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Encyclopedia > List of journalism topics

List of Journalism is a discipline of collecting, verifying, reporting and analyzing information gathered regarding current events, including trends, issues and people. Those who practice journalism are known as journalists. Journalism is sometimes called the first draft of history. Even though news articles are often written on deadline, they are usually edited... journalism topics

Contents

A-D

  • A slightly outdated edition of the Stylebook The The Associated Press Stylebook and Briefing on Media Law, usually simply called the AP Stylebook and nicknamed the journalists bible, is the primary guide of style and usage for most newspapers and newsmagazines in the United States. As of 2004, Norm... AP Stylebook
  • The Arizona Republic is a newspaper published in Phoenix, Arizona. It is the states largest newspaper, and it circulates throughout Arizona. The center-right Arizona Republic is the foremost newspaper in the city of Phoenix, Arizona (466,926 circ.) and the U.S. state of Arizona. It is owned... Arizona Republic
  • Associated Press logo The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency that claims to be the worlds oldest and largest. The AP is a cooperative owned by its contributing newspapers, who both contribute stories to it and use material written by its staffers. As of 2004, AP... Associated Press
  • A bar chart is a chart with rectangular bars of lengths usually proportional to the magnitudes or frequencies of what they represent. Sometimes the bars are not proportional, often because the chart didnt start at zero. Standards about starting a chart at zero are not universal. In some case... Bar chart
  • The Canadian Association of Journalists (CAJ) or LAssociation Canadienne des Journalistes in French is a Canadian organization of professional journalists created to promote excellence in journalism and encourage investigative journalism. The CAJ acts as a national voice for Canadian journalists. History The CAJ was founded in 1978 as the... Canadian Association of Journalists
  • A chart is a graphic representation of some data. Charts are often used to make large quantities of data more easily understandable, and recognizable on first view. Charts can represent data in several different ways. Some of the different methods are listed below. Charts represent data in different ways depending... Chart
  • Citizen journalism, also known as participatory journalism is the act of citizens playing an active role in the process of collecting, reporting, analyzing and disseminating news and information, according to the seminal report, We Media: How Audiences are Shaping the Future of News and Information, by Shayne Bowman and Chris... Citizen journalism
  • The Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) is an independent, nonprofit organization based in New York which is dedicated to promoting press freedom worldwide and defending the right of journalists to report the news without fear of reprisal. The CPJ was founded in 1981 by a group of US foreign correspondents... Committee to Protect Journalists
  • Conservative bias is the mirror image of liberal bias, a belief that the media is biased in favor of conservative views. Rarely spoken of directly, liberals tend to reference conservative bias by speaking sarcastically about the Liberal Media, or the evil Liberal Media. On many liberal blogs, this arises in... Conservative bias
  • Copy editing is the process of an editor making formatting changes and other improvements to text. Copy, in this case a noun, refers to material (such as handwritten or typewritten pages) to be set (as in typesetting) for printing. A person who performs the task of copy editing is called... Copy editing
  • Desktop publishing, or DTP, is the process of editing and layout of printed material intended for publication, such as books, magazines, brochures, and the like using a personal computer. Desktop publishing software, such as QuarkXPress or Adobe InDesign, is software specifically designed for such tasks. Such programs do not generally... Desktop publishing

E-J

  • Editor has four major senses: a person who obtains or improves material for a publication; a film editor, a person responsible for the flow of a motion picture or television program from scene to scene a sound editor, a person responsible for the flow and choice of music, voice, and... Editor
  • Freedom of the press (or press freedom) is the guarantee by a government of free public speech often through a state constitution for its citizens, and associations of individuals extended to members of news gathering organizations, and their published reporting. It also extends to news gathering, and processes involved in... Freedom of the press
  • Graphic design is the applied art of arranging image and text to communicate a message. It may be applied in any media, such as print, digital media, motion pictures, animation, product decoration, packaging, and signs. Graphic design as a practice can be traced back to the origin of the written... Graphic design
  • Hedcut is a style of drawing, primarily of people, pioneered and used by the Wall Street Journal. The drawings are traditionally 18 by 31 Picas (roughly 3 by 5), and use the stipple method of many small dots to create an image. They are designed to emulate the look of... Hedcut
  • A headline is text at the top of a newspaper article, indicating the nature of the article below it. Headlines may be written in bold, and are written in a much larger size than the article text. Headline conventions include normally using present tense and omitting a and the. Most... Headline
  • Headlinese is nonconversational language used in newspaper headlines. Because of tight space requirements, copy editors usually must write headlines in a compressed, telegraphic style. This includes the use of contractions, such as Pols (for politicians); Dems (for Democrats), GOP (from Grand Old Party, a nickname for the Republican Party). Grammatical... Headlinese
  • The hostile media effect, sometimes called the hostile media phenomenon, refers to the finding that ideological partisans consistently tend to think that media coverage is biased against their particular side of the issue. This tendency has been verified in a number of experiments. In one study by Robert Vallone, Lee... Hostile media effect
  • A publishing companys or periodicals house style is the collection of conventions in its manual of style. For example, see Wikipedia:Manual of Style. Style, in this context, does not refer to the writers voice. Categories: Substubs | Style guides ... House style
  • This article is in need of attention. Please improve it in any way you see fit. Information graphics are visual presentations of information. They are also known as infographics or just graphics. They are commonly found in the news, in subway maps, airport signage, timelines, and popular scientific literature. Information... Information graphic
  • The inverted pyramid is a graphical metaphor that is most often used to illustrate how information should be arranged or presented within a text, in particular within a news story. Despite the name, almost always the figure is drawn simply as an equilateral triangle with an apex pointing downward, rather... Inverted pyramid
  • Journalese is the artificial or hyperbolic language regarded as characteristic of the popular media. Joe Grimm of the Detroit Free Press likened journalese to a stage voice: We write journalese out of habit, sometimes from misguided training, and to sound urgent, authoritative and, well, journalistic. But it doesnt do... Journalese
  • Journalism is a discipline of collecting, verifying, reporting and analyzing information gathered regarding current events, including trends, issues and people. Those who practice journalism are known as journalists. Journalism is sometimes called the first draft of history. Even though news articles are often written on deadline, they are usually edited... Journalism
  • Journalistic fraud includes practices such as plagiarism, fabrication of quotes, facts, or other report details, staging or altering the event being putatively recorded, or anything else that may call the integrity and truthfulness of a piece of journalism into question. As their reputations for accuracy and truthfulness are arguably the... Journalism scandals
  • A journalist is a person who practices journalism. Reporters are one type of journalist. They create reports as a profession for broadcast or publication in mass media such as newspapers, television, radio, magazines, documentary film, and the Internet. Reporters find the sources for their work; the reports can be either... Journalist

L-N

  • Liberal bias, or liberal media, in American political discourse, are common phrases used, mostly by those on the political right, to explain their view that the American media generally has a liberal bias. This phrase is often used to summarize allegations that a left-wing agenda is promoted because of... Liberal bias
  • List of journalism topics
  • This article is about the magazine as a published medium. For other meanings, see magazine (disambiguation) A collection of magazines Magazines A magazine is a periodical publication containing a variety of articles on various subjects. Magazines are typically published weekly, biweekly, monthly, or quarterly, with a date on the cover... Magazine
  • McClatchy Co., created
  • Media bias is a real or perceived tendency of journalists and news producers within the mass media to approach both the presentation of particular stories, and the selection of which stories to cover, with an unbalanced perspective. In essence, media bias generally refers to accusations of either censorship or propagandism... Media bias
  • In American English, a muckraker is a journalist or an author who searches for and exposes scandals and abuses occurring in business and politics. In International English it has a similar root meaning but is highly pejorative. The term muckraker is most properly applied to American reporters and writers from... Muckraker
  • In journalism, news agencies are bodies established to supply news reports to newspapers, magazines, and radio and television broadcasters. They are also known as wire services or news services. News agencies can be either corporations that sell news (e.g. Reuters), cooperatives composed of newspapers that share their articles with... News agency
  • New journalism was a style of journalism invented by Tom Wolfe who, when having trouble writing an assignment, sent his editor an unstructured narrative letter rather than the tight piece usually expected of a journalist of that time. This letter was published under the title There Goes (Varoom! Varoom!) That... New Journalism
  • News is the reporting of current events usually by local, regional or mass media in the form of newspapers, television and radio programs, or sites on the World Wide Web. News reporting is a type of journalism, typically written or broadcast in news style. Most news is investigated and presented... News
  • Reading the newspaper: Brookgreen Gardens in Pawleys Island, South Carolina. A newspaper is a lightweight and disposable publication (more specifically, a periodical), usually printed on low-cost paper called newsprint. It may be general or special-interest, and may be published daily, weekly, biweekly, monthly, bimonthly, or quarterly. General-interest... Newspaper
  • Best-selling English language daily newspapers as of 2002, with circulation: The Sun 3,541,002 United Kingdom (tabloid) The Daily Mail 2,342,982 United Kingdom (tabloid) The Daily Mirror 2,148,058 United Kingdom (tabloid) The Times of India 2,144,842 India USA Today 2,120,357... Newspaper circulation
  • Source is a term used in journalism to refer to any individual from whom information about a story has been received. Outside of journalism, such a person is sometimes known as a news source. A more colloquial term for this is informant. Usually, a person is not referred to as... News source
  • News style is the prose style of short, front-page newspaper stories and the news bulletins that air on radio and television. It encompasses not only vocabulary and sentence structure, but the order in which stories present information, their tone and the readers or interests to which they cater. This... News style

P-Y

  • A pie chart is a circular chart divided into segments, illustrating relative magnitudes or frequencies. In a pie chart, the arc length (and consequently, the central angle and the area) of each segment, is proportional to the quantity it represents. Together, the wedges create a full disk. A chart with... Pie chart
  • Sports photojournalists at Indianapolis Photojournalism is a particular form of journalism (i.e., the collecting, editing, and presenting of news material for publication or broadcast) that creates images in order to tell a news story. It is now usually understood to refer only to still images, and to refer largely... Photojournalism
  • 1.A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. Major publishing companies include AOL Time Warner, including subsidiaries Warner Books and Little, Brown ASCII Baen Books Farrar, Straus and Giroux Hachette Filipacchi Media Harlequin Mills & Boon Harper Collins, including William Morrow and Avon... Publisher
  • The Pulitzer Prize is a United States literary award given out each April. Recipients of the award are chosen by an independent board and officially administered by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in the United States. The prize was established by Joseph Pulitzer, a Hungarian-American journalist and... Pulitzer Prize
  • Sportswriting is a form of journalism who writes and reports on sports topics and events. Ernest Hemingways writing could perhaps be considered in this category due to his love for hunting, fishing and boxing. Bernard Malamud also wrote powerfully about baseball in his novel The Natural. The Associated Press... Sportswriting
  • Sports photojournalists at Indianapolis Photojournalism is a particular form of journalism (i.e., the collecting, editing, and presenting of news material for publication or broadcast) that creates images in order to tell a news story. It is now usually understood to refer only to still images, and to refer largely... Photojournalism
  • Printing is an industrial process for reproducing copies of texts and images, typically with ink on paper using a printing press. It is an essential part of publishing. Books are usually printed today using the technique of offset printing,and occasionally relief print, (which is principally used for newspapers and... Printing
  • Proofreading is reading a proof copy of text for the purpose of detecting errors. A proof copy is traditionally a version of a manuscript that has been typeset after copy editing has been performed. The line between copy editing and proofreading is narrow. Often, proof manuscripts contain typographical errors introduced... Proofreading
  • The Pulitzer Prize is a United States literary award given out each April. Recipients of the award are chosen by an independent board and officially administered by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in the United States. The prize was established by Joseph Pulitzer, a Hungarian-American journalist and... Pulitzer Prize
  • Sportswriting is a form of journalism who writes and reports on sports topics and events. Ernest Hemingways writing could perhaps be considered in this category due to his love for hunting, fishing and boxing. Bernard Malamud also wrote powerfully about baseball in his novel The Natural. The Associated Press... Sportswriting
  • The Star-Ledger is the leading newspaper in New Jersey. It is based in Newark, which used to be part of its name. [1] Categories: Stub | Newspapers of New Jersey ... Star-Ledger
  • Style guides generally give guidance on language use. Some style guides consider or focus on elements of graphic design, such as typography and white space. Web site style guides often focus on visual or technical aspects. Overview Traditionally, a style guide (often called a style manual or stylebook) dictates what... Style guide
  • Typography (from the Greek words typos = form and grapho = write) is the art and technique of selecting and arranging type styles, point sizes, line lengths, line leading, character spacing, and word spacing for typeset applications. These applications can be physical or digital. The two primary functions of typography are the... Typography
  • Yellow journalism is a type of journalism in which sensationalism triumphs over factual reporting. This may take such forms as the use of colorful adjectives, exaggeration, a careless lack of fact-checking for the sake of a quick breaking news story, or even deliberate falsification of entire incidents. The sensationalized... Yellow journalism

  Results from FactBites:
 
directopedia : Directory : News : Media : Journalism (811 words)
News-oriented journalism often is described as the "first draft of history." Even though journalists often write news articles to a deadline, news media usually edit and proofread the results prior to publication.
Journalism has as its main activity the reporting of events — stating who, what, when, where, why and how, and explaining the significance and effect of events or trends.
Journalism exists in a number of media: newspapers, television, radio, magazines and, since the end of 20th century, the Internet.
Journalism (509 words)
News-oriented journalism often is described as the "first draft of history." Even though journalists often write news articles to a deadline, news media usually edit and proofread the results prior to publication.
Journalism has as its main activity the reporting of events — stating who, what, when, where, why and how, and explaining the significance and effect of events or trends.
Journalism exists in a number of media: newspapers, television, radio, magazines and, since the end of 20th century, the Internet.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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