. ... Declining-balance depreciation of a $50,000 asset with $6,500 salvage value over 20 years. ... Derelict may refer to: Negligence (dereliction) Neglect of legal or moral duty. ... A Shareholders derivative suit is an action brought by a shareholder not on its own behalf, but on behalf of the corporation, on grounds that the corporation is being cheated by corrupt actions from within. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Descent may refer to: Media Descent (computer game), a computer game released by Parallax Software in the mid-1990s Descent: Freespace, a computer game series released by Volition Inc. ... Desert view in Saudi Arabia. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Deuce can refer to several things: The number two. ... Commonly known as Devi (goddess), Vaishnodevi (देवी, DevÄ« in Hindi and Sanskrit) is the Divine Mother of Hinduism. ... Formerly, during the canonization process by the Roman Catholic Church, the Promoter of the Faith (Latin Promotor Fidei), or Devils Advocate (Latin advocatus diaboli), was a canon lawyer appointed by the Church to argue against the canonization of the proposed candidate. ... For the heavy metal band, see Devolved (band) Devolution or home rule is the granting of powers from central government to government at regional or local level. ... Devolution or home rule is the statutory granting of powers from the central government of a state to government at national, regional or local level. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Devolution. ... In law, the term dicta is used to refer to a judges statement of legal opinion that is not directly relevant to the case being heard. ... In common law legal terminology a dictum (plural dicta) is any statement that forms a part of the judgment of a court, in particular a court whose decisions have value as precedent under the doctrine of stare decisis. ... Digital signatures are a subset of electronic signatures. ... Due diligence is the effort a party makes to avoid harm to another party. ... In jurisprudence, diminished responsibility (or diminished capacity) is a defense by excuse via which a defendant argues that that although they broke the law, they should not be held criminally liable for doing so, as their mental functions were diminished or impaired. ... In criminal law, diminished responsibility (or diminished capacity) is a potential defense by excuse by which defendants argue that although they broke the law, they should not be held criminally liable for doing so, as their mental functions were diminished or impaired. ... For the law in other criminal jurisdictions, see diminished responsibility. ... Diplomatic immunity is a form of legal immunity and a policy held between governments, which ensures that diplomats are given safe passage and are considered not susceptible to lawsuit or prosecution under the host countrys laws (although they can be expelled). ... Diplomatic recognition is the act in which a states government is formally recognized by another state as being legitimate. ... For English law, see Causation in English law In the law, a proximate cause is an event sufficiently related to a legally recognizable injury to be held the cause of that injury. ... Direct Evidence is testimony or other proof which expressly or straight-forwardly proves the existence of a fact. ... Direct examination (also called examination in chief) is the questioning of a witness by the party who called him or her, in a trial in a court of law. ... In U.S. law, a directed verdict is an order from the judge presiding over a jury trial that one side or the other wins. ... In corporate law, the directors register is a list of the directors elected by the shareholders, generally stored in the companys minute book. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Disbarment is a penalty for lawyers. ... Disbarment is a penalty for lawyers. ... Look up Discharge in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... In finance, discounting is the process of finding the current value of an amount of cash at some future date, and along with compounding cash from the basis of time value of money calculations. ... In law, discovery is the pre-trial phase in a lawsuit in which each party through the law of civil procedure can request documents and other evidence from other parties or can compel the production of evidence by using a subpoena or through other discovery devices, such as requests for... In law, discovery is the pre-trial phase in a lawsuit in which each party through the law of civil procedure can request documents and other evidence from other parties or can compel the production of evidence by using a subpoena or through other discovery devices, such as requests for... Discretion describes the ability of a person in a position of power to make decisions regarding their application of that power. ... This article is about discrimination in the social science sense. ... Disembowelment is evisceration, or the removing of some or all of vital organs, usually from the abdomen. ... It has been suggested that mutilation be merged into this article or section. ... Inheritance is the practice of passing on property, titles, debts, and obligations upon the death of an individual. ... An allegation is a statement of a fact by a party in a pleading, which the party claims it will prove. ... Dismissal may refer to: In litigation, a dismissal the result of a successful motion to dismiss. ... In litigation, a dismissal the result of a successful motion to dismiss. ... The Disobbedienti are those who practice Civil and social disobedience, a philosophy growing out of the militant Italian social movement Tute Bianche, which literally means, White Overalls. This philosophy includes the occupation and creation of squatted selfmanaged Social centers, anti-sexist organizing, activism for migration rights and political asylum rights... In the criminal law of the United States of America, disorderly conduct is a name given to a rather ill defined crime. ... DISORDERLY HOUSE, in law, a house in which the conduct of its inmates is such as to become a public nuisance, or a house where persons congregate to the probable disturbance of the public peace or other commission of crime. ... In philosophy, physiology, and psychology, a disposition is a habit, a preparation, a state of readiness, or a tendency to act in a specified way. ... It has been suggested that Adjudication be merged into this article or section. ... Dissent is a sentiment or philosophy of non-agreement or opposition to an idea (eg. ... A dissenting opinion is an opinion of one or more judges in an appellate court expressing disagreement with the majority opinion. ... Dissolution is also the term for the legal process by which an adoption is reversed. ... Liquidation, or winding up, refers to a process whereby the assets of a business are converted to money. ... The Dissolution of the Monasteries (referred to by Roman Catholic writers as the Suppression of the Monasteries) was the formal process, taking place between 1538 and 1541, by which King Henry VIII confiscated the property of the Roman Catholic monastic institutions in England and took them to himself, as the... In law, to distinguish a case means to differentiate the facts of the case before the court from the facts of a case of precedent where is material depends on the legal issue. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This page deals with mathematical distributions. ... Look up distribution in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Distributive justice - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... A district attorney is, in some U.S. jurisdictions, the title of the local public official who represents the government in the prosecution of criminals. ... District courts are a category of courts which exists in several nations. ... A federal judge is a judge appointed in accordance with Article III of the United States Constitution. ... Disturbing Tha Peace (DTP) is a rap crew from Atlanta which is comprised of Ludacris, Shawnna, I-20, Tity Boi, Lil Fate, Jay Cee and St. ... In the terminology of the DEA, diversion is the use of prescription drugs for recreational purposes. ... Diversity jurisdiction is a term used in civil procedure to refer to the situation in which a United States district court has subject matter jurisdiction to hear a civil case because the parties are diverse, meaning that they come from different states. ... Divestment (divestiture) is a term in finance and economics. ... In finance and economics, divestment or divestiture is the reduction of some kind of asset, for either financial or social goals. ... Dividends are payments made by a company to its shareholders. ... A dividend tax is an income tax on money paid to the owners of a company through dividend payments. ... The Divine Right of Kings is a European political and religious doctrine of political absolutism. ... Division of property also known as equitable distribution of parties which is a judicial division of property rights and obligations between spouses during the process of the dissolution of marriage (divorce). ... Divorce or dissolution of marriage is the ending of a marriage before the death of either spouse, which can be contrasted with an annulment, which is a declaration that a marriage is void, though the effects of marriage may be recognized in such unions, such as spousal support, child custody... The general structure of a section of DNA Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is a nucleic acid —usually in the form of a double helix— that contains the genetic instructions specifying the biological development of all cellular forms of life, and most viruses. ... Dock can refer to several things: Places for the transfer of people and materials to, from, or between different forms of transport or working with transport: A maritime dock. ... The word docket can mean: Look up docket in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A document contains information. ... Documentary evidence is any evidence introduced at a trial in the form of documents. ... A conclusive presumption (also known as an irrebuttable presumption) in English law is an presumption of law that cannot that cannot be rebutted by evidence and must be taken to be the case whatever the evidence to the contrary. ... Domestic partner or domestic partnership identifies the personal relationship between individuals who are living together and sharing a common domestic life together but are not joined in any type of legal partnership, marriage or civil union. ... Domestic partner or domestic partnership identifies the personal relationship between individuals who are living together and sharing a common domestic life together but are not joined in any type of legal partnership, marriage or civil union. ... In the common law tradition, the law of domestic relations is a broad category that encompasses: divorce; property settlements; alimony; maintenance; the establishment of paternity; the establishment or termination of parental rights; child support; child custody; visitation; adoption; and the emancipation of children. ... Domestic violence occurs when a family member, partner or ex-partner attempts to physically or psychologically dominate or harm the other. ... In astrology, domicile, rulership or house is the strongest essential dignity of a planet. ... An easement is the right of use over the real property of another. ... A donation is a gift to a fund or cause, typically for charitable reasons. ... A legal phrase usually used in the context of gift-like transactions. ... A donor in general is a person that donates something. ... Double jeopardy (also called autrefois acquit meaning already acquitted) is a procedural defense (and, in many countries such as the United States, Canada and India, a constitutional right) that forbids a defendant from being tried a second time for a crime, after having already been tried for the same crime. ... Double taxation is a situation in which two or more taxes must be paid for the same asset or financial transaction. ... Dower (Lat. ... A dowry (also known as trousseau) is a gift of money or valuables given by the groomss family to that of the bride to permit their marriage. ... A draft of a document is one of several revisions, typically a crude and early one, though one may also speak of a final draft. ... Dram shop is a legal term in the United States for laws covering the liability of people serving liquor. ... Draw has the following meanings: Drawing is one way of making an image by making marks on a surface with a pen, pencil or other line tool. ... A Drawer This article refers to the type of furniture. ... Drawing and quartering was part of the penalty once ordained in England for treason. ... The Dreyfus Affair was a political scandal which divided France during the 1890s and early 1900s. ... current EU driving licence, German version - front 1. ... Driving under the influence, drunk driving, or drink-driving, is the act of operating a motor vehicle (and sometimes a bicycle or similar human-powered vehicle) after having consumed alcohol (ethanol) or other drugs, to the degree that mental and motor skills are impaired. ... Drunk driving (drink driving in the UK) or drinking and driving is the act of operating a motor vehicle after having consumed alcohol (i. ... Droit du seigneur (also droit de seigneur), French for the lords right, and jus primae noctis, Latin for law (or right) of the first night, are the terms now popularly used to describe the purported legal right of the lord of an estate to deflower its virgins. ... In trade and contract law, a drop dead date is a provision added to a legal or trade act, such as a contract or a court order. ... These lollipops were found to contain heroin when inspected by the US DEA The trade of illegal drugs is a global black market activity consisting of production, distribution, packaging and sale of illegal psychoactive substances. ... A subpoena duces tecum (Latin for bring with under penalty of punishment) is a court summons to appear and produce tangible evidence for use at a hearing or trial. ... Manufacturers are reponsible for adequately warning consumers of possibly dangerous products. ... Due diligence (also known as due care) is the effort made by an ordinarily prudent or reasonable party to avoid harm to another party or himself. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Due process of law is a legal concept that ensures the government will respect all of a persons legal rights instead of just some or most of those legal rights, when the government deprives a person of life, liberty, or property. ... Duress (coercion) (as a term of jurisprudence) is a possible defense, via excuse, by which a defendant may argue that they should not be held criminally liable for actions which broke the law. ... For a general discussion of the principles, see duress In English law, duress is a defence which allows a limited excuse in favour of those who commit crimes because they are forced or compelled to do so against their will by the threats of another. ... Duty is a term loosely applied to any action (or course of action) which is regarded as morally incumbent, apart from personal likes and dislikes or any external compulsion. ... In law, a duty of care is the legal requirement that a person exercise a reasonable standard of care to prevent injury of others. ... In tort, there can be no liability in negligence unless the claimant establishes both that he or she was owed a duty of care by the defendant, and that there has been a breach of that duty. ... A duty to warn is a concept that arises in the law of torts in a number of circumstances, indicating that a party will be held liable for injuries caused to another, where the party had the opportunity to warn the other of a hazard and failed to do so. ... In the law of evidence, a dying declaration is testimony that would normally be barred as hearsay but may nonetheless be admitted as evidence in certain kinds of cases because it constituted the last words of a dying person. ...


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Early Muslim philosophy -- Earned income tax credit -- Earnest payment -- Easement -- Ecclesia -- Ecclesiastical court -- Ecumenical council -- Edict -- Edict of Fontainebleau -- Edict of Milan -- Edict of Nantes -- Edict of Worms -- Egress -- ei incumbit probatio qui -- EIR -- Either -- Ejectment -- ejusdem generis -- Elder law -- Election of remedies -- Election under the will -- Elective share -- Electoral reform -- Electric chair -- Eleemosynary -- Element -- Emancipation -- Emancipation Proclamation -- Embezzlement -- Embezzler -- Emblements -- Emergency -- Eminent domain -- Emolument -- Emotional distress -- Employee -- Employer -- Employers' liability -- Employment -- Employment contract -- Employment law -- En banc -- Enabling clause -- Enclosure -- Encroach -- Encroachment -- Encumbrance -- End user license agreement -- Endorse (indorse) -- Endorsement -- Endowment -- Enfeoff -- Enfeoffment -- Enforcement -- English Bill of Rights -- English law -- Enjoin -- Enjoyment -- Enrolled Bill doctrine -- Entail -- Enter a judgment -- Entertainment law -- Entity -- Entrapment -- Entry -- Entry of judgment -- Environmental Impact Report -- Environmental impact statement -- Environmental law -- Ephebophilia -- Equal Access Act -- Equal opportunity -- Equal Protection Clause -- Equitable -- Equitable distribution -- Equitable estoppel -- Equitable lien -- Equitable remedy -- Equity -- Equity of redemption -- Equivalent -- erga omnes -- ergo -- erratum -- Erroneous -- Error -- Errors and omissions -- Escalator clause -- Escape clause -- Escheat -- Escrow -- Escrow account -- Escrow agent -- Escrow instructions -- Espionage -- Esquire -- esse -- Establishment clause -- Estate -- Estate by entirety -- Estate in land -- Inheritance tax -- Estop -- estoppel -- et al -- et cetera -- et seq -- et ux -- et uxor -- Ethical calculus -- Ethical code -- Ethics -- Ethics in religion -- Ethnic cleansing -- European Convention on Human Rights -- European Court of Human Rights -- European Court of Justice -- European Patent Convention -- European Patent Organisation -- European Union directive -- Directive (EU) -- European Union Law -- European Union regulation -- Regulation (EU) -- Euthanasia -- Evasion of tax -- Evasion of the law -- Eviction -- Evidence -- ex aequo et bono -- ex cathedra -- ex concessis -- ex delicto -- ex facie -- ex gratia -- ex officio -- ex parte -- ex post facto -- Ex post facto law -- ex propio motu -- ex rel -- Examination -- Exception -- Exception in deed -- Excessive bail -- Exchange -- Excise -- Exclusionary rule -- Excommunication -- Exculpatory -- Excusable neglect -- Excuse -- [[[Execution]] -- Execution -- Execution warrant -- Executioner -- Executive -- Executive clemency -- Executive order -- Executive privilege -- Executor -- Executory -- Executory interest -- executrix -- Exegesis -- Exemplary damages -- exempli gratia -- Exempt -- Exempt employees -- Exempt property -- Exemption -- Exhibit -- exigent circumstances -- Exile -- Expectancy -- Expense -- Expert determination -- Expert testimony -- Expert witness -- Express -- Express contract -- Express warranty -- Expropriation -- Extension -- Extenuating circumstances -- Extinguishment -- Extortion -- Extradition -- Extrajudicial -- Extraordinary fees -- Extraordinary General Meeting -- Extraordinary resolution -- Extreme cruelty -- Extrinsic fraud -- Eyewitness -- Early Muslim philosophy can be starkly divided into four clear sets of influences: First, the life of Muhammad or sira which generated both the Quran (revelation) and hadith (his daily utterances and discourses on social and legal matters), during which philosophy was defined by acceptance or rejection of his... The United States federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is a refundable tax credit that reduces or eliminates the taxes that low-income working people pay (such as payroll taxes) and also frequently operates as a wage subsidy for low-income workers. ... An earnest payment (sometimes called earnest money or simply earnest) is when a buyer gives of something of value (money or otherwise) to a seller at the time an agreement is made and it is accepted by the seller as an indication that the agreement is complete. ... NB: This article is manifestly incorrect outside of US law. ... This article may be confusing for some readers, and should be edited to be clearer. ... An ecclesiastical court (also called Court Christian) is any of certain courts having jurisdiction mainly in spiritual or religious matters. ... See also General Council (disambiguation). ... An edict is an announcement of a law, often associated with monarchism. ... The Edict of Fontainebleau (October 1685) was an edict issued by Louis XIV of France. ... The Edict of Milan (AD 313) declared that the Roman Empire would be neutral with regard to religious worship, officially ending all government-sanctioned persecution, especially of Christianity. ... The Edict of Nantes was issued on April 13, 1598 by Henry IV of France to grant French Protestants (also known as Huguenots) substantial rights in a nation still considered essentially Catholic. ... This article or section should be merged with Diet of Worms The Edict of Worms was issued by Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor on May 25, 1521 at Worms, at the end of the Diet of Worms. ... Egress (Lat. ... Eir (help or mercy) is, in Norse mythology, a goddess of the Æsir; she knew the medicinal properties of herbs and was capable of resurrection. ... Either is an English pronoun, adjective, and conjunction, meaning one, or the other, of two. ... Ejectment is in the common law the name given to the civil action to recover the possession of and title to land. ... Canons of statutory construction are rules of construction for the interpretation of statute law in the United States. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Election of remedies is a term used in the of law of civil procedure to describe a situtation in which a winning party in a lawsuit must choose the means by which their injury will be remedied. ... An elective share is a term used in American law relating to inheritance, which describes a proportion of an estate which the surviving spouse of the deceased may claim in place of what they were left in the decedents will. ... Electoral reform projects seek to change the way that public desires are reflected in elections through electoral systems. ... The first electric chair, which was used to execute William Kemmler in 1890 The electric chair is currently an optional form of execution in the U.S. states of Alabama, South Carolina, and Virginia, and the sole method of execution in Nebraska (the former three states allow the prisoner to... Eleemosynary has a few meanings. ... Look up element in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This French poster depicting the horrific conditions on slave ships was influential in mobilizing public opinion against slavery. ... The Emancipation Proclamation The Emancipation Proclamation was a presidential order in 1863 that freed most (but not all) of the slaves in the United States. ... Embezzlement is the fraudulent conversion of property from a property owner. ... Emblements are annual crops produced by cultivation and are treated as personal property. ... Look up Emergency in Wiktionary, the free dictionary An emergency is a situation that poses an immediate threat to human life or serious damage to property. ... Eminent domain (US), compulsory purchase (United Kingdom, New Zealand, Republic of Ireland), compulsory acquisition (Australia) or expropriation (Canada, South Africa) in common law legal systems is the lawful power of the state to expropriate private property without the owners consent, either for its own use or on behalf of... Emotional distress may refer to: Law of torts: Intentional infliction of emotional distress Negligent infliction of emotional distress Medicine: Stress (medicine) see also List of emotions Category: ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... Vicarious liability is a form of strict, secondary liability that arises under the common law doctrine of agency – respondeat superior – the responsibility of the superior for the acts of their subordinate and can be distinguished from contributory liability, another form of secondary liability, which is rooted in the tort theory... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... An employment contract is an agreement entered into between an employer and an employee at the commencement of the period of employment and stating the exact nature of their business relationship, specifically what compensation the employee will receive in exchange for specific work performed. ... Employment law is the branch of the law that deals with employment related issues. ... En banc or in bank is a term used to refer to the hearing of a case by all the judges of a court. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Inclosure (also commonly enclosure), refers to the process of subdivision of common lands for individual ownership. ... Encroachment is a term which implies advance beyond proper limits, and may have different interpretations depending on the context. ... Encroachment is a term which implies advance beyond proper limits, and may have different interpretations depending on the context. ... An encumbrance is a legal term of art for anything that affects or limits the title of a property, such as mortgages, leases, easements, liens, or restrictions. ... A software license is a type of proprietary or gratiuitious license as well as a memorandum of contract between a producer and a user of computer software — sometimes called an End User License Agreement (EULA) — that specifies the perimeters of the permission granted by the owner to the user. ... Endorsement can refer to: A political endorsement is where a significant individual, group, or business selects, campaigns, or contributes heavily to a political campaign. ... Endowment may refer to many things: Finance Financial endowment; relating to funds or property donated to institutions or individuals. ... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary. ... Under the feudal system, enfeoffment was the deed by which a person was given land in exchange for a pledge of service. ... For the band, see The Police. ... The Bill of Rights 1689 is an English Act of Parliament with the long title An Act Declaring the Rights and Liberties of the Subject and Settling the Succession of the Crown and known colloquially in the UK as the Bill of Rights. ... English law is a formal term of art that describes the law for the time being in force in England and Wales. ... An injunction is an equitable remedy in the form of a court order that either prohibits or compels (enjoins or restrains) a party from continuing a particular activity. ... This article is about an emotion. ... The Enrolled Bill Doctrine is a principle of judicial interpretation of rules of procedure in legislative bodies. ... Entail (from French tailler, to cut; the old derivation from tales haeredes is now abandoned), in law, a limited form of succession (q. ... A judgment or judgement, in a legal context, is synonymous with the formal decision made by a court following legal proceedings. ... Entertainment law or media law is a general term for a mix of more traditional categories of law with a focus on providing legal services to the entertainment industry. ... An entity is something that has a distinct, separate existence, though it need not be a material existence. ... In jurisprudence, entrapment is a procedural defense by which a defendant may argue that they should not be held criminally liable for actions which broke the law, because they were induced (or entrapped) by the police to commit said acts. ... ... A judgment or judgement, in a legal context, is synonymous with the formal decision made by a court following legal proceedings. ... An Environmental Impact Report (EIR) is a document required under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). ... According to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) whenever the U.S. Federal Government takes a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment it must first consider the environmental impact in a document called an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). ... Environmental law is a body of law, which is a system of complex and interlocking statutes, common law, treaties, conventions, regulations and policies which seeks to protect the natural environment which may be affected, impacted or endangered by human activities. ... An Ephebe Kisses A Man Tondo from an Attic kylix, 5th c. ... The Equal Access Act was passed by the US Congress in 1984 to combat discrimination against student religious groups in public high schools. ... Equal opportunity is a descriptive term for an approach intended to give equal access to an environment or to ensure people are not specifically excluded from participating in society, such as education, employment, health care on the basis of immutable traits. ... The Equal Protection Clause is a part of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, providing that no state shall . ... This article is about concept of equity in Anglo-American jurisprudence. ... Division of property also known as equitable distribution of parties which is a judicial division of property rights and obligations between spouses during the process of the dissolution of marriage (divorce). ... Estoppel is a concept that prevents a party from acting in a certain way because it is not equitable to do so. ... A constructive trust is a legal device used by courts sitting in equity to resolve claims raised by a plaintiff whose property has been converted to a profitable use by the defendant. ... For the actors guilds called equity, see Actors Equity Association (U.S.) or British Actors Equity Association (U.K.). For equity as the value of an ownership interest in property, see ownership equity. ... The Court of Chancery, London, early 19th century This article is about concept of equity in Anglo-American jurisprudence. ... The equity of redemption refers to the right of a mortgagor in law to redeem his property once the liability secured by the mortgage has been discharged. ... In mathematics, an equivalence relation on a set X is a binary relation on X that is reflexive, symmetric and transitive, i. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... A row of Concept2 indoor rowers An indoor rower (also known as an ergometer, ergo, erg or rowing machine) is a machine used to simulate the action of rowing on land. ... Look up erratum, corrigendum in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For the baseball concept see error (baseball). ... An escalator clause is a clause in a lease or contract that guarantees an increase in the agreement price once a particular factor that beyond control of either party affecting the value has been determined. ... “Escape Clause” is an episode of the television series The Twilight Zone. ... Escheat is an obstruction of the course of descent and the consequent reversion of property to the original grantor. ... Escrow is a legal arrangement whereby an asset (often money, but sometimes other property such as art, a deed of title, website, or software source code) is delivered to a third party (called an escrow agent) to be held in trust pending a contingency or the fulfillment of a condition... Escrow is a legal arrangement whereby an asset (often money, but sometimes other property such as art, a deed of title, website, or software source code) is delivered to a third party (called an escrow agent) to be held in trust or otherwise pending a contingency or the fulfillment of... Escrow is a legal arrangement whereby an asset (often money, but sometimes other property such as art, a deed of title, website, or software source code) is delivered to a third party (called an escrow agent) to be held in trust or otherwise pending a contingency or the fulfillment of... Espionage is the practice of obtaining information about an organization or a society that is considered secret or confidential (spying) without the permission of the holder of the information. ... Esquire (abbreviated Esq. ... The first ten Amendments to the U.S. Constitution make up the Bill of Rights. ... Estate is a term used in the common law. ... A concurrent estate or co-tenancy is a concept in property law, particularly derived from the common law of real property, which describes the various ways in which property can be owned by more than one person at a given time. ... An estate is the right, interest, or nature of interest, a person has in real property. ... Inheritance tax, also known in some countries outside the United States as a death duty and referred to as an estate tax within the U.S, is a form of tax levied upon the bequest that a person may make in their will to a living person or organisation. ... Estoppel is a legal doctrine proposing that any person who asks the courts to enforce a legal remedy should have a clear conscience. ... Estoppel is an equitable doctrine proposing that any person who asks the courts to enforce a legal remedy should have a clear conscience. ... This page includes English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations such as . ... Look up et cetera in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Et seq, an abbreviation of the Latin phrase et sequentia meaning and the following ones, is a legal term indicating that a writer is citing to a page and the pages that follow. ... ad hoc - for this purpose amicus curiae - friend of the court bona fide - in good faith corpus delicti - body of the crime, i. ... The term ethical calculus, when used generally, refers to any method of determining a course of action in a circumstance that is not explicitly evaluated in ones ethical code. ... In the context of a code adopted by a profession or by a governmental or quasi-governmental organ to regulate that profession, an ethical code may be styled as a code of professional responsibility, which may dispense with difficult issues of what behavior is ethical. Some codes of ethics have... Ethics (from Greek ἦθος meaning custom) is the branch of axiology, one of the four major branches of philosophy, which attempts to understand the nature of morality; to distinguish that which is right from that which is wrong. ... Ethics is a branch of philosophy dealing with right and wrong in human behaviour. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... The Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, also known as the European Convention on Human Rights, was adopted under the auspices of the Council of Europe in 1950 to protect human rights and fundamental freedoms. ... European Court of Human Rights building in Strasbourg The European Court of Human Rights, often referred to informally as the Strasbourg Court, was created to systematise the hearing of human rights complaints from Council of Europe member states. ... The European Court of Justice (ECJ) is formally known as the Court of Justice of the European Communities, i. ... The Convention on the Grant of European Patents of 5 October 1973, commonly known as the European Patent Convention (EPC), is a multilateral treaty instituting the European Patent Organisation and providing an autonomous legal system according to which European patents are granted. ... The European Patent Organisation (EPO or EPOrg in order to distinguish it from the European Patent Office, which is the main organ of the organisation) is a public international organisation set up by the European Patent Convention. ... A European Union Directive is the (mutually binding) collective decision made by the member states, acting through their national Government Ministers in the Council of the European Union and the Parliament. ... A European Union Directive is the (mutually binding) collective decision made by the member states, acting through their national Government Ministers in the Council of the European Union and the Parliament. ... The European Union is unique among international organisations in having a complex and highly developed system of internal law which has direct effect within the legal systems of its member states. ... The legislative acts of the European Union (EU) can have different forms: regulations, directives, decisions, recommendations and opinions. ... The legislative acts of the European Union (EU) can have different forms: regulations, directives, decisions, recommendations and opinions. ... Euthanasia (from Greek: ευθανασία -ευ good, θανατος death) is the practice of ending the life of an individual or an animal who is suffering from a terminal disease or a chronically painful condition in a painless or minimally painful way either by lethal injection, drug overdose, or by the withdrawal of medical support. ... This article contrasts tax evasion, tax avoidance, tax resistance and tax mitigation. ... In law, the Doctrine of Evasion is a fundamental public policy. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The law of evidence governs the use of testimony (e. ... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary. ... In Roman Catholic dogma, the Latin phrase ex cathedra, literally meaning from the throne is applied in Catholic theology to statements made by the pope in his capacity as infallible guide and teacher of the faithful. ... Ex delicto, Latin for from a wrong or from a transgression, is a legal term that indicates a consequence of a tort, though the phrase can also refer to the consequence of a crime. ... Ex facie, Latin for on the face [of it], is a legal term typically used to note that a documents explicit terms are defective without further investigation. ... Ex gratia (sometimes ex-gratia) is Latin and is most often used in a legal context. ... This page includes English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations such as . ... Ex parte is a Latin legal term meaning from (by or for) one party (pronounced ekss par-TAY or ekss par-TEE, although the proper Latin is Eks PAR-teh). An ex parte decision is one decided by a judge without requiring the plaintiff to be present. ... An ex post facto law (Latin for from a thing done afterward), also known as a retrospective law, is a law that is retroactive, i. ... An ex post facto law (from the Latin for from something done afterward) or retroactive law, is a law that retroactively changes the legal consequences of acts committed or the legal status of facts and relationships that existed prior to the enactment of the law. ... Ex proprio motu is legal latin, meaning of ones own accord. Category: ... Ex rel, an abbreviation of the Latin ex relatione meaning by the relation of, is a legal phrase most commonly used when a government brings a cause of action upon the request of a private party who has some interest in the matter. ... To examine somebody or something is to inspect it closely, hence an examination is a detailed inspection or analysis of an object or person. ... Exception may refer to: structured exception exception handling in computer programming a formal objection in legal cases an action that is not part of normal operations or standards Look up Exception in Wiktionary, the free dictionary This is a disambiguation page—a list of articles associated with the same title. ... The term excise has more than one legal meaning. ... In United States constitutional law, the exclusionary rule is a legal principle holding that evidence collected or analyzed in violation of the U.S. Constitution is inadmissible for a criminal prosecution in a court of law (that is, it cannot be used in a criminal trial). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Exculpatory evidence is the evidence favorable to the defendant in a criminal trial, which clears or tends to clear the defendant of guilt. ... In jurisprudence, an excuse or justification is a form of immunity which must be distinguished from an exculpation. ... An execution warrant is a warrant which authorizes the execution or capital punishment of an individual. ... A judicial executioner is a person who carries out a death sentence ordered by the state or other legal authority, which was known in feudal terminology as high justice. ... An executive order is an edict issued by a member of the executive branch of a government, usually the head of that branch. ... Executive privilege is a claim asserted by the President of the United States and other members of the executive branch to justify withholding of documents and information from other branches of government. ... An executor is a person named by a maker of a will to carry out the directions of the will. ... In property law and real estate, a future interest is an interest in property that does not include the right to present possession or enjoyment of the property. ... An executrix is a female executor, which is a person named by a maker of a will to carry out the directions of the will. ... This article discusses textual hermeneutics. ... Generally, punitive damages, which are termed exemplary damages in the United Kingdom, are damages not awarded in order to compensate the plaintiff, but in order to reform or deter the defendant and similar persons from pursuing a course of action such as that which damaged the plaintiff. ... This page lists English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations, such as and . ... An exemption is a rule or law which excepts certain things from another rule or law. ... Exempt property, under the law of property in many jurisdictions, is property that can neither be passed by will nor claimed by creditors of the deceased in the event that a decedant leaves a surviving spouse or surviving descendants. ... An exemption is a rule or law which excepts certain things from another rule or law. ... Look up exhibit in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Exigent Circumstances is a term in American Law. ... EXILE is a 6-member Japanese pop music band. ... In accounting, an expense represents an event in which an asset is used up or a liability is incurred. ... Expert determination is a historically accepted form of dispute resolution invoked when there isnt a formulated dispute in which the parties have defined positions that need to be subjected to arbitration, but rather both parties are in agreement that there is a need for an evaluation, e. ... An expert witness is a witness, who by virtue of education, or profession, or experience, is believed to have special knowledge of his subject beyond that of the average person, sufficient that others may officially (and legally) rely his opinion. ... An expert witness is a witness, who by virtue of education, or profession, or experience, is believed to have special knowledge of his subject beyond that of the average person, sufficient that others may officially (and legally) rely upon his opinion. ... A contract is any promise or set of promises made by one party to another for the breach of which the law provides a remedy. ... In business law, a warranty is a promise that something sold is in good condition. ... Expropriation is the act of removing from control the owner of an item of property. ... In metaphysics, extension is the property of taking up space; see Extension (metaphysics). ... This expression is used in law with reference to crimes, to describe cases in which, though an offence has been committed without legal justification or excuse, its gravity, from the point of view of punishment or moral opprobrium, is mitigated or reduced by reason of the facts leading up to... Extortion is a criminal offense, which occurs when a person obtains money, behaviour, or other goods and/or services from another by wrongfully threatening or inflicting harm to this person, reputation, or property. ... Extradition is a formal process by which a criminal suspect held by one government is handed over to another government for trial or, if the suspect has already been tried and found guilty, to serve his or her sentence. ... Extrajudicial execution and extrajudicial punishment are terms to describe death sentences and other types of punishment, respectively, executed without prior proper judicial procedure. ... An Extraordinary General Meeting, commonly abbreviated as EGM, is a meeting of members of an organisation, shareholders of a company, or employees of an offical body, which occurs at an irregular time. ... An extraordinary resolution (referred to in some countries as a special resolution[1]) is a resolution passed by the shareholders of a company by a greater majority than is required to pass an ordinary resolution. ... Eyewitness may refer to the following: For the TV show, Eyewitness (TV) For the movie, Eyewitness (movie) For the court system type of eye witness, witness For the nonfiction book series, Eyewitness (books) For the WW1 writer pseudonym, see Ernest Dunlop Swinton This is a disambiguation page: a list of...


F

Face amount -- Face value -- Faciendum -- Fact -- Factor -- Factum -- Faculty of law -- Failure of consideration -- Failure of issue -- Fair comment -- Fair dealing -- Fair market value -- Fair trade laws -- Fair use -- Fairness Doctrine -- False arrest -- False Claims Law -- False imprisonment -- False pretenses -- Family -- Family division -- Family court -- Family law -- Family patrimony -- Family purpose doctrine -- Fast track -- Fatwa -- Fault auto insurance system -- Federal Communications Commission -- Federal Constitutional Court (Germany) -- Federal courts -- Federal judge -- Federal jurisdiction -- Federal law -- Federal question -- Federal tort claims act -- Federalism -- Fee -- Fee simple -- Fee tail -- Felicific calculus -- Felon -- Felonious -- Felony -- Felony murder doctrine -- Feme covert -- Feoff -- Feoffee -- Feoffment -- Fertile octogenarian -- Feud -- Feudal land tenure -- Feudal system -- Feudalism -- Fiat -- Fictitious defendants -- fiduciary -- Fiduciary duty -- Fiduciary relationship -- Fief -- Fieri -- fieri facias -- Fighting words -- File -- Final decree -- Final judgment -- Final settlement -- Finder of fact -- Finding -- Findings of fact -- Fine -- Fiqh -- Firm offer -- First degree murder -- First impression -- First tier -- First to file and first to invent -- Fixture -- Fixtures -- Flight -- Floating charge -- Floating easement -- FOB -- Folkways -- For value received -- Forbearance -- Force majeure -- Forced sale -- Forcible entry -- Foreclosure -- Foreclosure sale -- Foreign corporation -- Forensic -- Forensic medicine -- Forensic testimony -- Forensics -- Foreseeability -- Foreseeable risk -- Forfeit -- Forfeiture -- Forger -- Forgery -- Formal contract -- Fornication -- Forthwith -- forum conveniens -- forum non conveniens -- Forum shopping -- Foster child -- Foundation -- Four Cardinal Virtues -- Four corners of an instrument -- Franc-tireur -- Franchise -- Franchise tax -- Franchising -- Fraud -- Fraud in the inducement -- Fraudulent conveyance -- Free and clear -- Free economic zone -- Free on board -- Free port -- Free software license -- Free speech -- Free will -- Freedom of assembly -- Freedom of association -- Freedom of expression -- Freedom of Information Act -- Freedom of religion -- Freedom of speech -- Freedom of speech (Canada) -- Freedom of the press -- Freedom of thought -- Freehold -- French law on secularity and conspicuous religious symbols in schools -- Fresh pursuit -- Friendly suit -- Frisk -- Frivolous -- Frivolous lawsuit -- Fructus naturales -- Fruit of the poisonous tree -- Frustration of purpose -- Fugitive from justice -- Full disclosure -- Full faith and credit -- Fully paid -- functus officio -- Fundamental justice -- Fundamentalism -- Fungible things -- Future interest -- Futuwa -- Fyrd -- Face value is the value of a coin or paper money, as printed on the coin or bill itself by the minting authority. ... Face Value is the title of Phil Collins debut solo album, released in February of 1981. ... Faciendum is an English term derived from Latin, meaning something to do or something that must be done. ... Look up fact in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A factor can be: a person acting for another as a mercantile and/or colonial agent, or, in Scotland, a Factor is a person or firm managing property on behalf of the owner; in mathematics, a multiplicative factor is a synonym for coefficient a number that is a divisor of... Brief redirects here. ... Faculty of law is another name for a law school or school of law, the terms commonly used in the United States. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Consideration under English law. ... In property law, a failure of issue is a situation in which a property-holder dies without leaving children who could have inherited their property. ... Fair comment is a legal term for a common law defense in defamation cases (libel or slander). ... Fair dealing is a doctrine of limitations and exceptions to copyright which is found in many of the common law jurisdictions of the Commonwealth of Nations. ... Fair Market Value is a term in both law and accounting to describe an appraisal based on an estimate of what a buyer would pay a seller for any piece of property, assuming neither the seller nor the buyer is under any compulsion to complete such a transaction, and that... A fair trade law was a statue that permitted manufacturers the right to specify the minimum retail price of a commodity. ... Fair use is a doctrine in United States copyright law that allows limited use of copyrighted material without requiring permission from the rights holders, such as use for scholarship or review. ... The Fairness Doctrine is a former policy of the United Statess Federal Communications Commission. ... False arrest is a common law tort, where a plaintiff alleges he or she was held in custody without reasonable cause or an order issued by a court of appropriate jurisdiction. ... In the United States, the False Claims Act (based on the Federal False Claims Act 31 U.S.C. 3729 et seq. ... False Imprisonment is a common law tort, and possibly a misdemeanor crime, wherein a person is intentionally confined without legal authority. ... False pretenses is a common law crime. ... A family of Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso in 1997 A family consists of a domestic group of people (or a number of domestic groups), typically affiliated by birth or marriage, or by comparable legal relationships — including domestic partnership, adoption, surname and (in some cases) ownership (as occurred in the Roman Empire). ... Her Majestys High Court of Justice (usually known more simply as the High Court) is, together with the Crown Court and the Court of Appeal, part of the Supreme Court of Judicature of England and Wales (which under the Constitutional Reform Act 2005, is to be known as the... A family court is a court convened in the UK to make orders in respect of childrens residence. ... Family Law was a television drama starring Kathleen Quinlan as a divorced lawyer who attempted to start her own law firm after her lawyer husband took all their old clients. ... Family patrimony is a type of civil law patrimony that is created by marriage or civil union (where recognized) which creates a bundle of entitlements and obligations that must be shared by the spouses or partners upon divorce, annulment, dissolution of marriage or dissolution of civil union, when there must... In law, the family purpose doctrine is a rule that states that the owner of an automobile is liable for damages to others incurred while members of his family are driving the vehicle, under the theory that the vehicle is owned for family purposes. ... Fast track gives the President of the United States authority to negotiate trade agreements that cannot be amended by Congress, only voted on yes or no. ... A fatwa (Arabic: ) plural fatāwa , is a legal pronouncement in Islam, issued by a religious law specialist on a specific issue. ... No-fault insurance is a type of automobile insurance where an insured need only prove that they were injured in an automobile accident (either damage to persons or damage to property) to recover under the policy. ... The FCCs official seal. ... The Federal Constitutional Court (in German: Bundesverfassungsgericht) is a special court established by the German constitution, the Grundgesetz (Basic Law). ... The term federal court, when used by itself, can refer to: Any court of the national government in another country that has a federal system such as that of the United States (United States federal courts) or Mexico In some countries, a particular court, for example, the Federal Court of... A federal judge is a judge appointed in accordance with Article III of the United States Constitution. ... Key concepts in general federal law in the USA (other countries using a federal system differ), at all court levels, include standing and the Case or Controversy Requirement. ... Federal law is the body of law created by the federal government of a nation. ... Federal question jurisdiction is a term used in the United States law of civil procedure to refer to the situation in which a United States federal court has subject matter jurisdiction to hear a civil case because the plaintiff has alleged a violation of the Constitution, laws, or treaties of... The Federal Tort Claims Act, 28 U.S.C. 2680(h) (FTCA), is a statute enacted by the United States Congress in 1946 which permits private parties to sue the United States in a federal court for most torts committed by persons acting on behalf of the U.S. Liability... Federalism is the idea of a group or body of members that are bound together (latin: foedus, covenant) with a governing representative head. ... One pays a fee as renumeration for services, especially the honorarium paid to a doctor, lawyer or member of a learned profession. ... Fee simple, also known as fee simple absolute or allodial, is a term of art in common law. ... Fee tail is an obsolescent term of art in common law. ... The felicific calculus was an algorithm formulated by Jeremy Bentham for calculating the degree or amount of happiness that a specific action is likely to cause, and hence its degree of moral rightness. ... A felony, in many common law legal systems, is the term for a very serious crime; misdemeanors are considered to be less serious. ... A felony, in many common law legal systems, is the term for a very serious crime, whereas misdemeanors are considered to be less serious offenses. ... The felony murder rule, adopted by a number of jurisdictions, is a legal doctrine according to which anyone who commits, or is found to be involved in, a serious crime (a felony), during which any person dies, is guilty of murder. ... A feme covert was considered a married woman, versus a feme sole, an unmarried woman. ... Under the system of feudalism, a fiefdom, fief, feud, feoff, or fee, often consisted of heritable lands or revenue-producing property granted by a liege lord in return for a form of allegiance, originally often to give him the means to fulfill his military duties when called upon. ... Feoffee, or more correctly within this context feoffee to uses, is a historical term relating to the law of trusts and equity, referring to the owner of a legal title of a property when he is not the equitable owner. ... Under the system of feudalism, a fiefdom, fief, feud or fee, consisted of heritable lands or revenue-producing property granted by a liege lord in return for a vassal knights service— usually fealty, military service, or security. ... The fertile octogenarian rule and the unborn widow rule are two concepts from the law of real property commonly used to examine the empirically unreasonable consequences of the rule against perpetuities. ... A feud is a long-running argument or fight between parties—often groups of people, especially families or clans. ... For the area of Sheffield, in England, see Manor, Sheffield. ... Feudalism comes from the Late Latin word feudum, itself borrowed from a Germanic root *fehu, a commonly used term in the Middle Ages which means fief, or land held under certain obligations by feodati. ... Roland pledges his fealty to Charlemagne; from a manuscript of a chanson de geste. ... FIAT Group, or Fiat S.p. ... Fictitious defendants are real persons a plaintiff believes it has a cause of action against in a lawsuit who, for one reason or another, cannot be identified by the plaintiff before a lawsuit is commenced. ... The court of chancery, which governed fiduciary relations prior to the Judicature Acts The fiduciary duty is a legal relationship between two or more parties, most commonly a fiduciary or trustee and a principal or beneficiary, that in English common law is arguably the most important concept within the portion... A fiduciary is a person who occupies a position of trust in relation to someone else such that he is required to act for the latters benefit within the scope of that relationship. ... A fiduciary is a person who occupies a position of trust in relation to someone else such that he is required to act for the latters benefit within the scope of that relationship. ... Under the system of feudalism, a fiefdom, fief, feud or fee, consisted of heritable lands or revenue-producing property granted by a liege lord in return for a vassal knights service (usually fealty, military service, and security). ... Fier (Albanian: Fier or Fieri) is a city in southwest Albania, in the district and county with the same name. ... Fieri facias, usually abbreviated ft. ... The fighting words doctrine, in United States constitutional law, is a limitation to freedom of speech as granted in the First Amendment to the United States Constitution In its 9-0 decision, Chaplinsky v. ... File has several meanings: Computer file File (tool) file (Unix), a program used to determine file types. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... In Christian eschatology, the Last Judgment or Judgement Day is the ethical-judicial trial, judgment, and punishment/reward of individual humans (assignment to heaven or to hell) by a divine tribunal at the end of time, following the destruction of humans present earthly existence. ... A Final Settlement is an agreement reached by the parties to a lawsuit, usually in writing and/or read into the record in court, settling all issues. ... A trier of fact is the person or group of persons in a trial who make findings of fact as opposed to rulings of law. ... A finding of fact is a determination on the evidence regarding a issue of fact raised by one party to case made by the fact finder, usually a judge or a jury. ... A fine is money paid as a financial punishment for the commission of minor crimes or as the settlement of a claim. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A firm offer is an offer defined by UCC 2-205 of the Uniform Commercial Code of the United States. ... Murder is both a legal and a moral term, that are not always coincident. ... A case of first impression is a case or controversy over an interpretation of law never before reported or decided by that court. ... First to file and first to invent are legal concepts that define who has the right to the grant of a patent for an invention. ... In the law of real property, fixtures are anything that would otherwise be a chattel that have, by reason of incorporation or affixation, become permanently attached to the real property. ... In the law of real property, fixtures are anything that would otherwise be a chattel that have, by reason of incorporation or affixation, become permanently attached to the real property. ... Flight is the process of flying: either movement through the air by aerodynamically generating lift or aerostatically using buoyancy, or movement beyond earths atmosphere by spacecraft. ... A floating charge is a form of security (i. ... A key fob is a chain used to secure a pocket watch to an article of clothing, or any ornament that hangs from such a chain. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Force majeure (French for greater force) is a common clause in contracts which essentially frees one or both parties from liabilities when an extraordinary event beyond the control of the parties, such as flood, war, riot, act of God, prevents one or both parties from fulfilling their obligations under the... Forcible entry is the act of entering a house or building with destructive methods. ... Foreclosure is the legal proceeding in which a bank or other secured creditor sells or repossesses a piece of real property (immovable property) due to the owners failure to comply on its promissory note. ... Foreclosure is the legal proceeding in which a bank or other secured creditor sells or repossesses a parcel of real property (immovable property) due to the owners failure to comply with an agreement between the lender and borrower called a mortgage or deed of trust. Commonly, the violation of... Forensics or forensic science is the application of science to questions which are of interest to the legal system. ... Forensics or forensic science is the application of science to questions which are of interest to the legal system. ... Forensic science (often shortened to forensics) is the application of a broad spectrum of sciences to answer questions of interest to the legal system. ... Forfeiting is the act of voluntarily admitting defeat in a competition or contest, thereby surrendering victory to the opposition. ... Search and seizure is a legal tool whereby police who suspect that a crime has been committed may do a search of the property. ... Forgery is the process of making or adapting objects or documents (see false document), with the intention to deceive (fraud is the use of objects obtained through forgery). ... Forgery is the process of making or adapting objects or documents (see false document), with the intention to deceive. ... A formal contract is a contract where the parties have attempted to spell out all the terms, while an informal contract is one where the parties have not attempted to spell out all the terms. ... Fornication refers to any sexual activity between unmarried partners. ... Forum non conveniens is a legal doctrine used by common law courts determine issues of jurisdiction, particularly with regard to foreign judgments and foreign court proceedings. ... Forum non conveniens is Latin for inconvenient forum or inappropriate forum. ... Forum shopping is the informal name given to the practice adopted by some plaintiffs to get their legal case heard in the court thought most likely to provide a favourable judgment, or by some defendants who seek to have the case moved to a different court. ... Foster care is a system by which adults care for minor children who are not able to live with their biological parents. ... Virtue (Greek αρετη; Latin virtus) is the habitual, well-established, readiness or diposition of mans powers directing them to some goodness of act. ... Franc-tireur is an informal term for an armed fighter who, if captured, is not entitled to prisoner of war status. ... Meanings of franchise: Full rights of citizenship given by a country or a town, especially suffrage (political franchise) In a wider sense: any right or privilege granted by constitution or statute. ... Franchise tax is a tax charged by some US states to corporations formed in those states based on the number of shares they issue or, in some cases, the amount of their assets. ... Franchising (from the French for free) is a method of doing business wherein a franchisor licenses trademarks and tried and proven methods of doing business to a franchisee in exchange for a recurring payment, and usually a percentage piece of gross sales or gross profits as well as the annual... The illegal transfer of property to another party in order to defer, hinder or defraud creditors. ... Many countries have, or have had at some time, designated areas where companies are taxed very lightly or not at all to encourage development or for some other reason. ... Free on Board (FOB) is an Incoterm. ... A free port (porto franco) or free zone (US: Foreign-Trade Zone) is a port or area with relaxed jurisdiction with respect to the country of location. ... Generally speaking, free software license is a phrase used by the free software movement to mean any software license that meets the free software definition of the Free Software Foundation (FSF). ... Freedom of speech is the right to freely say what one pleases, as well as the related right to hear what others have stated. ... Free will is the philosophical doctrine that holds that our choices are ultimately up to ourselves. ... Freedom of assembly is the freedom to associate with, or organize any groups, gatherings, clubs, or organizations that one wishes. ... Freedom of association is the right enjoyed by free adults to mutually choose their associates for whatever purposes they see fit. ... Freedom of speech is the right to freely say what one pleases, as well as the related right to hear what others have stated. ... Nearly sixty countries around the world have implemented some form of freedom of information legislation, which sets rules on governmental secrecy. ... The Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen guarantees freedom of religion, as long as religious activities do not infringe on public order in ways detrimental to society. ... A public demonstration Freedom of speech is the concept of being able to speak freely without censorship. ... Freedom of speech is the right to freely say what one pleases, as well as the related right to hear what others have stated. ... Freedom of the press (or press freedom) is the guarantee by a government of free public press for its citizens and their associations, extended to members of news gathering organizations, and their published reporting. ... Freedom of thought (also called freedom of conscience and freedom of ideas) is the freedom of an individual to hold or consider a fact, viewpoint, or thought, regardless of anyone elses view. ... Freehold is a term used in real estate or real property law, land held in fee simple, as opposed to leasehold, which is land which is leased. ... It has been suggested that Islamic veil controversy in France be merged into this article or section. ... United States In the United States, a friendly suit is most often used when two parties desire or require judicial recognition of a settlement agreement, and so one sues the other despite the lack of conflict between them. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... In courts, a defense or claim is termed frivolous if it is presented in spite of the fact that both the party and the partys attorney knew that it had no merit and it did not argue for a reasonable extension or reinterpretation of the law or no underlying... In property law, fructus naturales are the natural fruits of the land on which they arise, such as agricultural produce and wild game. ... Fruit of the poisonous tree is a legal term in the United States used to describe evidence gathered with the aid of information obtained illegally. ... Frustration of purpose is a term used in the law of contracts to describe a defense to an action for non-performance based on the occurance of an unforseen event which makes performance impossible or commercially impracticable. ... A fugitive is a person who is fleeing from legal custody, whether it be from an arrest to someone who is sought for questioning. ... Full Disclosure is an Thriller with the Megastar Fred Ward. ... Full faith and credit is mutual understanding between courts of the 50 states of the United States to recognize, honor and enforce each others actions. ... Functus officio, Latin for having performed his office, is a legal term used to indicate that a public official, court, governing body, or statute retains no legal authority because his or its duties and functions have been completed. ... Fundamental justice is a term in Canadian administrative law that signifies those basic procedural rights that are afforded anyone or anybody facing an adjudicative process or procedure that affects fundamental rights. ... In comparative religion, fundamentalism has come to refer to several different understandings of religious thought and practice, through literal interpretation of religious texts such as the Bible or the Quran and sometimes also anti-modernist movements in various religions. ... Fungibility is a measure of how easily one good may be exchanged or substituted for another example of the same good at equal value. ... In property law and real estate, a future interest - is an interest that accompanies a defeasible estate. ... Futuwa (sometimes translated as courage, chivalry or manliness) is a name of Sufi Islamic virtue that has some similarities to chivalry and charity. ... In Saxon times, defenses were based upon the housecarls, who were the professional soldiers of the king, and the fyrd, a militia of all able-bodied men that was called up from the districts threatened with attack. ...


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Gag order -- Gallows -- Gaps and gores -- Garnish -- Garnishee -- Garnishment -- Gas chamber -- Gasoline tax -- Gemara -- Gender bias -- General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade -- General appearance -- General Counsel -- General damages -- General denial -- General meeting -- General order -- General partner -- General plan -- General strike -- General Synod -- Generation skipping -- Geneva Conventions -- Genocide -- German town law -- Gibbet -- Gift -- Gift in contemplation of death -- Gift tax -- Glasnost -- Go bail -- Going concern -- Good cause -- Good faith -- Good governance -- Good samaritan rule -- Good title -- Goods -- Goodwill -- Goseibai Shikimoku -- Government -- Government-granted monopoly -- Governmental immunity -- Grace period -- Grand Inquisitor -- Grand jury -- Grand larceny -- Grand theft -- Grandfather clause -- Grandfathered in -- Grandparent visitation -- Grant -- Grant deed -- Grantee -- Grantor -- Grantor-grantee index -- Gratuitous -- gravamen -- Green card -- Grievance procedure -- Gross income -- Gross negligence -- Grounds for divorce -- Group Litigation Order -- Guanxi -- Guarantee -- Guarantees -- Guarantor -- Guaranty -- Guardian -- Guardian ad litem -- Guest -- Guest statute -- Guild -- Guillotine -- Guilt -- Guilty -- A gag order is an order, sometimes a legal order by a court or government, other times a private order by an employer or other institution, restricting information or comment from being made public. ... These gallows in Tombstone Courthouse State Historic Park are maintained by Arizona State Parks. ... A garnish is a substance used primarily as an embellishment or decoration to a prepared food or drink item. ... A garnishment is a means of collecting a monetary judgment against a defendant by ordering a third party (the garnishee) to pay money, otherwise owed to the defendant, directly to the plaintiff. ... A garnishment is a means of collecting a judgment for money in which some third person (the garnishee) is ordered to pay money to the plaintiff which the garnishee owes to the defendant. ... The gas chamber once used at San Quentin State Prison in California for the purpose of capital punishment. ... A gasoline tax (also known as a gas tax, petrol tax, fuel tax or fuel duty) is a sales tax imposed on the sale of gasoline. ... The Gemara (גמרא - from gamar: Hebrew [to] complete; Aramaic [to] study) is a component of the Talmud, comprising the rabbinical commentaries and analysis on the Mishnah, undertaken in the Academies of Palestine and Babylon over a 300 year period to about 500. ... The sign of the headquarters of the National Association Opposed To Woman Suffrage Sexism is commonly considered to be discrimination and/or hatred against people based on their sex rather than their individual merits, but can also refer to any and all systemic differentiations based on the sex of the... General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (typically abbreviated GATT) functioned as the precursor to the World Trade Organization. ... A special appearance is a term used in the United States law of civil procedure to describe a civil defendants appearance in the court of another state solely to dispute the personal jurisdiction of the court over that defendant. ... A General Counsel is the chief lawyer of a legal department, usually in a corporation or government department. ... Damages, in law has two different meanings. ... In pleading, a general denial is a denial that relates to all allegations which are not otherwise pleaded to. ... A General meeting is a meeting of an organisation which the generality of its members are entitled or encouraged to attend. ... In militaries, a general order is a published directive, originated by a commander, and binding upon all personnel under his command, the purpose of which is to enforce a policy or procedure unique to his units situation which is not otherwise addressed in applicable service regulations, military law, or... A general strike is a strike action by an entire labour force in a city, region or country. ... The General Synod is the title of the governing body of some church organizations. ... Development of the Geneva Conventions from 1864 to 1949 The Geneva Conventions consist of four treaties formulated in Geneva, Switzerland, that set the standards for international law for humanitarian concerns. ... Genocide is defined by the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (CPPCG) Article 2 as any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnic, racial or religious group, as such: Killing members of the group; Causing... German town law (German: ) or German municipal concerns (Deutsches Städtewesen) refers to town privileges used by many cities, towns, and villages throughout Central and Eastern Europe during the Middle Ages. ... Gibbet is a term applied to several different devices used in the capital punishment of criminals and/or the deterrence of potential criminals. ... giFT stands for giFT: Internet File Transfer. ... Inheritance tax, also known in some countries outside the United States as a death duty and referred to as an estate tax within the U.S, is a form of tax levied upon the bequest that a person may make in their will to a living person or organisation. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A Going Concern is a business that functions without the intention or threat of liquidation for the forseeable future. ... Good faith, or in Latin bona fides, is the mental and moral state of honesty, conviction as to the truth or falsehood of a proposition or body of opinion, or as to the rectitude or depravity of a line of conduct, even if the conviction is objectively unfounded. ... The terms governance and good governance are being increasingly used in development literature. ... The Good Samaritan. From a collection of public domain Christian clip art. ... Good title is a concept in property law. ... A good in economics is any physical object (natural or man-made) or service that, upon consumption, increases utility, and therefore can be sold at a price in a market. ... Goodwill means simply to have the will to do good in a community, or, to simply try to help people who are in need (for example, serving at a soup kitchen or at a homeless shelter). ... The Goseibai Shikimoku (御成敗式目) or the Formulary of Adjudications was the legal law of the Kamakura shogunate in Japan, promulgated by third shikken Hojo Yasutoki in 1232. ... In economics, a government-granted monopoly (also called a de jure monopoly) is a form of coercive monopoly in a government grants exclusive privilege to a private individual or firm to be the sole provider of a good or service; potential competitors are excluded from the market by law, regulation... Sovereign immunity or crown immunity is a type of immunity that in common law jurisdictions traces its origins from early English law. ... In law, a grace period is a period of time during which a particular rule exceptionally does not apply, or only partially applies. ... Grand Inquisitor (Latin: Inquisitor Generalis) is the lead official of an Inquisition. ... A grand jury is a type of common law jury responsible for investigating alleged crimes, examining evidence, and issuing indictments if they believe that there is enough evidence for a trial to proceed. ... Larceny is a crime involving stealing. ... Grand theft is a felony crime in the United States defined as the theft of objects exceeding a certain monetary value, as set by statute or court ruling. ... In American English, a grandfather clause, or grandfather rule, is an exception that allows an old rule to continue to apply to some existing situations, when a new rule will apply instead in all future situations. ... A grandfather clause is an exception, originating from the United States, that allows a pre-existing rule to remain as it is despite a change in the rules applied to newer situations. ... Grandparent visitation. ... Grant may refer to. ... This is a list of legal terms, often from Latin: A mensa et thoro A mensa et thoro, from bed and board. ... This is a list of legal terms, often from Latin: A mensa et thoro A mensa et thoro, from bed and board. ... A grantor-grantee index is a list of real property transfers maintained in alphabetical order of the last name of the seller (grantor). ... Gravamen (from Lat. ... A United States Permanent Resident Card, also known popularly as Green Card, is an identification card for a permanent resident of the United States of America who does not have U.S. citizenship. ... == Is the amount of a companys revenue after deducting cost of goods sold. ... Manufacturers are reponsible for adequately warning consumers of possibly dangerous products. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... In English law, a Group Litigation Order (abbreviated to GLO) is a legal process by which several sets of related proceedings are heard together as one action. ... Guanxi (Traditional Chinese: 關係; Simplified Chinese: 关系; Hanyu Pinyin: gÅ«an xi ), describes the basic dynamic in personalised networks of influence. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... A contract is any legally-enforceable promise or set of promises made by one party to another and, as such, reflects the policies represented by freedom of contract. ... A contract is a promise or an agreement that is enforced or recognized by the law. ... A surety is a person who agrees to be responsible for the debt or obligation of another. ... Several newspapers go by the name of Guardian: The Guardian, a British newspaper founded in 1821 as the Manchester Guardian, which took its current title in 1959. ... A legal guardian is a person who has the legal authority (and the corresponding duty) to care for the personal and property interests of another person, called a ward. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... A guest statute is a term used in the law of torts to describe a statute that makes it more difficult for a passenger in an automobile to recover damages from the driver for injuries received in an accident resulting from ordinary negligence on the part of the driver. ... A guild is an association of people of the same trade or pursuits (with a similar skill or craft), formed to protect mutual interests and maintain standards of morality or conduct. ... The Maiden, an older Scottish design. ... Guilt is primarily an emotion experienced by people who believe they have done something wrong. ... Guilt is primarily an emotion experienced by people who believe they have done something wrong. ...


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habeas corpus -- Writ of Habeas Corpus -- Habitable -- Habitual criminal -- Hadith -- Hague Convention -- Hague-Visby Rules -- Halaal -- Halakha (Jewish law) -- Jewish law (Halakha) -- Half blood -- Halsbury's Laws of England -- Hanafi -- Hanbali -- Hanging -- Haram -- Harass -- Harassment -- Harm reduction -- Harmless error -- Hate speech -- Head of household -- Headnote -- Headright -- Health care proxy -- Hearing -- Hearsay -- Hearsay rule -- Heat of passion -- Heir -- Heir apparent -- Heiress -- Heirs -- Heirs of the body -- Held -- Hereditament -- Heresy -- Hidden asset -- High court judge -- High Court of Australia -- Royal High Court of Bhutan -- High Court of Justice (England and Wales) -- Court of High Commission (ecclesiastical court in England) -- High Court (Fiji) -- High Court (Guyana) -- High Court (Hong Kong) -- High Courts of India, several courts -- High Court (Ireland) -- High Court (Isle of Man) -- High Court of Malaya -- High Court of New Zealand -- High Court of Cassation and Justice (Romania) -- High Court of Justiciary (Scotland) -- High Court of Sabah and Sarawak -- High Court of Singapore -- High Court of South Africa -- High Court (Sweden) -- Highway -- Highwayman -- Hima -- Hit and run -- Hobby loss -- Hold harmless -- Holder -- Holder in due course -- Holding -- Holding company -- Holdover tenancy -- Holographic will -- Home Rule -- Home Secretary -- Homestead -- Homestead -- Hometowned -- Homicide -- Hong Kong trademark law -- Hornbook law -- Hostile environment sexual harassment -- Hostile possession -- Hostile witness -- Hot pursuit -- Hotch-pot -- House counsel -- House of Lords -- Household -- Housing tenure -- Human rights -- Human Rights Committee -- Human rights issues in the United States -- Humanism -- Hung jury -- Hypothecate -- For other uses, see Habeas corpus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Habeas corpus (disambiguation). ... Recidivism is the act of a person repeating an undesirable behavior after they have either experienced negative consequences of that behavior, or have been treated or trained to extinguish that behavior. ... Hadith (Arabic: ‎ translit: ) are traditions relating to the words and deeds of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. ... The longtime status of Netherlands as a largely neutral nation in international conflicts and the corresponding ascendance of The Hague as a primary location for diplomatic and international conferences has led to several negotiated conventions over the years being termed the Hague Convention: The Hague Conventions of 1899 and 1907... Halaal (حلال, halāl, halal) is an Islamic Arabic term meaning permissible. In English it is most frequently used to refer to food that is permissible according to Islamic law. ... Halakha (Hebrew: הלכה; also transliterated as Halakhah, Halacha, Halakhot and Halachah) is the collective corpus of Jewish religious law, including biblical law (the 613 mitzvot) and later talmudic and rabbinic law as well as customs and traditions. ... Halakha (Hebrew: הלכה; also transliterated as Halakhah, Halacha, Halakhot and Halachah) is the collective corpus of Jewish religious law, including biblical law (the 613 mitzvot) and later talmudic and rabbinic law as well as customs and traditions. ... This article describes magic in the fictional Harry Potter universe. ... Halsburys Laws of England (also known as Halsburys Laws or simply Halsburys) is a definitive encyclopedic treatise on the laws of England. ... Hanafi (Arabic: حنفى ) is one of the four schools (madhabs) of jurisprudence (Fiqh) or religious law within Sunni Islam. ... Hambali is the nom de guerre of Indonesian terrorist Riduan Isamuddin. ... Suicide by hanging. ... Haraam (harām) (Arabic: حرام ) is an Arabic word, used in Islam to refer to anything that is prohibited by the faith. ... Harassment refers to a wide spectrum of offensive behavior. ... Harassment refers to a wide spectrum of offensive behavior. ... Harm reduction is a philosophy of public health intended to be a progressive alternative to the prohibition of certain lifestyle choices. ... A harmless error is a mistaken evidentiary ruling of a trial judge that, although clearly mistaken, does not meet the burden for a losing party to reverse the original decision of the trier of fact on appeal, or to warrant a new trial. ... Hate speech is a controversial term for speech intended to degrade, intimidate, or incite violence or prejudicial action against a group of people based on their race, gender, age, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, or disability. ... A headnote is a brief summary of a particular point of law that is added to the text of a court decision to aid readers in interpreting the highlights of an opinion. ... A headright is a legal grant of land, usually to settlers moving in to an uninhabited area. ... In law, a hearing is a proceeding before a court or other decisionmaking body or officer. ... Hearsay in its most general and oldest meaning is a term used in the law of evidence to describe an out of court statement offered to establish the facts asserted in that statement. ... Hearsay in its most general and oldest meaning is a term used in the law of evidence to describe an out of court statement offered to establish the facts asserted in that statement. ... For other uses, see inheritance (disambiguation). ... Contrasting with heir presumptive, an heir apparent is one who cannot be prevented from inheriting by the birth of any other person. ... For other uses, see inheritance (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see inheritance (disambiguation). ... The legal principle that certain types of property passes to the heirs of the grantees body means that each successive heir succeeds upon the death of their predeceasor, and the property passes only to someone who is the descendant of the otiginal grantee. ... A judgment or judgement (see spelling note below), in a legal context, is synonymous with the formal decision made by a court following a lawsuit. ... Hereditament (from Lat. ... Heresy, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, is a theological or religious opinion or doctrine maintained in opposition, or held to be contrary, to the Catholic or Orthodox doctrine of the Christian Church, or, by extension, to that of any church, creed, or religious system, considered as orthodox. ... A judge or justice is an appointed or elected official who presides over a court. ... High Court entrance The High Court of Australia is the final court of appeal in Australia, the highest court in the Australian court hierarchy. ... The Royal High Court of Bhutan is apex court of Bhutan. ... Her Majestys High Court of Justice (usually known more simply as the High Court) is, together with the Crown Court and the Court of Appeal, part of the Supreme Court of England and Wales: see Courts of England and Wales. ... The Court of High Commission was the supreme ecclesiastical court in England. ... The High Court of Fiji is independent of the legislative and executive branches of the acting government. ... The High Court of Hong Kong was part of the English legal system and a lower court under the Supreme Court. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The High Court (Irish: An Ard-Chúirt) of the Republic of Ireland is a court which deals at first instance with the most serious and important civil and criminal cases, and also acts as a court of appeal for civil cases in the Circuit Court. ... This article concerns the Courts of Malaysia Malaysia is a federation of thirteen states, but judicial power in the Federation is almost exclusively vested in a federal court system. ... The High Court of New Zealand was established in 1841 and known as the Supreme Court until 1980. ... The High Court of Cassation and Justice (Romanian: ÃŽnalta Curte de CasaÅ£ie ÅŸi JustiÅ£ie) is Romanias supreme Court of justice. ... Seal of the High Court of Justiciary © Crown Copyright The High Court of Justiciary is Scotlands supreme criminal court. ... Sultan Abdul Samad Building houses the High Court of Malaya at Kuala Lumpur as well as the Trade Court. ... Judicial power in Singapore is vested in the Supreme Court as well as surbodinate courts by the constitution. ... The High Court of South Africa is a court of law in South Africa. ... Highway in Pennsylvania, USA A highway is a major road designed for automobile travel that connects cities, places, other highways, or other significant points of interest. ... Folk image of a mounted highwayman This page is about the criminal occupation of highwayman, for groups of that name, see The Highwaymen. ... Hima means (is Arabic for) inviolate zones solely for the conservation of natural capital, typically fields, wildlife and forests (contrast haram to protect areas for more immediate human purposes). ... Hit and run is the illegal act of hitting an object, such as a pedestrian, parked car, or mailbox, with a vehicle and immediately leaving the location of the incident. ... Indemnification is a promise, usually as a contract provision, protecting one party from financial loss. ... Holder may refer to several people: Frederick Holder, former Premier of South Australia Geoffrey Holder, American actor and dancer Noddy Holder, vocalist and guitarist in the band Slade Nancy Holder, American fantasy author Otto Ludwig Hölder (1859 - 1937), a German mathematician Topics named in honour of Otto Hölder... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... A holding company is a company that owns enough voting stock in another firm to control management and operations by influencing or electing its board of directors. ... A leasehold estate is an ownership interest in land in which a lessee or a tenant holds real property by some form of title from a lessor or landlord. ... A holographic will is a will and testament that has been entirely handwritten and signed by the testator. ... Devolution or Home rule is the pooling of powers from central government to government at regional or local level. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department, known as the Home Secretary, is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order (except in Scotland). ... A homestead is: A farm with the buildings around it, see homestead (buildings) Ones legal residence, see homestead (law) An area measure of 160 acres (650,000 m²), see homestead (area) and Homestead Act To homestead is to establish ownership of previously unowned property (usually but not exclusively land... Homestead laws exist in many states in the United States and generally serve two main purposes: prevent forced sale of home by creditors provide surviving spouse with shelter In Texas, homestead protection is automatic. ... Etymology: Latin homicidium, from homo- human being + caedere- to cut, kill Homicide is the intentional or negligent killing of another human being by one or more persons. ... The trade mark law of Hong Kong is based on the Trade Marks Ordinance Cap. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Hornbook In law, a hornbook is a textbook that gives a basic overview of a particular area of law. ... In employment law, hostile environment sexual harassment refers to a situation where employees in a workplace are subject to a pattern of exposure to unwanted sexual behavior from persons other than an employees direct supervisor where supervisors or managers take no steps to discourage or discontinue such behavior. ... A witness who is called by and who testifies for the opposing party or, less frequently, who, when offering testimony adverse to the party who called him, may at request to the judge be termed a hostile witness, which means that the witness is then subject to direct questions in... Hot Pursuit is a TV show running on Court TV that features police chase footage. ... Hotch-pot, or hotch-potch, in English law, is the name given to a rule of equity whereby a person, interested along with others in a common fund, and having already received something in the same interest, is required to surrender what has been so acquired into the common fund... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... The household is the basic unit of analysis in many microeconomic and government models. ... Housing tenure refers to the financial arrangements under which someone has the right to live in a house or apartment. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... The Human Rights Committee is a group of 18 experts who meet three times a year to consider the five-yearly reports submitted by United Nations member states on their compliance with the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. ... The American Bill of Rights, enacted in 1791, provides a list of basic guaranteed rights The United States has an established legal tradition of providing strong protection for civil rights and human rights. ... Humanism is a broad category of active ethical philosophies that affirm the dignity and worth of all people, based on the ability to determine right and wrong by appeal to universal human qualities—particularly rationalism. ... A hung jury is a jury whose required majority cannot reach or agree upon a unanimous verdict after an extended period of deliberation and is deadlocked with irreconcilable differences of opinion. ... Hypothecation (literally: hypothetical dedication) is a treatment and possible justification for government taxation or expenditure. ...


I

i.e. -- ibid -- id est -- Idea-expression divide -- idem -- ignorantia juris non excusat -- Ijma -- Ijtihad -- Illegal combatant -- Illegal drug trade -- Illegal immigrant -- Illegitimacy -- Illusory promise -- Ilm ar-Rijal -- Imam -- Immaterial -- Immediately -- Immigrant visa -- Immigration -- Immigration Apellate Authority -- Immunity -- Impairment -- Impanel -- Impaneling -- Impeach -- Impeachment -- Impleader -- Implied -- Implied Bill of Rights -- Implied consent -- Implied consent laws -- Implied contract -- Implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing -- Implied terms -- Implied warranty -- Implied warranty of fitness for a particular purpose -- Implied warranty of habitability -- Implied warranty of merchantability -- Importation right -- Impossibility -- Impotence -- Impound -- Improve -- Improvement -- Impute -- in absentia -- in camera -- In chambers -- in curia -- in delicto -- in esse -- in extenso -- in extremis -- In fee simple -- in flagrante delicto -- in forma pauperis -- in futoro -- in haec verba -- In kind -- In lieu -- in limine -- in loco parentis -- in omnibus -- in pari delicto -- In perpetuity -- in personam -- in pleno -- in pro per -- in prope persona -- in propria persona -- in re -- in rem -- in situ -- in solidum -- in terrorem -- in terrorem clause -- in toto -- Incapacity -- Incest -- Inchoate offense -- Incidental beneficiary -- Income -- Income tax -- Incompatibility -- Incompatible -- Incompetency -- Incompetent -- Incompetent evidence -- Incontrovertible evidence -- Incorporation (business) -- Incorporate by reference -- Incorporation (business) -- Incorporeal -- Incriminate -- Incumbrance -- Indecent exposure -- Indefeasible -- Indefeasible estate -- Indemnify -- Indemnity -- Indenture -- Indentured servant -- Independent contractor -- Indeterminacy debate in legal theory -- Indeterminate sentence -- indicia -- Indictable offence -- Indictable offense -- Indictment -- Indigent -- Indispensable party -- Individual capital -- Individual rights -- Indorse -- Indorsement -- Industrial design rights -- Industrial tribunal -- Infancy -- Infant -- Infanticide Act -- Inference -- Information -- Information and belief -- Informed consent -- infra -- Infraction -- Infractions -- Infringement -- Ingress -- Inherit -- Inheritance -- Inheritance tax -- Injunction -- Injunctive relief -- Injury -- Inkan -- Innocence -- Innocent -- Inns of Court -- innuendo -- Inquest -- Inquisition -- Inquisitor -- Inquisitorial system -- Insanity -- Insanity defense -- Insertion -- Insider -- Insider trading -- Insolvency -- Insolvent -- Inspection of documents -- Installment contract -- Instruction -- Instructional capital -- Insufficient evidence -- Insurance -- Insured -- Insurer -- Intangible property -- Integration -- Intellectual capital -- Intellectual property -- Intellectual rights -- Intendant of New France -- Intent -- inter alia -- inter se -- inter vivos -- Inter vivos trust -- Interest -- Interference proceeding -- Interim order -- Interium -- Interlineation -- interlocutory -- Interlocutory decree -- Interlocutory order -- Intermediate sanctions -- International Court of Justice -- International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights -- International crime -- International Criminal Court -- International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda -- International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia -- International environmental law -- International human rights instruments -- International human rights law -- International law -- International relations -- International trade -- International trade law -- Internment -- Interpleader -- Interrogation -- Interrogatories -- Interstate commerce -- Intertemporal Law -- Intervene -- Intervenor -- Intervening cause -- Intervention -- Intestacy -- Intestate -- Intestate succession -- Intoxication -- intra -- intra fauces terra -- intra legem -- intra vires -- Intrinsic fraud -- Inure -- Invasion of privacy -- Inventor -- Inventor's notebook -- Inverse condemnation -- Invest -- Investiture -- Investment -- Invitation to treat -- Invitee -- Involuntary -- Involuntary commitment -- ipse dixit -- ipsissima verba -- ipso facto -- Irreconcilable differences -- Irrelevant -- Irreparable damage or injury -- Irresistible impulse -- Irrevocable living trust -- Islamic Law (Sharia) -- Sharia (Islamic law) -- Islamic philosophy -- Isnad -- Issue -- Issue preclusion -- Issued shares -- This page includes English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations such as . ... Ibid (Latin, short for ibidem, the same place) is the term used to provide an endnote or footnote citation or reference for a source that was cited in the last endnote or footnote. ... This page includes English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations such as . ... In intellectual property law, the idea-expression divide is the principle which states that the function of the law is to protect the fixed expression or manifestation of an idea, rather than the fundamental concept or information which gives rise to the idea. ... Ibid (Latin, short for ibidem, the same place) is the term used to provide an endnote or footnote citation or reference for a source that was cited in the last endnote or footnote. ... It has been suggested that presumed knowledge of the law be merged into this article or section. ... Ijmāʿ (إجماع) is an Arabic tern referring to the consensus of the ummah, the community of Muslims, those practicing Islam, or of the ulema, those learned in the relevant topic. ... Ijtihad (Arabic اجتهاد) is a technical term of Islamic law that describes the process of making a legal decision by independent interpretation of the legal sources, the Quran and the Sunnah. ... Unlawful combatant (also illegal combatant or unprivileged combatant) describes a person who engages in combat without meeting the requirements for a lawful belligerent according to the laws of war as specified in the Third Geneva Convention. ... These lollipops were found to contain heroin when inspected by the US DEA The trade of illegal drugs is a global black market activity consisting of production, distribution, packaging and sale of illegal psychoactive substances. ... Illegal immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently, in violation of the law or without documents permitting an immigrant to settle in that country. ... Illegitimacy was a term in common use for the condition of being born of parents who were not validly married to one another; the legal term was bastardy. ... In contract law, an illusory promise is one that courts will not enforce. ... Ilm ar-Rijal (Arabic) is the science of biography especially as practiced in Islam, where it was first applied to the sira, the life of the Prophet Muhammad. ... Imam (Arabic: إمام ,Persian: امام ) is an Arabic word meaning Leader. The ruler of a country might be called the Imam, for example. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... The Immigration Appellate Authority (IAA) is an independent judicial body in the United Kingdom constituted under the Immigration Act of 1971. ... Immunity confers a status ojavascript:insertTags(ì,,)n a person or body that makes that person or body free from otherwise legal obligations such as, for example, lijavascript:insertTags(Ú,,)ability for damages or punishment for criminal acts. ... The term disability, as it is applied to humans, refers to any condition that impedes the completion of daily tasks using traditional methods. ... Impeachment is the process by which a legislative body formally levels charges against a high official of government. ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... Impleader is procedural device before trial in which a party joins a third-party into a lawsuit because that third-party is liable to an original defendant. ... Implied Bill of Rights is a judicial theory in Canadian jurisprudence that recognizes that certain basic principles are underlying the Constitution of Canada. ... A quasi-contract, also an implied-in-law contract, is a legal substitute for a contract. ... A contract is a promise or an agreement that is enforced or recognized by the law. ... In common law jurisdictions, an implied warranty is a contract law term for certain assurances that are presumed to be made in the sale of products or real property, due to the circumstances of the sale. ... An implied warranty is a common law term used in United States contract law to describe certain assurances that are presumed to be made with the sale of goods or realty because of the circumstances of the sale. ... An implied warranty is a common law term used in United States contract law to describe certain assurances that are presumed to be made with the sale of goods or realty because of the circumstances of the sale. ... An implied warranty is a common law term used in United States contract law to describe certain assurances that are presumed to be made with the sale of goods or realty because of the circumstances of the sale. ... Modal logic, or (less commonly) intensional logic is the branch of logic that deals with sentences that are qualified by modalities such as can, could, might, may, must, possibly, and necessarily, and others. ... Impotence or, more clinically, erectile dysfunction is the inability to develop or maintain an erection of the penis for satisfactory sexual intercourse regardless of the capability of ejaculation. ... In Absentia is the eighth studio album by British progressive rock band Porcupine Tree, first released in September 24, 2002. ... In camera (Latin: in chamber) is a legal term meaning in secret. It applies to court cases (or portions thereof) to which the public are not admitted. ... This page lists English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations, such as and . ... Fee simple, also known as fee simple absolute, is an estate in land in common law. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... In Forma Pauperis is a legal term derived from the Latin phrase in the form of a pauper. ... In finance, when a bond pays in kind, it means that the amount of principal owed to the bondholder is increased in lieu of paying current interest. ... Motion in limine (Latin: at the outset) is a motion, raised before or during trial, to exclude the presentation of certain evidence to the jury. ... The term en loco parentis, Latin for in the place of a parent, refers to the legal responsibility of a person or organization to take on some of the functions and responsibilities of a parent. ... In pari delicto, Latin for in equal fault, is a legal term used to indicate that two persons or entities are equally at fault, whether the malfeasance in question is a crime or tort. ... In personam (in purr-soh-nam) from Latin for directed toward a particular person. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... In re, Latin for in the matter [of], is a legal term used to indicate that a judicial proceeding may not have formally designated adverse parties or is otherwise uncontested. ... Sometimes a court may exercise jurisdiction over property located within the perimeter of its powers without regard to personal jurisdiction over the litigants; this is called jurisdiction in rem. ... In situ (in place in Latin), a term used in: biology, where it means to examine the phenomenon exactly in place where it occurs (without removing it in some special medium etc. ... In terrorem, Latin for in [order to] frighten, is a legal term used to describe a warning, usually one given in hope of compelling someone to act without resorting to a lawsuit or criminal prosecution. ... A no-contest clause, also called an in terrorem clause, is a clause in a legal document, such as a contract or a will, that is designed to threaten someone, usually with litigation or criminal prosecution, into acting or ceasing to act. ... This page lists English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations, such as and . ... Incapacity is a term of law that refers to a persons lack of capacity to engage in certain actions to which legal consequences attach. ... Incest is sexual activity between close family members. ... An inchoate offense is a crime. ... A third party beneficiary, in the law of contracts, is a person who may have the right to sue on a contract, despite not having originally been a party to the contract. ... Income, generally defined, is the money that is received as a result of the normal business activities of an individual or a business. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... The term compatibility has the following meanings: In telecommunication, the capability of two or more items or components of equipment or material to exist or function in the same system or environment without mutual interference. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Incompetence. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Incorporation (abbreviated Inc. ... Incorporation (abbreviated Inc. ... Incorporeal is the descriptional attribute of something that cannot be manifested into anything tangible or at least representational at a one dimensional level. ... An encumbrance (sometimes referred to, particularly in the United States as an incumbrance) is a legal term of art for anything that affects or limits the title of a property, such as mortgages, leases, easements, liens, or restrictions. ... Indecent exposure is the display of bare parts of the human body that, according to the standards of the local cultural norms, would otherwise be clothed. ... Defeasible reasoning is the study of forms of reasoning that, while convincing, are not as formal and rigorous as deductive reasoning. ... Indemnity is generally a payment or compensation for damages done. ... Indemnity is a legal exemption from the penalties or liabilities incurred by any course of action. ... An Indentured servant is an unfree labourer under contract to work (for a specified amount of time) for another person, often without any pay, but in exchange for accommodation, food, other essentials and/or free passage to a new country. ... An indentured servant is a labourer under contract (an indenture--explained below) to work (for a specified amount of time) for another person or a company/corporation, often without any monetary pay, but in exchange for accommodation, food, other essentials, training, or passage to a new country. ... An independent contractor is a person or business which provides goods or services to another entity under terms specified in a contract. ... The indeterminacy debate in legal theory can be summed up as follows: Can the law constrain the results reached by adjudicators in legal disputes? Some members of the critical legal studies movement — primarily legal academics in the United States — argued that the answer to this question is no. ... Preprinted marking on each piece of a bulk mailing which shows that postage has been paid by the sender. ... In many common law jurisdictions (e. ... In many common law jurisdictions (e. ... In the common law legal system, an indictment is a formal charge of having committed a serious criminal offence. ... Category: ... An indispensable party is a party to a lawsuit whose participation is required for jurisdiction or the purpose of rendering a judgment. ... Individual capital comprises inalienable or personal traits of persons, tied to their bodies and available only through their own free will, such as skill, creativity, enterprise, courage, capacity for moral example, non-communicable wisdom, invention or empathy, non-transferable personal trust and leadership. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Industrial design rights are intellectual property rights that protect the visual design of objects that are not purely utilitarian. ... Industrial tribunals are independant panels found in the UK that rules on desputes in the workplace relating to statutory terms and conditions of employment. ... A human infant The word Infant derives from the Latin in-fans, meaning unable to speak. ... A human infant Infant is a slightly more formal term for the word baby, the youngest category of child. ... The Infanticide Act is the name for a number of laws introduced into UK law (England and Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland) that recognised the special nature of the killing of an infant child by its mother during the early months of life. ... Inference is the act or process of drawing a conclusion based solely on what one already knows. ... Information as a concept bears a diversity of meanings, from everyday usage to technical settings. ... Informed consent is a legal condition whereby a person can be said to have given consent based upon an appreciation and understanding of the facts and implications of any actions. ... This article is about the Latin term used in law. ... Infraction as a general term means a violation of a rule or local ordinance or regulation, promise or obligation. ... Infraction as a general term means a violation of a rule or local ordinance or regulation, promise or obligation. ... In a legal context, an infringement refers to the violation of a law or a right. ... To inherit something is to get it from ones ancestors. ... Inheritance is the practice of passing on property, titles, debts, and obligations upon the death of an individual. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... An injunction is an equitable remedy in the form of a court order that either prohibits or compels (restrains or enjoins) a party from continuing a particular activity. ... An injunction is an equitable remedy in the form of a court order that either prohibits or compels (enjoins or restrains) a party from continuing a particular activity. ... Injury is damage or harm caused to the structure or function of the body caused by an outside agent or force, which may be physical or chemical. ... An inkan (印鑑) or hanko (判子) is a name seal customarily used in Japan instead of a signature when doing business or other procedures. ... Innocence is a term that describes the lack of guilt of an individual, with respect to a crime. ... Innocence is a term that describes the lack of guilt of an individual, with respect for a crime. ... The Inns of Court, in London, are where barristers train and traditionally practice, although growth in the profession caused many barristers chambers to move outside the precincts of the Inns of Court in the late 20th century. ... Look up Innuendo in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... An inquest is a formal process of state investigation. ... The term Inquisition (Latin: Inquisitio Haereticae Pravitatis Sanctum Officium) refers broadly to a number of historical movements orchestrated by the Roman Catholic Church aimed at securing religious and doctrinal unity through the conversion, and sometimes persecution, of alleged heretics. ... An official in an Inquisition, an Inquisitor is literally one who searches out or inquires (Latin inquirere < quaerere, to seek). The Grand Inquisitor, or Inquisitor Generalis, was the chief Inquisitor of an Inquisition. ... An inquisitorial system is a legal system where the court or a part of the court is actively involved in determining the facts of the case, as opposed to an adversarial system where the role of the court is solely that of an impartial referee between parties. ... Inmates at Bedlam Asylum, as portrayed by William Hogarth Insanity, or madness, is a semi-permanent, severe mental disorder typically stemming from a form of mental illness. ... In a criminal trial, the insanity defenses are possible defenses by excuse, via which defendants may argue that they should not be held criminally liable for breaking the law, as they were mentally ill at the time of their allegedly criminal actions. ... An illustration of an insertion An insertion is a type of chromosomal abnormality in which a DNA sequence is inserted into a gene, disrupting the normal structure and function of that gene. ... An insider is a member of any group of people of limited number and generally restricted access. ... Insider trading is a term often used to refer to a practice, which is illegal in many jurisdictions, in which an investor trades securities of a company (, stocks, bonds or stock options) based on material non-public information which was obtained by an officer, manager, or other corporate insider, during... Insolvency is a financial condition experienced by a person or business entity when their assets no longer exceed their liabilities (commonly referred to as balance-sheet insolvency) or when the person or entity can no longer meet its debt obligations when they come due (commonly referred to as cash-flow... This article is in need of attention. ... An instruction is a form of communicated information that is both command and explanation for how an action, behavior, method, or task is to be begun, completed, conducted, or executed. ... Instructional capital is a term used in educational administration, to reflect capital resulting from investment in producing learning materials. ... Insurance, in law and economics, is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of potential financial loss. ... Insurance, in law and economics, is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of potential financial loss. ... Insurance is the business of providing protection against financial aspects of risk, such as those to property, life, health and legal liability. ... Intangible property, also known as incorporeal property, describes something which a person or corporation can have ownership of and can transfer ownership of to another person or corporation, but has no physical substance. ... An integration clause, in the contract law, is a term in the language of the contract that declares it to be the complete and final agreement between the parties. ... Intellectual capital makes an organization worth more than its balance sheet value. ... In law, intellectual property (IP) is an umbrella term for various legal entitlements which attach to certain types of information, ideas, or other intangibles in their expressed form. ... Intellectual rights (from the French droits intellectuels) is a term sometimes used to refer to the legal protection afforded to owners of intellectual capital. ... New France was governed by three rulers: the governor, the bishop and the intendant, all appointed by the King, and sent from France. ... Intent in law is the planning and desire to perform an act. ... This page includes English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations such as . ... Inter se is a legal latin phrase meaning between or amongst themselves. For example: The constitutional documents of a company constitute a contract between the company and its shareholders, and between the shareholders inter se. ... A living trust (or inter vivos trust) is a type of trust created for the purpose of holding ownership to an individuals assets during the persons lifetime, and for distributing those assets after death. ... An inter vivos trust is an express trust created by the settlor during his lifetime, as distinguished from a testamentary trust which arises upon the testators death, usually under his will. ... In finance, interest has three general definitions. ... An interference proceeding, also known as priority contest, is an inter partes proceeding to determine the priority issues of multiple patent applications. ... An order, sentence, decree, or judgment, given in an intermediate stage between the commencement and termination of a cause, is called interlocutory (1913 Webster). ... Interlocutory is a law term which can refer to an order, sentence, decree, or judgment, given in an intermediate stage between the commencement and termination of a cause, used to provide a temporary or provisional decision on an issue. ... Interlocutory is a law term which can refer to an order, sentence, decree, or judgment, given in an intermediate stage between the commencement and termination of a cause, used to provide a temporary or provisional decision on an issue. ... Intermediate sanctions is a term used in regulations enacted by the United States Internal Revenue Service that is applied to non-profit organizations who engage in transactions that inure to the benefit of a disqualified person within the organization. ... Peace Palace, seat of the ICJ. The International Court of Justice (known colloquially as the World Court or ICJ; French: Cour internationale de justice) is the principal judicial organ of the United Nations. ... The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights is a United Nations treaty based on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, created in 1966 and entered into force on 23 March 1976. ... International crime may refer to: Crime against international law Crime against humanity Crime against peace War crime It may also refer to trans-national crimes such as: Smuggling Trafficking in human beings Arms trafficking Drug trafficking Money laundering See also Interpol This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles... Official logo of the ICC. The International Criminal Court (ICC) was established in 2002 as a permanent tribunal to prosecute individuals for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes, as defined by several international agreements, most prominently the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. ... Wanted poster for the ICTR The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) is a court under the auspices of the United Nations for the prosecution of offenses committed in Rwanda during the genocide which occurred there during April, 1994, commencing on April 6. ... The International Tribunal for the Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of the Former Yugoslavia since 1991, more commonly referred to as the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), is a body of the United Nations (UN) established to... International environmental law is the body of international law that concerns the protection of the global environment. ... International human rights instruments can be classified into two categories: declarations, adopted by bodies such as the United Nations General Assembly, which are not legally binding although they may be politically so; and conventions, which are legally binding instruments concluded under international law. ... International human rights law codifies legal provisions governing human rights in various international human rights instruments. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... International relations (IR), a branch of political science, is the study of foreign affairs of and relations among states within the international system, including the roles of states, inter-governmental organizations (IGOs), non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and multinational corporations (MNCs). ... International trade is the exchange of goods and services across international boundaries or territories. ... International trade law is a misnomer. ... This page is about the usage and history of the terms concentration camp, internment camp and internment. ... Interpleader is a device allowed in U.S. civil litigation. ... Interrogation is the method of interviewing a source used by police and military personnel to obtain information that the source would not otherwise willingly disclose. ... In law, interrogatories are a formal set of written questions propounded by one litigant and required to be answered by an adversary, in order to clarify matters of evidence and help to determine in advance what facts will be presented at any trial in the case. ... Article I, Section 8, Clause 3 of the United States Constitution empowers the United States Congress To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes. The Commerce Clause has been the subject of intense constitutional and political disagreement centering on the extent to... Intertemporal Law is a new concept in the field of legal theory. ... In law, an intervener is a third party to a lawsuit who has been granted permission to make submissions to the court as they have interests in the outcome of the case. ... In law, an intervener is a third party to a lawsuit who has been granted permission to make submissions to the court as they have interests in the outcome of the case. ... An intervening cause is a potential defense to the tort of negligence, if it is an unforseeable, and therefore superseding intervening cause, rather than a foreseeable intervening cause. ... See: Intervention (counseling) - an orchestrated attempt by family and friends to get a family member to get help for addiction or other similar problem. ... Intestacy is the condition of the estate of a person who dies owning property greater than the sum of his or her enforceable debts and funeral expenses without having made a valid will or other binding declaration; alternatively where such a will or declaration has been made, but only applies... Intestacy refers to the body of common law that determines who is entitled to the property of a dead person in the absence of a last will and testament or other binding declaration. ... Intestacy refers to the body of common law that determines who is entitled to the property of a dead person in the absence of a last will and testament or other binding declaration. ... ... Intra fauces terra is a Latin legal phrase which translates as In the jaws of the land. It is used to define the territorial claim of bodies of water. ... Ultra vires is a Latin phrase that literally means beyond the power. ... Intrinsic fraud. ... Category: ... Invasion of privacy is a legal term essentially defined as a violation of the right to be left alone. ... An inventor is a person who creates new inventions, typically technical devices such as mechanical, electrical or software devices or methods. ... An inventors notebook is used by inventors, scientists and engineers to record their ideas, invention process, experimental tests and results and observations. ... Inverse condemnation or regulatory taking are terms used in the law of real property to describe a situation in which the government has so heavily regulated the permissible uses of a specific piece of property as to make it unusable for any reasonable purpose. ... Investment is a term with several closely related meanings in finance and economics. ... Investiture, from the Latin (preposition in and verb vestire, dress from vestis robe) is a rather general term for the formal installation of an incumbent (heir, elect of nominee) in public office, especially by taking possession of its insignia. ... Invest redirects here. ... In contract law, an invitation to treat (invitation to bargain in the US) is an action by one party which may appear to be a contractual offer but which is actually inviting others to make an offer of their own. ... An invitee is a term used in the law of torts to describe a person who is on the property of another because that property owner has chosen to hold the property open to some portion of the general public, because the owner of the property has allowed the licensee... Transfiguration of Vincent, released in 2003, is the third studio album by singer-songwriter M. Ward. ... Involuntary commitment is the practice of using legal means or forms as part of a mental health law to commit a person to a mental hospital, insane asylum or psychiatric ward without their informed consent, against their will or over their protests. ... This page includes English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations such as . ... Ipsissima verba, Latin for the very words, is a legal term referring to material, usually esablished authority, that a writer or speaker is quoting or reffering to. ... Ipso Facto was a Spanish football player, the goalkeeper for the national side in the 1970 World Cup. ... Irreconcilable differences are one possible grounds for a divorce in the United States; often they are used as justification for a no-fault divorce. ... This article needs cleanup. ... In jurisprudence, irresistible impulse is a defense by excuse, in this case some sort of insanity, in which the defendant argues that they should not be held criminally liable for actions which broke the law, because they couldnt control their actions. ... Sharia (Arabic شريعة also Sharia, Shariah or Syariah) is traditional Islamic law. ... Sharia (Arabic شريعة also Sharia, Shariah or Syariah) is traditional Islamic law. ... Islamic philosophy (الفلسفة الإسلامية) is a part of the Islamic studies, and is a longstanding attempt to create harmony between faith, reason or philosophy, and the religious teachings of Islam. ... The isnad (Arabic اسناد or in Quranic era Arabic اسند) are the citations or backings that establish the legitimacy of the hadith, which are the sayings of Muhammad, Prophet of Islam. ... Look up Issue in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Collateral estoppel, also sometimes known as issue preclusion, is a common law estoppel doctrine that prevents a person from relitigating an issue. ...


J

J.D. -- Juris Doctor -- Jafari -- Jane Doe -- Jaywalking -- JD -- Jeopardy -- Jewish principles of faith -- Jewish Theological Seminary of America -- Jim Crow law -- Jobber -- John Doe -- Joinder -- Joinder of issue -- Joint -- Joint adventure -- Joint and several -- Joint and several liability -- Joint and survivor annuity -- Joint custody -- Joint enterprise -- Joint liability -- Joint powers agreement -- Joint property -- Joint tenancy -- Joint tortfeasors -- Joint venture -- Joint venture agreement -- Jointure -- Jones act -- Journeyman -- Joyride -- Judge -- Judge advocate -- Judge Advocate General -- Judgment -- Judgment by default -- Judgment creditor -- Judgment debt -- Judgment debtor -- Judgment in Berlin -- Judgment non obstante veredicto -- Judgment notwithstanding the verdict -- Judgment notwithstanding verdict -- Judicial -- Judicial Committee of the Privy Council -- Judicial discretion -- Judicial economy -- Judicial foreclosure -- Judicial functions of the House of Lords -- Judicial independence -- Judicial interference -- Judicial notice -- Judicial proceedings -- Judicial review -- Judicial sale -- Jump bail -- jurat -- Jurisdiction -- Jurisdictional amount -- Jurisprudence -- Jurist -- Juror -- Jury -- Jury box -- Jury charge -- Jury fees -- Jury instructions -- Jury nullification -- Jury of one's peers -- Jury panel -- Jury selection -- Jury stress -- Jury tampering -- Jury trial -- jus -- jus ad bellum -- jus ad bellum -- jus civile -- jus cogens -- jus commune -- jus gentium -- jus inter gentes -- jus naturale -- jus primae noctis -- jus sanguines -- jus sanguinis -- jus soli -- Just cause -- Just compensation -- Just war -- Justice -- Justice of the Peace -- Justiciable -- Justifiable homicide -- Justification -- Juvenile -- Juvenile court -- Juvenile delinquent -- J.D. redirects here; for alternate uses, see J.D. (disambiguation) J.D. is an abbreviation for the Latin Juris Doctor, also called a Doctor of Law or Doctorate of Jurisprudence, and is the law degree typically awarded by an accredited U.S. law school after successfully completing three years... J.D. redirects here; for alternate uses, see J.D. (disambiguation) J.D. is an abbreviation for the Latin Juris Doctor, also called a Doctor of Law or Doctorate of Jurisprudence, and is the law degree typically awarded by an accredited U.S. law school after successfully completing three years... Twelvers or the Ithna Asharia are members of the group of Shias who believe in twelve Imams. ... For the musician and actor, see John Doe (musician) For the television series, see John Doe (Television series) For the childrens book by L. Frank Baum, see John Dough and the Cherub In English-speaking common-law jurisdiction, the name John Doe is used for a defendant or victim... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... JD is the name of a GunBound mobile JD is the IATA code for Japan Airlines domestic service JD or jd may also stand for: Johnny Depp James Dean Jermaine Dupri John Deere John Doe Johnny Damon Jon Dorian, the fictional lead character of the sitcom Scrubs Julian date, the... Double jeopardy (also called autrefois acquit meaning already acquitted) is a procedural defense (and, in many countries such as the United States, Canada and India, a constitutional right) that forbids a defendant from being tried a second time for a crime, after having already been tried for the same crime. ... There are a number of basic Jewish principles of faith that one is expected to uphold in order to be said to be in consonance with the Jewish faith. ... The Jewish Theological Seminary of America The Jewish Theological Seminary of America, known in the Jewish community simply as JTS, is one of the academic and spiritual centers of Conservative Judaism. ... The term Jim Crow laws refers to a series of laws enacted mostly in the Southern United States in the later half of the 19th century that restricted most of the new privileges granted to African-Americans after the Civil War. ... As professional wrestling is staged, inevitably a wrestler will be required to lose to an opponent. ... In the United States, the name John Doe is used for a defendant or victim in a legal example or for a person whose identity is unknown or is intended to be anonymous. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A joint (articulation) is the location at which two bones make contact (articulate). ... A joint venture (often abbreviated JV) is a strategic alliance between two or more parties to undertake economic activity together. ... Joint and several liability is a common law rule of liability, whereby a plaintiff may recover the entirety of the damages from any of negligent defendants independent of their individual share of the liability. ... Joint and several liability is a common law rule of liability, whereby a plaintiff may recover the entirety of the damages from any of negligent defendants independent of their individual share of the liability. ... Joint custody is a court order whereby custody of a child is a awarded to both parties. ... A concurrent estate or co-tenancy is a concept in property law, particularly derived from the common law of real property, which describes the various ways in which property can be owned by more than one person at a given time. ... A joint venture (often abbreviated JV) is a strategic alliance between two or more parties to undertake economic activity together. ... Jointure is, in law, a provision for a wife after the death of her husband. ... A journeyman is a tradesman or craftsman who may well have completed an apprenticeship but is not yet able to set up his own workshop as a master. ... To joyride is to drive around in a car with no particular goal, a ride taken solely for pleasure. ... A judge or justice is an official who presides over a court. ... Judge Advocate Generals Corps, also known as JAG, is the judicial arm of the United States armed forces, consisting of autonomous departments in the Air Force, Army and Navy. ... This article is in reference to the U.S. JAG Corps. ... A judgment or judgement (see spelling note below), in a legal context, is synonymous with the formal decision made by a court following a lawsuit. ... Default judgment is a binding judgment in favor of the plaintiff when the defendant has not responded to a summons or has failed to appear before a court. ... JUDGMENT DEBTOR, in English law, a person against whom a judgment ordering him to pay a sum of money has been. ... Judgment in Berlin is a book by federal judge Herbert Jay Stern about a hijacking trial in the United States Court for Berlin in 1979, over which he presided. ... Judgment notwithstanding the verdict, or J.N.O.V. for short (Lat. ... Judgment notwithstanding the verdict, or J.N.O.V. for short (Latin Judgment Non Obstante Veredicto) is the practice in American courts whereby the presiding judge in a criminal or civil case may overrule the decision of a jury and reverse or amend their verdict. ... Judgment notwithstanding the verdict, or J.N.O.V. for short (Lat. ... The judiciary, also referred to as the judicature, consists of justices, judges and magistrates among other types of adjudicators. ... The Judicial Committee of the Privy Council is one of the highest courts in the United Kingdom. ... In many actions at law or cases in equity the judge is not required by statute or precedent to make a predetermined decision; but is able to make a decision within a range of decisions. ... Judicial economy is the notion that a judge should hear and decide all related parts of a case at one time, not piecemeal. ... The House of Lords, in addition to having a legislative function, has a judicial function as a court of last resort within the United Kingdom. ... Judicial independence is the doctrine that decisions of the judiciary should be impartial and not subject to influence from the other branches of government or from private or political interests. ... Judicial interference is a negatively connoted term used to describe the actions of courts or judicial officers in matters that are interpreted by some as beyond their constitutionally established role. ... Judicial Notice is a rule of evidence that allows a fact to be introduced into evidence if the truth of that fact is so notorious or well known that it is cannot be refuted. ... Judicial review is the power of a court to review a law or an official act of a government employee or agent for constitutionality or for the violation of basic principles of justice. ... Jurat (through French from mediaeval Latin juratus, one sworn, Lat. ... In law, jurisdiction from the Latin jus, juris meaning law and dicere meaning to speak, is the practical authority granted to a formally constituted body or to a person to deal with and make pronouncements on legal matters and, by implication, to administer justice within a defined area of responsibility. ... Amount in controversy (sometimes called jurisdictional amount) is a term used in United States civil procedure to denote a requirement that persons seeking to bring a lawsuit in a particular court must be suing for a certain minimum amount before that court may hear the case. ... Jurisprudence is essentially the theory and philosophy of law. ... A jurist is a professional who studies, develops, applies or otherwise deals with the law. ... This article is confusing for some readers, and needs to be edited for clarity. ... A jury is a sworn body of persons convened to render a rational, impartial verdict and a finding of fact on a legal question officially submitted to them, or to set a penalty or judgment in a jury trial of a court of law. ... Jury instructions are the set of legal rules that jurors must follow when the jury is deciding a case. ... Jury nullification is a jurys refusal to render a verdict according to the law, as instructed by the court, regardless of the weight of evidence presented. ... This article can be confusing for some readers, and needs to be edited for clarity. ... A jury is a sworn body of persons convened to render a rational, impartial verdict and a finding of fact on a legal question officially submitted to them, or to set a penalty or judgment in a jury trial of a court of law. ... This article can be confusing for some readers, and needs to be edited for clarity. ... Jury tampering is the crime of unduly attempting to influence the composition and/or decisions of a jury during the course of a trial. ... A jury trial is a trial in which the judge of the facts, as opposed to the judge of the law, is a jury, made up of citizens who are usually randomly selected and are generally not legal professionals. ... Jus could be: Another spelling for the Latin word for justice, ius (iuris n. ... Jus ad bellum (Latin for Law to War; see also just war) are a set of criteria that are consulted before engaging in war, in order to determine whether entering into war is justifiable. ... Jus ad bellum (Latin for Law to War; see also just war) are a set of criteria that are consulted before engaging in war, in order to determine whether entering into war is justifiable. ... A peremptory norm (also called jus cogens, Latin for compelling law) is a fundamental principle of international law considered to have acceptance among the international community of states as a whole. ... Jus commune or ius commune is Latin for common law. ... Ius gentium, Latin for law of nations, was the part of Roman law that the Roman Empire applied to its dealings with foreigners, especially provincial subjects. ... Natural law (Latin jus naturale) is law that exists independently of the positive law of a given political order, society or nation-state. ... The jus primae noctis meaning law (or right) of the first night, and droit du seigneur meaning the lords right, is the purported right of the lord of an estate to deflower its virgins. ... Jus sanguinis (Latin for right of blood) is a right by which nationality or citizenship can be recognised to any individual born to a parent who is a national or citizen of that state. ... Jus sanguinis (Latin for right of blood) is a right by which nationality or citizenship can be recognised to any individual born to a parent who is a national or citizen of that state. ... Jus soli (Latin for right of the territory), or birthright citizenship, is a right by which nationality or citizenship can be recognised to any individual born in the territory of the related state. ... Movie: Just Cause is a 1995 movie starring Blair Underwood, Ed Harris, and Sean Connery, among others. ... Just Compensation is typically a term used to mean the fair market value of a property, generally in relation to a taking under Eminent Domain. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Lady Justice - allegory of Justice as woman with sword and with book - statue at court building. ... A Justice of the Peace (JP) is an inferior magistrate appointed by means of a commission of the peace (mandate) to keep the peace. ... Justiciability is a term used in civil procedure to describe whether a dispute is capable of being settled by a court of law. ... The concept of justifiable homicide in criminal law stands on the dividing line between an excuse and an exculpation. ... In jurisprudence, justification is a defense in which a defendant argues that although they broke the law, they should not be held liable for, or found guilty of, a crime, as some special or extenuating circumstance(s) existed such that the illegal action was, for some reason or other, reasonable... In law, a person who is not yet a legal adult is known as a minor (known in some places as an infant or juvenile). ... Juvenile courts are courts, which are specifically created and given authority to try and pass judgments for crimes committed by persons who have not attained the age of majority. ... Juvenile delinquency refers to antisocial or criminal acts performed by juveniles. ...


K

Kangaroo court -- Karaites -- Karma -- Kosher law -- Kellogg-Briand Pact -- Kidnapping -- Kin -- King's Bench -- Know-how -- Kollel -- Look up kangaroo court in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Karaite Judaism is a Jewish denomination characterized by reliance on the Tanakh as the sole scripture, and rejection of the Oral Law (the Mishnah and the Talmuds) as halakha (Legally Binding, i. ... Karma (Sanskrit: from the root , to do, [meaning deed] meaning action, effect, destiny) is a term that comprises the entire cycle of cause and effect. ... The circled U indicates that this product is certified as kosher by the Orthodox Union (OU). ... The Kellogg-Briand Pact, also known as the Pact of Paris, after the city where it was signed on August 27, 1928, is an international treaty providing for the renunciation of war as an instrument of national policy. ... Kin has multiple meanings: It can refer to family. ... One of the ancient courts of England, the Kings Bench (or Queens Bench when the monarch is female) is now a division of the High Court of Justice of England and Wales. ... Procedural knowledge or know-how is the knowledge of how to perform some task. ... A Kollel is an institute for Jewish learning for adults; they have traditionally been a Yeshiva for married men. ...


L

Labor and materials -- Labor law -- labor union -- Laches -- lacunae -- -- Land use -- Land value tax -- Landlady -- Landlocked -- Landlord -- Landlord and tenant -- Landlord and tenant act -- Landlord's lien -- Lapse -- Larceny -- Last antecedent rule -- Last clear chance -- Last will and testament -- Latent defect -- Lateral support -- Law -- Law and economics -- Law and literature -- Law and motion calendar -- Law basic topics -- Law book -- Law dictionary -- Law French -- Law lords -- Law of admiralty -- Law of Canada -- Law of costs -- Law of Ireland -- Law of obligations -- Law of the case -- Law of the land -- Law of the Russian Federation -- Law of the Sea -- Law of the Soviet Union -- Law of the United Kingdom -- Law of the United States -- Law of treaties -- Law school -- Law Society -- Laws of war -- Lawsuit -- Lawyer -- Lay a foundation -- Lay assessor -- Laïcité -- Leading -- Leading question -- Leading the witness -- Lease -- Lease and release -- Leasehold -- Legacy -- Legal -- Legal action -- Legal advertising -- Legal age -- Legal aid -- Legal Aid Society -- Legal code -- Legal consequences of marriage in the United Kingdom -- Legal custody -- legal debate -- Legal duty -- Legal entity -- Artificial person -- Legal fiction -- Legal formalism -- Legal history -- Legal instrument -- Legal Latin -- Legal lexicography -- Legal personal representative -- Legal positivism -- Legal realism -- Legal separation -- Legal services -- Legal technicality -- Legal tender -- Legal translation -- Legalese -- Legalism (Western philosophy) -- Legalism (Chinese philosophy) -- Legalism (theology) -- Legalization -- Legatee -- Legislation -- Legislature -- Legitimacy (law) -- Legitimacy (political science) -- Legitimate -- legitime -- Lemon law -- Lemon laws -- Lessee -- Lesser crime -- Lesser included offenses -- Lesser-included offense -- Lessor -- Let -- Lethal injection -- Letter of credit -- Letter of marque -- Letters -- Letters of administration -- Letters patent -- Letters testamentary -- Leverage -- Leviticus -- Levy -- Lewd and lascivious -- lex communis -- lex lata -- lex posterior derogat priori -- lex scripta -- lex specialis derogat generali -- Liability -- Liable -- Libel -- Libel per se -- Liberal Judaism -- Libertarian theories of law -- Liberty -- Licence -- License -- Licensee -- Licensor -- Lie detector test -- Lien -- Lienor -- Life -- Life estate -- Life without possibility of parole -- Limitation of actions -- Limitations clause, Constitition of Canada -- Limited company -- Limited jurisdiction -- Limited liability -- Limited liability company -- Limited partner -- Limited partnership -- Line of succession -- Lineal descendant -- Lineup -- Liquidate -- Liquidated damages -- Liquidation -- Liquidator (legal) -- lis pendens -- List of books and references on sentencing, law, and related matters -- List of Roman laws -- Listed building -- Listing questionnaire -- Literary property -- Litigant -- Litigation -- Litigious -- Liturgy -- Livery -- Livery of seizin -- living trust -- Living will -- LL.B. -- LL.M. -- Loanshark -- Locator -- Lockout -- locus -- locus delicti -- locus in quo -- Loiter -- Long cause -- Long vacation -- Long-arm statute -- Lord Chancellor -- Lord Chancellor's Department -- Lord Chief Justice -- Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales -- Lord Justice General -- Lord Justice of appeal -- Lord Keeper of the Great Seal -- Lord President of the Council -- Lord Steward -- Loss -- Loss of bargain -- Loss of consortium -- Loss of use -- Lower court -- Lübeck law -- Labor and materials is a standard phrase in a contract for construction in which the buyer agrees to pay the contractor based on the work performed by the contractors employees and sub-contractors, and for materials used in the construction (plus the contractors mark up), no matter how... This article is in need of attention. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Laches is an equitable defense, or doctrine, in an action at law. ... A lacuna is a gap in a manuscript, inscription or text. ... Land use is the pattern of construction and activity land is used for. ... Land value taxation (LVT) is the policy of raising state revenues by charging each landholder a portion of the value of a site or parcel of land that would exist even if that site had no improvements. ... A landlord is the owner of a house, apartment, condominium, or land which is rented or leased to an individual or business, who is called the tenant. ... A landlocked country is one that has no coastline. ... A landlord, or landlady, is the owner of a house, apartment, condominium, or real estate which is rented or leased to an individual or business, who is called the tenant. ... A leasehold estate is an ownership interest in land in which a lessee or a tenant holds real property by some form of title from a lessor or landlord. ... Lapse and anti-lapse are complementary concepts under the law of wills, which address the disposition of property that is willed to someone who dies before the testator (the writer of the will). ... In the United States, larceny is a common law crime involving stealing. ... The last clear chance is a doctrine in the law of torts that is employed in contributory negligence jurisdictions. ... In the law, a will or testament is a documentary instrument by which a person regulates the rights of others over his property or family after his death. ... In the law of the sale of property (both real estate and chattels) a latent defect is a fault in the property that could not have been discovered by a reasonably thorough inspection before the sale. ... A lane departure warning system is a mechanism designed to warn a car driver when his or her vehicle begins to move out of its lane (unless a turn signal is on in that direction) on freeways and arterial roads. ... See also Portal:Law The stela of King Hammurabi depicts the god Shamash revealing a code of laws to the king. ... Law and economics is the term usually applied to an approach to legal theory that incorporates methods and ideas borrowed from the discipline of economics. ... Law and literature is an interdisciplinary study of law and literature. ... These should be the most basic topics in the field--topics about which wed like to have articles soon. ... A law dictionary is a dictionary that is designed and compiled to give information about terms used in the field of law. ... Law French is an archaic language based on Norman and Anglo-Norman. ... The House of Lords, in addition to having a legislative function, has a judicial function as a court of last resort within the United Kingdom. ... Admiralty law (usually referred to as simply admiralty and also referred to as maritime law or Law of the Sea) is a distinct body of law which governs maritime questions and offenses. ... The Canadian legal system has its foundation in the British common law system, inherited from being a part of the Commonwealth. ... The law of costs is typical of common law jurisdictions. ... The Republic of Ireland has a common law legal system with four main sources of law: Constitution of Ireland (Bunreacht na hÉireann) Legislation Primary Legislation - Acts of the Oireachtas Secondary Legislation - Statutory Instrument Case law European Community Law Historical The state became independent in 1922 as the Irish Free... The Law of Obligations is one of the component elements of the civil law system of law and encompasses contractual obligations, quasi-contractual obligations such as unjust enrichment and extra-contractual obligations. ... As generally used the term law of the case designates the principle that if an appellate court has passed on a legal question and remanded the cause to the court below for further proceedings, the legal question thus determined by the appellate court will not be differently determined on a... The primary and fundamental statement of laws in Russian Federation is the Constitution of Russian Federation. ... Admiralty law (usually referred to as simply admiralty and also referred to as maritime law) is a distinct body of law which governs maritime questions and offenses. ... The Law of the Soviet Union—also known as Soviet Law, or Socialist Law—was the law that developed in the Soviet Union following the Russian Revolution of October 1917; modified versions of it were adopted by many Communist states (see below) following the Second World War. ... The law of the United Kingdom consists of several independent legal systems which use common law principles, civil law principles, or both. ... The law of the United States was originally largely derived from the common law of the system of English law, which was in force at the time of the Revolutionary War. ... The law of treaties is that part of international law which deals with legally binding agreements between states, generally referred to as treaties. ... // A law school is an institution where future lawyers obtain legal degrees. ... The Law Society of England and Wales is the professional association that regulates and represents the solicitors profession in England and Wales. ... The two parts of the laws of war: Law concerning acceptable practices while engaged in war, like the Geneva Conventions, is called Jus in bello; while law concerning allowable justifications for armed force is called Jus ad bellum. ... A lawsuit is a civil action brought before a court in which the party commencing the action, the plaintiff, seeks a legal remedy. ... British barrister 16th century painting of a civil law notary, by Flemish painter Quentin Massys. ... In law, to lay a foundation means to provide sufficient evidence of the authenticity and relevance for the admission of the testimony of a witness, documentary evidence, or other piece of evidence. ... Sohyun Chun defines lay assessors as secular judges. ... Motto of the French republic on the tympanum of a church. ... In typography, leading (IPA , rhymes with heading) refers to the amount of added space between lines of type. ... A leading question is a question which attempts to direct a respondant to a particular answer or implies a correct response. ... A leading question is a question which attempts to direct a respondant to a particular answer or implies a correct response. ... This article or section should include material from Tenancy agreement A lease is a contract conveying from one person (the lessor) to another person (the lessee) the right to use and control some article of property for a specified period of time (the term), without conveying ownership, in exchange for... Leasehold is a form of property tenure where one party buys the right to occupy land or a building for a given length of time. ... Look up legacy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about law in society. ... This article is about law in society. ... The concept of legal age is a limitation set by law that specifies that only people that have reached a certain age are allowed to participate in some activity. ... Most liberal democracies consider that it is necessary to provide some level of legal aid to persons otherwise unable to afford legal representation. ... The Legal Aid Society is the United States oldest and largest provider of legal services to the indigent. ... A legal code is a moral code enforced by the law of a state. ... This is a list of legal consequences of marriage in the United Kingdom, as of 2004. ... Child custody and guardianship are legal terms which are sometimes used to describe the legal and practical relationship between a parent and his or her child, such as the right of the parent to make decisions for the child, and the parents duty to care for the child. ... A legal debate is a discussion between lawyers, legal academics, jurists, politicians, and others who might have an interest or expertise in the law, about a particular legal issue. ... This can be a disputable topic. ... A legal entity is a legal construct through which the law allows a group of natural persons to act as if it were an individual for certain purposes. ... A legal entity is a legal construct through which the law allows a group of natural persons to act as if it were an individual for certain purposes. ... In the common law, legal fictions are suppositions of fact taken to be true by the courts of law, but which are not necessarily true. ... Legal formalism is a Positivist view in jurisprudence and the philosophy of law. ... Legal history is a term that has at least two meanings. ... Legal instrument is a legal term of art that is used for any written legal document such as a certificate, a deed, a will, an Act of Parliament or a law passed by a competent legislative body in municipal (domestic) or international law. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with List of legal Latin terms. ... Legal lexicography is a term used to describe the complex of activities that are concerned with the design, compilation, use and evaluation of dictionaries within the field of law. ... Legal positivism is a school of thought in modern and contemporary jurisprudence and the philosophy of law. ... Legal realism is a family of theories about the nature of law developed in the first half of the 20th century in the United States (American Legal Realism) and Scandinavia (Scandinavian Legal Realism). ... Legal separation is a possible step towards divorce under United States law. ... The term legal technicality refers to the technical niceties and exactitudes of legal procedure, which is divided into criminal procedure and civil procedure. ... Legal tender or forced tender is payment that cannot be refused in settlement of a debt denominated in the same currency by virtue of law. ... Legal translation is the translation of texts within the field of law. ... Legalese is the term given to the special technical terminology of any given language (usually English) in a legal document. ... Legalism, in the Western sense, is an approach to the analysis of legal questions characterized by abstract logical reasoning focusing on the applicable legal text, such as a constitution, legislation, or case law, rather than on the social, economic, or political context. ... In Chinese history, Legalism (法家; pinyin FÇŽjiā) was one of the four main philosophic schools in the Spring and Autumn Period and the Warring States Period (Near the end of the Zhou dynasty from about the sixth century B.C. to about the third century B.C.). It is actually... Legalism, in Christian theology, is a pejorative term referring to an improper fixation on law or codes of conduct, or legal ideas, usually implying an allegation of pride and the neglect of mercy, and ignorance of the grace of God. ... Legalization is the process of removing a legal prohibition against something which is currently illegal. ... A legatee, in the law of wills, is any individual or organization to whom has been bequeathed a portion (or all) of the testators estate or a portion (or all) of a devise, such as an inter vivos bequest. ... Bold textJAMES CHECKLEY Legislation (or statutory law) is law which has been promulgated (or enacted) by a legislature or other governing body. ... A legislature is a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to adopt laws. ... Freiheitsrechte Recht auf Leben, Freiheit, Eigentum, Sicherheit der Person Allgemeine, nur durch Gesetz beschränkbare Handlungsfreiheit Freiheit von willkürlichen Eingriffen in die Privatsphäre (Wohnung, Briefgeheimnis etc. ... Legitimacy in political science, is the popular acceptance of a governing regime or law as an authority. ... Legitimacy is the popular acceptance of a governing regime or law. ... In civil and Roman law, the legitime, or forced share, of a decedents estate is that portion of the estate from which he cannot disinherit his children, or his parents, without sufficient legal cause. ... Lemon Laws are U.S. state laws that provide remedies to consumers for vehicles that repeatedly fail to meet certain standards of quality and performance. ... Lemon Laws are United States state laws that provide remedies to consumers for automobiles that repeatedly fail to meet certain standards of quality and performance, which are called lemons. ... ... A lesser included offense, in criminal law, is a crime for which all of the elements necesary to impose liability are also elements found in a more serious crime. ... A lesser included offense, in criminal law, is a crime for which all of the elements necesary to impose liability are also elements found in a more serious crime. ... Lessor is the name of two places in the United States: Lessor, Wisconsin Lessor Township, Minnesota This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Lethal injection involves injecting a person with fatal doses of drugs to cause death. ... After a contract is concluded between buyer and seller, buyers bank supplies a letter of credit to seller. ... Letter of marque of the First French Empire given to captain Antoine Bollo, via the ship owner Dominique Malfino from Gena, owner of the Furet, 15-tonne privateer. ... This article is about letter, a written message from one party to another. ... Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal document which is an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as a corporation. ... Leverage is related to torque; leverage is a factor by which lever multiplies a force. ... Leviticus is the third book of the Hebrew Bible, also the third book in the Torah (five books of Moses). ... Look up Levy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Levy may refer to: forced labor; see conscription or national service a form of tax A misspelling of Levi A misspelling of levee See List of people by name: Lev for people named Levy. ... Look up Lex lata in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Lex lata (also called de lege lata) is a Latin expression that means the law as it exists (as opposed to lex ferenda). ... In the most general sense, a liability is anything that is a hindrance, or puts one at a disadvantage. ... In the most general sense, a liability is anything that is a hinderance, or puts one at a disadvantage. ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ... In law, defamation is a right of action for communicating statements that may harm of an individuals reputation or character. ... Liberal Judaism is a term used by some communities worldwide for what is otherwise also known as Reform Judaism or Progressive Judaism. ... Libertarian theories of law build on libertarianism or classical liberalism. ... The Statue of Liberty is a very popular icon of liberty. ... A license or licence is a document or agreement giving permission to do something. ... It has been suggested that Licensing (strategic alliance) be merged into this article or section. ... A licensee is a term used in the law of torts to describe a person who is on the property of another, despite the fact that the property is not open to the general public, because the owner of the property has allowed the licensee to enter. ... A polygraph or lie detector is a device which measures and records several physiological variables such as blood pressure, heart rate, respiration and skin conductivity while a series of questions is being asked, in an attempt to detect lies. ... In law, lien is the broadest term for any sort of charge or encumbrance against an item of property that secures the payment of a debt or performance of some other obligation. ... Look up life, living in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A life estate, at common law is an estate in real property that ends at death. ... Life imprisonment is a term used for a particular kind of sentence of imprisonment. ... The Limitations clause of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms (Section 1) limits the rights of citizens and all those present in Canada or otherwise under Canadian jurisdiction as follows: The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms guarantees the rights and freedoms set out in it subject only to... A limited company in the United Kingdom is a company whose liability is limited by English law or Scots law. ... Limited liability (LL) is liability that is limited to a partner or investors investment. ... A limited liability company (denoted by L.L.C. or LLC in the US) is a legal form of business company offering limited liability to its owners. ... A limited partnership is a form of partnership similar to a general partnership, except that in addition to one or more general partners (GPs), there are one or more limited partners (LPs). ... An order of succession is a formula or algorithm that determines who inherits an office upon the death, resignation, or removal of its current occupant. ... line up (or line-up) may refer to a queue of waiting people a police lineup (or identity parade) of suspects the roster of a sports team at a given time (see batting order) the members of a music band at a given time the acts performing at a concert... Liquidation, or winding up, refers to a business whose assets are converted to money in order to pay off debt. ... Liquidated damages is a term use in the law of contracts to describe a contractual term which establishes damages to be paid to one party if the other party should breach the contract. ... Liquidation, or winding up, refers to a business whose assets are converted to money in order to pay off debt. ... Liquidation, or winding up, refers to a process whereby the assets of a business are converted to money. ... Lis pendens is a notice of litigation which is recorded with the title of real property. ... This is an attempted alphabetical List of Roman laws. ... Buckingham Palace, a Grade I listed building. ... The term literary property is used in publishing to refer to works generally covered by copyright but also an associated set of property rights that go far beyond what courts have historically permitted to be claimed as copyright infringement. ... Categories: Move to Wiktionary | Law stubs | Legal terms ... A lawsuit is a civil action brought before a court in order to recover a right, obtain damages for an injury, obtain an injunction to prevent an injury, or obtain a declaratory judgment to prevent future legal disputes. ... From the Greek word λειτουργία, which can be transliterated as leitourgia, meaning a public work, a liturgy comprises a prescribed religious ceremony, according to the traditions of a particular religion; it may refer to, or include, an elaborate formal ritual (such as the Catholic Mass), or a daily activity such as... A livery is a uniform worn by a civilian person. ... Historically, livery of seisin referred to the ceremony by which the transferor conveyed property to the recipient pursuant to a conveyance. ... A living trust (revocable living trust or inter vivos trust) is a type of trust created for the purpose of holding ownership to an individuals assets during the persons lifetime and for distributing those assets after death. ... A living will, also called will to live, advance health directive, or advance health care directive, is a specific type of power of attorney or health care proxy or advance directive. ... The degree of Bachelor of Laws is the principal academic degree in law in most common law countries. ... The Master of Laws is an advanced law degree that allows someone to specialize in a particular area of law. ... Usury (from the Latin usus meaning used) was defined originally as charging a fee for the use of money. ... A lockout is a work stoppage in which an employer prevents employees from working. ... The word locus (plural loci) is Latin for place: In biology and evolutionary computation, a locus is the position of a gene (or other significant sequence) on a chromosome. ... The lex loci delicti commissi is the Latin term for law of the place where the tort was committed in the Conflict of Laws. ... In aeronautics and aviation, Loiter is a phase of flight. ... This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... The Lord Chancellors Department was a United Kingdom government department. ... The Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales is the second-highest judge of the Courts of England and Wales, after the Lord Chancellor, and the presiding judge of Criminal Division of the Court of Appeal, and of the Queens Bench Division of the High Court. ... The Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales is the second-highest judge of the Courts of England and Wales, after the Lord Chancellor, and the presiding judge of Criminal Division of the Court of Appeal, and of the Queens Bench Division of the High Court. ... The Lord Justice General of Scotland is head of the High Court of Justiciary, Lord President of the Court of Session and head of the judiciary in Scotland. ... The Lord Keeper of the Great Seal of England, and later of Great Britain, was formerly an officer of the English Crown charged with physical custody of the Great Seal of England. ... The Office of Lord President of the Council is a British cabinet position, the holder of which acts as presiding officer of the Privy Council. ... almLord Steward or Lord Steward of the Household, in England, an important official of the Royal Household. ... Loss has several meanings including: Loss in electronics is the ratio of the system output to system input In electronics, loss is the ratio of system output to system input. ... Loss of consortium is a legal term that refers to the deprivation of care and affection, often sexual, in a (usually spousal) relationship. ... The phrase lower court has several possible meanings in English: In reference to an appeal, the lower court is the court whose decision is being reviewed. ... Lübecks law was from the 13th century in the Middle Ages the foundation for municipal laws in many neighbouring cities on the Baltic Sea. ...


M

M'Naghten Rules -- M.O. -- Madhhab -- Madrassa -- Magdeburg rights -- Magdeburg law -- Magistrate -- Magistrates' Court -- Magistrates court -- magna carta -- magnum opus -- Mail box rule -- Maim -- Maintenance -- Maintenance pending suit -- Majority -- Make -- Make one whole -- Maker -- Mala fides -- male fide -- Malfeasance -- Malice -- Malice aforethought -- Malicious prosecution -- Maliki -- Malpractice -- malum in se -- malum prohibitum -- mandamus -- Writ of mandamus -- Mandate -- Mandate of Heaven -- Mandatory -- Mandatory joinder -- Mandatory sentence -- Manifest -- Mann act -- Manorialism -- Manslaughter -- Manslaughter -- Manumission -- Manusmriti -- mare clausum -- mare liberum -- Marital deduction -- Marital life estate -- Marital rights -- Maritime law -- Marked for identification -- Market value -- Marketable title -- Marriage -- Marriageable age -- Marshal -- Martial law -- Mask work -- Masoretes -- Masoretic Text -- Masorti -- Massachusetts trust -- Master -- Master and servant -- Master of Laws -- Master of the Rolls -- Material -- Material representation -- Material witness -- Matrimonial regime -- Matter -- Matter of record -- Maturity -- Maxims -- Maxims of equity -- Maxims of law -- May -- Mayhem -- Mcnabb-mallory rule -- Mechanic's lien -- Mechanics lien -- Mediation -- Mediator -- Medical directive -- Medical ethics -- Medieval Inquisition -- Meet and confer -- Meeting of the minds -- Meforshim -- Megan's Law -- Memorandum -- Memorandum of Association -- mens rea -- Mental anguish -- Mental competency -- Mental cruelty -- Mental health law -- Mental suffering -- Mercantile law -- Merchantable -- Merger -- Mesne -- mesne assignment -- Mesne profits -- Messuage -- Metes and bounds -- Military alliance -- Military dictatorship -- Military law -- Military tribunal -- Militia -- Mining claim -- Ministerial act -- minor -- Minority -- Minority shareholder -- Minutes -- Miranda warning -- Mirror wills -- Misadventure -- Misappropriation -- Mischief -- Misdemeanor -- Misfeasance -- Mishnah Berurah -- Mishnah -- Hebrew law (Mishpat Ivri) -- Mishpat Ivri (Hebrew law) -- Misjoinder -- Misnomer -- Misprision of a felony -- Misprision of treason -- Misrepresentation -- Mistake -- Mistrial -- Mitigating circumstances -- Mitigating factors -- Mitigation -- Mitigation of damages -- Mitzvah -- Mock trial -- Modern Islamic philosophy -- Modification -- modus operandi -- Moiety -- Molestation -- Monarch -- Money laundering -- Monopoly -- Monopoly on the legitimate use of physical force -- Month-to-month -- Monument -- Moot -- Moot court -- Moot point -- Mootness -- Mopery -- Moral absolutism -- Moral certainty -- Moral code -- Moral core -- Moral relativism -- Moral rights -- Moral turpitude -- Moral universalism -- Morality -- Moratorium -- More or less -- Mores -- Morganatic marriage -- Mortgage -- Mortgagee -- Mortgagor -- Motion -- Motion for a new trial -- Motion for a summary judgment -- Motion for more definite statement -- Motion for directed verdict -- Motion for dismissal -- Motion for summary judgment -- motion in limine -- Motion to dismiss -- Motion to strike -- Motion to suppress -- Motion to suppress evidence -- Motive -- Motor vehicle theft -- Mouthpiece -- Movant -- Move -- Mujtahid -- Mullah -- Multi track -- Multifarious -- Multiple citizenship -- Multiplicity of suits -- Municipal -- Municipal court -- Muniment of title -- Murder -- Murder in English law -- Muslim dietary laws -- Mutation -- mutatis mutandis -- Mutiny -- Mutual -- Mutual wills -- The MNaghten Rules are used to establish insanity as an excuse to potential criminal liability, but the definitional criteria establish insanity in the legal and not the psychological sense. ... Modus operandi (often used in the abbreviated form MO) is a Latin phrase, approximately translatable as mode of operation. ... Madhhab (Arabic مذهب pl. ... A Madrasah complex in Gambia Ulugh Beg Madrasa, Samarkand, ca. ... The Magdeburg Rights (or Magdeburg law) were a set of city laws regulating the degree of internal autonomy within cities and villages granted with it by a local ruler. ... The Magdeburg Rights (or Magdeburg law) were a set of city laws regulating the degree of internal autonomy within cities and villages granted with it by a local ruler. ... A magistrate is a judicial officer with limited authority to administer and enforce the law. ... Bedford Magistrates Court A Magistrates Court or court of petty sessions, formerly known as a police court, is the lowest level of court in England and Wales and many other common law jurisdictions. ... Bedford Magistrates Court A Magistrates Court or court of petty sessions, formerly known as a police court, is the lowest level of court in England and Wales and many other common law jurisdictions. ... Magna Carta Magna Carta (Latin for Great Charter, literally Great Paper), also called Magna Carta Libertatum (Great Charter of Freedoms), is an English charter originally issued in 1215. ... Magnum opus (sometimes Opus magnum), from the Latin meaning great work, refers to the best, most popular, or most renowned achievement of an author, artist, or composer. ... The mailbox rule or the postal acceptance rule is a term of common law contracts which determines when a contract has been formed where the parties are communicating via the mail. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Maintenance see repair and maintenance Maintenance is a legal term of art that is used to describe child support and alimony (also called spousal support). ... A majority is a subset of a group that is more than half of the entire group. ... The correct title of this article is make. ... Manufacturing is the transformation of raw materials into finished goods for sale, or intermediate processes involving the production or finishing of semi-manufactures. ... Bad faith (Latin: male fides) is a legal concept that can be found in many areas of the law. ... Bad faith (Latin: male fides) is a legal concept that can be found in many areas of the law. ... The expressions misfeasance and nonfeasance, and occasionally malfeasance, are used in English law with reference to the discharge of public obligations existing by common law, custom or statute. ... The term Malice has several meanings: Malice (legal term), a legal term describing the intent to harm Malice (movie), a 1993 movie starring Nicole Kidman, Alec Baldwin and Bill Pullman Malice (noun), a way to describe the feeling of hatred or disrespect. ... Malice Aforethought is a 1931 murder mystery novel written by Anthony Berkeley Cox, using the name Francis Iles. ... Malicious prosecution is a common law intentional tort. ... The Maliki madhab (Arabic مالكي) is one of the four schools of Fiqh or religious law within Sunni Islam. ... In law, malpractice is type of tort in which the misfeasance, malfeasance or nonfeasance of a professional under a duty to act fails to follow generally accepted professional standards. ... Malum in se (plural mala in se) is a Latin phrase meaning wrong in itself; it is an act that is illegal from the nature of the act, i. ... Malum prohibitum (plural mala prohibita, literal translation: wrong because prohibited) is a Latin phrase used in law to refer to crimes made so by statute, as opposed to crimes based on English common law and obvious violations of societys standards which are defined as malum in se. ... A writ of mandamus or simply mandamus, which means we order in Latin, is the name of one of the prerogative writs and is a court order directing someone, most frequently a government official, to perform a specified act. ... A writ of mandamus or simply mandamus, which means we order in Latin, is the name of one of the prerogative writs and is a court order directing someone, most frequently a government official, to perform a specified act. ... Mandate can mean: An obligation handed down by an inter-governmental body; see mandate (international law) The power granted by an electorate; see mandate (politics) A League of Nations mandate To some Christians, an order from God; see mandate (theology) The decision of an appeals court; see mandate (law) The... The Mandate of Heaven (天命 Pinyin: Tiānmìng) was a traditional Chinese concept of legitimacy used to support the rule of the kings of the Shang Dynasty and later the Emperors of China. ... Mandatory Access Control (MAC) It means that Access control policy decisions are made beyond the control of the individual owner of an object. ... A mandatory sentence is a judicial decision setting the punishment to be inflicted on a person convicted of a crime where judicial discretion is limited by law. ... Manifest adj: Clearly apparent to the sight or understanding; obvious. ... The United States White-Slave Traffic Act of 1910 prohibited so-called white slavery. ... Generic plan of a mediaeval manor; open-field strip farming, some enclosures, triennial crop rotation, demesne and manse, common woodland, pasturage and meadow Manorialism or Seigneurialism describes the organization of rural economy and society in medieval western and parts of central Europe, characterised by the vesting of legal and economic... Manumission is the act of freeing a slave, done at the will of the owner. ... The Manu Smriti or Laws of Manu, is one of the eighteen Smritis of the Dharma Sastra (or laws of righteous conduct), written c. ... In legal latin, mare clausum refers to any sea or other navigable body of water which is under the jurisdiction of a particular country and which is closed to other nations. ... The terms international waters or transboundary waters apply where any of the following types of bodies of water (or their drainage basins) transcend international boundaries: oceans, large marine ecosystems, enclosed or semi-enclosed regional seas and estuaries, rivers, lakes, groundwater systems (aquifers), and wetlands [1]. Oceans and seas, waters outside... Marital deduction is a type of tax law that allows a person to give assets to his or her spouse with reduced or no tax imposed upon the transfer. ... Admiralty law (usually referred to as simply admiralty and also referred to as maritime law) is a distinct body of law which governs maritime questions and offenses. ... Market capitalization, often abbreviated to market cap, mkt. ... A marriage is a relationship between or among individuals, usually recognized by civil authority and/or bound by the religious beliefs of the participants. ... This is an incomplete list of ages at which people are allowed to marry in various countries. ... Marshal (also sometimes spelled marshall in American English, but not in British English) is a word used in several official titles of various branches of society. ... Martial law is the system of rules that takes effect (usually after a formal declaration) when a military authority takes control of the normal administration of justice. ... A mask work is a two or three-dimensional layout of an integrated circuit (IC), i. ... The Masoretes (baalei masorah) were scribes based primarily in at least three places, Tiberias (the best known); Eretz Yisrael, or the land of Israel; and Babylonia. ... The Masoretic Text (MT) is the Hebrew text of the Tanakh approved for general use in Judaism. ... Masorti means traditional in Hebrew. ... A Master is a low (or lowest, in some jurisdictions) rank of judge or judicial official in a number of judiciaries, such as those of the United Kingdom, the Republic of Ireland, and a number of Canadian provinces. ... The Master of Laws is an advanced law degree that allows someone to specialize in a particular area of law. ... The Master of the Rolls is the third most senior judge of England, the Lord Chancellor of Great Britain traditionally being first and the Lord Chief Justice second. ... Materials are inputs to production or manufacturing. ... A material witness is a witness who possesses relevant and important information in a criminal investigation or trial. ... Matrimonial regimes are the property ownership regimes that are set forth in the law to which couples may precribe under civil law marriage law. ... Matter is commonly defined as the substance of which physical objects are composed. ... Maturity may refer to: Sexual maturity Maturity, a geological term describing hydrocarbon generation Maturity, a financial term indicating the end of payments of principal or interest Look up Maturity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Maxim may refer to: Maxim (saying), an aphorism Maxim (magazine), an international mens magazine Maxim gun, the first self-acting machine gun Gricean maxims, conversational principles theorized by philosopher Paul Grice Maxim (law) Maxim_(philosophy), a principle of willing Maxim is the name of: Maxim Litvinov (1876-1951), Russian... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Mayhem, under the common law of crimes, consisted of the intentional and wanton removal of a body part that would handicap a persons ability to defend themselves in combat. ... A mechanics lien is a hold on real property for the benefit of someone whose work or property improves the property. ... A mechanics lien is a hold on real property for the benefit of someone whose work or property improves the property. ... Mediation in legal terminology, comprises an act of bringing two states, sides or parties in a dispute closer together toward agreement through alternative dispute resolution, a dialogue in which a (generally) neutral third party, the mediator, using appropriate techniques, assists two or more parties to help them negotiate an agreement... For other uses, see Mediation Mediator is a book series written by Meg Cabot. ... Medical ethics is the discipline of evaluating the merits, risks, and social concerns of activities in the field of medicine. ... Pedro Berruguete. ... The Meeting of the Minds (also referred to as mutual assent) is a term in contract law used to describe the intentions of the parties forming the contract. ... Meforshim is a Hebrew word meaning commentators (or roughly meaning exegetes), and is used as a substitute for the correct word perushim which means commentaries. In Judaism this term refers to commentaries by the commentators on the Torah (five books of Moses), Hebrew Bible, the Mishnah, the Talmud, responsa, even... Megans Law is the colloquial term used to denote a number of state laws in the United States that require law enforcement authorities to identify what are generally called sex offenders to the public at large through various media, including in some cases the Internet. ... Look up Memorandum in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A memorandum is a written form of communication most often employed in business environments. ... A Memorandum of Association is one of the documents required in the United Kingdom to incorporate a company, also seen in many jurisdictions of the British Commonwealth. ... The mens rea is the Latin term for guilty mind used in the criminal law. ... Mental cruelty is a dangerous kind of torture to somebody by some third party or parties. ... Mental health law is that area of law that deals with mental conditions. ... The phrase mergers and acquisitions or M&A refers to the aspect of corporate finance strategy and management dealing with the merging and acquiring of different companies as well as assets. ... Mesne (an Anglo-French legal form of the O. Fr. ... In property law, a mesne assignment is an intermediate assignment in a series of assignments which occurs prior to the final assignment. ... Mesne profits are sums of money paid for the occupation of land to a person with right of immediate occupation, where no permission has been given for that occupation. ... In law, the term messuage equates to a dwelling-house and includes outbuildings, orchard, curtilage or court-yard and garden. ... Metes and bounds is a system or method of describing land, real property (in contrast to personal property) or real estate. ... A military alliance is an agreement between two, or more, countries; related to wartime planning, commitments, or contingencies; such agreements can be both defensive and offensive. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Military law is a distinct legal system to which members of armed forces are subject. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Mineral rights, mining rights, oil rights or drilling rights, are the rights to remove minerals, oil, or sometimes water, that may be contained in and under some land. ... In law, a person who is not yet a legal adult is known as a minor (known in some places as an infant or juvenile). ... The definition of a minority group can vary, depending on specific context, but generally refers to either a sociological sub-group that does not form either a majority or a plurality of the total population, or a group that, while not necessarily a numerical minority, is disadvantaged or otherwise has... Bold text:This article is about the written record of a meeting. ... The Miranda warning is a police warning that must be given to criminal suspects in police custody in the United States before they can be asked questions relating to the commission of crimes. ... Misappropriation is the intentional, illegal use of the property or funds of another person for ones own use or other unauthorized purpose, particularly by a public official, a trustee of a trust, an executor or administrator of a dead persons estate or by any person with a responsibility... Mischief, in criminal law, is an offence against property that does not involve conversion. ... A misdemeanors (or misdemeanour), in many common law legal systems, is a lesser criminal act. ... The expressions misfeasance and nonfeasance, and occasionally malfeasance, are used in English law with reference to the discharge of public obligations existing by common law, custom or statute. ... Mishnah Berurah (Hebrew: Clarified Teaching) is a work of halakha (Jewish law) by Rabbi Yisrael Meir Kagan, better known as The Chofetz Chaim (Poland, 1838 - 1933). ... The Mishnah (Hebrew משנה, repetition) is a major source of rabbinic Judaisms religious texts. ... Mishpat Ivri (Hebrew for Hebrew law or Jewish/Hebrew jurisprudence.) In content, Mishpat Ivri refers to those aspects of Halakha (traditional Jewish law) that many in modern society generally consider relevant to non-religious or secular law. ... Mishpat Ivri (Hebrew for Hebrew law or Jewish/Hebrew jurisprudence.) In content, Mishpat Ivri refers to those aspects of Halakha (traditional Jewish law) that many in modern society generally consider relevant to non-religious or secular law. ... Look up Misnomer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Misprision of felony, under the common law of England, was the crime of failing to report knowledge of a felony to the appropriate authorities. ... Misprision of treason is an offence found in many common law jurisdictions, committed by someone who knows a treason is being or is about to be committed but does not report it to a proper authority. ... In contract law, a misrepresentation is a false statement of fact made by one party to another party and has the effect of inducing that party into the contract. ... Mistake of law and mistake of fact are two types of defense by excuse, via which a defendant may argue that they should not be held criminally liable for breaking the law or liable for damages under a civil law action. ... Mistrial. ... This expression extenuating circumstances is used in law with reference to crimes, to describe cases in which, though an offence has been committed without legal justification or excuse, its gravity, from the point of view of punishment or moral opprobrium, is mitigated or reduced by reason of the facts leading... Mitigation consists of the activities designed to reduce or eliminate risks to persons or property or to lessen the actual or potential effects or consequences of an incident. ... Mitzvah (Hebrew: מצווה, commandment; plural, mitzvot; from צוה, tzavah, command) is a word used in Judaism to refer to (a) the commandments, of which there are 613, given in the Torah (the first five books of the Hebrew Bible) or (b) any Jewish law at all. ... A mock trial (sometimes synonymous with moot court, although the activities are often different) is a contrived or imitation trial. ... There are many new trends in Islamic Philosophy and meanwhile some traditional schools are still very alive and active. ... Modification is the act of applying change to an original. ... Modus operandi (often used in the abbreviated form MO) is a Latin phrase, approximately translated as mode of operation. ... Look up moiety in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Molestation is a commonly used synonym for general sexual abuse. ... Look up monarch in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Money laundering is the practice of engaging in financial transactions in order to conceal the identity, source and destination of the money in question. ... In economics, a monopoly (from the Latin word monoplium - Greek language Greek monos, one + polein, to sell) is defined as a persistent market situation where there is only one provider of a kind of product or service. ... The monopoly on the legitimate use of physical force designs an essential attribute of the states sovereignty. ... The Taj Mahal, commissioned by the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan, as a mausoleum for his wife, Arjumand Banu Begum. ... The word moot has multiple meanings. ... Moot court (sometimes synonymous with mock trial) is an extracurricular activity in many law schools. ... In law, a matter is moot if further legal proceedings with regard to it can have no effect, or events have placed it beyond the reach of the law. ... In law, a matter is moot if further legal proceedings with regard to it can have no effect, or events have placed it beyond the reach of the law. ... Mopery is a vague and obscure legal term, used in certain jurisdictions to mean walking down the street with no clear destination or purpose. Like loitering and vagrancy laws, it can be used by law enforcement to legitimately detain unsavory types before they have committed a clearer or more dangerous... Moral absolutism is the belief that there are absolute standards against which moral questions can be judged, and that certain actions are right or wrong, devoid of the context of the act. ... Moral certainty is a concept of intuitive probability. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Morality. ... The moral core of an individual is the extent to which that person will apply his or her notions of morality. ... This article attempts to confine itself to discussion of relativism in morality and ethics. ... Moral rights are rights of creators of copyrighted works generally recognized in civil law jurisdictions and first recognized in France and Germany, before they were included in the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works in 1928. ... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary using the Transwiki process. ... Moral universalism is a moral view, often related to humanist philosophy, which claims that the fundamental basis for a universalist ethic—universally applicable to all humanity—can be derived or inferred from what is common among existing moral codes. ... Morality deals with that which is regarded as right or wrong. ... In law, a moratorium (from Latin morari, to delay) is a legal authorization postponing for a specified time the payment of debts or obligations. ... The term mores (IPA ) as used in sociology is a plural noun. ... A morganatic marriage is a type of marriage which can be contracted in certain countries, usually between persons of unequal social rank (unebenbürtig in German), which prevents the passage of the husbands titles and privileges to the wife and any children born of the marriage. ... A mortgage is a method of using property as security for the payment of a debt. ... A mortgage (Law French for dead pledge) is a device used to create a lien on real estate by contract. ... A mortgage (Law French for dead pledge) is a device used to create a lien on real estate by contract. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... In the United States a Motion for More Definite Statement as defined by Rule 12(e) of The Federal Rules of Procedure is a means of obtaining a more detailed motion from the opposing party in a civil case before interposing a responsive pleading. ... In law, a directed verdict is an order from the judge presiding over a jury trial that one side or the other wins. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... A summary judgment is a legal decision in a case made when one party to a lawsuit requests summary judgment by pre-trial motion. ... Motion in limine (Latin: at the outset) is a motion, raised before or during trial, to exclude the presentation of certain evidence to the jury. ... A legal motion is a procedural device in law to bring a limited but contested matter before a court for decision. ... Motive is a term that turns up in many different forms in the popular psychology of literature, cinema, business and as term of art in law. ... Motor vehicle theft is a crime of theft. ... // Scuba diving and industrial breathing sets Nemrod twin-hose diving regulator made in the 1980s. ... MOVE is an organization formed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1972 by John Africa (Vincent Leaphart) and Donald Glassey. ... ijtihad is a technical term of the Islamic law and means the process of making a legal decision by independent interpretation of the sources of the law, the Quran and the Sunna. ... See also Akhoond, alternate title for such an individual Shaykh Categories: | | | | | ... Countries that do (yellow) and do not (red) recognize multiple citizenship. ... Multiplicity of suits is a term to describe when more than one lawsuit exists regarding the same transaction or occurrence. ... A municipality or general-purpose district (compare with: special-purpose district) is an administrative local area generally composed of a clearly defined territory and commonly referring to a city, town, or village government. ... A muniment of title is a deed or other documentary evidence of title to land. ... In English law, murder is considered the most serious form of homicide where one person kills another either intending to cause death or intending to cause serious injury in a situation where death is virtually certain (originally termed malice aforethought even though it requires neither malice nor premeditation). ... Muslim dietary laws provide a set of rules as to what Muslims eat in their diet. ... In biology, mutations are changes to the genetic material (usually DNA or RNA). ... In Latin, mutatis mutandis means upon changing what needs to be changed, where what needs to be changed is usually implied by a prior statement assumed to be understood by the reader. ... Mutiny is the crime of conspiring to disobey an order that a group of similarly-situated individuals (typically members of the military; or the crew of any ship, even if they are civilians) is legally obliged to obey. ... Mutual describes a form of business enterprise which is owned by those who do business with it. ... Joint wills and mutual wills are closely related terms used in the law of wills to describing two types of testemantary devices that may be executed by a married couple to insure that their property is disposed of identically. ...


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N.O.V. -- Name change -- Named plaintiffs -- Napoleonic Code -- Narcotic -- National Insurance contributions -- National Labor Relations Board -- National trade union center -- Nationality -- Natural law -- Natural person -- ne exeat -- Necessary inference -- Necessary party -- Negative declaration -- Negative pregnant -- Negligence -- Negligence per se -- Negligent -- Negotiable instrument -- Negotiation -- nemo dat quod non habet -- nemo judex in sua causa -- Net -- Net estate -- Neutral country -- New matter -- Next friend -- Next of kin -- nexus -- Night and Fog prisoner -- nihil -- nil -- nisi -- nisi prius -- No contest -- No fault divorce -- No fault insurance -- No-par stock -- Noble Eightfold Path -- nolle prosequi -- nolo contendere -- Nominal damages -- Nominal party -- Nominal value -- Nominee -- Non -- non compos mentis -- non constat -- non est factum -- non liquet -- non obstante verdicto -- Non-conforming use -- Non-contestability clause -- Non-contiguous -- Non-disclosure agreement -- Non-discretionary trust -- Non-executive director -- Non-feasance -- Non-profit corporation -- Non-profit organization -- Non-suit -- Nonimmigrant visa -- Nonviolence -- Not guilty -- Not guilty by reason of insanity -- Not-for-profit corporation -- nota bene -- Notary -- Notary public -- Note (disambiguation) -- Notice -- Notice of appeal -- Notice of default -- Notice of issue -- Notice to quit -- Notorious possession -- Notwithstanding clause (Canadian Constitution) -- Novation -- Noxious -- Nugatory -- Nuisance -- nulla bona -- nulla poena sine lege -- Nullity -- nullum crimen, nulla poena sine praevia lege poenali -- nunc pro tunc -- Nuremberg Code -- Nuremberg Trials -- Judgment notwithstanding the verdict, or J.N.O.V. for short (Latin Judgment Non Obstante Veredicto) is the practice in American courts whereby the presiding judge in a criminal or civil case may overrule the decision of a jury and reverse or amend their verdict. ... Name change is a basic legal act that is recognized in practically all legal systems to allow an individual the opportunity to adopt a name other than the name given by birth, marriage, or adoption. ... A plaintiff, also known as a claimant or complainant, is the party who initiates a lawsuit (also known as an action) before a court. ... First page of the 1804 original edition The original Napoleonic Code, or Code Napoléon (originally called the Code civil des français, or civil code of the French), was the French civil code, established at the behest of Napoléon I. It entered into force on March 21, 1804. ... The term narcotic, derived from the Greek word narkotikos, meaning benumbing or deadening, originally referred to a variety of substances that induced sleep (such state is narcosis). ... The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) is an independent agency of the United States Government charged with conducting elections for union representation and with investigating and remedying unfair labor practices. ... A national trade union center is a federation of trade unions in a single country. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... It has been suggested that Law of nature (precept) be merged into this article or section. ... In jurisprudence, a natural person is a human being perceptible through the senses and subject to physical laws, as opposed to an artificial person, i. ... A negative pregnant (sometimes called a pregnant denial) refers to a denial which implies its affirmative opposite by seeming to deny only a qualification of the allegation and not the allegation itself. ... In law, negligence is a type of tort or delict that can be either criminal or civil in nature. ... Negligence per se is the legal doctrine whereby certain acts are considered intrinsically negligent, with no requirement to prove the negligence was known or intended. ... Manufacturers are reponsible for adequately warning consumers of possibly dangerous products. ... A negotiable instrument is a specialized type of contract which obligates a party to pay a certain sum of money on specified terms. ... Negotiation is the process where interested parties resolve disputes, agree upon courses of action, bargain for individual or collective advantage, and/or attempt to craft outcomes which serve their mutual interests. ... Nemo dat quod non habet, literally meaning no one [can] give what they dont have is a legal rule, sometimes called the nemo dat rule that states that the purchase of a possession from someone who has no ownership right to it also denies the purchaser any ownership title. ... Nemo judex in sua causa is a Latin term which describes the principle of natural justice that no person can judge a case in which he or she is a party. ... Wiktionary has related dictionary definitions, such as: net Bird netting on wine grapes. ... A neutral country takes no side in a war between other parties, and in return hopes to avoid being attacked by either of them. ... Next friend, in British law, the phrase used for a person who represents in an action another person who is under disability to maintain a suit on their own behalf. ... Next of kin is the term used to describe a persons closest living blood relative or relatives. ... Look up nexus in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Nacht und Nebel (Night and Fog ) was an incident and edict in Nazi Germany. ... Nihil is an album by the German industrial music band KMFDM released in 1995 (see 1995 in music). ... Look up nil in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Nisi ben Menasseh or Nisi ben Moses was a Jewish ruler of the Khazars mentioned in the Khazar Correspondence. ... Nisi Prius, in English law, a term used to denote generally all actions tried before judges of the kings bench division. ... In both criminal and civil trials in the United States, a plea of nolo contendere means that the defendant neither admits nor disputes the charge. ... No-fault divorce is the dissolution of a marriage, upon petition to the court by either party, without the requirement that the petitioner show fault on the part of the other party. ... No fault insurance is a type of automobile insurance where an insured need only prove that they were injured in an automobile accident (either damage to persons or damage to property) to recover under the policy. ... The Noble Eightfold Path (Sanskrit Ä€ryo ṣṭāṅgo mārgaḥ , Pāli Ariyo aá¹­á¹­haá¹…giko maggo) of Buddhism, as taught by the Buddha Śākyamuni, is the way to the cessation of suffering, the fourth part of the Four Noble Truths. ... Nolle prosequi is a Latin legal phrase meaning unwilling to pursue. ... In both criminal and civil trials in the United States, a plea of nolo contendere means that the defendant neither admits nor disputes the charge. ... In law, damages refers to the money paid or awarded to a claimant (as it is known in the UK) or plaintiff (in the US) following their successful claim in a civil action. ... Nominal value is the value of anything expressed in money of the day, versus real value which removes the effect of inflation. ... Nomination is part of the process of selecting a candidate for either election to an office, or the bestowing of an honor or award. ... Non or non can refer to: Look up non in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The term non compos mentis comes from Latin, non meaning not, compos meaning in control, and mentis, genitive singular of mens, and means It is most typically used in its negative form, non compos mentis, that is, not having control of ones faculties, as in a phrase such as... Non constat approxamitely translates into it is not certain. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A situation where there is no applicable law. ... Judgment notwithstanding the verdict, or J.N.O.V. for short (Latin Judgment Non Obstante Veredicto) is the practice in American courts whereby the presiding judge in a criminal or civil case may overrule the decision of a jury and reverse or amend their verdict. ... A non-disclosure agreement (NDA), also called a confidential disclosure agreement (CDA), confidentiality agreement or secrecy agreement, is a legal contract between at least two parties which outlines confidentiality materials the parties wish to share with one another for certain purposes, but wish to restrict from generalized use. ... A non-executive director is a member of the board of directors of a company who does not form part of the executive management team. ... ... A non-profit organization (often called non-profit org or simply non-profit or not-for-profit) is an organization whose primary objective is something other than the generation of profit. ... A nonprofit organization (abbreviated NPO, or non-profit or not-for-profit) is an organization whose primary objective is to support some issue or matter of private interest or public concern for non-commercial purposes. ... In law, a non-suit is a judgment against a plaintiff in a civil action for failure to prosecute the case or to introduce sufficient evidence. ... Nonviolence (or non-violence) is a set of assumptions about morality conflict that leads its proponents to reject the use of violence in efforts to attain social or political goals. ... In criminal law, an acquittal is the legal result of a verdict of not guilty, or some similar end of the proceeding that terminates it with prejudice without a verdict of guilty being entered against the accused. ... The insanity defense are possible defenses by excuse, via which a defendant may argue that they should not be held criminally liable for breaking the law, as they were mentally ill or mentally incompetent at the time of their allegedly criminal actions. ... A Not-for-profit corporation is a corporation created by statute, government or judicial authority that does not issue stock. ... Nota Bene is a Latin phrase meaning Note Well, coming from notâre -- to note. ... Notary can refer to either of the following two professions: Notary public. ... An Embossed Notary Seal A notary public is an officer who can administer oaths and statutory declarations, witness and authenticate documents and perform certain other acts varying from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. ... Look up note in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Note refers to a musical note. ... Notice is the legal concept describing a requirement that a party be aware of legal process affecting their rights, obligations or duties. ... A notice of default is a notification given to a borrower stating that he or she has not made their payments by the predetermined deadline. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Section Thirty-three of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms is part of the Constitution of Canada. ... Novation is a term used in contract law and business law to describe the act of either replacing an obligation to perform with a new obligation, or replacing a party to an agreement with a new party. ... Noxious Saucy Beast is the debut album by Atlanta-based rock band The Press, released in April 2005. ... Nuisance is a common law tort. ... The phrase Nulla poena sine lege (Latin: no penalty without a law) refers to the legal principle that one cannot be penalised for doing something that isnt prohibited by law. ... In linear algebra, the nullity of a matrix M is the number of columns of M minus the rank of M. If the m by n matrix M is regarded as a linear transformation Rn → Rm, then the nullity is equal to the dimension of the kernel of this linear... Nullum crimen, nulla poena sine praevia lege poenali is a basic maxim in continental European legal thinking, authored by Paul Johann Anselm Ritter von Feuerbach as part of the Bavarian Code in 1813. ... Nunc pro tunc is a Latin expression in common use in the English language. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... The Süddeutsche Zeitung announces The Verdict in Nuremberg. ...


O

O.R. -- O.S.C. -- Oath -- obiter dicta is plural; see the singular obiter dictum -- Object -- Objection -- Objectivist philosophy -- Obligation -- Obligations of confidentiality -- Obligee -- Obligor -- Obscene -- Obscenity -- Obstruction of justice -- Occupancy -- Occupant -- Occupation -- Occupational disease -- Occupational hazard -- Occupy the field -- Of counsel -- Off calendar -- Offender -- Offense -- Offer -- Offer of proof -- Offeree -- Offeror -- Officer -- Officer of the court -- Officers of a corporation -- Official -- Official misconduct -- Official receiver -- Official Solicitor -- Officious intermeddler -- Offset -- Offshore corporation -- Ombudsman -- Omission -- Omnibus clause -- On all fours -- On demand -- On file -- On or about -- On or before -- On the merits -- On the stand -- onus probandi -- Open adoption -- Open court -- Open-source license -- Opening statement -- Operation of law -- opinio juris sive necessitatis -- Opinion -- Option -- Or -- Oral argument -- Oral contract -- Oral examination -- Oral law -- Order -- Order to show cause -- Order-in-Council -- Ordinance -- Ordinary -- Ordinary course of business -- Ordinary resolution -- Ordinary shares -- Organized crime -- Original jurisdiction -- Original sin -- Originating application -- Orphan -- orse -- Ostensible agent -- Ostensible authority -- Ouster -- Out of court -- Out-of-pocket expenses -- Outbuilding -- Outlaw -- Output contract -- Over-the-counter drug -- Overcharge -- Overrule -- Overt act -- Owe -- Own -- Own recognizance -- Owner -- Owner-occupier -- Ownership -- OR and/or or may stand for: Look up OR, Or, or in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... OSC is a three-letter acronym that may stand for: United States Office of Special Counsel Ontario Science Centre Ontario Securities Commission OpenSound Control Orbital Sciences Corporation Orson Scott Card Ohio Supercomputing Center OpenSource Connections, a software development consultancy OSC is also an abbreviation for oscillator. ... An oath (from Old Saxon eoth) is either a promise or a statement of fact calling upon something or someone that the oath maker considers sacred, usually a god, as a witness to the binding nature of the promise or the truth of the statement of fact. ... Obiter Dictum is a remark or observation made by a judge while issuing a ruling. ... WordNet gives four main senses for the English noun object: a physical entity; something that is within the grasp of the senses; an aim, target or objective — see Object (task); a grammatical Object — either a direct object or an indirect object the focus of cognitions or feelings. ... In law and in religion, testimony is a solemn attestation as to the truth of a matter. ... Objectivism is the philosophical system developed by Russian-American philosopher and writer Ayn Rand. ... An obligation can be legal or moral. ... Delegation is a term used in the law of contracts to describe the act of giving another person the responsibility of carrying out the performance agreed to in a contract. ... An assignment is a term used with similar meanings in the law of contracts and in the law of real estate. ... Obscenity has several connotations. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Modern Obstruction of Justice, in a common law state, refers to the crime of offering interference of any sort to the work of police, investigators, regulatory agencies, prosecutors, Irvine High School students, or other (usually government) officials. ... is a defined and legal term in building construction and building codes. ... Occupation may refer to: the principal activity (job or calling) that earns money for a person (see profession, business) the periods of time following a nations territory invasion by controlling enemy troops (see belligerent occupation) any activity that occupies an important portion of a persons attention (see fan... Occupation may refer to: the principal activity (job or calling) that earns money for a person (see List of occupations, employment, profession, business) the periods of time following a nations territory invasion by controlling enemy troops (see Military occupation) the act of settling onto an uninhabited tract of land... An occupational disease is any recognized chronic ailment that is known to occur in a given body of workers in a given industry at a rate far higher than occurs in the general population, and includes diseases that are only known among workers in a given industry and no-where... Occupational safety and health is the discipline concerned with protecting the safety, health and welfare of employees, organisations, and others affected by the work they undertake (such as customers, suppliers, and members of the public). ... Of counsel is often the title of an attorney employed by a law firm or organization to assist in litigation but who is usually not an associate or partner. ... For other senses of this word, see crime (disambiguation). ... In law, an offense is a violation of the penal law. ... Offer and acceptance analysis is a tool in contract law used to determine whether a contract exists between two parties. ... Offer and acceptance analysis is a traditional approach in contract law used to determine whether an agreement exists between two parties. ... Offer and acceptance analysis is a traditional approach in contract law used to determine whether an agreement exists between two parties. ... Any holder of an office or of a post may bear the title officer. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... An official (from the Latin Officialis, person – or object – related to an officium, see that article) is, in the primary sense, someone who holds an office (i. ... Malfeasance in office, or official misconduct, is the commission of an unlawful act, done in an official capacity, which affects the performance of official duties. ... The Official Receiver (usually abbreviated OR) is the name of a statutory office holder in England and Wales. ... Official Solicitor is a term which relates to two different and relatively old offices of British government. ... Is a person who volunarily, and without request or pre-existing legal duty, interjects herself into the affairs of another, then seeks renumeration for services or reimbursement. ... In computer science, an offset within an array or other data structure object is an integer indicating the distance (displacement) from the beginning of the object up until a given element or point, presumably within the same object. ... An offshore company is one which does not conduct substantial business in its country of incorporation. ... Look up Ombudsman in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... start ... An omnibus clause is a clause in a contract for motor insurance which extends coverage to all drivers operating the insured vehicle with the owners permission. ... This article is in need of attention. ... On the merits refers to a legal decision based on the facts in evidence and the law pertaining to those facts, because the judge considers technical and procedural defenses to be overcome or irrelevant. ... Burden of proof is the obligation to prove allegations which are presented in a legal action. ... Open adoption is a term generally used to describe a variety of arrangements allowing for ongoing contact between the natural/birth/biological parent(s), and a child placed for adoption. ... An open-source license is a copyright license for computer software that makes the source code available under terms that allow for modification and redistribution without having to pay the original author. ... An opening statement is generally the first occasion that the trier of fact (jury or judge) has to hear from counsel in a trial, aside from (depending on jurisdiction) questioning during voir dire. ... The phrase by operation of law is a legal term that indicates that a right or liability has been created for a party, irrespective of the intent of that party, because it is dictated by existing legal principles. ... Opinio juris sive necessitatis or Opinio juris is the belief that a behavior was done because it was a legal obligation. ... Look up Opinion in Wiktionary, the free dictionary An opinion is a persons ideas and thoughts towards something. ... In finance, an option is a contract whereby one party (the holder or buyer) has the right but not the obligation to exercise a feature of the contract (the option) on or before a future date (the exercise date or expiry). ... OR logic gate. ... Oral arguments are verbal presentations to a judge or appellate court by a lawyer (or the party when representing themselves) of the legal reasons why they should prevail. ... An oral contract is a contract that exists only in verbal communication, having not been written down or only partially written; in the latter case, the partially written contract lacks a memorandum. ... An oral law is a code of conduct in use in a given culture, religion or other regroupement, by which a body of rules of human behaviour is transmitted by oral tradition and effectively respected, or the single rule that is orally transmitted. ... A court order is an official proclamation by a judge (or panel of judges) that defines the legal relationships between the parties before the court and requires or authorizes the carrying out of certain steps by one or more parties to a case. ... An order to show cause is a type of court order that requires one or more of the parties to a case to justify, explain, or prove something to the court. ... An Order-in-Council is an executive order issued in Commonwealth Realms operating under the Westminster system. ... Ordinance can mean: A law made by a non-sovereign body such as a city council or a colony. ... Pope Pius XI, depicted in this window at Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace, Honolulu, was ordinary of the universal Roman Catholic Church and local ordinary of Rome. ... In law, the ordinary course of business covers the usual transactions, customs and practices of a certain business and of a certain firm. ... Common stock, also referred to as common or ordinary shares, are, as the name implies, the most usual and commonly held form of stock in a corporation. ... Organized crime is crime carried out systematically by formal criminal organizations. ... The original jurisdiction of a court refers to matters on which the court rules directly, rather than on matters which are referred to it after being heard by another court. ... Michelangelos painting of the original sin (the Fall) According to Christian tradition, Original sin describes the condition of sinfulness (lack of holiness) into which human beings are hereditarily born. ... Orphans, by Thomas Kennington An orphan (from the Greek ορφανός) is a person (or animal), who has lost one or both parents, often through death. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... A concurrent estate or co-tenancy is a concept in property law, particularly derived from the common law of real property, which describes the various ways in which property can be owned by more than one person at a given time. ... Out-of-pocket expenses are direct outlays of cash which are not reimbursed. ... An outbuilding is any structure secondary to a house, such as a shed, or an outhouse. ... Butch Cassidy, a famous Western American outlaw An outlaw, a person living the lifestyle of outlawry, meaning literally outside of the law. ... output contract; it is an agreement in which a producer agrees to sell its entire production to the buyer, who in turn agrees to purchase the entire output, whatever that is. ... In criminal law, an overt act is an act that, while innocent per se, can potentially be used as evidence against someone during a trial to show his/her participation in a crime. ... For other uses, see Debt (disambiguation). ... An owner-occupier is a person who lives in a house that he or she owns. ... Ownership is the state or fact of exclusive possession or control of property, which may be an object, land/real estate, intellectual property or some other kind of property. ...


P

pacta sunt servanda -- Paid into court -- Pain and suffering -- Palimony -- Pander -- Panderer -- Panel -- Paper hanger -- par delictum -- Paralegal -- Paramount title -- Paraphilia -- Parcel -- Pardon -- parens patriae -- Parent -- Parent company -- Parental neglect -- Pari delicto -- Pari materia -- Pari passu -- Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property -- Parish -- Parliament -- Parliamentary procedure -- Parliamentary supremacy -- Parliamentary system -- Parody -- Parol -- Parol evidence rule -- Parole -- Parquet -- Partial -- Partial breach -- Partial disability -- Partial verdict -- Participate -- Particulars -- Partition -- Partly-paid -- Partner -- Partnership -- Party -- Party and party -- Party of the first part -- Party of the second part -- Party wall -- Passenger -- Passing off -- Passion -- Passive -- Patent -- Patent ambiguity -- Patent Cooperation Treaty -- Patent defect -- Patent infringement -- Patent pending -- Patentability -- Patently unreasonable -- Paternity -- Paternity suit -- Patient -- Patrimony -- Patrimony of affectation -- Patronage -- Pawn -- Pay -- Pay as you earn (paye) -- Payable -- Payable on demand -- Payee -- Payment in due course -- Payment in full -- Payor -- Peace bond -- Peaceable possession -- Peculation -- Pecuniary -- Pedophilia -- Peeping tom -- Peer group -- Peerage -- Peer review -- Penal -- Penal code -- Penal colony -- Penal law -- Penal notice -- Penal transportation -- Penalty -- Penalty phase -- Penance -- Pendent jurisdiction -- pendente lite -- Penitentiary -- Pension plan -- Pension scheme -- People -- People's Republic of China's trademark law -- per -- per capita -- per curiam -- per diem -- per minas -- per pro -- per quod -- per se -- per stirpes -- Peremptory -- Peremptory challenge -- Peremptory challenges -- Peremptory norm -- Peremptory writ of mandate -- Perfect -- Perfected -- Perform -- Performance -- Perjurer -- Perjury -- Permanent Court of Arbitration -- Permanent disability -- Permanent injunction -- Permanent injury -- Permissive -- Permit -- Perpetuity -- Person -- Person having ordinary skill in the art -- persona non grata -- Personal application -- Personal effects -- Personal guardian -- Personal jurisdiction -- Personal property -- Personal recognizance -- Personal representative -- Personal service -- Personal services -- Personality rights -- Personalty -- Perversion -- Petit jury -- Petition -- Petition for probate -- Petition to make special -- Petitioner -- Petty larceny -- Petty offenses -- Philosophy of law -- Physical custody -- Physician-patient privilege -- Picketing -- Pierce the corporate veil -- Piercing the corporate veil -- Pilferage -- Pillory -- Pimp -- Pink slip -- Piracy -- Plagiarism -- Plain error -- Plain view doctrine -- Plaint note -- Plaint number -- Plaintiff -- Plaintiff's attorney -- Planting and seating -- Plc -- Plea -- Plea bargain -- Plea in abatement -- Plead -- Pleading -- Pleadings -- Pledge -- Plenary -- Plenary authority -- Police -- Police brutality -- Police court -- Police oppression -- Police powers -- Police state -- Corruption -- Political prisoner -- Political question -- Political science -- Poll -- Poll tax -- Polyandry -- Polygamy -- Bigamy -- Polygraph -- Pornography -- Port of entry -- Positive law -- Posse -- posse comitatus -- Possess -- Possession -- Possession of stolen goods -- Possession proceedings -- Possessory -- Possessory interest -- Possibility of a reverter -- Post -- post mortem -- Postdated check -- Pot -- Pour over will -- Power -- Power of acceptance -- Power of appointment -- Power of arrest -- Power of attorney -- Practicable -- Practice -- Practice Direction -- Practice of law -- Praemunire -- praetor peregrinus -- Pray -- Prayer -- Pre-emption rights -- Precatory -- Precedent -- Predecease -- Preemption -- Preemption of state and local laws in the United States -- Preemptive right -- Preference -- Preferred dividend -- Preferred stock -- Preliminary hearing -- Preliminary injunction -- Premeditation -- Premises -- Premium -- Prenuptial agreement -- Preponderance of the evidence -- Prerogative writ -- Prescription -- Prescription drug -- Prescriptive easement -- Presentment -- President of the family division -- Presiding judge -- Presumption -- Presumption of innocence -- Pretermitted heir -- Pretrial discovery -- Prevailing party -- Price fixing -- prima facie -- Prima facie case -- Prima impressionis -- Prime suspect -- primogeniture -- Principal -- Principal place of business -- Prior restraint -- Prior(s) -- Priority -- Prison -- Prisoner of war -- Privacy -- Private bill -- Private carrier -- Private company -- Private Express Statutes -- Private international law -- Private law -- Private nuisance -- Private parts -- Private property -- Private road -- Privateer -- Privilege -- Privilege against self incrimination -- Privileged communication -- Privileges and immunities -- Privity -- Privy Council -- Privy Council of Sweden -- pro bono -- pro bono publico -- pro forma -- pro hac vice -- pro per -- pro rata -- pro se -- pro tanto -- pro tem -- pro tempore -- Probable cause -- Probate -- Probation -- Probative -- Probative facts -- Probative value -- Procedendo -- Procedural defense -- Procedural justice -- Procedural law -- Procedure -- Proceeding -- Process -- Process server -- Proctor -- Product liability -- Professional corporation -- Professional negligence -- Proffer -- Prohibition -- Writ of prohibition -- Promise -- Promissory estoppel -- Promissory note -- Promoter -- Promotional stock -- Proof -- Proper party -- Property -- Property damage -- Property guardian -- Property law -- Property tax -- propria persona -- Proprietary -- Proprietary interest -- Proprietary rights -- Proprietor -- Prosecute -- Prosecution -- Prosecutor -- Prospectus -- Prostitute -- Prostitution -- Protective custody -- Protective order -- Protest -- Protocol -- Prove -- Prove up -- Provisional remedy -- Proviso -- Proximate cause -- Proxy -- Prudent man rule -- Public -- Public administrator -- Public benefit corporation -- Public charge -- Public company -- Public corporation -- Public defender -- Public domain -- Public easement -- Public figure -- Public limited company -- Public nuisance -- Public order -- Public property -- Public record -- Public trust doctrine -- Public trustee -- Public use -- Public utility -- Publication -- Publici juris -- Publish -- Puffing -- Puisne judge -- Punitive damages -- Putative -- Putative father -- Pacta sunt servanda (Latin for pacts must be respected) is a Brocard, a basic principle of civil law and of international law. ... Pain and suffering is the legal term for the physical and emotional stress caused from an injury. ... Palimony is a slang term coined by attorney Marvin Mitchelson in 1977 when his client Michelle Marvin (the former Michelle Triola) filed an unsuccessful suit against actor Lee Marvin. ... A pimp finds and manages clients for a prostitute and engages them in prostitution, often street prostitution, in order to profit from their earnings. ... A panel is a thing that blocks one area from another. ... Paper hanger is slang for a person who writes and cashes bad or rubber checks (because they bounce back to the depositor when the bank dishonors them. ... A legal assistant or paralegal is a person, qualified by education, training or work experience who is employed or retained by a lawyer, law office, corporation, governmental agency or other entity and who performs specifically delegated substantive legal work for which a lawyer is responsible (ABA House of Delegates,1997). ... In psychology and sexology, paraphilia (in Greek para παρά = besides and -philia φιλία = love) is a term that describes sexual arousal in response to sexual objects or situations which may interfere with the capacity for reciprocal affectionate sexual activity. ... A parcel is a mailable or shippable item other than a letter, book, or other document. ... A pardon is the forgiveness of a crime and the penalty associated with it. ... Parens patriae is Latin for parent of the fatherland or parent of the homeland. ... A parent is a father or mother; one who begets or one who gives birth to or nurtures and raises a child; a relative who plays the role of guardian // Mother This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A holding company is a company that owns enough voting stock in another firm to control management and operations by influencing or electing its board of directors. ... Pari passu is a Latin phrase that means at the same pace, and by extension also fairly, without partiality. In structured finance or bond securitization this term refers to two securities having equal rights of payment (i. ... The Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property, signed in Paris, France, on March 20, 1883, is an important and one of the first intellectual property treaties. ... A parish is a type of administrative subdivision. ... States currently utilizing parliamentary systems are denoted in orange and red—the former being constitutional monarchies where authority is vested in a parliament, and the latter being parliamentary republics whose parliaments are effectively supreme over a separate head of state. ... A parliamentary procedure is the individual process used for decision making by a deliberative assembly. ... Parliamentary sovereignty or Parliamentary supremacy is the concept in British constitutional law that a parliament has sovereignty. ... States currently utilizing parliamentary systems are denoted in red and orange—the former being constitutional monarchies and the latter being republics A parliamentary system, also known as parliamentarianism (and parliamentarism in U.S. English), is distinguished by the executive branch of government being dependent on the direct or indirect support... In contemporary usage, parody is a form of satire that imitates another work of art in order to ridicule it. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Parole can have different meanings depending on the context. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... An overtone is a sinusoidal component of a waveform, of greater frequency than its fundamental frequency. ... Breach of contract is a legal concept in which a binding agreement or bargained-for exchange is not honored by one or more of the parties to the contract by non-performance or interference with the other partys performance. ... A partial verdict, in criminal law, is when the jury finds the defendant guilty of one or more, but not all, of the counts against him. ... Look up partition in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A partner is: a domestic partner. ... In the common law, a partnership is a type of business entity in which partners share with each other the profits or losses of the business undertaking in which they have all invested. ... High school students celebrate at a birthday party. ... A party is a person or group of persons that compose a single entity which can be identified as one for the purposes of the law. ... A party is a person or group of persons that compose a single entity which can be identified as one for the purposes of the law. ... Party wall is a building term which, in England, apart from special statutory definitions, may be used in four different legal senses. ... A passenger is a person using but not operating an airplane, train, bus or other mode of transport. ... Passing off is a common law tort which can be used to enforce unregistered trademark rights. ... The Passion is the technical term for the suffering and Agony of Jesus that led directly to the Crucifixion, a central Christian event. ... Passive has several meanings: In grammar it describes a grammatical voice. ... A patent is a set of exclusive rights granted by a state to a person for a fixed period of time in exchange for the regulated, public disclosure of certain details of a device, method, process or composition of matter (substance) (known as an invention) which is new, inventive, and... The Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) provides a unified procedure for filing patent applications to protect inventions internationally. ... In law, a patent infringement occurs when the subject-matter claimed in a patent has been utilized by someone other than the rightholder, without the owners approval or in disagreement with the terms of use given by the owner. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Within the context of a national or multilateral body of law, an invention is patentable or, in other words, it satisfies the patentability requirements if it meets the legal conditions to be granted a patent. ... Patently unreasonable or the patent unreasonableness test is a legal test created by common law and used in Canada by a court performing judicial review of administrative decisions. ... Paternity is the social and legal acknowledgment of the parental relationship between a father and his child. ... ... A patient is any person who receives medical attention, care, or treatment [1]. A patient is often ill or injured and is being treated by, or in need of treatment by, a physician or other medical professional. ... 1. ... In the civil law tradition the patrimony of affectation is a patrimony, or legal entitlement, that can be divided for a purpose, as being distinct from the general patrimony of the person. ... Generally, patronage is the act of a so-called patron who supports or favors some individual, family, group or institution. ... Look up pawn in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up pay in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary using the Transwiki process. ... A peace bond, in Canadian law, is an order from a criminal court that restrains one person from bothering or threatening another. ... An example of Money. ... Pedophilia, paedophilia, or pædophilia (see spelling differences), is the paraphilia of being sexually attracted primarily or exclusively to pre-pubescent children. ... Peeping Tom is a slang term for a voyeur. ... A peer group is a group of people of approximately the same age, social status, and interests. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Peer review (known as refereeing in some academic fields) is a scholarly process used in the publication of manuscripts and in the awarding of funding for research. ... Penal (originally Peñal) is a town in southern Trinidad. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Criminal Code. ... A Penal Colony is a colony used to detain prisoners and generally use them for penal labor in an economically underdeveloped part of the states (usually colonial) territories, and on a far larger scale than the prison farm. ... In the most general sense, penal is the body of laws that are enforced by the State in its own name and impose penalties for their violation, as opposed to civil law that seeks to redress private wrongs. ... This picture depicts women in England mourning their lovers who are soon to be transported to Botany Bay. ... A penalty is a punishment: a legal sentence, e. ... Penance (via Old French penance from the Latin Poenitentia, the same root as penitence, which in English means repentance, the desire to be forgiven, see contrition; in many languages only one single word is derived) is, strictly, repentance of sins as well as the actual name of the Catholic Sacrament... pendent jurisdiction under Mine Workers v. ... A Latin term meaning while pending which is utilized for court orders or legal agreements entered into while a matter (such as a divorce) is pending. ... A prison is a place in which people are confined and deprived of a range of liberties. ... A retirement plan is an arrangement to provide people with an income, or pension, during retirement, when they are no longer earning a steady income from employment. ... ... Per is a common first name in Scandinavia. ... Per capita is a Latin phrase meaning for each head. ... A per curiam decision (or opinion) is a ruling handed down by a court with multiple judges in which the decision was made by the court acting as a whole, as opposed to statements made by individual judges. ... Per diem, or per day, is a Latin phrase meaning specific amount of money an organization allows an individual to spend per day. ... This page includes English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations such as . ... Per stirpes is a Latin phrase (meaning per branch) used in wills that specifies that each branch of the testators family is to receive an equal share of the estate. ... Peremptory challenge usually refers to a right in jury selection for the parties to a court case to reject a certain number of potential jurors without having to give any reason. ... Peremptory challenge usually refers to a right in jury selection for the parties to a court case to reject a certain number of potential jurors without having to give any reason. ... Peremptory challenge is a right in jury selection for the parties to a court case to reject a certain number of potential jurors without having to give any reason. ... A peremptory norm (also called jus cogens, Latin for compelling law) is a fundamental principle of international law considered to have acceptance among the international community of states as a whole. ... Look up Perfect in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Perjury is lying or making verifiable false statements under oath in a court of law. ... Perjury is the act of lying or making verifiably false statements on a material matter under oath or affirmation in a court of law or in any of various sworn statements in writing. ... The Permanent Court of Arbitration (PCA), also known as the Hague Tribunal is an international organization based in The Hague in the Netherlands. ... An injunction is an equitable remedy in the form of a court order that either prohibits or compels (enjoins or restrains) a party from continuing a particular activity. ... Two ships of the United States Navy have borne the name USS Permit, named in honor of the permit, a food fish, often called round pompano, found in waters from North Carolina to Brazil. ... A perpetuity is an annuity in which the periodic payments begin on a fixed date and continue indefinitely. ... Person, in the classic sense, refers to a living human being. ... The person having ordinary skill in the art (often abbreviated PHOSITA in the United States), the person skilled in the art or the man skilled in the art is a legal fiction found in many patent laws throughout the world. ... Persona non grata (Latin, plural: personae non gratae), literally meaning an unwelcome person, is a term used in diplomacy with a specialized and legally defined meaning. ... Personal jurisdiction, jurisdiction of (or over) the person, or jurisdiction in personam is the power of a court to require a party (usually the defendant) or a witness to come before the court. ... Personal property is a type of property. ... An Executor or the administrator of an intestate estate. ... Service of process is the term given to legal notice of a court or administrative bodys exercise of its jurisdiction over a person (defendant etc. ... Personality rights are generally considered to consist of two types of rights: the right to privacy, or to keep ones image and likeness from being exploited without permission or contractual compensation, and the right to publicity use of ones identity, which is similar to the use of a... Personal property is a type of property. ... Perversion is a term and concept describing those types of human behavior that are perceived to be a deviation from what is considered orthodox or normal. ... This article is confusing for some readers, and needs to be edited for clarity. ... Look up Petition in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A petition is a request to an authority, most commonly a government official or public entity. ... Petition to make special (PTMS) is a U.S. procedure that requests the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to accelerate a patents prosecution. ... The plaintiff, claimant, or complainant is the party initiating a lawsuit, (also known as an action). ... Philosophy of law is a branch of philosophy and jurisprudence which studies basic questions about law and legal systems, such as what is the law?, what are the criteria for legal validity?, what is the relationship between law and morality?, and many other similar questions. ... Physical custody involves the day-to-day care of a child and establishes where a child will live. ... In the laws of many common law jurisdictions, the concept of legal privilege, or the rule that certain conversations are so private and confidential that they cannot be used as evidence in court, extends to communication between a patient and physician. ... Employees of the BBC form a picket line during a strike in May 2005. ... The corporate law concept piercing (Lifting) the corporate veil describes a legal decision where an officer, director, or shareholder of a corporation is held liable for the debts of the corporation despite the general principle that those persons are immune from suits in contract or tort that otherwise would only... The corporate law concept piercing (Lifting) the corporate veil describes a legal decision where an officer, director, or shareholder of a corporation is held liable for the debts of the corporation despite the general principle that those persons are immune from suits in contract or tort that otherwise would only... It has been suggested that Pranger be merged into this article or section. ... A pimp finds and manages clients for a prostitute, engaging her in prostitution, often street prostitution, in order to profit from her earnings. ... The term pink slip dates to 1915. ... The flag of 18th-century pirate Calico Jack This article is about sea piracy; for other uses of Piracy or Pirate, see Pirate (disambiguation). ... Plagiarism is a form of academic dishonesty; it is a matter of deceit: fooling a reader into believing that certain written material is original when it is not. ... The plain view doctrine is very important in the 4th Amendment. ... A plaint note is a legal document, chiefly referred to as such under English law and that of other Commonwealth nations. ... A plaintiff, also known as a claimant or complainant, is the party who initiates a lawsuit (also known as an action) before a court. ... PLC may stand for: Palestinian Legislative Council, law-making body of the Palestinian Authority Parti Libéral du Canada, the term in French for the Liberal Party of Canada Partido Liberal Constitucionalista (or Constitutional Liberal Party), a major political party in Nicaragua Phospholipase C Platoon Leaders Class Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth... In legal terminology, a plea is simply an answer to a claim made by someone in a civil or criminal case under common law using the adversary system. ... A plea bargain is an agreement in a criminal case in which a prosecutor and a defendant arrange to settle the case against the defendant. ... In the law, a pleading is one of the papers filed with a court in a civil action, such as a complaint, a demurrer, or an answer. ... In the law, a pleading is one of the papers filed with a court in a civil action, such as a complaint, a demurrer, or an answer. ... In the law, a pleading is one of the papers filed with a court in a civil action, such as a complaint, a demurrer, or an answer. ... Pledge is a verb, meaning to promise solemnly, and a noun, meaning the promise or its maker or its object. ... Plenary is an adjective related to the noun, plenum carrying a general connotation of fullness. ... Derived from the Latin term plenus meaning full, plenary authority refers to the complete power of a governing body. ... Police brutality is a term used to describe the excessive use of physical force, assault, verbal attacks, and threats by police officers. ... Bedford Magistrates Court A Magistrates Court or court of petty sessions, formerly known as a police court, is the lowest level of court in England and Wales and many other common law jurisdictions. ... Police brutality is a term used to describe the excessive use of force by police officers. ... Police Power is the constitutional authority of the state to pass and enforce laws to protect and promote the public safety, health, general welfare, and morals of a community. ... A police state is a political condition where the government maintains strict control over society, particularly through suspension of civil rights and often with the use of a force of secret police. ... A political prisoner may be someone held in prison or otherwise detained, perhaps under house arrest, because their ideas or image are deemed by a government to either challenge or threaten the authority of the state. ... In United States law, a ruling that a matter in controversy is a political question is a statement by a federal court, declining to rule in a case because: 1) the U.S. Constitution has committed decision-making on this subject to another branch of the federal government; 2) there... Political science is an academic and research discipline that deals with the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behavior. ... A poll is either an election or a survey of a particular group. ... A poll tax, soul tax, or capitation is a tax of a uniform, fixed amount per individual (as opposed to a percentage of income). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Polygraph results are sometimes recorded on a chart recorder A polygraph or lie detector is a device which measures and records several physiological variables such as blood pressure, heart rate, respiration and skin conductivity while a series of questions is being asked, in an attempt to detect lies. ... Pornography (from Greek πόρνη prostitute and γραφία writing) (more informally referred to as porn or porno) is the representation of the human body or sexual activity with the goal of sexual arousal. ... A port of entry is a place where one may lawfully enter a country. ... Positive law is law that has been codified into a written form. ... Posse may refer to: Look up Posse in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A group of people compelled to assist law enforcement in unusual circumstances under the sheriffs common law power of Posse Comitatus. ... Posse Comitatus can refer to: In common law, Posse Comitatus refers to a means of law enforcement in unusual circumstances. ... Possession is having some degree of control over something else. ... Look up Possession in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... In Law, possession proceedings are proceedings in a court of law due to a dispute over possession of a physical asset. ... . ... An autopsy (also known as a post-mortem examination, necropsy or obduction) is a medical procedure that consists of a thorough examination performed on a corpse after death, to evaluate disease or injury that may be present and to determine the cause and manner of a persons death. ... A Cannabis sativa plant The drug cannabis, commonly known as marijuana, is produced from parts of the cannabis plant, primarily the cured flowers and gathered trichomes of the female plant. ... A pour-over will is a testamentary device wherein the writer of a will creates a trust, and decrees in the will that the property in his estate at the time of his death shall be placed in the trust. ... Sociologists usually define power as the ability to impose ones will on others, even if those others resist in some way. ... A power of appointment is a term most frequently used in the law of wills to describe the ability of the testator (the person writing the will) to select a person who will be given the authority to dispose of certain property under the will. ... The power of arrest is a mandate given to certain members of a society by the central authority that allows them to remove a criminal or suspected criminals liberty. ... A power of attorney or letter of attorney in common law systems or mandate in civil law systems is an authorization to act on someone elses behalf in a legal or business matter. ... A practice refers to a way that something is done. ... In English law, a Practice Direction is a supplemental protocol to rules of civil and criminal procedure in the Courts. ... In its most general sense, the practice of law involves giving legal advice to clients, drafting legal documents for clients, and representing clients in legal negotiations and court proceedings such as lawsuits, and is applied to the professional services of a lawyer or attorney at law, barrister, solicitor or civil... Praemunire (an error, from Latin præmonere, to pre-admonish or forewarn), was an offence in English law that took its name from the introductory words of the writ of summons issued to the defendant to answer the charge, Præmunire facias A.B., &c. ... According to the definition in Websters 1913 Dictionary, Praetor Peregrinus was, during the ancient Roman Republic, a magistrate (judge) of cases in which one or both of the parties were foreigners. ... Prayer is an effort to communicate with a God, or to some deity or deities, either to offer praise to the deity, to make a request of the deity, or simply to express ones thoughts and emotions to the deity. ... Maria Magdalene in prayer. ... Precedent, sometimes authority, is the legal principle or rule created by a court which guides judges in subsequent cases with similar issues or facts. ... Preemption as used with respect to operating systems means the ability of the operating system to preempt or stop a currently scheduled task in favour of a higher priority task. ... In the United States federal statutes can limit the states powers by invalidating conflicting state and local laws. ... Preference (or taste) is a concept, used in the social sciences, particularly economics. ... A preferred stock, also known as a preferred share or simply a preferred, is a share of stock carrying additional rights above and beyond those conferred by common stock. ... Within some criminal justice systems, a preliminary hearing (evidentiary hearing) is a meeting, after a criminal complaint has been filed by the prosecutor, to determine whether, and to what extent, criminal charges and civil cause of actions will be heard (by a court), what evidence will be admitted, and what... An injunction is an equitable remedy in the form of a court order that either prohibits or compels (enjoins or restrains) a party from continuing a particular activity. ... Premeditation, in law, is when you think about and plan out a crime before you commit it. ... The word premise came from Latin praemisus meaning placed in front. See Premise (film) for an article discussing the use of the word in the film industry A premise (sometimes spelled premiss in philosophy) is a statement, usually put forth as part of a logical argument, that will be presumed... Look up premium in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A Premium may refer to: Premium rate telephone number, the UK Premium Bond Premium outlet Risk premium, in finance, the monetary difference between the guaranteed return and the possible return on an investment This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which... // Definition A prenuptial agreement or antenuptial agreement, commonly abbreviated to prenup or prenupt, is a contract entered into by two people prior to marriage or civil union. ... Preponderance of the evidence is the level of burden of persuasion typically employed in the civil procedure and administrative law. ... In English law, the prerogative writs are a class of writs originally available only to the Crown, but which were later made available to the kings subjects through the courts. ... Look up prescription in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A prescription drug (or POM Prescription Only Medicine, in UK) is a licensed medicine that is regulated by legislation to require a prescription before it can be obtained. ... An easement is the right of use over the real property of another. ... A judge or justice is an appointed or elected official who presides over a court. ... In common law, a rebuttable presumption is an assumption that is made that will stand as a fact unless someone comes forward to contest it and prove otherwise. ... Presumption of innocence is a legal right that the accused enjoys in criminal trials in many modern nations. ... A pretermitted heir is a term used in the law of property to describe a person who would likely stand to inherit under a will, except that the testator (the person who wrote the will) did not know or did not know of the party at the time the will... The examples and perspective in this article do not represent a worldwide view. ... Prima facie (PRY-muh-FAY-shee; -shuh) is a Latin expression meaning at first sight, used in common law jurisdictions to denote evidence that is sufficient, if not rebutted, to prove a particular proposition of fact. ... Prima facie is a Latin expression meaning at first sight, used in common law regions to denote a case that is strong enough to justify further discovery and possibly a full trial. ... A case of first impression is a case or controversy over an interpretation of law never before reported or decided by that court. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Prior restraint is a legal term referring to a governments actions that prevent materials from being published. ... Priority can refer to in telecommunications, the right to occupy a specific frequency for authorized uses, free of harmful interference from stations of other agencies a synonym of priority level in DOD record communications systems, one of the four levels of precedence used to establish the time frame for handling... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... Privacy is the ability of an individual or group to keep their lives and personal affairs out of public view, or to stop information about themselves from becoming known to people other than those whom they choose to give the information. ... A private bill is the term used for legislation that originates from a particular member of a legislature or parliament or from a member of the public. ... A private carrier provides transportation or delivery of goods or services for a single entity, often a corporation; usually that entitys primary business is not transportation but rather something else. ... A private company is a company that is independently owned. ... The Private Express Statutes (PES) are, a group of federal civil and criminal laws in United States (Title 18 United States Code sec. ... Private International Law, International Private Law, or Conflict of Laws is that branch of law regulating all lawsuits involving a foreign law element where a difference in result will occur depending on which laws are applied as the lex causae. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For the English criminal law, see public nuisance. ... Private Parts, a 1997 movie about Howard Stern. ... This page deals with property as ownership rights. ... A private road is a road owned and maintained by a private individual, organization, or company rather than by a government. ... A privateer was a private ship (or its captain) authorized by a countrys government to attack and seize cargo from another countrys ships. ... A privilege—etymologically private law or law relating to a specific individual—is an honour, or permissive activity granted by another person or a government. ... The first ten Amendments to the U.S. Constitution make up the Bill of Rights. ... A privilege—etymologically private law or law relating to a specific individual—is an honour, or permissive activity granted by another person or a government. ... The doctrine of Privity in English law provides that a contract cannot confer rights or impose obligations arising under it on any person or agent except the parties to it. ... A privy council is a body that advises the head of state of a nation, especially in a monarchy. ... The Swedish Senate: Riksrådet, from 1809 Statsrådet, from 1975 Regeringen was and is the principal government institution of Sweden The Swedish Senate, Senatus Regni Sueciae, originated as a council of Regional Magnates acting as advisers to the Monarch of the combined Realms of the Swedes (from 996, approximately). ... Pro bono is a phrase derived from Latin meaning for the good. The complete phrase is pro bono publico, for the public good. It is used to designate legal or other professional work undertaken voluntarily and without payment, as a public service. ... Pro bono, is a Latin phrase meaning for the good, it is sometimes stated as pro bono publico, for the good of the public. ... Many companies report pro forma earnings, in addition to normal earnings calculated under the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), in their quarterly and yearly financial reports. ... Pro hac vice, Latin for for this occassion or for this event, is a legal term usually referring to a lawyer who has not been admitted to practice in a certain jurisdiction, but has been allowed to participate in a particular case in that jurisdiction. ... PRO PER - IN PROPRIA PERSONA - Latin - In ones own proper person. ... Pro se is a Latin adjective meaning for self, that is applied to someone who represents himself (or herself) without a lawyer in a court proceeding, whether as a defendant or a plaintiff and whether the matter is civil or criminal. ... Pro tanto is a philosophical term meaning partially fulfilled. ... Pro tempore or pro tem is a latin phrase which best translates to for the time being in English. ... Pro tempore or pro tem is a latin phrase which best translates to for the time being in English. ... In United States criminal law, probable cause refers to the standard by which a police officer may make an arrest, conduct a personal or property search or obtain a warrant. ... Probate is the legal process of settling the estate of a deceased person; specifically, distributing the decedents property. ... Probation is the suspension of a prison or jail sentence - the criminal who is on probation has been convicted of a crime, but instead of serving prison time, has been found by the Court to be amenable to probation and will be returned to the community for a period in... In common law jurisprudence, procedendo is one of the prerogative writs. ... In jurisprudence, procedural defenses are a form of defense, via which a defendant may argue that they should not be held criminally liable for breaking the law, as the criminal justice program violated procedural law as it was creating its case, and trial, against said defendant. ... Procedural justice concerns the fairness of the processes by which decisions are made--as contrasted with the distributive justice (fairness in the distribution of rights or resources) and corrective justice (fairness in the rectification of wrongs). ... Procedural law comprises the rules by which a court hears and determines what happens in civil or criminal proceedings. ... A procedure is a series of activities, tasks, steps, decisions, calculations and other processes, that when undertaken in the sequence laid down produces the described result, product or outcome. ... Process (lat. ... Service of process is the term given to legal notice of a court or administrative bodys exercise of its jurisdiction over a person (defendant etc. ... Proctor is the name of certain important university officials. ... Product liability encompasses a number of legal claims that allow an injured party to recover financial compensation from the manufacturer or seller of a product. ... In the English law of tort, professional negligence is a subset of the general rules on negligence to cover the situation in which the defendant has represented him or herself as having more than average skills and abilities. ... To proffer (sometimes profer) means to offer evidence in support of an argument, or elements of an affirmative defense or offense, often at trial. ... This article is about the prohibition of alcoholic beverages; separate articles on the prohibition of drugs in general and writs of prohibition are also available. ... A writ of prohibition, in the United States, is an official legal document drafted and issued by a supreme court or superior court to a judge presiding over a suit in an inferior court. ... A promise is a transaction between two persons whereby the first person undertakes in the future to render some service or gift to the second person or devotes something valuable now and here to his use. ... Estoppel is a concept that prevents a party from acting in a certain way because it is not equitable to do so. ... A promissory note is a contract detailing the terms of a promise by one party (the maker) to pay a sum of money to the other (the payee). ... In genetics, a promoter is a DNA sequence that enables a gene to be transcribed. ... Look up proof in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... // Use of the term In common usage, property means ones own thing and refers to the relationship between individuals and the objects which they see as being their own to dispense with as they see fit. ... Property damage is damage or destruction done to public or private property, caused either by a person who is not its owner or by natural phenomena. ... Property law is the area of law that governs the various forms of ownership in real property (land as distinct from personal or movable possessions) and in personal property, within the common law legal system. ... // Property tax is an ad valorem tax that an owner of real estate or other property pays on the value of the thing taxed. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Proprietary indicates that a party exercises private ownership, control or use over an item of property, usually to the exclusion of other parties. ... A proprietary colony is a colony in which the king gave land to one or more people called proprietors. ... Criminal law (also known as penal law) is the body of law that regulates governmental sanctions (such as imprisonment and/or fines) as retaliation for crimes against the social order. ... Criminal law (also known as penal law) is the body of law that regulates governmental sanctions (such as imprisonment and/or fines) as retaliation for crimes against the social order. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... A prospectus is a legal document that institutions and businesses use to describe what they have to offer for participants and buyers. ... Prostitution is the sale of sexual services (typically manual stimulation, oral sex, sexual intercourse, or anal sex) for cash or other kind of return, generally indiscriminately with many persons. ... Prostitution is the sale of sexual services. ... Solitary confinement, colloquially referred to as the hole (or in British English the block), is a punishment in which a prisoner is denied contact with any other persons, excluding members of prison staff. ... Demonstrators march in the street while protesting the World Bank and International Monetary Fund on April 16, 2005. ... In international law and international relations, a protocol is a treaty or international agreement that supplements a previous treaty or international agreement. ... The word proof can mean: originally, a test assessing the validity or quality of something. ... Provisional Remedy is a temporary order made by a judge or an arbitrator to preserve the status quo between disputing parties until final disposition of a matter can occur. ... In the law, a proximate cause is an event sufficiently related to a legally recognizable injury to be held the cause of that injury. ... Proxy may refer to something which acts on behalf of something else as in: Proxy democracy, a bottom-up democracy or delegative democracy Proxy server, a computer network service that allows clients to make indirect network connections to other network services Proxy pattern, a software design pattern in computer programming... There are two fiduciary standards governing the prudence of the individual investments and risk exposure selected by a fiduciary: the Prudent Investor Act and the Prudent Man Rule. ... Public is of or pertaining to the people; belonging to the people; relating to, or affecting, a nation, state, or community; opposed to private; as, the public treasury, a road or lake. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A public benefit corporation is usually a government-owned corporation that performs a specific, narrow function for the public good. ... A public company is a company owned by the public rather than by a relatively few individuals. ... Literally a public company is a company owned by the public. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... Public figure is a legal term applied in the context of defamation actions (libel and slander). ... The initials plc after a UK or Irish company name indicate that it is a public limited company, a type of limited company whose shares may be offered for sale to the pubic. ... Nuisance is a common law tort. ... In urban planning, the notion of public order refers a city containing relatively empty (and orderly) spaces; which allow for flexibility in redesiging the citys layout; such perceptions played an important role in the establishments of suburbs. ... Public property is land which is owned by a local government, and is accessible to everybody. ... Public records are records, usually criminal, which are generally available. ... The public trust doctrine is the principle that certain resources are preserved for public use, and that the government is required to maintain it for the publics reasonable use. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... A public utility is a company that maintains the infrastructure for a public service. ... To publish is to make publicly known, and in reference to text and images, it can mean distributing paper copies to the public, or putting the content on a website. ... Publishing is the activity of putting information in the public arena. ... Puffing is a technique to bring smoke (usually tobacco) into the mouth cavity. ... ... Punitive damages are damages awarded to a successful plaintiff in a civil action, over and above the amount of compensatory damages, to: punish the conduct of the civil defendant; deter the civil defendant from committing the invidious act again; and deter others from doing the same thing. ...


Q

quaeitur -- quaere -- quantum -- quantum meruit -- Quash -- quasi -- Quasi community property -- Quasi contract -- Quasi corporation -- Quasi in rem -- Quasi-contract -- Quasi-criminal -- Quasi-delict -- Quasi-judicial -- Queen's bench -- Queen's Privy Council for Canada -- Queens bench division -- Queens counsel -- Query -- Question of fact -- Question of law -- qui tam action -- quid pro quo -- quid pro quo sexual harassment -- Quiet enjoyment -- Quiet title action -- Quit -- Quitclaim deed -- Quitrent -- quo warranto -- quod hoc -- Quorum -- Quotient verdict -- Qur'an -- Quaeitur is a legal latin phrase meaning the question is raised. Categories: | ... Quaere is legal latin, literally meaning inquire or query. In legal drafting it is usually used to indicate that the person expressing the view that precedes the phrase may not apply to the hypothesis following it. ... In physics, a quantum refers to an indivisible, and perhaps, elementary entity. ... Quantum meruit is a Latin phrase meaning as much as he has deserved. In the context of contract law, it means something along the lines of reasonable value of services. Situations The concept of quantum meruit applies to the following situations: I. When a person employs (impliedly or expressly) another... A criminal conviction is quashed if it is overturned, usually due to the trial having been in some way improper. ... Quasi is an indie rock band formed in Portland, Oregon in 1993, consisting of the ex-husband and wife team of Sam Coomes (vocals, guitar, roxichord, various keyboards) and Janet Weiss (also drummer for punk band Sleater-Kinney) on vocals and drums. ... A quasi-contract, also an implied-in-law contract, is a legal substitute for a contract. ... A quasi corporation generally refers to an entity that exercises some of the functions of a corporation, but has not been granted separate legal personality by statute, particularly a public corporation with limited authority and powers such as a county or school district. ... Quasi in rem (Latin, as if against a thing) is a legal term referring to a legal action which is based on property rights of a person absent from the jurisdiction. ... A quasi-contract, also an implied-in-law contract, is a legal substitute for a contract. ... Quasi-delict is a French legal term used in civil law jurisdictions, encompassing the common law concept of negligence as the breach of a non-wilful extra-contractual obligation to third parties. ... A quasi-judicial body is an individual or organisation which has powers resembling those of a court of law or judge and is able to remedy a situation or impose legal penalties on a person or organisation. ... One of the ancient courts of England, the Kings Bench (or Queens Bench when the monarch is female) is now a division of the High Court of Justice of England and Wales. ... The Privy Council Office as it appeared in the 1880s The Queens Privy Council for Canada (French: Conseil privé de la Reine pour le Canada) is the ceremonial council of advisers to the Queen of Canada, whose members are appointed by the Governor General of Canada for life on... One of the ancient courts of England, the Kings Bench (or Queens Bench when the monarch is female) is now a division of the High Court of Justice of England and Wales. ... Queens Counsel (postnominal QC), during the reign of a male Sovereign known as Kings Counsel (KC), are barristers or, in Scotland, advocates appointed by Letters patent to be one of Her Majestys Counsel learned in the law. They do not constitute a separate order or degree of... In general, a query is a form of questioning, in a line of inquiry. ... Fact is the following: Generally a fact is something that exists or has existed, of evidence. ... In law, a question of law (also known as a point of law) is a question which must be answered by applying relevant legal principles, by an interpretation of the law. ... Qui tam is a legal term, an abbreviation of qui tam pro domino rege quam pro seipse, meaning he who sues for the king as for himself. It is associated with whistleblower laws that protect an employee who brings a civil action against his or her employer alleging fraud against... Quid pro quo (Latin for something for something, many times understood by English speakers as what for what or tit for tat) is used to mean, in the English speaking world, a favour for a favour (in other linguistic contexts, such as Portuguese and French, it means a misunderstanding, a... Sexual harassment is harassment or unwelcome attention of a sexual nature. ... For the English criminal law, see public nuisance. ... An action to quiet title is brought in a court having jurisdiction over land disputes, and is comprised of a complaint that the ownership (title) of a parcel of land or other real property is defective in some fashion. ... A quitclaim deed is a term used in property law to describe a document by which a person disclaims any interest the grantor might have in a piece of real property, and passes that claim to another person (the grantee). ... Quit-rent is/was a rent the payment of which frees the tenant of a holding from other services such as were obligatory under feudal tenure. ... Quo warranto (Latin for by what warrant?) is one of the prerogative writs, the one that requires the person to whom it is directed to show what authority he has for exercising some right or power (or franchise) he claims to hold. ... In law, a quorum is the minimum number of members of a deliberative body necessary to conduct the business of that group. ... The Quran [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also called The Noble Quran; also transliterated as Quran, Koran, and Al-Quran, Turkish Kuran), is the central religious text of Islam. ...


R

Rabbi -- Rabbinic literature -- Rabbinical Assembly -- Race to the courthouse -- Racial discrimination -- Racial segregation -- Racism -- Racketeer influenced corrupt organization (rico) statue -- Racketeering -- Radical transparency -- Ransom -- Rape -- Ratable -- Ratification -- Ratify -- ratio decidendi -- ratio scripta -- Rational basis -- Re -- Ready, willing and able -- Ready-made company -- Real estate -- Real estate investment trust -- Real party in interest -- Real property -- Realty -- Reasonable -- Reasonable care -- Reasonable doubt -- Reasonable man doctrine -- Reasonable reliance -- Reasonable speed -- Reasonable time -- Reasonable wear and tear -- Rebate -- Rebbe -- rebus sic stantibus -- Rebuttable presumption -- Rebuttal -- Recapture -- Receipt -- Receivership -- Recess -- Recidivist -- Reciprocal discovery -- Reciprocity -- Reckless -- Reckless disregard -- Reckless driving -- Recklessness -- Recognisance -- Reconstructionist Judaism -- Reconveyance -- Record -- Recorder -- Recording acts -- Records -- Recoupment -- Recourse -- Recover -- Recoverable -- Recovery -- Recusal -- Recuse -- Redeem -- Redemption -- Redemption of shares -- Redetermination -- Redirect examination -- Redundancy -- Reentry -- Referee -- Referendum -- Reform Judaism -- Reformation -- Refresh one's memory -- Refugee -- Refundable tax credit -- Register -- Register of members -- Registered office -- Registered trade mark -- Registrar -- Registration statement -- Registry of deeds -- Regulation -- Regulations -- Regulatory taking -- Rehearing -- Reichstag Fire Decree -- Reid technique -- Rejection of claim -- Release -- Release on one's own recognizance -- Relevancy -- Relevant -- Reliance -- Reliction -- Relief -- Religion and heterosexuality -- Religion and homosexuality -- Religious law -- Remainder -- Remainderman -- Remand -- Remedy -- Remise -- Remittitur -- Remote -- Removal -- Renewal -- Rent -- Rent control -- Rent review -- Rental value -- Renunciation -- Reorganization -- Repair -- Repeal -- Repentance -- Replevin -- Reply brief -- Reports -- Repossess -- Represent -- Representation -- Representative -- Reprieve -- Reprisal -- Repudiation -- Reputation -- Reputed -- Request -- Requirements contract -- res -- res adjudicata -- res gestae -- res ipsa loquitur -- res judicata -- res nulis -- res publica christiana -- Resale -- Rescind -- Rescission -- Rescue doctrine -- Reservation -- Reserved decision -- Reserve fund -- Residence -- Resident -- Resident alien -- Residuary bequest -- Residuary estate -- Residuary legatee -- Residue -- Resistance movement -- Resisting arrest -- Resolution -- Resolution of disputes -- respondeat superior -- Respondent -- Responsa -- Responsibility -- Responsible -- Restatement of the law -- Restitution -- Restorative justice -- Restraining order -- Restraint of trade -- Restraint on alienation -- Restrictive covenant -- Restrictive endorsement -- Result -- Resulting trust -- Retainer -- Retaining lien -- Retire -- Retraction -- Retrial -- Retributive justice -- Retroactive -- Return of service -- Revenue ruling -- Reversal -- Reversible error -- Reversion -- Revert -- Reverter -- Review -- Revival -- Revocable living trust -- Revocation -- Revoke -- RICO -- Rider -- Right -- Right of audience -- Right of eminent domain -- Right of survivorship -- Right of the first night -- Right-of-way -- Right to privacy -- Right to silence -- Right-of-way -- Right-to-work laws -- Rights -- Riot -- Riot control agent -- Riparian -- Riparian rights -- Ripe -- Risk -- Risk of loss -- Ritual -- Roadside test -- Robbery -- Robert's Rules of Order -- Rogatory letters -- Roman Forum -- Roman Inquisition -- Roman law -- Room -- Royal Assent -- Royal Charter -- Royal Commission -- Royal Courts of Justice -- Royal Prerogative -- Royal Warrant -- Royalty -- Rule -- Rule against perpetuities -- Rule by decree -- Rule in Shelley's Case -- Rule of law -- Rulemaking -- Rules of appellate procedure -- Rules of court -- Rules of evidence -- Ruling -- Running at large -- Running with the land -- Ruse of war -- Rabbi (Classical Hebrew רִבִּי ribbÄ«;; modern Ashkenazi and Israeli רַבִּי rabbÄ«) in Judaism, means teacher, or more literally great one. The word Rabbi is derived from the Hebrew root-word RaV, which in biblical Hebrew means great or distinguished, (in knowledge). In the ancient Judean schools (and among Sefaradim today) the sages... Rabbinic literature, in the broadest sense, can mean the entire spectrum of Judaisms rabbinic writing/s throughout history. ... Originally set up as the alumni association of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America (JTS), the Rabbinical Assembly (RA) is the official, international body of Conservative rabbis, with some 1400 members. ... Race to the courthouse is an informal name given to a form of so-called forum shopping where both parties are allowed to file a lawsuit in a favorable court. ... An African-American drinks out of a water fountain marked for colored in 1939 at a street car terminal in Oklahoma City. ... The Rex Theatre for Colored People, Leland, Mississippi, June 1937 This entry is related to, but not included in the Political ideologies series or one of its sub-series. ... An African-American man drinks out of the colored only water cooler at a racially segregated street car terminal in the United States in 1939. ... RICO or the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act is a United States law which provides for extended penalties for criminal acts performed as part of an ongoing criminal organization. ... Organized crime is crime carried out systematically by formal criminal organizations. ... Radical transparency is a management method where nearly all decision making is carried out publicly. ... The term ransom refers to the practice of holding a prisoner to extort money or property extorted to secure their release, or to the sum of money involved. ... Ratification is the process of adopting an international treaty, or a constitution or other nationally binding document (such as an amendment to a constitution) by the agreement of multiple subnational entities. ... Ratification is the process of adopting an international treaty, or a constitution or other nationally binding document (such as an amendment to a constitution) by the agreement of multiple subnational entities. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... Rational basis review, in U.S. constitutional law, is the lowest level of scrutiny applied by courts deciding constitutional issues through judicial review. ... RE may mean: Aer Arann: IATA airline designator RE (complexity), the set of recursively enumerable languages Relative effectiveness factor, (R.E. factor) a measurement of an explosives power Real Estate Recursively Enumerable set The complexity class of all recursively enumerable languages Regular expression, in computer science, a string that... Real estate is a legal term that encompasses land along with anything permanently affixed to the land, such as buildings. ... A Real Estate Investment Trust or REIT (rhymes with treat) is a tax designation for a corporation investing in real estate that reduces or eliminates corporate income taxes. ... In law, the real party in interest is the party to the lawsuit who actually has an interest in and will be affected by the outcome of the lawsuit. ... The factual accuracy of this article is disputed. ... Real property is a legal term encompassing real estate and ownership interests in real estate. ... ... For the English law, see duty of care in English law. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The reasonable man or reasonable person standard is a legal fiction that originated in the development of the common law. ... Reasonable time is a term that has been a topic of controversy for many years. ... Note: This article title may be easily confused with rabbet A rebate is a type of sales promotion used by marketers, primarily as incentives or supplements to product sales. ... Rebbe which means master, teacher, or mentor is the pronunciation by Ahskenazic Jews of the Hebrew word רבי. Its transliteration should be Rebbi, but the i (eeh sound) is rarely stressed, rendering its pronounciation as the a in America, hence Rebbe. ... rebus sic stantibus : matters standing thus, things staying as they are The doctrine that treaty obligations hold only as long as the fundamental conditions and expectations that existed at the time of their creation hold. ... In law, a rebuttable presumption is an assumption that is made that will stand as a fact unless someone comes forward to contest it and prove otherwise. ... In law, rebuttal is a form of evidence that is presented to contradict or nullify other evidence that has been presented by an adverse party. ... A receipt is a document made by a merchant, landlord, vendor, or other creditor in favor of a customer acknowledging having received an amount of money for some purpose. ... Bankruptcy is a legally declared inability or impairment of ability of an individual or organization to pay their creditors. ... Children can be found playing on playhouses such as this during recess. ... Recidivism is the act of a person repeating an undesirable behavior after they have either experienced negative consequences of that behavior, or have been treated or trained to extinguish that behavior. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Recklessness is wanton disregard for the dangers of a situation. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... In the criminal law, recklessness (sometimes also termed wilful blindness) is one of the three possible classes of mental state constituting mens rea (the Latin for guilty mind). To commit an offence of ordinary as opposed to strict liability, the prosecution must be able to prove both an actus reus... In British and American law, the term recognizance is usually employed to describe an obligation of record, entered into before some court or magistrate duly authorized, whereby the party bound acknowledges (recognizes) that he owes a personal debt to the government or Crown, with a defeasance, subject to a condition... Reconstructionist Judaism is a movement of Judaism with a very liberal set of beliefs: an individuals personal autonomy should generally override traditional Jewish law and custom, yet also take into account communal consensus, modern culture is accepted, traditional rabbinic modes of study, as well as modern scholarship and critical... Various recorders The recorder is a woodwind musical instrument of the family known as fipple flutes or internal duct flutes—whistle-like instruments which include the tin whistle and ocarina. ... Recoupment is the practice, common in the music industry, of claiming an advance provided to an artist back from that artist rather than (or, as well as) from related sources. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... In the field of databases, a schedule is a list of actions, (i. ... Recovery is the first e-book and seventh installment of The New Jedi Order series set in the Star Wars galaxy. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Redemption can mean several things: Redemption is a term in Christianity synonymous with salvation, or delivery from sins. ... Redemption can mean several things: Redemption is a religious term synonymous with salvation; or delivery from sins. ... In the United Kingdom, treasury stocks refer to government bonds or gilts. ... Redirect examination is the trial process by which the party who offered the witness has a chance to explain or otherwise qualify damaging testimony brought out by the opponent during cross-examination. ... Redundancy, in general terms, refers to the quality or state of being redundant, that is: exceeding what is necessary or normal, containing an excess. ... Atmospheric entry is the transition from the vacuum of space to the atmosphere of any planet or other celestial body. ... A referee is a person who has authority to make decisions about play in many sports. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite (from Latin plebiscita, a decree of the Concilium Plebis) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... Reform Judaism can refer to (1) the largest denomination of Judaism in America and its sibling movements in other countries, (2) a branch of Judaism in the United Kingdom, and (3) the historical predecessor of the American movement that originated in 19th Century Germany. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ... Refundable tax credit refers to the concept of giving tax refunds to individuals in excess of the amount of tax actually paid. ... Register or registration may mean: Registration (or licensing) is required of a number of occupations and professions where maintenance of standards is required to protect public safety. ... The Registered Office is generally the location of a company, an association or any other legal entity, where it conducts its business. ... A trademark (Commonwealth English: trade mark)[1] is a distinctive sign of some kind which is used by a business to identify itself and its products or services to consumers, and to set the business and its products or services apart from those of other businesses. ... Registrar may refer to: In education, a registrar or registry is an official in an academic institution (a college, university, or secondary school) who handles student records. ... Recorder of deeds refers to the government office that maintains records of transfers of real estate, as well as many other public documents. ... When a government deprives a person of the use of property by the application of regulations, but such regulations have not affected the ownership of the property, a regulatory taking has occurred. ... A German newspapers final issue, announcing its own prohibition (Verbot) by the police authorities on the basis of the Reichstag fire decree The Reichstag Fire Decree (Reichstagsbrandverordnung in German) is the common name of the decree issued by German president Paul von Hindenburg in direct response to the Reichstag... The Reid technique is an interrogation method. ... A release is a legal instrument that acts to terminate any legal liability between the releasor and the releasee(s) signed by the releasor. ... Relevant may refer to: A concept in physics, for which see renormalization group; or A legal concept in the law of evidence; see relevance. ... Reliance could refer to: Reliance Industries Limited, Indian conglomerate which includes: Reliance Infocomm, telecommunications subsidiary Reliance Energy, electricity subsidiary Reliance (yacht), Americas Cup defender in 1903 a popular name for the ZPG-3W airships of the US Navy. ... In the art of sculpture, a relief is an artwork where a modelled form projects out of a flat background. ... Religious views on heterosexuality, sexual conduct and sexual morality vary widely by culture, group, faith, etc. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... In the religious sense, law can be thought of as the ordering principle of reality; knowledge as revealed by God defining and governing all human affairs. ... In mathematics, the result of the division of two integers usually cannot be expressed with an integer quotient, unless a remainder —an amount left over— is also acknowledged. ... A remainderman is person who inherits property upon the termination of the estate of the former owner. ... A prisoner who is denied, refused or unable to meet the conditions of bail, or who is unable to post bail, may be held in a prison on remand until their criminal trial. ... A remedy is the solution or amelioration of a problem or difficulty. ... A remittitur is a ruling by a judge (usually upon motion to reduce or throw out a jury verdict) lowering the amount of damages granted by a jury in a civil case. ... Look up Remote in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A remote may mean: A remote control A remote broadcast As an adjective, anything which is distant or desolate. ... In the United States, removal jurisdiction refers to the power of a defendant to move a lawsuit filed in state court to the Federal district court of the original courts district. ... Renewal is the collective term for Charismatic, pentecostal and neo-charismatic churches. ... Renting is an agreement where a payment is made for the temporary use of a good owned by another person or company. ... Rent Control refers to laws or ordinances that set price controls on residential housing. ... Nekkhamma (Renunciation) is one of the ten paramis or perfections that a bodhisattva must develop in order to become a Buddha. ... Repair and Maintenance is fixing any sort of mechanical or electrical device should it get out of order or broken (repair) as well as performing the routine actions which keep the device in working order (maintenance) or prevent trouble from arising (preventive maintenance). ... A repeal is the removal or reversal of a law. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Replevin is an Anglo-French law term (derived from repletir, to replevy). ... A brief or factum (latin for act or deed) is a written legal document used in various legal adversary systems that is presented to a court arguing why the party to the case should prevail. ... Repossession is generally used to refer to a financial institution taking back an object that was either used as collateral or rented or leased in a transaction. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... Most generally, a representation is a performing of selected functions or roles of another physical or abstract object/person/organization in predefined circumstances and it is based on the consensus of the group/community involved. ... A legislature is a governmental deliberative body with the power to adopt laws. ... A pardon is the forgiveness of a crime and the penalty associated with it. ... In warfare, a reprisal is a limited and deliberate violation of the laws of war to punish an enemy for breaking the laws of war. ... Repudiation the act of refusing and not accepting; the act of repudiating The young mans repudiation of the churchs doctrines caused a conflict between him and his religious parents. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... Ask can be used to refer: Amplitude-shift keying a telecommuncations term Ask and Embla about Norse Mythology Ask Jeeves A song by The Smiths. ... Requirements contracts are contracts in which one party agrees to supply as much of a good or service as is required by the other party. ... RES can refer to: a bimonthly media lifestyle magazine, see RES (magazine) a digital short film festival run by the magazine, see RESFest the R&B singer, Res (singer) See also: Renewable energy (sources) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the... Res judicata (from res iudicata, Latin for a thing decided), more commonly res judicata in legal usage, is a common law doctrine meant to bar relitigation of cases between the same parties in court. ... This article is for the legal term Res Gestae. For the article on the record of the accomplishments of the first Roman emperor, Augustus, see the article for Res Gestae Divi Augusti. ... Res ipsa loquitur is a legal term from the Latin meaning literally, The thing speaks for itself. The doctrine is applied to claims which, as a matter of law, do not have to be explained beyond the obvious facts. ... Res judicata (from res iudicata, Latin for a thing decided), more commonly res judicata in legal usage, is a common law doctrine meant to bar relitigation of cases between the same parties in court. ... Res nullius is a term derived from Roman law whereby res (objects in the legal sense, anything that can be owned, even slaves, but not subjects in law such as citizens) are not yet the subject of rights. ... Res publica christiana is a Latin phrase combining the idea of res publica + christiana to describe the worldwide community of Christianity and its well-being. ... In contract law, rescission (to rescind or set aside a contract) refers to the cancellation of the contract between the parties. ... In contract law, rescission (to rescind or set aside a contract) refers to the cancellation of the contract between the parties. ... The rescue doctrine of the law of torts holds that, where a tortfeasor creates a circumstance that places the tort victim in danger, the tortfeasor is liable not only for the harm caused to the victim, but also the harm caused to any person injured in an effort to rescue... Reservation is something reserved. ... Reserved decision is a legal term. ... Look up Reserve in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A dwelling is a structure in which humans or other animals live. ... Residency is a stage of postgraduate medical training in North America which leads to eligibility for board certification in a primary care or referral specialty. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... A residuary estate, in the law of wills, is any portion of the testators estate that is not specifically devised to someone in the will, or any property that is part of such a specific devise that fails. ... A residuary estate, in the law of wills, is any portion of the testators estate that is not specifically devised to someone in the will, or any property that is part of such a specific devise that fails. ... A residuary estate, in the law of wills, is any portion of the testators estate that is not specifically devised to someone in the will, or any property that is part of such a specific devise that fails. ... A residue, broadly, is anything left behind by a reaction or event. ... A resistance movement is a non-military group or collection of individual groups, dedicated to fighting an invader in an occupied country through either the use of physical force, or nonviolence. ... Resisting arrest is a term used in the United States (and possibly elsewhere) to describe a criminal charge against an individual who has committed at least any one of the following acts: Eluding a police officer who is attempting to arrest the individual Using or threatening to use force against... This article concerns the legal meaning of the term resolution. ... For Wikipedias dispute resolution guidelines, see Wikipedia:Dispute resolution. ... Respondeat superior, Latin for let the master answer, is a legal doctrine which states that an employer is responsible for employee actions performed within the course of the employment. ... In Common law, a defendant is any person who is required to answer the complaint of a plaintiff in a civil suit or any person who has been named in a criminal information or criminal complaint and stands accused of violating a criminal statute. ... Note: This is based on an entry from the 1906 public domain Jewish Encyclopedia The responsa literature, known in Hebrew as Sheelot U-teshuvot (questions and answers), is the body of written decisions and rulings given by rabbis to questions addressed to them. ... The word responsibility means the obligation to answer for actions. ... In moral philosophy, the word responsibility has at least two related meanings: The obligation to answer for actions. ... The American Law Institute (ALI) was established in 1923 to promote the clarification and simplification of American common law and its adaptation to changing social needs. ... Restitution is the name given to a form of legal relief in which the plaintiff recovers something from the defendant that belongs, or should belong, to the plaintiff. ... Restorative justice is a theory of criminal justice that focuses on crime as an act against another individual or community rather than the state. ... An injunction is an equitable remedy in the form of a court order that either prohibits or compels (enjoins or restrains) a party from continuing a particular activity. ... At present, the law will not enforce certain types of contracts on the ground of illegality. ... A restraint on alienation, in the law of real property, is a clause used in the conveyance of real property that seeks to prohibit the recipient from selling or otherwise transferring his interest in the property. ... A restrictive covenant is a legal obligation imposed in a deed by the seller upon the buyer of real estate to do or not to do something. ... The result in a game of cricket may be a win for one of the two teams playing, a draw or a tie. ... A resulting trust is a type of implied trust created through implication of law where the actions of the parties involved and the nature of the transaction implies an intention to create a trust. ... A retainer can be a person being part of the retinue (suite, train) of a dignitary etcetera, either performing personal services such as man servant, pageboy, bodyguard, or rather occasionally in proximity such as a minstrel the part of a contractualy due sum that is payed in advance, while the... Retirement is the status of a worker who has stopped working. ... A retraction is a public statement that confirms that a previously made statement was incorrect, invalid, or morally wrong. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Trial de novo. ... Retributive justice is a theory of criminal justice wherein punishments are justified on the grounds that the criminal has created an imbalance in the social order that must be addressed by action against the criminal. ... Retroactive is an album by British band Def Leppard released in 1993. ... Service of process is the term given to legal notice of a court or administrative bodys exercise of its jurisdiction over a person (defendant etc. ... A reversal might refer to: A reversal of polarity A reversal in grappling An option-trading strategy A reversal of fortunes A reaction command used in Kingdom Hearts II A Version of Deficating This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Reversible error in an error by the trier of law (judge) or the trier of fact (jury - or again the judge if it is a bench trial) or malfeasance by one of the trying attorneys which results in an unfair trial. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Shortcut: WP:RV Wikipedia:Editing FAQ>How to revert a page to an earlier version You may wish to revert an article to an earlier version, perhaps because it has been the target of vandalism or because material has been added or removed inappropriately. ... Look up Review in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article should be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Revocation is the act of recalling or annulling, the reversal of an act, the recalling of a grant, or the making void of some deed previously existing. ... A revoke (also called a renege) is a violation of important rules regarding the play of tricks in trick-taking card games serious enough to render the round invalid. ... For The Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, a United States law which provides for extended penalties for criminal acts performed as part of an ongoing criminal organization, see: RICO (law) For Rico the Border Collie, see: Rico (Border Collie). ... A rider can refer to: Rider, an additional provision attached to a bill under the consideration of a legislative assembly An amendment or addition to an entertainers performance contract, covering a performers equipment or meal, drink, and general comfort requirements Riding a horse A cyclist riding a bicycle... A right is the power or privilege to which one is justly entitled or a thing to which one has a just claim. ... Eminent domain (US), compulsory purchase (United Kingdom, New Zealand), compulsory acquisition (Australia) or expropriation (Canada, South Africa) in common law legal systems is the lawful power of the state to expropriate private property without the owners consent, either for its own use or on behalf of a third party. ... A concurrent estate or co-tenancy is a concept in property law, particularly derived from the common law of real property, which describes the various ways in which property can be owned by more than one person at a given time. ... The jus primae noctis meaning law (or right) of the first night, and droit du seigneur meaning the lords right, is the purported right of the lord of an estate to deflower its virgins. ... Right-of-way is a legal term which may have any of several meanings: priority at a crossing, or in traffic. ... The right to privacy is a purported human right and an element of various legal traditions which may restrain both government and private party action. ... The right to silence is a legal protection enjoyed by people undergoing police interrogation or trial in certain countries. ... Right-of-way is a legal term which may have any of several meanings: priority at a crossing, or in traffic. ... Right-to-work laws are statutes enforced in several US States, which prohibit several types of deals between employers and unionized employees, such as union security. ... For the direction right, see left and right or starboard. ... Riots occur when crowds of people have gathered and are committing crimes or acts of violence usually due to a perceived grievance or out of dissent. ... A riot control agent is a type of lachrymatory agent (or lacrimatory agent). ... A riparian zone schematic from the Everglades. ... Riparian water rights (or simply riparian rights) is a system of allocating water among the property owners who abut its source. ... Look up ripe in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Risk is the potential impact (positive or negative) to an asset or some characteristic of value that may arise from some present process or from some future event. ... Risk of loss is a term used in the law of contracts to determine which party should bear the burden of risk for damage occurring to goods after the sale has been completed, but before delivery has occurred. ... A ritual is a set of actions, performed mainly for their symbolic value, which is prescribed by a religion or by the traditions of sex A ritual may be performed at regular intervals, or on specific occasions, or at the discretion of individuals or communities. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Driving under the influence. ... Roberts Rules of Order is a book containing rules of order, intended to be adopted by a deliberative assembly as its parliamentary authority. ... Rogatory letters are a formal proceeding by a court to request that a court in another jurisdiction compel a witness to appear under oath to answer questions relevant to the determination of an issue of fact in the jurisdiction that issues the request. ... Roman Forum with Palatine Hill in the background. ... The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) (Congregatio pro Doctrina Fidei) is the oldest of the nine congregations of the Roman Curia. ... Roman law is the legal system of ancient Rome. ... A room is an enclosed space in a house or other building. ... The granting of Royal Assent is the formal method by which the Sovereign of the United Kingdom, or the Sovereigns representative in Commonwealth Realms, completes the process of the enactment of legislation by formally assenting to an Act of Parliament. ... A Royal Charter is a charter given by a monarch to legitimize an incorporated body, such as a city, company, university or such. ... In states that are Commonwealth Realms a Royal Commission is a major government public inquiry into an issue. ... The main entrance The Royal Courts of Justice, commonly called the Law Courts, is a building in London, which houses the Court of Appeal and the High Court of Justice of England and Wales. ... The Royal Prerogative is a body of customary authority, privilege, and immunity, recognised in common law jurisdictions possessing a monarchy as belonging to the Crown alone. ... In the United Kingdom, a Royal Warrant of Appointment is a grant made by senior members of the British Royal Family to companies or tradespeople who supply goods and services to individuals in the family. ... Royalty may refer to either: the royal family of a country with a monarchy royalties the payment made to the owner of a copyright, patent, or trademark, for the use thereof This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... See also Portal:Law The stela of King Hammurabi depicts the god Shamash revealing a code of laws to the king. ... The rule against perpetuities is a rule in property law which prohibits a contingent grant or will from vesting outside a certain period of time. ... Rule by decree is a style of governance allowing quick, unchallenged creation of law by a single person or group, and is used primarily by dictators and absolute monarchs. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The rule of law is the principle that governmental authority is legitimately exercised only in accordance with written, publicly disclosed laws adopted and enforced in accordance with established procedure. ... In administrative law, rulemaking refers to the process that executive agencies use to create, or promulgate, regulations. ... The rules of appellate procedure are the rules which control the nature and conduct of a legal appeal, which may be: door closing , the notice of appeal shall be filed with the clerk of the lower court within thirty days of the date of the entry of the judgment appealed... Rules of evidence govern if, when, how, and for what purpose proof of a case is placed before a trier of fact for consideration. ... A covenant running with the land, is a real covenant, in the law of real property. ... A ruse of war is an action taken by a belligerent in warfare to fool the enemy in order to gain intelligence or a military advantage against an enemy. ...


S

Sabotage -- Sacred text -- Said -- Salafi -- Sale -- Sales tax -- Salvage -- Samaritan Pentateuch -- Same-sex marriage -- Sanction -- Sanctions -- Sanhedrin -- Satisfaction -- Satisfaction of judgment -- Satisfaction of mortgage -- Satyagraha -- Save harmless -- Savings and loan -- Scapegoat -- School of law -- Sciens -- scienter -- scintilla -- scire facias -- Scope of employment -- Scots law -- Scrivener -- Scutage -- se defendendo -- Seal -- Sealed verdict -- Sealing of records -- Search -- Search and seizure -- Search warrant -- Second degree murder -- Second tier -- Secondary boycott -- Secret police -- Secret rebate -- Secret tribunal -- Secretary of State for the Home Department -- Secularism -- Secured transaction -- Security -- Security agreement -- Security deposit -- Security for costs -- Security interest -- Security of tenure -- Secus -- Sedition -- Seduction -- Seigniorage -- Seised -- Seisin -- Seized -- Seizure -- Self-certify -- Self-dealing -- Self-defense -- Self-determination -- Self-executing -- Self-help -- Self-incrimination -- Self-serving -- Sell -- Seller -- semble -- Semicha -- Senior lien -- Sentence (law) -- Separate property -- Separation -- Separation agreement -- Separation of church and state -- Separation of powers -- Separatism -- Septuagint -- Sequester -- Sequestration -- Serf -- Sergeantry -- seriatim -- Servant -- Service -- Service by fax -- Service by mail -- Service by publication -- Service contract -- Service of process -- Services -- Servient estate -- Session -- Set -- Set aside -- Setoff -- Setting -- Settle -- Settlement -- Settlement agreement -- Settlor -- Seven deadly sins -- Severable contract -- Several liability -- Severance -- Sex offender -- Sex tourism -- Sex worker -- Sex-related court cases -- Sexual assault -- Sexual discrimination -- Sexual harassment -- Sexual morality -- Sexual norm -- Shafi'i -- Shaikh -- Shall -- Shame -- Share -- Share and share alike -- Share capital -- Share certificate -- Shareholder -- Shareholders agreement -- Shareholders' agreement -- Shareholders' derivative action -- Shareholders' meeting -- Sharia law --Sharp practice -- Shepardize -- Sheriff -- Sheriff's sale -- Shield laws -- Shifting the burden of proof -- Shoplifting -- Short cause -- Shortening time -- Show cause order -- Shulkhan Arukh -- Sick pay -- Sidebar -- Sign -- Signature -- Signing bonus -- Silent partner -- Silk -- Similarly situated -- Simple trust -- Simultaneous death act -- Sin -- Sin-offering -- sine die -- sine qua non -- Single life annuity -- Sira -- Situated ethics -- Situational ethics -- situs -- Slander -- Slavery -- Small claims court -- Small claims track -- Smuggling -- Socage -- Social capital -- Social control -- Social engineering -- Social justice -- Socialist law -- Sodomy -- Sodomy law -- Software license -- Software patent -- Software piracy -- Soke -- Sole proprietorship -- Solicitation -- Solicitor -- Solicitor General (disambiguation) -- Solitary confinement -- Solvency -- Solvent -- Sound mind and memory -- Sounds in -- Southern Poverty Law Center -- Sovereign immunity -- Sovereignty -- Spanish Constitution of 1978 -- Spanish Inquisition -- Speaking demurrer -- Special -- Special administrator -- Special appearance -- Special circumstances -- Special damages -- Special master -- Special notice -- Special prosecutor -- Special resolution -- Special verdict -- Specific bequest -- Specific devise -- Specific finding -- Specific legacy -- Specific performance -- Specified claim -- Speculative damages -- Speed limit -- Speed trap -- Speedy trial -- Spendthrift clause -- Spendthrift trust -- Spoliation of evidence -- Spontaneous exclamation -- Spot zoning -- Spousal abuse -- Spousal right -- Spousal support -- Springing interest -- Squat -- Squatter -- Stakeholder -- Stamp duty -- Standard form contract -- Standard of care -- Standing -- Standing order -- Star Chamber -- Star chamber proceedings -- stare decisis -- State -- State action -- State court -- State of domicile -- State of Emergency -- State religion -- State-owned enterprise -- Statement -- Stationhouse bail -- Statism -- Status conference -- Statute -- Statute of frauds -- Statute of limitations -- Statutes of fraud -- Statutes of limitations -- Statutory Instrument -- Statutory law -- Statutory offer of settlement -- Statutory rape -- Stay -- Stay away order -- Stay of execution -- Stet -- Stipendiary magistrate -- Stipulation -- Stock -- Stock certificate -- Stock in trade -- Stock option -- Stockholder -- Stockholders' derivative action -- Stoning -- Stop and frisk -- Strata title -- Strategic lawsuits against public participation -- Straw deed -- Straw man -- Street -- Strict construction -- Strict liability -- Strike -- Strike action -- Structure -- sua sponte -- sub judice -- sub modo -- sub nomine -- sub silentio -- Sub-tenant -- Subchapter S corporation -- Subcontractor -- Subject to -- Sublease -- Sublet -- Submitted -- Subordination -- Subordination agreement -- Subornation of perjury -- subpoena -- subpoena ad testificum -- subpoena duces tecum -- Subrogation -- Subrogee -- Subrogor -- Subscribe -- Subscribers -- Subsidiary company -- Substantial performance -- Substantive law -- Substitute in -- Substituted service -- Substitution -- Substitution of attorney -- Succession -- Successive sentences -- Suffering -- Suffrage -- suggestio falsi -- sui generis -- Suicide -- Suit -- Suitor -- Sum certain -- Summary adjudication of issues -- Summary assessment -- Summary dismissal -- Summary judgment -- Summary offence -- Summation -- Summing -- Summons -- Sunnah -- Superior court -- supersedeas -- Superseding cause -- Supplemental -- suppressio veri -- Suppression of evidence -- supra -- Supremacy clause -- Supreme court -- Supreme Court of Canada -- Supreme Court of India -- Supreme Court of judicature -- Supreme Court of New Zealand -- Surcharge -- Surety -- Surplusage -- Surrebutal -- Surrender -- Surrogate -- Surrogate court -- Survivorship -- Suspended sentence -- Sustain -- Swear -- Swindle -- Syndicate -- Synod -- Sabotage is a deliberate action aimed at weakening an enemy through subversion, obstruction, disruption, and/or destruction. ... Many religions and spiritual movements believe that their sacred texts (or scriptures) are the Word of God, often feeling that the texts are wholly divine or spiritually inspired in origin. ... سید Sayyid (also rendered as Sayed or, in Malaysia and The Subcontinent, as Syed) is an honorific title often given to descendants of the Prophet Muhammad through his grandson, Hussain and Hassan (Descendants of Hassan were known as Sharif in the Arab world. ... A Salafi (Arabic سلفي , from the Arabic word Salaf سلف (literally meaning predecessors or early generations), is an adherent of a contemporary movement in Sunni Islam ascribing his understanding and practice of Islam to the Salaf. Salafism was designated by outsiders the name Wahhabism. ... Sale is the name of several places: Sale, Victoria, Australia Sale, Greater Manchester, England Sale, Italy (pronunciation: SAH-leh) - in the province of Alessandria Salè, Morocco Sale Marasino (first pronunciation: SAH-leh), an Italian commune in the province of Brescia Sale is also a type of contract for the exchange... A sales tax is an excise tax on the privilege of selling or renting certain property or services in a state or locality. ... Salvage may refer to: Look up salvage in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... World homosexuality laws Same-sex marriage is the union of two people who are of the same gender. ... Sanction is an interesting word, in that, depending on context, it can have diametrically opposing meanings. ... Sanctions is the plural of sanction (see also penalty). ... For the tractate in the Mishnah, see Sanhedrin (tractate). ... The term satisfaction can refer to: (I Cant Get No) Satisfaction, a Rolling Stones song, which has also been covered by several artists, including: The Residents, released as a single (Satiafaction b/w Loser=Weed) in 1976 and 1978. ... Satyagraha is the philosophy of nonviolent resistance most famously employed by Mohandas Gandhi in forcing an end to the British Raj and also against apartheid in South Africa. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A savings and loan association is a financial institution which specializes in accepting savings deposits and making mortgage loans. ... The scapegoat was a goat that was driven off into the wilderness as part of the ceremonies of Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, in Judaism during the times of the Temple in Jerusalem. ... In the United States, the institution where future lawyers obtain a legal degree is called a law school. ... In law, sciens is a state of mind, referring to knowledge of a fact, usually of a specific risk. ... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary. ... The Imperial Guard is a team of fictional super-powered alien warriors in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Scire Facias, in English law, a judicial writ founded upon some record directing the sheriff to make it known (scire-facias) to the party against whom it is brought, and requiring the latter to show cause why the party bringing the writ should not have the advantage of such record... Scots law (or Scottish law) is the law of Scotland. ... A Scrivener (or Scribe) was traditionally a person who could read and write. ... The tax of scutage or escuage in the law of England involved the pecuniary commutation, under the feudal system, of the military service due from the holder of a knights fee. ... Seal on envelope A seal is an impression printed on, embossed upon, or affixed to a document (or any other object) in order to authenticate it, in lieu of or in addition to a signature. ... Searching is the act of trying to find something or someone. ... I love this law whereby police, who suspect that a crime has been committed, do a search of a persons property and confiscate any relevant evidence to the crime. ... A search warrant is a written warrant issued by a judge or magistrate which authorizes the police to conduct a search of a person or location for evidence of a criminal offense. ... Murder is both a legal and a moral term, that are not always coincident. ... A secondary boycott is an attempt by labor to convince others to stop doing business with a particular firm because that firm does business with another firm that is the subject of a strike and/or a primary boycott. ... Secret police (sometimes political police) are a police organization which operates in secrecy for the national purpose of maintaining national security against internal threats to the state. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department (the Home Secretary) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... Secularity is the state of being free from religious or spiritual qualities. ... Generally, a secured transaction is a loan or credit transaction in which the lender retains acquires a security interest in certain collateral owned by the borrower and has the right to foreclose or repossess the collateral in the event of the borrowers default. ... Security is a type of transferable interest representing financial value. ... A security agreement is the contract that governs the relationship between the parties to a secured transaction (ie, the lender and the borrower). ... Security for costs is a common law legal concept of application only in costs jurisdictions, and is an order sought from a court in litigation. ... A security interest is a property interest created by agreement or by operation of law over assets to secure the performance of an obligation (usually but not always the payment of a debt) which gives the beneficiary of the security interest certain preferential rights in relation to the assets. ... Security of Tenure is a term used in political science to describe a constitutional or legal guarantee that an office-holder cannot be removed from office except in exceptional and specified circumstances. ... Secus is a legal latin phrase meaning otherwise or to the contrary. Category: ... Sedition is a deprecated term of law to refer to covert conduct such as speech and organization that is deemed by the legal authority as tending toward insurrection against the established order. ... In sociology, seduction is the process of deliberately enticing a person into an act. ... Seigniorage, also spelled seignorage or seigneurage, is the net revenue derived from the issuing of currency. ... Seisin (from Middle English saysen, seysen, in the legal sense of to put in possession of, or to take possession of, hence, to grasp, to seize; the Old French seisir, saisir, is from Low Lat. ... This article is about the medical term, epileptic seizure, as distinct from psychogenic non-epileptic seizure. ... Self-dealing is the conduct of a trustee, an attorney, a corporate officer, or other fiduciary that consists of taking advantage of his position in a transaction and acting for his own interests rather than for the interests of the beneficiaries of the trust, corporate shareholders, or his clients. ... This article and defense of property deal with the legal concept of excused (sometimes termed justified) acts that might otherwise be illegal. ... Self-determination is a principle in international law that a people ought to be able to determine their own governmental forms and structure free from outside influence. ... A self-executing file on a computer will execute itself, and is most often an executable file (.exe). ... Though the term self-help can refer to any case whereby an individual or a group betters themselves economically, intellectually or emotionally, the connotations of the phrase have come to apply particularly to psychological or psychotherapeutic nostrums, often purveyed through the popular genre of the self-help book. ... Self-incrimination is the act of accusing oneself of a crime for which a person can then be prosecuted. ... Sell can mean: A verb relating to Sales Sell (professional wrestling) In Investing to give up control of an asset in exchange for a valuable consideration. ... Sales, or the activity of selling, forms an integral part of commercial activity. ... Semicha (סמיכה -- meaning leaning [of the hands] or סמיכה לרבנות -- rabbinical ordination) is a Hebrew word referring to what may be roughly translated as the ordination (in Hebrew: semichut סמיכות) of a rabbi within Judaism. ... In law, a sentence forms the final act of a judge-ruled process, and also the symbolic principal act connected to his function. ... Separation may refer to a several different subjects: In chemistry, separation refers to the separation process. ... The separation of church and state is a political doctrine which states that the institutions of the state or national government should be kept separate from those of religious institutions. ... The separation of powers (or trias politica, a term coined by French political thinker Montesquieu) is a model for the governance of the state. ... Separatism is a term usually applied to describe the attitudes or motivations of those seeking independence or separation of their land or region from the country that governs them. ... The Septuagint (LXX) is the name commonly given in the West to the Greek Alexandrine translation of the Hebrew Bible (Tanakh/Old Testament) translated some time between the 3rd to 1st century BC. The Septuagint translation includes additional books and chapters of the Hebrew text, including the books of the... Sequestration, the act of removing, separating or seizing anything from the possession of its owner, particularly in law, of the taking possession of property under process of law for the benefit of creditors or the state. ... Sequestration, the act of removing, separating or seizing anything from the possession of its owner, particularly in law, of the taking possession of property under process of law for the benefit of creditors or the state. ... Costumes of Slaves or Serfs, from the Sixth to the Twelfth Centuries, collected by H. de Vielcastel, from original Documents in the great Libraries of Europe. ... Seriatim, Latin for in series, is a legal term typically used to indicate that a court is addressing multiple issues in a certain order, such as the order that the issues were originally presented to the court. ... A servant is a person who is hired to provide regular household or other duties, and receives compensation. ... In economics and marketing, a service is the non-material equivalent of a good. ... Service of process is the term given to legal notice of a court or administrative bodys exercise of its jurisdiction over individuals who are the subject of proceedings or actions brought before such court, body or other tribunal. ... Service of process is the term given to legal notice of a court or administrative bodys exercise of its jurisdiction over individuals who are the subject of proceedings or actions brought before such court, body or other tribunal. ... Service of process is the term given to legal notice of a court or administrative bodys exercise of its jurisdiction over individuals who are the subject of proceedings or actions brought before such court, body or other tribunal. ... Service of process is the procedure employed to give legal notice to a person (defendant etc. ... Services are: plural of service Tertiary sector of industry IRC services Web services the name of a first-class cricket team in India This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Note: this article name (or a redirect to it) is a homophone with cession. ... In mathematics, a set can be thought of as any collection of distinct things considered as a whole. ... Set-Aside in the EU, will be updated as i update my IPM from another editor (i also am doing an ipm and shall add it on here) 1. ... In drama, the set (or setting) is the location of a storys action. ... A settlement is a contract that is one possible result when parties sue (or contemplate so doing) each other in civil courts, usually seeking money as reparations for the alleged wrongdoing of the defendants. ... In law there are two main meanings of the word settlement. ... A settlement is a contract that is one possible result when parties sue (or contemplate so doing) each other in civil courts, usually seeking money as reparations for the alleged wrongdoing of the defendants. ... In law a settlor is a person who settles property on express trust for the benefit of beneficiaries. ... The factual accuracy of this article is disputed. ... In contract law, a severable contract is a contract that is actually composed of several separate contracts concluded between the same parties, so that failing (breaching) one part of such a For example, if Mr. ... Severance is the debut album by Australian melodic death metal band Daysend. ... A sex offender is a person who has been criminally charged and convicted of, or has pled guilty to, a sex crime. ... Sex tourism is tourism, partially or fully for the purpose of having sex. ... A sex worker in Germany. ... There have been a number of cases decided by the United States Supreme Court or by the courts of the various states regarding pornography, sexual activity and what consenting adults are allowed to do in the privacy of their homes (or sometimes, in other places). ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Sexism is discrimination between people based on their Sex rather than their individual merits. ... Sexual harassment is harassment or unwelcome attention of a sexual nature. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... A sexual norm can be an individual norm or a social norm. ... The Šāfiˤī madhab (Arabic: شافعي) is one of the four schools of fiqh, or religious law, within Sunni Islam. ... Shaikh (Arabic: شيخ ),(also rendered as Sheik, Shaykh or Sheikh) is a word in the Arabic language meaning elder of tribe, lord or a revered old man. ... According to one tradition of prescriptive grammar, the modal verb shall in English has traditionally been used to express mere futurity for the first person. ... Shame is a psychological condition and a form of religious, political, judicial, and social control consisting of ideas, emotional states, physiological states and a set of behaviors, induced by the consciousness or awareness of dishonor, disgrace, or condemnation. ... In finance a share is a unit of account for various financial instruments including stocks, mutual funds, limited partnerships, and REITs. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Issued capital. ... In corporate law, a stock certificate (also known as certificate of stock or share certificate) is a legal document that certifies ownership of a specific number of stock shares in a corporation. ... A shareholder or stockholder is an individual or company (including a corporation) that legally owns one or more shares of stock in a joint stock company. ... A shareholders agreement (sometimes referred to in the U.S.A. as a stockholders agreement) is an agreement between the shareholders of a company relating to the ownership and management of the company. ... A shareholders agreement (sometimes referred to in the U.S.A. as a stockholders agreement) is an agreement between the shareholders of a company relating to the ownership and management of the company. ... A Shareholders derivative suit is an action brought by a shareholder not on its own behalf, but on behalf of the corporation, on grounds that the corporation is being cheated by corrupt actions from within. ... It is a meeting, usually annual, of all shareholders of a corporation (although in large corporations only a small percentage attend) to elect the Board of Directors and hear reports on the companys business situation. ... Sharia (Arabic شريعة also Sharia, Shariah or Syariah) is traditional Islamic law. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Sheriff is both a political and a legal office held under English common law, Scots law or U.S. common law, or the person who holds such office. ... Sheriffs sale is an auction sale of property held by the sheriff pursuant to a writ (court order) of execution (to seize and sell the property) to satisfy (pay) a judgment, after notice to the public. ... Shield laws are laws that are passed by some states in order to protect the reporters right to keep their sources private. ... The argument from ignorance, also known as argumentum ad ignorantium or argument by lack of imagination, is the assertion that because something is currently inexplicable, it did not happen, or that because one cannot conceive of something, it cannot exist. ... Shoplifting (also known as retail theft) is theft of merchandise for sale in a shop, store, or other retail establishment, by an ostensible patron. ... Order to Show Cause An order to show cause, or a show cause order, is one means of initiating a proceeding before a court. ... The Shulkhan Arukh (Hebrew: Prepared Table), by Rabbi Yosef Karo is considered the most authoritative compilation of Jewish law since the Talmud. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... For other uses, see Signature (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Signature (disambiguation). ... A signing bonus or sign-on bonus is a sum of money paid to a new employee by a company as an incentive to join that company. ... In the common law, a partnership is a type of business entity in which partners share with each other the profits or losses of the business undertaking in which they have all invested. ... Silk weaver Silk is a natural protein fiber that can be woven into textiles. ... A bare trust (sometimes referred to as a simple trust) is one in which the beneficiary has a right to both income and capital and may call for both to be remitted into their own name, they are also entitled to take actual ownership and control of the trust property. ... SiN is a computer game developed by Ritual Entertainment and published by Activision in late 1998. ... This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... Adjournment sine die (from the Latin, without day) occurs when an organized bodys existence terminates. ... Sine qua non or conditio sine qua non was originally a Latin legal term for without which it could not be (but for). It refers to an indispensable and essential action, condition, or ingredient. ... For the river and also village in Norway named Sira, see Sira, Norway. ... Situated ethics, often confused with situational ethics, is a view of applied ethics in which abstract standards from a culture or theory are considered to be far less important than the ongoing processes in which one is personally and physically involved, e. ... Situational ethics (also known as Situationism) refers to a particular view of ethics,faggot that states: (J. Fletcher, Situation Ethics (Westminster, Philadelphia, 1966). ... In law, the situs (Latin for position or site) of property is where the property is treated as being located for legal purposes. ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ... For other uses, see Slavery (disambiguation). ... Small claims courts are courts of limited jurisdiction that hear civil cases between private litigants. ... Small claims courts are courts of limited jurisdiction that hear civil cases between private litigants. ... A skirmish with smugglers from Finland at the Russian border, 1853, by Vasily Hudiakov. ... Socage was one of the forms of land tenure in the feudal system. ... Social capital is defined as the value that is created through the application of social networks during non-organizational time. ... Social control refers to social mechanisms that regulate individual and group behavior, in terms of greater sanctions and rewards. ... Social engineering has several meanings: Social engineering (political science) Social engineering (computer security) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Social justice refers to conceptions of justice applied to an entire society. ... Socialist law is the official name of the legal system used in Communist states. ... Sodomy is a term of religious origin used to characterize certain sexual acts. ... A sodomy law is a law which defines certain sexual acts as sex crimes. ... A software license is a legal agreement which may take the form of a proprietary or gratuitous license as well as a memorandum of contract between a producer and a user of computer software. ... Software patents are patents on computer-implemented inventions. ... The copyright infringement of software is often called software piracy by those seeking to reduce its incidence. ... The term soke (in Old English: soc, connected ultimately with secan (to seek)), at the time of the Norman Conquest of England generally denoted jurisdiction, but due to vague usage probably lacks a single precise definition. ... A Sole proprietorship is a business which legally has no separate existence from its owner. ... Solicitation is a crime; it is an inchoate offense that consists of a person inciting, counseling, advising, urging, or commanding another to commit a crime with the specific intent that the person solicited commit the crime. ... A solicitor is a type of lawyer in many common law jurisdictions, such as the United Kingdom, Hong Kong, Republic of Ireland, Canada and some States of Australia but not the United States. ... The Solicitor General is a cabinet position in several countries, dealing with legal affairs. ... Solitary confinement, colloquially referred to as the hole (or in British English the block), is a punishment in which a prisoner is denied contact with any other persons, excluding guards, chaplains and doctors. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... A solvent is a liquid that dissolves a solid, liquid, or gaseous solute, resulting in a solution. ... The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) is an American non-profit legal, educational, and intelligence-gathering group for the purposes of advocacy for civil rights and against racism. ... Sovereign immunity or crown immunity is a type of immunity that, in common law jurisdictions traces its origins from early English law. ... Sovereignty is the exclusive right to exercise supreme political (e. ... The Spanish Constitution of 1978 is the culmination of the Spanish transition to democracy. ... // Pedro Berruguete. ... Look up special in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A special appearance is a term used in the United States law of civil procedure to describe a civil defendants appearance in the court of another state solely to dispute the personal jurisdiction of the court over that defendant. ... In the science fiction of Iain M. Banks, Special Circumstances (SC) is an organisation that exists within the anarcho-socialist civilisation known as the Culture (which forms the basis of several of his novels and shorter works). ... Damages, in law has two different meanings. ... In law, a special master is an authority appointed by a judge to make sure that judicial orders are actually followed. ... A special prosecutor is a lawyer from outside the government appointed by the attorney general or Congress to investigate a federal official for misconduct while in office. ... An extraordinary resolution (referred to in some countries as a special resolution[1]) is a resolution passed by the shareholders of a company by a greater majority than is required to pass an ordinary resolution. ... Definition of Specific performance In the law of remedies, a specific performance is a demand of a party to perform a specific act. ... Speculative damages are claims made by a plaintiff for losses that may occur in the future, but are highly improbable. ... A speed limit is the maximum speed allowed by law for road vehicles. ... The term speed trap most commonly refers to enhanced enforcement of speed limits in a way that appears not to be primarily motivated by road safety. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into spendthrift trust. ... A spendthrift trust is a trust that is created for the benefit of a person who is in debt (often because they are unable to control their spending) that gives an independent trustee full authority to make decisions as to how the trust funds may be spent for the benefit... Lawyers and courts use the term spoliation to refer to destruction of evidence relevant to a legal proceeding. ... An excited utterance, in the law of evidence, is a statement made by a person in response to a shocking event. ... Spousal abuse is a specific form of domestic violence where physical or sexual abuse is perpetuated by one spouse upon another. ... In many countries alimony, maintenance or spousal support is an obligation established by law that is based on the premise that both spouses have an absolute obligation to support each other during the marriage (or civil union) unless they are legally separated, though in some instances the obligation to support... A springing interest is a future interest held by a grantee for property owned by the grantor. ... The word squat has different meanings: Squatting is a term for inhabiting unused land without title, especially in a city. ... This article is about occupying land without permission. ... A stakeholder was originally a person who holds money or other property while its owner is being determined. ... Stamp duty is a form of tax that is levied on documents. ... A standard form contract (sometimes referred to as a contract of adhesion or boilerplate contract) is a contract between two parties that does not allow for negotiation, i. ... In tort law, the standard of care is the degree of prudence and caution required of an individual who is under a duty of care. ... In law, standing or locus standi is the ability of a party to demonstrate to the court sufficient connection to and harm from the law or action challenged. ... A standing order is a general order of indefinite duration. ... The Star Chamber was an English court of law at the royal Palace of Westminster that began sessions in 1487 and ended them in 1641 when the court itself was abolished. ... For other uses see Star Chamber (disambiguation). ... Stare decisis (Latin: , Anglicisation: , to stand by things decided) (more fully, stare decisis et non quieta movere) is a Latin legal term, used in common law to express the notion that prior court decisions must be recognized as precedents, according to case law. ... A state is a set of institutions that possess the authority to make the rules that govern a society, having internal and external sovereignty over a definite territory. ... A state actor is a term used in United States civil rights law to describe a person who is acting on behalf of a governmental body, and is therefore subject to regulation under the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments, which prohibit the federal and state governments, respectively, from violating the rights... In the U.S., a state court has jurisdiction over disputes which occur in a state. ... In Conflict of Laws, domicile (termed domicil in the U.S.) is the basis of the choice of law rule operating in the characterisation framework to define a persons status, capacity and rights. ... A state of emergency is a governmental declaration that may suspend certain normal functions of government, may work to alert citizens to alter their normal behaviors, or may order government agencies to implement emergency preparedness plans. ... A state religion (also called an official religion, established church or state church) is a religious body or creed officially endorsed by the state. ... A state-owned enterprise (SOE) is an enterprise, often a corporation, owned by a government. ... The term statement can have several meanings: In programming, a statement is an instruction to execute something that will not return a value. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Statism (or Etatism) is a term used in a variety of disciplines (economics, sociology, education policy etc) to describe a system that involves a significant interventionist role for the state in economic or social affairs. ... A statute is a formal, written law of a country or state, written and enacted by its legislative authority, perhaps to then be ratified by the highest executive in the government, and finally published. ... The statute of frauds refers to a requirement in many common law jurisdictions that certain kinds of contracts, typically contractual obligations, be done in writing. ... A statute of limitations is a statute in a common law legal system setting forth the maximum period of time, after certain events, that legal proceedings based on those events may begin. ... The statute of frauds refers to a requirement in many common law jurisdictions that certain kinds of transactions, typically contractual obligations, be evidenced by a writing signed by the party against whom enforcement is sought, or by the partys authorized agent. ... A statute of limitations is a statute in a common law legal system setting forth the maximum period of time, after certain events, that legal proceedings based on those events may begin. ... Statutory Instruments (SIs) are parts of United Kingdom law separate from Acts of Parliament which do not require full Parliamentary approval before becoming law. ... Statutory law is written law (as opposed to oral or customary law) set down by a legislature or other governing authority such as the executive branch of government in response to a perceived need to clarify the functioning of government, improve civil order, answer a public need, to codify existing... The Offer of Judgment rule is a tort reform law aimed at controlling unnecessary litigation. ... The term statutory rape is used when national and/or regional governments, citing an interest in protecting minors, consider people under a certain age to be unable to give informed consent, and therefore consider sexual contact with them to be a felony regardless of their stated consent. ... The word stays has more than one meaning:- An item of ships gear: see nautical term and stays (nautical). ... ... When a condemed person is about to be executed and order comes through usually from a court to stop the execution because there has been a break in the case and the accused may be innocent. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... A magistrate is a judicial officer. ... Categories: Move to Wiktionary | Substubs ... In financial terminology, stock is the capital raised by a corporation, through the issuance and sale of shares. ... In corporate law, a stock certificate (also known as certificate of stock) is a legal document that certifies legal ownership of a specific number of stock shares in a corporation. ... In business management, inventory consists of a list of goods and materials held available in stock. ... Main article: Option A stock option is a specific type of option that uses the stock itself as an underlying instrument to determine the options pay-off (and therefore its value). ... A shareholder or stockholder is an individual or company (including a corporation), that legally owns one or more shares of stock in a joint stock company. ... A Shareholders derivative suit is an action brought by a shareholder not on its own behalf, but on behalf of the corporation, on grounds that the corporation is being cheated by corrupt actions from within. ... Stoning or lapidation is a form of capital punishment in which the convicted criminal is put to death by having stones thrown at him or her, generally by a crowd. ... Strata Title is a form of ownership devised for multi-level apartment blocks, which have apartments at different levels or strata. Strata title was first introduced in New South Wales, Australia to better cope with apartment blocks. ... Strategic lawsuits against public participation, (SLAPP) refers to litigation filed by a large corporation (or in some cases, a wealthy individual) to silence a less powerful critic by so severely burdening them with the cost of a legal defense that they abandon their criticism. ... A straw deed is when two deeds are filed in quick succession, the first from party A to Party B and then the second from Party B back to party A. This is used to sidestep legal restrictions of sales between spouses or joint owners, or to incorporate a new... The straw man fallacy is a rhetorical technique (also classified as a logical fallacy) based on misrepresentation of an opponents position. ... A street in Ynysybwl, Wales, typical of a small town A street is a public parcel of land adjoining buildings in an urban context, on which people may freely assemble, interact, and move about. ... Strict constructionism is a philosophy of judicial interpretation and legal philosophy that limits judicial interpretation to the meanings of the actual words and phrases used in law, and not on other sources or inferences. ... Strict liability is a legal doctrine in tort law that makes a person responsible for the damages caused by their actions regardless of culpability (fault) or mens rea. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Look up Structure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Acting spontaneously without prompting from another party. ... In law, sub judice, Latin for under judgment, means that a particular case or matter is currently under trial or being considered by a judge or court. ... Sub modo is Latin for Subject to a modification or qualification. ... Sub silentio is legal latin meaning without saying. It is often used as a backhanded reference to something that is implied but not expressly stated. ... A sublease is when the lessee in a lease assigns the lease to a third party, thereby making the old lessee the sublessor, and the new lessee the sublessee, or subtenant. ... In the United States, an S Corporation or S-Corp is a form of corporation that meets the IRS requirements to be taxed under Subchapter S of the Internal Revenue Code. ... A subcontractor is an individual or in many cases a business that signs a contract to perform part or all of the obligations of anothers contract. ... A sublease is when the lessee in a lease assigns the lease to a third party, thereby making the old lessee the sublessor, and the new lessee the sublessee, or subtenant. ... Category: ... Subordination is a state in which one person or group of people has rights or privileges which rank below those of another. ... A subordination agreement is a legal document used to deprecate the claim of one party in favor of another. ... Subornation of perjury is a legal term describing the act of an attorney who presents testimony (or an affidavit) the attorney knows is materially false to a judge or jury as if it were factual. ... A subpoena is a writ commanding a person to appear under penalty (from Latin). ... A subpoena ad testificandum is a court order to appear and give testimony. ... Subpoena Duces Tecum (Latin for: bring with under penalty of punishment). ... Subrogation is best known as a concept of insurance law. ... Subrogation is where one person assumes the legal rights of another person for whom the first person has paid expenses or a debt on their behalf. ... Subrogation is best known as a concept of insurance law. ... The subscription business model is a business model that has long been used by magazines and record clubs, but the application of this model is spreading. ... Subscriber: In a public switched telecommunications network such as the common telephone system, the ultimate user, customer, of a communications service. ... A subsidiary is a company controlled by another usually a large corporation. ... Substantive law is the statutory or written law that governs rights and obligations of those who are subject to it. ... Service of process is the term given to legal notice of a court or administrative bodys exercise of its jurisdiction over a person (defendant etc. ... In general, substitution is the replacement of one thing with another. ... A substitution of attorney is a legal document that may be created during a lawsuit if a party wishes to replace its attorney with another one. ... Succession is the act or process of pooing or of following in order or sequence. ... In law, a sentence forms the final act of a judge-ruled process, and also the symbolic principal act connected to his function. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Pronunciation SOO-eye jen-ER-ihs Sui generis is a (post) Latin expression, literally meaning of its own kind/genus or unique in its characteristics. ... Suicide (from Latin sui caedere, to kill oneself) is the act of willfully ending ones own life. ... Look up Suit in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Dates romantically sharing a chili cheese dog, in a dream sequence Courtship (sometimes called dating or going steady) is the process of selecting and attracting a mate for marriage. ... Summary judgment is a legal term which means that a court has made a determination (a judgment) without a full trial. ... Summary judgment in U.S. legal practice is a judgment awarded by the court prior to trial, based upon the courts finding that: (1) there are no issues of material fact requiring a trial for their resolution, and (2) in applying the law to the undisputed facts, one party... In the law of many common law jurisdictions, a summary offence (or summary offense) is an offence which can be tried without an indictment. ... A summons is a legal document issued by a court addressed to a defendant in a legal proceeding. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In law, and more specifically, in the Anglo-American common law legal tradition, a superior court is a court of general jurisdiction over all, or major, civil and criminal cases. ... A bond that a court requires from an appellant who wants to delay payment of a judgement until the appeal is over. ... Suppression of evidence is a term used in the United States legal system to describe the lawful or unlawful act of preventing evidence from being shown in a trial. ... Supra (Latin for above) is a legal citation signal used when a writer desires to refer a reader to an earlier-cited authority. ... Article VI, Paragraph 2 of the United States Constitution is known as the Supremacy Clause: The Supremacy Clause establishes the Constitution, Federal Statutes, and U.S. treaties as the supreme law of the land. ... The supreme court in some countries, provinces, and states, functions as a court of last resort whose rulings cannot be challenged. ... The Supreme Court Building in Ottawa The Supreme Court of Canada (French: Cour suprême du Canada) is highest court of Canada and is the final court of appeal for all litigants in the Canadian justice system. ... The Supreme Court of India is the highest court of the land as established by Part V, Chapter IV of the Constitution of India. ... This article concerns the Courts of England and Wales. ... The Supreme Court of New Zealand is the highest court of appeal in New Zealand, having formally come into existence at the beginning of 2004, and sitting for the first time on 1 July 2004. ... An overprint is the addition of text (and sometimes graphics) to the face of a postage stamp after it has been printed. ... A surety is a person who agrees to be responsible for the debt or obligation of another. ... In jurisprudence, surplusage is a useless statement completely irrelevant to the cause. ... A surrebuttal is the response to the opposing partys rebuttal in a trial; in essence it is a rebuttal to a rebuttal. ... To surrender is when soldiers give up fighting and become prisoners of war, either as individuals or when ordered to by their officers. ... Surrogate (from Lat. ... A concurrent estate or co-tenancy is a concept in property law, particularly derived from the common law of real property, which describes the various ways in which property can be owned by more than one person at a given time. ... A suspended sentence is a legal construct. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Swearing originally meant making an oath, and this usage is still used today in official and legal contexts. ... In the broadest sense, a fraud is a deception made for personal gain, although it has a more specific legal meaning, the exact details varying between jurisdictions. ... // Common usage A syndicate is an association of people or companies. ... A synod (also known as a council) is a council of a church, usually a Christian church, convened to decide an issue of doctrine, administration or application. ...


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T.R.O. -- Table A -- Tainted evidence -- Take -- Taking the fifth -- Taliban -- Talis qualis -- Tallage -- Talmud -- Tangible personal property -- Tangible property -- Taqlid -- Targeting civilians -- Targum -- Tax -- Tax avoidance -- Tax costs -- Tax court -- Tax credit -- Tax deduction -- Tax evasion -- Tax haven -- Tax law -- Tax return -- Tax sale -- Tax treaty -- Taxation in the United States -- Taxation of costs -- Temporary injunction -- Temporary insanity -- Ten Commandments -- Tenancy -- Tenancy at sufferance -- Tenancy at will -- Tenancy by the entirety -- Tenancy in common -- Tenant -- Tender -- Tenement -- Tentative trust -- Tenure -- Term -- Terms and conditions of employment -- Terms and conditions of purchase -- Terms and conditions of sale -- Terms of disparagement -- terra nullius -- Territorial integrity -- Terrorism -- Test Act -- Testacy -- Testamentary -- Testamentary capacity -- Testamentary disposition -- Testamentary trust -- Testate -- Testator -- Testatrix -- Teste -- Testify -- Testimony -- Texas Declaration of Independence -- Crown -- Old Bailey -- The problem of evil -- Theft -- Theocracy -- Third party -- Third tier -- Third-party beneficiary -- Thirds -- Thirty-day notice -- Three strikes, you're out -- Three theological virtues -- Three-day notice -- Tide lands -- Time is of the essence -- Time served -- Timely -- Timeshare -- Tipstaff -- Tithe -- Title -- Title abstract -- Title insurance -- Title report -- Title search -- To wit -- Toll -- Toll bridge -- Toll road -- Tontine -- Tools of trade -- Torah -- Torah study -- Torrens title -- Tort -- Tort claims act -- Tortfeasor -- Tortious -- Torture -- Tosafists -- Tosefta -- Total depravity -- Totalitarian democracy -- Totalitarianism -- Totten doctrine -- Totten trust -- Tract -- Trade -- Trade fixture -- Trade name -- Trade secret -- Trade union -- Trade-Related aspects of Intellectual Property rights -- Trademark -- Trademarks registry -- Trader -- Tragedy of the commons -- Transcript -- Transfer -- Transfer agent -- Transfer in contemplation of death -- Transfer of shares -- Transferred intent -- Transparency -- Treason -- Treasure Trove -- Treasury security -- Treasury stock -- Treaty -- Treaty of Waitangi -- Treble damages -- Trespass -- Trial -- Trial by combat -- Trial by ordeal -- Trial court -- Trial de novo -- Trial window -- Tribunal -- Tribute -- Trier of fact -- trinoda necessitas -- Triple net lease -- Truancy -- True bill -- Trust law -- Trust deed -- Trust fund -- Trustee -- Trustee in bankruptcy -- Trustor -- Trusts and estates -- Truth in Lending Act -- Try title -- Turn states' evidence -- Twelve Tables -- Twinkie defense -- ... In English company law, Table A refers to the default form of Memorandum of Association and Articles of Association for companies limited by shares incorporated in England and Wales where the incorporators do not choose to use modified forms. ... Falsified evidence, forged evidence or tainted evidence is used to either convict an innocent person, or to guarantee conviction of a guilty person. ... This article needs cleanup. ... In American criminal law, taking the fifth is the act of refusing to testify under oath in a court of law or any other tribunal (such as a Congressional committee) on the grounds that the answers that would be given could be used as evidence against the witness to convict... Flag flown by the Taliban. ... Tallage or talliage (from the French a part cut out of the whole) appears to have signified at first a tax in general, but became afterwards confined in England to a special form of tax: the assessment upon cities, boroughs, and royal domains. ... Tractate Brachos, folio 2a The Talmud (תלמוד) is a record of rabbinic discussions of Jewish law, ethics, customs, and stories, which are authoritative in Jewish tradition. ... Personal property is a type of property. ... Tangible property in law is, literally, anything which can be touched, and includes both real property (or, in civil law systems, immovable property) and personal property (or moveable property), and stands in distinction to intangible property. ... Taqlid is typically considered blind following, and is allegedly what inspired the Wahhabi movement to eradicate forms of Sufism that had - per their perspective - departed significantly from both the spirit and practice of Islam. ... Civilian casualties is a military term describing civilian or non-combatant persons killed or injured by military action. ... A targum (plural: targumim) is an Aramaic translation of the Hebrew Bible (Tanakh) written or compiled in the Land of Israel or in Babylonia from the Second Temple period until the early Middle Ages (late first millennium). ... A tax (also known as a duty) is a financial charge or other levy imposed on an individual or a legal entity by a state or a functional equivalent of a state (e. ... This article contrasts tax evasion, tax avoidance and tax mitigation. ... The United States Tax Court is a special court created by the U.S. Congress to adjudicate disputes over tax assessments. ... Within the Australian, Canadian, United Kingdom, and United States tax systems, a tax credit is an item which is treated as a payment already made towards taxes owed. ... A tax deduction or a tax-deductible expense, is an item which is subtracted from gross income in order to arrive at the taxable income. ... This article contrasts tax evasion, tax avoidance, tax resistance and tax mitigation. ... A tax haven is a place where certain taxes are levied at a low rate or not at all. ... Tax law is the codified system of laws that describes government levies on economic transactions, commonly called taxes. ... Look up Tax return in Wiktionary, the free dictionary For tax returns in the United States see Tax return (United States); for tax returns in Canada see Tax return (Canada). ... Tax treaties exist between many countries on a bilateral basis to prevent double taxation (taxes levied twice on the same income, profit, capital gain, inheritance or other item). ... Taxation in the United States is a complex system which may involve payments to at least four different levels of government: Local government, possibly including one or more of municipal, township, district and county governments Regional entities such as school, utility, and transit districts State government Federal government // Federal taxation... Taxation of costs is a ministerial function performed by a court clerk upon the resolution of case. ... An injunction is an equitable remedy in the form of a court order that either prohibits or compels (enjoins or restrains) a party from continuing a particular activity. ... In a criminal trial, the insanity defenses are possible defenses by excuse, via which defendants may argue that they should not be held criminally liable for breaking the law, as they were mentally ill or mentally incompetent at the time of their allegedly criminal actions. ... The Ten Commandments on a monument on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol This 1768 parchment (612x502 mm) by Jekuthiel Sofer emulated 1675 decalogue at the Esnoga synagogue of Amsterdam The Ten Commandments, or Decalogue, are a list of religious and moral imperatives which, according to religious tradition, were... A tenant farmer is one who resides on and farms land owned by a landlord. ... A leasehold estate is an ownership interest in land in which a lessee or a tenant holds real property by some form of title from a lessor or landlord. ... A leasehold estate is an ownership interest in land in which a lessee or a tenant holds real property by some form of title from a lessor or landlord. ... A concurrent estate or co-tenancy is a concept in property law, particularly derived from the common law of real property, which describes the various ways in which property can be owned by more than one person at a given time. ... Co-tenancy or joint tenancy is a concept in property law, particularly derived from the common law of real property, which describes the various ways in which property can be owned by more than one person at a given time. ... A tenant (from the Latin tenere, to hold), in legal contexts, holds real property by some form of title from a landlord. ... Tender may mean: one of several types of boat or ship, all sharing the general function of servicing another type of air or sea vessel: seaplane tender - supplies and services seaplanes submarine tender - resupplies submarines motor torpedo boat tender - resupplies motor torpedo boats ships tender - used to transport people... Categories: Stub | House types ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... The word term refers to either a word unit or a time unit with specified boundaries or limits. ... An employment contract is an agreement entered into between an employer and an employee at the commencement of the period of employment and stating the exact nature of their business relationship, specifically what compensation the employee will receive in exchange for specific work performed. ... Terms of disparagement are pejorative terms such as yid, kike, nigger, whore, slut, fag and queer whose use usually arouses painful feelings in the target, members of the targeted group or sympathizers. ... Terra nullius (English pronunciation , Latin pronunciation [[IPA]])is a Latin expression deriving from Roman Law meaning no mans land or, literally, empty land. // Rationale As in Antiquity peace was considered an exceptional condition between states, only established by peace treaty, war being their natural rapport, any territory that was... Territorial integrity is the principle under international law that nation-states should not attempt to promote secessionist movements or to promote border changes in other nation-states. ... Terrorism refers to a strategy of using violence, or threat of violence to generate fear, cause disruption, and ultimately, to bring about compliance with specific political, religious, ideological, and personal demands. ... The several Test Acts were a series of English penal laws that imposed various civil disabilities on Roman Catholics and Nonconformists. ... In the common law tradition, testamentary capacity is the legal term of art used to describe a persons legal and mental ability to make a valid will. ... A testamentary trust is trust which arises upon the death of the testator, usually under his will. ... It has been suggested that Intestacy Rules be merged into this article or section. ... A testator is a person who has made a legally binding will or testament, which specifies what is to be done with that persons penis family and/or property after death. ... A testator is a person who has made a legally binding will or testament, which specifies what is to be done with that persons family and/or property after death. ... In law and in religion, testimony is a solemn attestation as to the truth of a matter. ... In law and in religion, testimony is a solemn attestation as to the truth of a matter. ... The Texas Declaration of Independence was the formal declaration of independence of the Republic of Texas from Mexico in the Texas Revolution. ... The Crown is a term which is used to separate the government authority and property of the state in a kingdom from any personal influence and private assets held by the current Monarch. ... The Old Bailey by Mountford (1907) The Central Criminal Court, commonly known as The Old Bailey (a bailey being part of a castle), is a Crown Court (criminal high court) in London, dealing with major criminal cases in the UK. It stands on the site of the mediaeval Newgate Gaol... In the philosophy of religion, “the problem of evil” is the problem of reconciling the existence of evil or suffering in the world with the existence of an omniscient, omnipotent, omnibenevolent god. ... Everyday instance of theft: the bike which fits on this wheel has disappeared. ... The term theocracy is commonly used to describe a form of government in which a religion or faith plays the dominant role. ... In a two-party system a third party is a party other than the two dominant ones. ... A third party beneficiary, in the law of contracts, is a person who may have the right to sue on a contract, despite not having originally been a party to the contract. ... Thirds is the third studio album by James Gang, released in 1971, and is the last studio album led by Joe Walsh. ... The three Theological Virtues listed in the Bible are: faith hope charity They are mentioned in 1 Corinthians 13:13 And now abideth faith, hope, charity, these three; but the greatest of these is charity (from the King James version) The New King James version and New International version translate... In criminal law, time served describes a sentence where the defendant is released immediately after the guilty verdict, with the time spent in remand awaiting trial effectively being the length of the sentence. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Tipstaff has two different meanings, both somewhat related // Staff The Tipstaff itself is a truncheon or rod. ... A tithe (from Old English teogotha tenth) is a one-tenth part of something, paid as a voluntary contribution or as a tax or levy, usually to support a Jewish or Christian religious organization. ... A title is a prefix or suffix added to a persons name to signify either veneration, an official position or a professional or academic qualification. ... An abstract of title is the condensed history of title to a particular parcel of real estate, consisting of a summary of the original grant and all subsequent conveyances and encumbrances affecting the property and a certification by the abstractor that the history is complete and accurate. ... Title insurance is insurance against defects in title to real property, available in most but not all countries. ... A title search is an action taken prior to the sale of real property to determine whether there are any liens or other encumbrances on the property which might prevent or delay the sale of the property. ... The word toll has several meanings. ... Paying toll on passing a bridge. ... A high-speed toll booth on SR 417 near Orlando, Florida A toll gate on the Sayama bypass (Saitama prefectural road 397) in Japan A toll gate on the Dom Pedro I Highway near the city of Itatiba, Brazil A New Jersey Turnpike Toll Gate for Exit 8A in Monroe... A tontine is an investment vehicle which combines features of a group annuity, group life insurance, and a lottery. ... Torah () is a Hebrew word meaning teaching, instruction, or law. It is the central and most important document of Judaism revered by Jews through the ages. ... Torah study is the study by Jews of the Torah, Tanakh, Talmud, responsa, rabbinic literature and similar works, all of which are Judaisms religious texts, for the purpose of the mitzvah (commandment) of Torah study itself, meaning study for religious (as opposed to academic) purposes. ... Torrens title is a system of land title where a register of land holdings maintained by the state guarantees indefeasible title to those included in the register. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This is a list of legal terms, often from Latin: A mensa et thoro A mensa et thoro, from bed and board. ... In the common law, a tort is a civil wrong for which the law provides a remedy. ... Torture is any act by which severe pain, whether physical or psychological, is intentionally inflicted on a person as a means of intimidation, deterrence, revenge, punishment, or information gathering. ... Tosafists were medieval rabbis who collected commentaries on the Talmud, and appear in virtually every edition since it was first printed. ... The Tosefta is a second compilation of oral law from the period of the Mishnah. ... Total depravity (also called total inability and total corruption) is a theological doctrine that derives from the Augustinian doctrine of original sin and is advocated in many Protestant confessions of faith and catechisms, including those of Lutheranism,1 Anglicanism and Methodism,2 and especially Calvinism. ... Totalitarian democracy is a term coined by Israeli historian J. L. Talmon to refer to a system of government in which lawfully elected representatives maintain the integrity of a nation state whose citizens, while granted the right to vote, have little or no participation in the decision-making process of... Totalitarianism is a typology employed by political scientists, especially those in the field of comparative politics, to describe modern regimes in which the state regulates nearly every aspect of public and private behavior. ... A Totten trust is a form of trust created where one party (the settlor of the trust) places money in a bank account with instructions that upon the settlors death, whatever is in that bank account will pass to a named beneficiary. ... poop ... A fruit stand at a market. ... In the law of real property, fixtures are anything that would otherwise be a chattel that have, by reason of incorporation or affixation, become permanently attached to the real property. ... A trade name, also known as a trading name or a business name, is the legal name of a business, or the name which a business trades under for commercial purposes. ... A trade secret is a formula, practice, process, design, instrument, pattern, or compilation of information used by a business to obtain an advantage over competitors within the same industry or profession. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... The WTO Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPs) is an international agreement on the subject of intellectual property. It covers copyright, patents, trademarks, trade secrets, industrial designs, geographical indicia and integrated circuit layouts. ... A trademark or trade mark[1] is a distinctive sign of some kind which is used by a business to uniquely identify itself and its products and services to consumers, and to distinguish the business and its products or services from those of other businesses. ... The term Trader can refer to: In economics, a merchant, a retail business or one who attempts to generally buy wholesale and sell later at a profit In finance, someone who buys and sells financial instruments such as stocks, bonds and derivatives - see stock trader In marketing, Trader Classified Media... The tragedy of the commons is a phrase used to refer to a class of phenomena that involve a conflict for resources between individual interests and the common good. ... Transcript can have several meanings depending on the context used. ... Did you mean? decal Population transfer Manhattan Transfer List of Latin words with English derivatives Transfer (movie) Electron transfer Fare transfer A technique in propaganda This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... A transfer in contemplation of death is a transfer of property made by a person in the expectation that he or she will shortly die. ... Transferred intent is a doctrine used in both criminal law and tort law that is applied when the intent to harm one individual inadvertently causes a second person to be hurt instead. ... In the physical sciences, specifically in optics, a transparent physical object is one that can be seen through. ... In law, treason is the crime of disloyalty to ones nation or state. ... A treasure-trove is gold, silver, gems, money, jewellery, etc found hidden under ground or in cellar or attics, etc. ... Treasury securities are government bonds issued by the United States Department of the Treasury through the Bureau of the Public Debt. ... In the United Kingdom, treasury stocks refer to government bonds or gilts. ... It has been suggested that Protocol (treaty) be merged into this article or section. ... The Treaty of Waitangi The Treaty of Waitangi (Māori: Te Tiriti o Waitangi) was signed on February 6, 1840 at Waitangi in the Bay of Islands, New Zealand. ... Treble damages, in law, is a term that indicates that a statute permits a court to triple the amount of the actual damages to be awarded to a prevailing party, generally in order to punish the losing party for willful conduct. ... A sign warning against trespassing In law, trespass can be: the criminal act of going into somebody elses land or property without permission of the owner or lessee; it is also a civil law tort that may be a valid cause of action to seek judicial relief and possibly... In legal parlance, a trial is an event in which parties to a dispute present information (in the form of evidence) in a formal setting, usually a court, before a judge, jury, or other designated finder of fact, in order to achieve a resolution to their dispute. ... The Judicial Duel. ... Trial by ordeal is a judicial practice by which the guilt or innocence of the accused is determined by subjecting them to a painful task. ... A trial court or court of first instance is the court in which most civil or criminal cases begin. ... In law, the expression trial de novo literally means new trial. It is most often used in certain legal systems that provide for one form of trial, then another if a party remains unsatisfied with the decision. ... A tribunal is a generic term for any body acting judicially, whether or not it is called a tribunal in its title. ... A tribute (from Latin tribulum, contribution) is wealth one party gives to another as a sign of respect or, as was often case in historical contests, of submission or allegiance. ... A trier of fact is the person or group of persons in a trial who make findings of fact as opposed to rulings of law. ... Trinoda necessitas is a Latin term used in Anglo-Saxon times: meaning threefold tax. ... A Triple net lease (also referred to as NNN or Net-Net-Net) is a lease agreement on a property where the tenant or lessee agrees to pay all taxes, insurance and miscellaneous expenses on the property in addition to any normal fees that are expected under the agreement (rent... Truancy (in Great Britain, colloquially known as bunking off, wagging, skiving or Mitching. ... True bill is a synonym for an indictment. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Protected Trust Deed (PTD) is a formal arrangement that is used in Scotland where a consumer debtor grants a ‘deed’ in favour of the trustee which transfers their assets to the trustee for the benefit of creditors. ... In common law legal systems, a trust is a relationship in which a person or entity (the trustee) has legal control over certain property (the trust property or trust corpus), but is bound by a fiduciary duty to exercise that legal control for the benefit of someone else (the beneficiary... The word trustee is a legal term that refers to a holder of property on behalf of some other beneficiary. ... A trustee in bankruptcy (TIB), in United States bankruptcy law, is a person appointed by the Bankruptcy court to oversee the distribution of the assets of a bankrupt to his creditors. ... In law a settlor is a person who settles property on express trust for the benefit of beneficiaries. ... The law of trusts and estates is generally considered the body of law which governs the management of personal affairs and the disposition of property of an individual in anticipation and the event of such persons incapacity or death, also known as the law of successions in civil law. ... In the United States, the Truth in Lending Act (TILA) is a federal statute designed to protect consumers in credit transactions by requiring clear disclosure of key terms of the lending arrangement and all costs. ... The Law of the Twelve Tables (Lex Duodecim Tabularum, more informally simply Duodecim Tabulae) was the ancient legislation that stood at the foundation of Roman law. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ...


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Uberrima fides -- UCC-1 -- Ulema -- Ultimate fact -- ultra vires -- Ultrahazardous activity -- Unclean hands -- Unconscionable -- Unconstitutional -- Under the influence -- Underground Railroad -- Underwrite -- Underwriter -- Underwriting agreement -- Undisclosed principal -- Undivided interest -- Undue influence -- Unfair competition -- Unfair dismissal -- Unfree labour -- Unified estate and gift tax -- Uniform Code of Military Justice -- Uniform Commercial Code -- Uniform reciprocal enforcement of support act -- Unilateral contract -- Uninsured motorist clause -- Unissued stock -- Unitary state -- United Nations Charter -- United Nations Convention Against Torture -- United States bankruptcy court -- United States Bill of Rights -- United States Code -- United States Constitution -- United States constitutional law -- United States court of appeals -- United States Declaration of Independence -- United States Department of Justice -- United States district court -- United States Federal Income Tax Dependent Deduction -- United States federal judicial circuit -- United States federal judicial district -- United States Office of the Independent Counsel -- United States Patent and Trademark Office -- United States prison population -- United States Supreme Court -- United States tax reform -- Trademark Law (United States) -- Universal Declaration of Human Rights -- Universal jurisdiction -- Unjust enrichment -- Unjust taking -- Unlawful -- Unlawful assembly -- Unlawful detainer -- uno flatu -- Unreasonable search and seizure -- Unspecified claim -- Use -- Use tax -- Usurious -- Usury -- uti possidetis -- Utilitarianism -- Utility (patent) -- Utter -- uxor -- This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Ulema is a common romanisation for the plural of Arabic ˤĀlim Scholar, namely ˤUlamā (علماء). The same word appears in Turkish as Ulema and in Persian as Olæma. ... Ultra vires is a Latin phrase that literally means beyond the power. ... An ultrahazardous activity in the common law of torts is one that is so inherently dangerous that a person engaged in such an activity can be held strictly liable for injuries caused to another person, even if the person engaged in the activity took every reasonable precaution to prevent others... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... An unconscionable transaction is a contract that is unenforceable because the consideration offered is lacking or is so obviously inadequate that to enforce the contract would be unfair to the party seeking to escape the contract. ... Constitutionality is the status of a law, procedure, or act being in accordance with the laws or guidelines contained in a constitution. ... Drink driving or drinking and driving is the act of operating a motor vehicle after having consumed alcohol (ethanol) or other drugs, to the degree that mental and motor skills are impaired. ... Map of some Underground Railroad routes This page is about the slave escape route. ... Debt & Equity underwriting Debt and equity underwriting is the concept of securing the price and sale of a new issue of stocks or bonds. ... In banking, underwriting is the detailed credit analysis preceding the granting of a loan, based on credit information furnished by the borrower, such as employment history, salary, and financial statements; publicly available information, such as the borrowers credit history, which is detailed in a credit report; and the lender... A concurrent estate or co-tenancy is a concept in property law, particularly derived from the common law of real property, which describes the various ways in which property can be owned by more than one person at a given time. ... Undue influence (as a term in jurisprudence) is an equitable doctrine that involves one person taking advantage of a position of power over another person. ... Antitrust is also the name for a movie, see Antitrust (movie) Antitrust or competition laws legislate against trade practices that undermine competitiveness or are considered to be unfair. ... Unfair dismissal is the term used to describe an employers action when terminating an employees contract unfairly. ... Unfree labour is a generic or collective term for those work relations, especially in modern or early modern history, in which adults and/or children are employed against their will by the threat of destitution, detention, violence (including death), or other extreme hardship to themselves, or to members of their... The Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) is the foundation of military law in the United States. ... The Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) is one of the uniform acts that has been promulgated in attempts to harmonize the law of sales and other commercial transactions in the fifty state in the United States of America. ... The Uniform reciprocal enforcement of support act concerns interstate cooperation in the collection of spousal and child support. ... A contract is any legally-enforceable promise or set of promises made by one party to another and, as such, reflects the policies represented by freedom of contract. ... Definition An Uninsured Motorist Clause is a provision commonly found in United States automobile insurance policies that provides for a driver to receive damages for any injury they receive from an uninsured, negligent driver. ... Unissued stock is stock that has been authorised in a companies charter, but has never been sold. ... A map showing the unitary states. ... United Nations Charter Opened for signature June 26, 1945 at San Francisco Entered into force October 24, 1945 Conditions for entry into force Ratification by the Republic of China, France, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and the United States of... World map of CAT member states The United Nations Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (UNCAT) is an international human rights instrument, organized by the United Nations and intended to prevent torture and other similar activities. ... In the United States, Federal courts have exclusive jurisdiction over bankruptcy cases. ... Image of the United States Bill of Rights from the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration. ... The United States Code (U.S.C.) is a compilation and codification of the general and permanent federal law of the United States. ... The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... In the United States, constitutional law generally refers to the provisions of the United States Constitution, as interpreted by the United States Supreme Court. ... The United States Courts of Appeals (or circuit courts) are the mid-level appellate courts of the United States federal court system. ... U.S. Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence is the document in which the Thirteen Colonies in North America declared themselves independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain and explained their justifications for doing so. ... Justice Department redirects here. ... Map of the boundaries of the United States Courts of Appeals and United States District Courts The United States district courts are the general trial courts of the United States federal court system. ... A personal exemption amount for each of the taxpayer, their spouse, and their child or dependent for purposes of calculating ones federal income tax was instituted in the 1950s. ... Congress has divided the United States into a number of judicial circuits, each of which includes several District Courts and a Court of Appeals to decide appeals from cases decided in the district courts within the circuit. ... For purposes of the federal judicial system, Congress has divided the United States into judicial districts. ... United States Office of the Independent Counsel was an independent prosecutor — distinct from the Attorney General of the United States Department of Justice — that provided reports to the Congress under Title 28 of the United States Code, Section 595. ... The United States Patent and Trademark Office (PTO or USPTO) is an agency in the United States Department of Commerce that provides patent and trademark protection to inventors and businesses for their inventions and corporate and product identification. ... This article or section should be merged with Prisons in the United States The prison population of the United States is in a constant state of flux, increasing or decreasing based on a number of factors, including the number of arrests, length of prison sentences, parole, legislation to determine what... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C.