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Encyclopedia > List of faux pas
Image:Split-arrows.gif It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. (Discuss)

Caveat: It has been noted on the discussion page that this list includes examples of common etiquette, superstitions, linguistic guidelines, preferences in terminology, cultural tendencies, local laws, regional customs and many other occurrences which are not correctly defined as faux pas. Image File history File links Derived from public domain images featured at: http://commons. ... A faux pas, (IPA , plural: faux pas ) (French for false step) is a violation of accepted, although unwritten, social rules. ...


Nevertheless, the following list contains useful generalized information about ways that one might breach social expectations in various countries.


Note that changing attitudes and multiculturalism within countries means that some entries listed here may apply to the social expectations of only a few individuals. To avoid giving offense, it is best to use a conservative and observant approach in any social situation where one is unfamiliar with cultural expectations.

Contents

Common Faux Pas

Faux pas in the following area are common around the world. The specifics vary from place to place, but these are all areas of human activity in which faux pas can be committed whether traveling across the globe or visiting with a next door neighbor.


Enthusiasm

  • The amount of enthusiasm or restraint one displays in such situations as greeting people, saying thank you, and giving compliments can constitute a faux pas in certain situations. Some people say goodbye with hugs and kisses, others say it with a grunt and a nod of the head. Both the kissers and the grunters might be committing a faux pas depending upon the setting and the expectations of others.
  • Some generalizations about this matter on a country-by-country basis might be helpful, but is a matter in which individual personalties matter a great deal. Accordingly, one should be observant on a per situation basis to avoid committing a faux pas.
 Customs regarding giving or receiving gifts vary according to the culture and situation. Even if given with noble intentions, a poorly-choosen given can be a faux pas. Depicted on this Athenian vase from ca. 460, a man presents a cut of meat to a youth.
Enlarge

Customs regarding giving or receiving gifts vary according to the culture and situation. Even if given with noble intentions, a poorly-choosen given can be a faux pas. Depicted on this Athenian vase from ca. 460, a man presents a cut of meat to a youth.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (852x1030, 1069 KB) Summary Man presents a cut of meat to a youth, a pederastic love gift. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (852x1030, 1069 KB) Summary Man presents a cut of meat to a youth, a pederastic love gift. ... A faux pas, (IPA , plural: faux pas ) (French for false step) is a violation of accepted, although unwritten, social rules. ... A view of the Acropolis of Athens during the Ottoman period, showing the buildings which were removed at the time of independence The History of Athens is the longest of any city in Europe: Athens has been continuously inhabited for at least 3,000 years. ...

Gift Giving

Giving and receiving Gifts gifts can be a complex matter. A gift or present is the transfer of money or goods without requiring something in return (at least not immediately); by extension it can be anything that makes the other more happy or less sad, especially as a favor, including forgiveness, and kindness (even when the other is not kind). ...

  • In some places it is a faux pas to open a gift in front of the giver. Elsewhere it is a faux pas not to do so. Ask the locals.
  • In most places, it us inappropriate to indicate the value of your gifts by failing to remove the price tag.
  • Certain gifts are taboo in certain situations. As noted below, certain gifts conflict with the belief system of many Chinese people regarding good luck and bad luck. Other gifts are taboo for different reasons, such as a man in North America giving red roses to a woman married to another man. Many of these specific taboos are noted below.

A world view, (or worldview) is a term calqued from the German word Weltanschauung (pronounced //) meaning a look onto the world. It implies a concept fundamental to German philosophy and epistemology and refers to a wide world perception. ... The term Chinese people may refer to any of the following: A person who resides in and holds citizenship of the Peoples Republic of China (including Hong Kong and Macau) or the Republic of China (Taiwan). ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... Roses (Spanish: Rosas) is a municipality in the comarca of the Alt Empordà in Catalonia, Spain. ...

Humor

Humor is a delicate art. Attempts at humor in unfamiliar situations are always risky.

  • Deprecating humor always involves a risk of offense. For example, a Canadian with four Filipino friends might get a bad reaction when making a joke based on Filipino stereotypes, even after hearing these four friends engage in this humor over a long period of time.
  • Deprecating humor can offend even when the listener is not the subject of the humor. For example, a joke about gay people might offend many straight people as well.
  • Imitation is often not flattering. Scots are unlikely to enjoy a Californian’s impersonation of Billy Connolly, nor are Californians likely to enjoy a Scot’s impersonation of Moon Unit Zappa.
  • Risqué means risky, and it is. What is acceptably risqué not only varies from place to place, it varies from person to person. Overstepping the bounds of sexual or scatological humor is among the most serious faux pas one can commit.
  • Lastly, be mindful that people who appear to take amusement might actually be offended but prefer not to show offense either out of nervousness or as a point of etiquette.

For other articles with similar names, see Gay (disambiguation). ... Heterosexuality is a sexual orientation characterized by esthetic attraction, romantic love or sexual desire exclusively for members of the opposite sex or gender, contrasted with homosexuality and distinguished from bisexuality and asexuality. ... Imitation is an advanced animal behaviour whereby an individual observes anothers behaviour and replicates it itself. ... Motto: , traditionally rendered in Scots as Wha daur meddle wi me?[1] and in English as No one provokes me with impunity. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... William Billy Connolly, CBE, (born 24 November 1942) is a comedian, musician, presenter, and actor. ... Moon Unit Zappa (born September 28, 1967, in New York City) is the oldest child of late American rock star Frank Zappa and Gail Sloatman; she goes by the name Moon Zappa. ...

Inquisition

  • Asking questions can be a way to express curiosity, concern and enthusiasm. However, questions about a persons age, employment status, marital/romantic situation, place of residence and other personal matters can be a faux pas. Although this sort of information-sharing is somewhat dependant on cultural background, individual personality plays a great role as well.

Language

Most faux pas involving language belong more to a language textbook than this list; nevertheless, a few are sufficiently likely to be committed by people who haven't mastered a language that they merit mention.

  • Some languages mark familiarity and/or respect using T-V distinction. This often applies to common phrases such as "how are you" that are sometimes learned in isolation (such as from phrase books).
  • Which part of name and/or title to use to address people can be problematic. Some languages distinguish male and female forms of surnames. Many cultures put surnames first. Most languages use forms of address which don’t directly correspond with the titles such as Mr., Miss, Mrs., and Ms. that are familiar to speakers of English.
  • Be especially careful when addressing people who have higher social status (such as one’s employer) and people who are older. This applies not only in regard to forms of address but to what slang words and topics might be inappropriate.

In sociolinguistics, a T-V distinction describes the situation wherein a language has second-person pronouns that distinguish varying levels of politeness, social distance, courtesy, familiarity, or insult toward the addressee. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...

Lumping and Splitting

  • There are many issues involved with failing to discern people with one ethnic, national, religious, linguistic or cultural identity with others who don't share their identity. New Zealanders rarely appreciate being called Australian, most Puerto Ricans won't like being called Mexicans, and so on ad infinitum.
  • Some of these of issues can be as obvious failing to differentiate between Korean people and Japanese people or as relatively esoteric as confusing San people with the closely-related Khoikhoi or failing to comprehend that certain natives of Netherlands prefer to identify as Frisian or Flemish rather than Dutch. Further complicating the issue is that someone might consider themselves Hopi (for example) while other Hopi people might not.
  • Although “lumping” is the biggest danger, sometimes “splitting” can result in a faux pas instead. An example might trying to discern whether someone is Irish Catholic or Anglo-Irish.
  • These distinctions are far beyond the scope of this article. When in doubt, avoid characterizing people according to a cultural identity. Make inquiries regarding identity carefully (if at all) and with consideration about how close a relationship you have with the person being questioned.
Matters of etiquette regarding such things as clothing choice vary greatly from one society to another. Show here is a woman in Afghanistan wearing a burqa.
Matters of etiquette regarding such things as clothing choice vary greatly from one society to another. Show here is a woman in Afghanistan wearing a burqa.

Look up Ad infinitum in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... An 18th century drawing of Khoikhoi worshipping the moon The Khoikhoi (men of men) or Khoi are a historical division of the Khoisan ethnic group of south-western Africa, closely related to the Bushmen (or San, as the Khoikhoi called them). ... Satellite view of the German Bight (the Frisian Coast). ... The term Flemings (Dutch: ) is currently mostly used to refer to the ethnic group native to Flanders (the northern half of Belgium, historically part of the Southern Netherlands), which in total numbers about 6 million people in Belgium (the majority of all Belgians) . The term also designates, not only the... Hopi woman dressing hair of unmarried girl. ... Irish Catholics are persons of predominantly Irish descent who adhere to the Roman Catholic faith. ... Anglo-Irish was a term used historically to describe a ruling class inhabitants of Ireland between 1570 and 1829, who were the descendants and successors of the Protestant Ascendancy[1], mostly belonging to the Anglican Church of Ireland or to a lesser extent one of the English dissenting churches, such... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (720x1250, 195 KB) Source: http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (720x1250, 195 KB) Source: http://www. ... Etiquette, also known as decorum, is the code that governs the expectations of social behavior, the conventional norm. ... Woman in an Afghan burqa For the traditional coat that may be worn by men of the Caucasus region, see burka. ...

What to Wear

  • In some countries, shoes are removed when entering a home. Depending on the culture, they may be removed outside the door or inside the foyer. Elsewhere, removing ones shoes might be a faux pas.
  • Men's hats commonly need to be removed in various circumstances such attending a church service or funeral, when eating dinner, etc. In some places, wearing a hat indoors in any situation is considered impolite.
  • Conversely, there are places where men are expected to wear some sort of head covering, especially in relation to Jewish and Muslim holy places.
  • Many circumstances limit the amount of skin considered appropriate in a given situation. For both men and women, the choice to wear revealing clothes (i.e. short pants, small t-shirts, short skirts, etc.) risks a breech of etiquette when one is unfamiliar with the circumstances. Short pants that are quite acceptable (for example) in an Episcopal chapel in a laid-back seaside resort might raise eyebrows in a stuffy restaurant or conservative household a few miles inland.

A church building (or simply church) is a building used in Christian worship. ... Underwater funeral in Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea A funeral is a ceremony marking a persons death. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Turkish: Müslüman, Persian and Urdu: مسلمان, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of Islam. ... Episcopal Church and Episcopal redirect here. ...

Taking Offense

Warnings against committing faux pas work both ways. Failing to recognize that someone has committed a faux pas might lead the observer to believe that someone is willfully rude, annoying, inconsiderate or whatever. Acting upon this misbelief is essentially a second faux pas committed in reaction to the first.


Faux Pas by Region

Listed country-by-country, the following points define faux pas which might more easily befall an naive visitor to the given nation than a native or a seasoned expatriate. In considering this list, remember the following: An expatriate (in abbreviated form expat) is someone temporarily or permanently residing in a country and culture other than that of their upbringing and/or legal residence. ...

  • In most countries there are significant numbers of people from different cultures. For example, Laos has several groups of indigenous people who possess Laotian citizenship but are neither culturally nor linguistically Lao. A faux pas listed here under the heading for Laos might therefore apply to the Lao but not (for example) the Hmong people, or vice versa.
  • Conversely, a point mentioned under a given country might, in some instances, be useful in avoiding a faux pas with people from that country living or visiting elsewhere.

The terms Hmong (IPA:) and Mong [mɔ̃ŋ] both refer to an Asian ethnic group whose homeland is in the mountainous regions of southern China. ...

Africa

For other uses, see Africa (disambiguation). ...

Ghana

  • In Ghana, asking a person to a social event (e.g. a bar or restaurant) implies that the person offering the invite will be paying for everything. Inviting a person out and then expecting them to pay for their own drinks, etc is considered extremely rude. [citation needed]

South Africa

  • It is the custom to look someone in the eye whenever touching glasses for a toast. Varying superstitious results can follow should you not do so. [citation needed]

Middle East

  • Throughout most of the Middle East the left hand is reserved for bodily hygiene and considered unclean. Thus, the right hand should be used for eating. Shaking hands with one's left hand is considered an insult. [1]
  • Public displays of affection are frowned upon. [1]
  • Displaying the soles of one's feet or touching somebody with one's shoes is considered rude. [1]
  • In Iraq, the "Thumbs Up" gesture is considered an offensive insult. [1]
  • In some Arab cultures, it is considered disrespectful not to stand when speaking to elders or when they enter a room. Similarly it is expected that elders will be the first to be greeted and served in social gatherings. [1]
  • Entering the living room with shoes on is considered rude. [2]
  • In some Middle East countries it is considered rude for an individual to step away when another individual is stepping closer. [3]
  • In most Arab countries, it is considered polite and a sign of friendship to hold hands when walking. This does not have the romantic connotations it does in the West. [4]

A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Hand with thumb up A Thumbs Up is a common gesture represented by a closed fist held with the thumb extended upward or downward in approval or disapproval respectively. ... The Arabs (Arabic: عرب) are a heterogenous ethnic group who are predominantly speakers of the Arabic language, mainly found throughout the Middle East and North Africa. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... The Arabs (Arabic: عرب) are a heterogenous ethnic group who are predominantly speakers of the Arabic language, mainly found throughout the Middle East and North Africa. ... The term Western World or the West can have multiple meanings depending on its context. ...

Israel

  • Grouping your thumb and fingers together, and shaking it at a person, fingers pointing upwards, indicates "wait". It is not a rude gesture, by any means.

South and East Asia

  • Confusing or thoughtlessly considering groups of very distinct East-Asian peoples (e.g.: Japanese, Chinese, Koreans etc) as "all the same" is considered rude and impolite. [5]
  • It is common in many Asian countries that the person cooking a meal will say that there was something wrong with it ("Oh, it was too salty.") You are expected to disagree ("No, no, it was incredible!") [citation needed]
  • Breaking commitments, especially social commitments, is a major faux pas. Asians are bound by duty to their families. Tearing an Asian away from an arranged commitment, especially with their families, is considered rude. [citation needed]

Map of South Asia (see note on Kashmir) South Asia, also known as Southern Asia, is a southern geopolitical region of the Asian continent comprising territories on and in proximity to the Indian subcontinent. ... East Asia is a subregion of Asia that can be defined in either geographical or cultural terms. ...

Bangladesh

  • While it is acceptable for men to shake hands in greetings, women are only permitted to nod. [4]
  • Eating should be done with only the right hand. [4]
  • The American thumbs up gesture is considered obscene. [4]

China, Taiwan

Faux pas derived from Mandarin pronunciation

The following faux pas are derived from Mandarin and Cantonese, so they may also apply in other Chinese-speaking areas: Standard Mandarin is the official Chinese spoken language used by the Peoples Republic of China, the Republic of China (Taiwan) and Singapore. ... en:Cantonese (linguistics) ...

  • Giving someone a timepiece, such as a clock or a watch, as a gift is a very unlucky faux pas. Traditional superstitions regard this as counting the seconds to the recipient's death. Another common interpretation of this is that the phrase "to gift a clock" (Traditional Chinese: 送鐘, Simplified Chinese: 送钟) in Chinese is pronounced "sòng zhōng" in Mandarin, which is a homophone of a phrase for "terminating" or "attending a funeral" (both can be written as 送終 (traditional) or 送终 (simplified)). Cantonese people consider such a gift as a curse. [6]
  • Giving someone a fan or an umbrella as a gift is frequently unfriendly. The words fan "shàn" (扇) and umbrella "sǎn" (Traditional Chinese: , Simplified Chinese: ) sounds like the word "sàn" (散), meaning scatter or to lose. "sàn kāi" (Traditional Chinese: 散開, Simplified Chinese: 散开) means to split up. [7]
  • As a book (Traditional Chinese: , Simplified Chinese: , pinyin: shū) is a Mandarin homophone of a loss (Traditional Chinese: , Simplified Chinese: , pinyin: shū), carrying or reading (looking at) a book (Traditional Chinese: 帶書, 看書, Simplified Chinese: 带书, 看书, pinyin: dài shū, kàn shū) when betting, such as gambling or investing in stocks, may be considered an unlucky faux pas while being homophones of carrying or looking at a loss (Traditional Chinese: 帶輸, 看輸, Simplified Chinese: 带输, 看输, pinyin: dài shū, kàn shū). This unlucky faux pas does not apply to carrying or reading newspapers (Traditional Chinese: 帶報, 看報, Simplified Chinese: 带报, 看报, pinyin: dàibào, kànbào) as newspapers (Traditional Chinese: 報紙, Simplified Chinese: 报纸, pinyin: bàozhǐ) are not books. [7]
  • Traditionally, the bride gives her parents a fan, symbolizing that she is leaving them for her husband. (Chinese society is traditionally patrilocal.)[8]
  • Sharing a pear with your loved ones is unlucky. "Sharing a pear" (分梨) is a homophone of "separate" (Traditional Chinese: 分離, Simplified Chinese: 分离), both pronounced "fēnlí" in Mandarin. Sharing with distant friends is okay. [9]
  • When eating at a reunion dinner on the eve of the Chinese New Year, eating fish completely is widely considered an unlucky faux pas. See Reunion dinner for the reason why partially-eaten fish is customarily stored overnight. [10]

Traditional Chinese characters are one of two standard character sets. ... Simplified Chinese characters (Simplified Chinese: 简体字; Traditional Chinese: 簡體字; pinyin: jiǎntǐzì; also Simplified Chinese: 简化字; Traditional Chinese: 簡化字; pinyin: jiǎnhuàzì) are one of two standard character sets of printed contemporary Chinese written language. ... Standard Mandarin is the official Chinese spoken language used by the Peoples Republic of China, the Republic of China (Taiwan) and Singapore. ... Homonyms (in Greek homoios = identical and onoma = name) are words which have the same form (orthographic/phonetic) but unrelated meaning. ... Cantonese people (Traditional Chinese: 廣東人; Simplified Chinese: 广东人; Pinyin: Guǎngdōng rén; Jyutping: gwong2 dung1 yan4), broadly speaking, are persons originating from the present-day Guangdong province in southern China. ... Traditional Chinese characters are one of two standard character sets. ... Simplified Chinese characters (Simplified Chinese: 简体字; Traditional Chinese: 簡體字; pinyin: jiǎntǐzì; also Simplified Chinese: 简化字; Traditional Chinese: 簡化字; pinyin: jiǎnhuàzì) are one of two standard character sets of printed contemporary Chinese written language. ... Traditional Chinese characters are one of two standard character sets. ... Simplified Chinese characters (Simplified Chinese: 简体字; Traditional Chinese: 簡體字; pinyin: jiǎntǐzì; also Simplified Chinese: 简化字; Traditional Chinese: 簡化字; pinyin: jiǎnhuàzì) are one of two standard character sets of printed contemporary Chinese written language. ... Traditional Chinese characters are one of two standard character sets. ... Simplified Chinese characters (Simplified Chinese: 简体字; Traditional Chinese: 簡體字; pinyin: jiǎntǐzì; also Simplified Chinese: 简化字; Traditional Chinese: 簡化字; pinyin: jiǎnhuàzì) are one of two standard character sets of printed contemporary Chinese written language. ... Pinyin is a system of romanization (phonemic notation and transcription to Roman script) for Standard Mandarin, where pin means spell and yin means sound. The most common variant of pinyin in use is called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: , Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: Hànyǔ Pīnyīn), also known as scheme... Traditional Chinese characters are one of two standard character sets. ... Simplified Chinese characters (Simplified Chinese: 简体字; Traditional Chinese: 簡體字; pinyin: jiǎntǐzì; also Simplified Chinese: 简化字; Traditional Chinese: 簡化字; pinyin: jiǎnhuàzì) are one of two standard character sets of printed contemporary Chinese written language. ... Pinyin is a system of romanization (phonemic notation and transcription to Roman script) for Standard Mandarin, where pin means spell and yin means sound. The most common variant of pinyin in use is called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: , Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: Hànyǔ Pīnyīn), also known as scheme... Traditional Chinese characters are one of two standard character sets. ... Simplified Chinese characters (Simplified Chinese: 简体字; Traditional Chinese: 簡體字; pinyin: jiǎntǐzì; also Simplified Chinese: 简化字; Traditional Chinese: 簡化字; pinyin: jiǎnhuàzì) are one of two standard character sets of printed contemporary Chinese written language. ... Pinyin is a system of romanization (phonemic notation and transcription to Roman script) for Standard Mandarin, where pin means spell and yin means sound. The most common variant of pinyin in use is called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: , Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: Hànyǔ Pīnyīn), also known as scheme... Traditional Chinese characters are one of two standard character sets. ... Simplified Chinese characters (Simplified Chinese: 简体字; Traditional Chinese: 簡體字; pinyin: jiǎntǐzì; also Simplified Chinese: 简化字; Traditional Chinese: 簡化字; pinyin: jiǎnhuàzì) are one of two standard character sets of printed contemporary Chinese written language. ... Pinyin is a system of romanization (phonemic notation and transcription to Roman script) for Standard Mandarin, where pin means spell and yin means sound. The most common variant of pinyin in use is called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: , Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: Hànyǔ Pīnyīn), also known as scheme... Traditional Chinese characters are one of two standard character sets. ... Simplified Chinese characters (Simplified Chinese: 简体字; Traditional Chinese: 簡體字; pinyin: jiǎntǐzì; also Simplified Chinese: 简化字; Traditional Chinese: 簡化字; pinyin: jiǎnhuàzì) are one of two standard character sets of printed contemporary Chinese written language. ... Pinyin is a system of romanization (phonemic notation and transcription to Roman script) for Standard Mandarin, where pin means spell and yin means sound. The most common variant of pinyin in use is called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: , Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: Hànyǔ Pīnyīn), also known as scheme... Traditional Chinese characters are one of two standard character sets. ... Simplified Chinese characters (Simplified Chinese: 简体字; Traditional Chinese: 簡體字; pinyin: jiǎntǐzì; also Simplified Chinese: 简化字; Traditional Chinese: 簡化字; pinyin: jiǎnhuàzì) are one of two standard character sets of printed contemporary Chinese written language. ... Pinyin is a system of romanization (phonemic notation and transcription to Roman script) for Standard Mandarin, where pin means spell and yin means sound. The most common variant of pinyin in use is called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: , Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: Hànyǔ Pīnyīn), also known as scheme... A patrilocal society is one in which a married couple traditionally lives with the mans family. ... Traditional Chinese characters are one of two standard character sets. ... Simplified Chinese characters (Simplified Chinese: 简体字; Traditional Chinese: 簡體字; pinyin: jiǎntǐzì; also Simplified Chinese: 简化字; Traditional Chinese: 簡化字; pinyin: jiǎnhuàzì) are one of two standard character sets of printed contemporary Chinese written language. ... Chinese New Year decoration in Londons Chinatown Hand-painted Chinese New Years poetry pasted on the sides of doors leading to peoples homes, Lijiang, Yunnan, China. ...

Other faux pas

  • Giving a married man green-colored headwear as a gift is unfriendly. The Chinese saying "wearing a green hat" (Traditional Chinese: 戴綠帽, Simplified Chinese: 戴绿帽, Pinyin: dài lǜmào) means that someone's wife is unfaithful. The gift would be an insult to the couple. [8]
  • At a dinner table, always serve the oldest person at the table first. If you do not know their age, serve the guest first. It is very important to show respect to the elders. [citation needed]
  • Sticking your chopsticks into your rice and leaving them standing there is a very unlucky faux pas. This looks like sticks of incense in a bowl used to honor dead ancestors, and such a symbol of death is extremely offensive at the dinner table. In Cantonese funeral tradition, a pair of chopsticks is used to stick a salt-preserved duck egg into a bowl of rice on the altar as an offering to the deceased. [1]
  • Attending a Cantonese wedding while you are still in mourning for a death in the family is unlucky. It is believed to bring bad luck to the marrying couple. [11]
  • It is considered bad luck for a pregnant woman to attend a funeral. [11]

Traditional Chinese characters are one of two standard character sets. ... Simplified Chinese characters (Simplified Chinese: 简体字; Traditional Chinese: 簡體字; pinyin: jiǎntǐzì; also Simplified Chinese: 简化字; Traditional Chinese: 簡化字; pinyin: jiǎnhuàzì) are one of two standard character sets of printed contemporary Chinese written language. ... Chopsticks is also the name of a simple piece of music for piano. ... Cantonese people (Traditional Chinese: 廣東人; Simplified Chinese: 广东人; Pinyin: Guǎngdōng rén; Jyutping: gwong2 dung1 yan4), broadly speaking, are persons originating from the present-day Guangdong province in southern China. ...

Hong Kong

Superstition

  • Giving someone a clock is offensive, as (Traditional Chinese: 送鐘 in Cantonese is a homophone for a phrase of "attending a funeral for a father". [12]
  • Carrying a book (Traditional Chinese: , Simplified Chinese: , pinyin: shū) is a taboo to some people when betting, because book is pronounced as Shu, which a homophone of "loss". [7]
  • Wearing a green-colored hat is avoided for a man, because Chinese saying "wearing a green hat" (Traditional Chinese: 戴綠帽) means that a wife is unfaithful. [8]
  • Attending a wedding while you are still in mourning for a death in the family is unlucky. [11]
  • It is considered bad luck for a pregnant woman to attend a funeral. [11]

Traditional Chinese characters are one of two standard character sets. ... en:Cantonese (linguistics) ... Homonyms (in Greek homoios = identical and onoma = name) are words which have the same form (orthographic/phonetic) but unrelated meaning. ... Traditional Chinese characters are one of two standard character sets. ... Simplified Chinese characters (Simplified Chinese: 简体字; Traditional Chinese: 簡體字; pinyin: jiǎntǐzì; also Simplified Chinese: 简化字; Traditional Chinese: 簡化字; pinyin: jiǎnhuàzì) are one of two standard character sets of printed contemporary Chinese written language. ... Pinyin is a system of romanization (phonemic notation and transcription to Roman script) for Standard Mandarin, where pin means spell and yin means sound. The most common variant of pinyin in use is called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: , Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: Hànyǔ Pīnyīn), also known as scheme... Traditional Chinese characters are one of two standard character sets. ...

Table

  • leaving chopsticks to stand into a bowl of rice is impolite and considered unlucky, as it looks like sticks of incense to honor dead ancestor. [1]
  • Tapping one's chopsticks against the side of a bowl imitates the gesture of beggars on the street, and is considered impolite.[citation needed]
  • Crossing chopsticks with others' is considered rude and uncivilized.

Chopsticks is also the name of a simple piece of music for piano. ...

Family

  • While cursing someone himself is offensive, cursing someone's parents or family members is a severe insult, thanks to Confucius' influence.
  • It's impolite not to greet parents or elder people when going into a private home.

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...

Social

  • Splitting bills is common among youngsters, but elder generation considers that competing for paying a bill is polite and "face-saving".

India

As Indian culture vary vastly depending on the region you visit (even state by state), what might hold true for Northern India, might not hold true for Southern India. But rules are certainly relaxed for foreigners as they usually are given the benefit of doubt.

  • While dining in a Hindu household, food will be offered multiple times. These are generally second and third "rounds" and it is fine to decline them. [citation needed]
  • Guests are generally offered food or drink depending on the season and the time of visit. Meal times will usually result in an invitation to the meal. It is acceptable to decline the offer if you are not staying for a long time. Otherwise, you might be delaying the host's meal. [citation needed]
  • Other than meal times, it is perfectly acceptable to decline or accept what is being offered. Like in many other countries, asking for coffee (especially in South India) or tea will be polite. If the day is too hot, you could ask for water. [citation needed]
  • It is considered immature and hoggish to open a gift in front of the person who has given it. This is in stark contrast to many Western cultures. Gifts are opened in private. [citation needed]
  • As in many other countries, India with all its varied languages has three versions of you (polite, friendly and informal forms, see T-V distinction) in every language - not using them appropriately can be a cause of lot of disapproving frowns. [citation needed]
  • Accepting goods or making payments with the left hand (the left hand is considered unfit and dirty) is considered impolite. The right hand should always be used. However, using both hands together is a sign of respect. [citation needed]
  • While giving someone a gift, it is polite to remove the price tag. It is considered inappropriate to indicate the value of your gifts. [citation needed]
  • Often, calling someone older than you by their first name can be offensive. Either avoid using the name during conversation or use Mr./Ms./Mrs. <Last name>. You can also address them generically as 'Uncle' (for men) or 'Aunty' (for women). [citation needed]
  • It is considered condescending or patronizing to place the hands on the shoulders of an older person, especially someone from an older generation, unless the latter is a close friend. [citation needed]
  • It is customary to stand up when an older person enters the room. It is also impolite to sit on a chair / sofa if the elder person is sitting on the floor / carpet. This does not happen nowadays since most places you visit will have sofas or chairs. [citation needed]
  • Many men / women in South Asia avoid shaking hands with individuals of the opposite gender. When meeting a person of the opposite gender, it is prudent to verbally greet and then wait to see if the other person extends the hand first.[citation needed]
  • India has had a complicated history with its neighbors (Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Sri Lanka), and confusing an Indian with any of these (or vice versa) is seriously offensive. This rule extends especially to Westerners. [citation needed]
  • For a man to comment to another person about the appearance of the latter's adult female relative (wife, sister, daughter, etc) is considered inappropriate behavior. However, it is acceptable for a woman to do so. [citation needed]
  • In most cases, eating should be done with only the right hand. [citation needed]
  • In India, asking a person to a social event (e.g. a bar or restaurant) implies that the person offering the invite will be paying for everything. Inviting a person out and then expecting them to pay for their own drinks, etc is considered extremely rude. [citation needed]
  • In India, birthdays are celebrated by the host throwing a party. People who attend the party are not required to spend money on the host. [citation needed]

South India is a linguistic-cultural region of India that comprises the four Indian states of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala and Tamil Nadu and the Union Territory of Pondicherry, whose inhabitants are collectively referred to as South Indians. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... In sociolinguistics, a T-V distinction describes the situation wherein a language has second-person pronouns that distinguish varying levels of politeness, social distance, courtesy, familiarity, or insult toward the addressee. ...

Japan

  • Business cards should be accepted (and given) with both hands as a sign of deference and placed on the table in front of you for the duration of the meeting. You are also expected to make a show of studying the card and paying attention to the rank of the person offering the card. When exchanging cards, make sure your name is in its readable aspect to the receiver and always swap cards to the right. After the meeting, do not place the card in your back pocket. [13]
  • In Japanese culture it is considered polite to decline a gift when it is first offered and the giver is expected to offer it multiple times. Also the gifts are generally not opened in the giver's presence. [14]
  • In greeting or thanking another person, it may be a little insulting if someone does not bow lower than the other person when the other person is older or has a higher social status. However, foreigners are never expected to bow and often do it incorrectly and end up looking silly. It is an art, and the level and degree of the bow depends on status, age and other factors. It's something best left to the native Japanese to sort out as even they can be a bit confused. [15]
  • Guests entering a Japanese home are expected to remove their shoes in the foyer and have socks or stockings in good condition. There will often be house slippers provided for you to wear. Leave your shoes together neatly in the entrance with the toes pointing towards the door. Also, note that when entering the toilet, there will be special toilet slippers to use. Do not wear your house slippers into the toilet. [15]
  • Holding anything with chopsticks by two people at the same time, or passing an item from chopsticks to chopsticks is considered very impolite, as it will remind bystanders of the Japanese funeral ritual. Sticking them into food (and especially rice) so that they stand straight up has similar connotations. Pouring soy sauce onto rice is considered gross. [15]
  • It is considered impolite for a person to pour their own drink. Generally an individual will offer to pour a companion's drink and the companion, in return will pour the individual's drink. [15] Although if one of you is drinking from a bottle to glass and the other one is drinking just from a glass, it is fine to pour yourself otherwise you will be in for a long wait.
  • Blowing the nose in public (also, the Japanese do not use their handkerchief for hanakuso, literally 'nose shit')[15] (However, if you find that you must, you must.) Snorting it back in is the way to go.
  • It is slightly rude for females to go out in public without some makeup applied.
  • Not using polite language and honorifics when speaking with someone having a higher social status. (Though most Japanese are very lenient with Westerners in this regard.)[15]
  • Expressing outward anger, annoyance and losing one's temper causes them to lose face in Japanese culture. [15] (Much like Western culture--what is your opinion of the man screaming at the customer service desk?) Also, a smile from a Japanese person may mean that they are feeling nervous or uncomfortable, and not necessarily happy.
  • Not sending a New Year's postcard to someone who sent you one. [citation needed]
  • Sending a New Year's postcard to someone who suffered a death in the family during the past year. [citation needed]
  • Tipping is considered rude and is rarely done in Japan except in certain cases, such as tipping your surgeon for an operation, when visiting a high class Ryokan or when dealing with house movers as examples. Consult the locals to be sure what is appropriate. Cash is given on certain occasions such as weddings (a standard gift) or at New Years to children Otoshidama, unlike in many Western countries. [citation needed] Although if you want to tip a taxi driver (can't be bothered to wait for change) you can ask them if it's OK to show them the western style.
  • When beckoning someone with a hand gesture, hold you hand flat with your palm down, then flex your fingers towards the ground. To crook the finger(s) up in the air is considered obscene.
  • If using a toothpick, one should cover the mouth with the other hand. (this comes from an ancient Buddhist belief that showing any bone, including teeth, is dirty)
  • It is uncommon for women to not wear a bra. It's not exactly rude, but it is considered polite to wear a bra at all times.
  • Never point directly at someone, instead extend your fingers outward with you palm up, as if you were carrying a tray, and gesture towards the person.

Japan has a code of etiquette, the code that governs the expectations of social behavior, and it is considered very important. ... Bowing is the act of lowering the head, or sometimes the entire upper body from the waist, as a social gesture. ... Chopsticks, a pair of small even-length tapered sticks, are the traditional eating utensils of East Asia (China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, the four chopstick countries) as well as Thailand, where they are now restricted to just soup and noodles since the introduction of Western utensils by King Rama V... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Honorific speech is speech which shows respect. ... Face refers to two separate but related concepts in Chinese social relations. ... In ancient times, the Japanese New Year (正月 shōgatsu) followed the same lunisolar calendar as the Chinese, Korean and Vietnamese New Year (at the beginning of spring). ... A sample of various postcards. ... A tip (also known as gratuity) is a small amount of money received by some service sector professionals from persons they serve, in addition to or instead of a formally required payment. ...

Philippines

  • It is impolite to refuse an offer of hospitality if you are a guest in someone's home. Take it as a great compliment if they offer a room from one of the members of the household. [citation needed]
  • When you are attending a funeral, avoid wearing any loud color, especially red. It is considered rude if you wear a red shirt at a funeral. Black, white, grays, muted and earth tones are proper colors for funeral attire. Money, flowers or prayer cards are acceptable gifts. [citation needed]
  • Cupping your chin with your hands at the dinner table is considered rude. [citation needed]
  • It is usually the birthday celebrant who treats everyone for his/her birthday. If you know that you are invited by the celebrant to a birthday celebration at a restaurant, do not assume that you are buying the celebrant dinner (unless you are offering to pay for everyone's meal, as a gift), unless specified. Bring a gift instead. [citation needed]
  • Gift giving is important to an occasion. Coming to a party empty-handed is considered rude. If you can't get a gift on short notice, buy something for the party instead (and that is why you will often see 3 birthday cakes at a birthday party). [citation needed]
  • Most Filipinos are fluent in English, and most insults and gestures translate pretty well, even the snide, sarcastic insults. [citation needed]
  • Traditionally, it is rude to try to ask someone out on a date at a public place. Women usually don't ask men out on dates. [citation needed]
  • Gentlemen rules: you always give your seat to the handicapped, pregnant women, elderly, and women in general. If you are a woman, don't bother getting up to give up your seat, someone else will offer you their seat eventually. [citation needed]
  • As for introductions, introduce the senior to the junior first. Introduce the man to the woman. Introduce the group to an individual (because the individual is not expected to remember all the names at first introduction). [citation needed]
  • Always acknowledge the presence of the elder in the room first, by shaking their hand or if you are many years younger, ask for their hand ("Mano") and bring it to your forehead. (Not to be confused with the custom of hand/ring kissing. There are no kisses involved with this gesture.) There are no rules for "clean" "unclean" hands. [citation needed]
  • In restaurants, condiment use is acceptable. The waiter usually only comes several times to take your order, refill your drink and bring your check. Most will not ask you if you need anything else, you will have to "summon" the waiter if you do. It is rude to yell "Waiter!". Your waiter will be watching your table from the service area. Make eye contact if you want something. You may ask for your check without asking for the waiter by drawing a small box in the air after making eye contact with the waiter. [citation needed]
  • If someone is buying you a meal, the inviter orders first. The invited should order items equal to or below the cost of the inviter's meal. [citation needed]
  • Hide if you want some alone time. Refusing to socialize with anyone, especially if invited, could be considered offensive. [citation needed]
  • Children under your care are expected to avoid interjecting or "butting in" adult conversations. You are expected to apologize for any distraction or unruly behavior on your child's behalf and take appropriate measures. Usually, this means you will have to extract yourself from the conversation and bring your child outside for a talking to. [citation needed]
  • As much as Filipinos like to bash their own country, it is considered rude if you join in to criticize the surroundings, especially if you are a foreigner. You are a guest, and it is offensive if you are not happy. [citation needed]

South Korea

  • Wiping or blowing your nose in a restaurant, even if the food is spicy, is considered mildly offensive. It is expected that you should take a trip to the toilet if you need to do this. [1]
  • In Korean cultures, it is considered disrespectful not to stand when speaking to your elders or when they enter a room. Similarly it is expected that elders will be the first to be greeted and served in social gatherings. [1]
  • When entering a restaurant you are expected to take off your shoes and leave them by the door. Some modern, western style, restaurants are an exception. These can be identified as they have higher tables with chairs. This also includes walking into any homes in Korea. [citation needed]
  • In restaurants and bars, pouring your own drink is considered rude. You should keep an eye on your neighbors' glasses and fill them if they are empty. In return, they will fill your glass when it's empty. If you do not want to get drunk, try to leave your glass half full. [citation needed]
  • When pouring drinks, hold bottle in right hand, lightly place left hand on forearm near elbow, as a sign of respect. Also turn your head and look away to drink. [citation needed]
  • Never show the bottom of your foot. This is a sign of disrespect. [citation needed]
  • Patting the head of an elder or a superior is extremely insubordinate. It is not acceptable to call elders by their first name, this includes parents. It is appropriate to call elders and anyone that you presume to be of higher or equal status by a title (i.e. Mr. Kim). [citation needed]
  • Leaving tip/gratuity is usually or almost always not accepted or expected. [citation needed]
  • When handing an item to someone, there are specific rules as to whether you expect to get the item back. To hand someone an item with the expectation to get it back (lend a CD or to show a trinket), one hand is used (usually the right). To permanently give someone an item, with no expectation of return, you hold the item in your right, and support your right hand with your left as you pass the item. When paying a bill, use the latter. The change will be returned in a like manner. [citation needed]

Thailand

  • Touching somebody on the foot (in Buddhism the foot is the most impure region of the body). Strictly speaking this also applies to children. [citation needed]
  • Touching somebody on the head. Thais regard the head as the highest part of the body, literally and figuratively. If you accidentally touch someone’s head, offer an apology immediately. This doesn't apply to touching the head of a child or people who are younger than you. [citation needed]
  • Stepping over or standing on bills or coins (money is another symbol of good fortune and prosperity) signifies disrespect. Currency usually depicts the King, and it is a sign of utmost disrespect to place your foot above the head of the King. Similarly, licking the back of a postage stamp - which also features the King's image - is also considered disrespectful. [16]
  • Pointing your sole or foot at somebody. Following the logic that the head is the most sacred part of the body, the foot is the least sacred. In Buddhist temples particularly, it is important to sit with the soles of your feet not pointing at the Buddha. [citation needed]
  • Kissing in the streets and any public display of affection are considered rude. [citation needed]
  • When entering a house, stepping on the threshold is considered rude. It is best to step over it. [citation needed]

A replica of an ancient statue of Gautama Buddha, found in Sarnath, near Varanasi. ...

Malaysia

Major Faux Pas:

  • When entering Malaysian homes, shoes must be left outside. Wearing shoes into the house is extremely rude. [citation needed]
  • As well, never enter a Muslim mosque or Indian temple without removing your shoes. For other Chinese (Buddhist, Taoist, etc) temples, observe the local customs carefully with regard to footwear (some allow, some don't). [citation needed]
  • In some States with a more Islamic majority (e.g. Kelantan, Terrenganu), a woman should not wear revealing clothes in public (it is considered vulgar). This includes shorts (or mini-skirts), halter tops, sleeveless garments, anything that shows belly or cleavage, etc. [citation needed]
  • Nudity (as is toplessness with regard to women) is absolutely prohibited on the many tropical beaches. [citation needed]
  • Placing/slapping an open palm on the top of a sideways held fist of the other hand is a rude gesture. [citation needed]
  • As well, inserting the thumb between the fore and middle fingers of a closed fist is a rude gesture. [citation needed]
  • Usually, in Malaysia, we address friends' parents either "uncle" or "auntie". Never call them by first names. [citation needed]

Minor Faux Pas: Islam (Arabic:  ) is a monotheistic religion based upon the Quran, its principal scripture, whose followers, known as Muslims (مسلم), believe God (Arabic: الله ) sent through revelations to Muhammad. ... The Masjid al-Haram in Mecca as it exists today A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... Statues of Buddha such as this, the Tian Tan Buddha statue in Hong Kong, remind followers to practice right living. ... Taoism (sometimes written as and actually pronounced as Daoism (dow-ism)) is the English name for: Dao Jia [philosophical tao] philosophical school based on the texts the Tao Te Ching (ascribed to Laozi [Lao Tzu] and alternately spelled Dào Dé JÄ«ng) and the Zhuangzi; a family of organized... State Motto: Berserah kepada Tuhan Kerajaan Kelantan (English : Submit to God, government of Kelantan Capital Kota Bharu Sultan Tuanku Ismail Petra ibni al-Marhum Sultan Yahya Petra Chief minister Tuan Guru Dato Haji Nik Aziz Nik Mat Area 14,922 km² Population 1. ...

  • Pointing with your forefinger is considered impolite (especially when pointing at people). Instead, a closed fist held sideways (thumb at the top) with the thumb pointing the direction is used. [citation needed]
  • Many Indians and Malays (esp. in rural communities) eat with their hands - if you are in that circumstance, it is customary to follow their lead, using only your right hand to eat. Using the left hand to handle food is impolite, as it is considered unclean. [citation needed]
  • Shaking hands should only be done with the right hand. Among Malays, it is customary to lightly hold the right forearm with the left hand when shaking hands (as well as when giving/receiving money). As well, it is customary to touch your heart/chest with the right hand immediately after ending the handshake. It is only very minor faux pas if these customs are not observed (esp. with Westerners). [citation needed]
  • Touching anyone's head. Some Malaysians, like Thais, also regard the head as the most important part of the human body. If you touch anyone's head, offer an apology. [citation needed]
  • Crossing your legs in the presence of elderly people is sometimes considered impolite. [citation needed]
  • Addressing strangers in formal situations by their names (even if they have nametags) is rude. Instead, use the honorific "Encik" (pronounced "in-chayk") for a man, or "Cik" ("chayk") for a woman (If in doubt of a woman marital status you can use "CikPuan" equivalent to using Ms in English) - you may append their name after the honorific. "Mister" and "Miss" are also acceptable (esp. for Westerners). [citation needed]

Vietnam

  • When going out to eat with other people, it is considered very polite to pay for the meal. It is therefore also rude to prevent someone who has offered to pay from doing so (don't argue). If you want to pay for a meal, then, simply make sure you offer to do so before the other person. This will often occur before you even arrive at the restaurant. Offer as early as you can. [citation needed]
  • Always remove shoes at the door when entering someone's home or any Buddhist temple. [citation needed]
  • If you invite someone out for a meal, drink or event, it is customary for you to pay for your guests. It is considered rude to expect them to pay. However, this is slowly changing with some of the younger generation in urban centers who are more influenced by western ways and when out with friends, will sometimes pay for their own or split the bill. It is better to assume you will be paying though if you invited others out. [citation needed]
  • It is customary to pour alcoholic drinks for others before pouring for yourself, and then inviting others to drink before you take a sip. This is done by holding your glass up and clinking glasses with everyone. When someone does this, you must take a sip of your drink. This happens throughout the entire drinking session and not just at the beginning. [citation needed]
  • It is customary to bring out the tea and offer to guests when they visit your home. [citation needed]
  • At the table (or floor since many Vietnamese eat their meals on the floor), it is considered rude to begin eating before inviting others to eat (particularly elders, guests, etc.). Children must always invite adults to eat. [citation needed]
  • More common in this country to be asked how much you earn or how much you paid for something. If you become uncomfortable, it is often looked upon as being evasive or snooty.
  • It is considered impolite to kiss a significant other in front of parents or other elders. [citation needed]

A replica of an ancient statue of Gautama Buddha, found in Sarnath, near Varanasi. ... An urban area is a term used to define an area where there is an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... The term Western World or the West can have multiple meanings depending on its context. ...

Oceania

For the fictional superstate in George Orwells novel, see Oceania (Nineteen Eighty-Four). ...

Australia

  • Requesting items like a fanny pack in Australia can be considered obscene due to the usage of "fanny" as referring to a woman's genitalia. [17] Bumbag is an acceptable local variation.
  • When using public transport, always let passengers leave the bus/train before attempting to board. [citation needed]
  • When paying a cashier, always place the money in their hand. Placing the money on the table/bench is considered rude. [citation needed]
    • When paying at a restaurant, it is, however, acceptable to leave the money in the provided tray on the table. [citation needed]
  • While giving someone a gift, it is polite to remove the price tag. It is considered inappropriate to indicate the value of your gifts. [citation needed]
  • When riding alone in a taxi, it is considered polite to sit in the front passenger seat next to the driver. There are some exceptions, for example, it is not considered impolite for women to choose the back seat, especially at night. [citation needed]
  • You should shake hands when leaving the company of a person you have just met or someone you have not seen for a long time. [citation needed]
  • Queuing is expected when there is any demand for an item. The only exception to this is a pub or bar, where finding a space at the bar displays your intention. However it is still considered rude to allow a barperson to serve you before someone who has been waiting longer than you [citation needed]
  • When asked to "bring a plate" to an event such as a party, bring a plate of food and not just a plate. (The comparable American phrase is to "bring a dish".)[18]
  • Referring to Australia as "down under" is considered patronizing and mildly offensive. Australians rarely use the term, but realize it has been widely promoted and used in U.S.A.
  • Tipping is not expected in Australia. Tipping someone personally can be unexpected or awkward; some employees are forbidden from accepting tips. However, if you have received particularly good service in a cafe or restaurant, it is polite to add a few coins to the 'tip jar' on the counter, which is usually shared among staff. It's also acceptable to suggest that taxi drivers or waiters 'keep the change', especially if the difference is small. [citation needed]
  • Confusing Australians with New Zealanders. The mistake will generally be taken in good humor, provided an apology is given; it would, however, be considered ignorant and boorish to dismiss the difference. [citation needed]

A fanny pack [also called, in the USA, a fag bag (offensive slang)], belt bag, butt bag, waist pack , belly bag or bum bag (in the United Kingdom and Australia) is an accessory often worn by travelers. ... Look up Fanny, fanny in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A sex organ, or primary sexual characteristic, narrowly defined, is any of those parts of the body (which are not always bodily organs according to the strict definition) which are involved in sexual reproduction and constitute the reproductive system in an complex organism; namely: Male: penis (notably the glans penis... The term Down Under is a colloquialism referring to all things Australian, which is known as the land Down Under for its position in the southern hemisphere. ...

New Zealand

  • Requesting items like a fanny pack in New Zealand can be considered obscene due to the usage of "fanny" as referring to a woman's genitalia. [17] Bumbag is an acceptable local variation.
  • When riding alone in a taxi, it is considered polite to sit in the front passenger seat next to the driver. [4]
  • In New Zealand, bus fares should never be handed directly to the driver, but should be placed on the small tray used for that purpose. [citation needed]
  • Confusing Australians with New Zealanders. The mistake will generally be taken in good humor, provided an apology is given; it would, however, be considered ignorant and boorish to dismiss the difference. [citation needed]
  • In the Māori community of New Zealand, it is a faux pas to wear shoes when entering a Māori sacred building, such as a marae. In the dominant European community not removing shoes when entering a building is not a faux pas, therefore Europeans can sometimes forget to observe this tradition. This can offend Māori and sometimes cause tension. [citation needed]
  • Sitting on or resting one's backside against a table or desk can also offend Māori. A table is where food is served, so should not be touched by the 'dirty' nether regions. [citation needed]
  • You should shake hands when leaving the company of a person you have just met or someone you have not seen for a long time. [citation needed]
  • Queuing is expected when there is any demand for an item. The only exception to this is a pub or bar, where finding a space at the bar displays your intention. However it is still considered rude to allow a barperson to serve you before someone who has been waiting longer than you [citation needed]
  • When asked to "bring a plate" to an event such as a party, bring a plate of food and not just a plate. [citation needed]
  • Tipping is not expected in New Zealand in any situation. Tipping someone personally can be unexpected or awkward; some employees are forbidden from accepting tips. However, if you have received particularly good service in a cafe or restaurant, it is polite to add a few coins to the 'tip jar' on the counter, which is usually shared among staff. It's also acceptable to suggest that taxi drivers or waiters 'keep the change', especially if the difference is small. [citation needed]
  • Avoid using the term "mainland" for specifically either the North or South Islands of New Zealand as this is a sensitive issue. [citation needed]
  • It is considered rude not to greet someone you have met previously when passing in the street.[citation needed]
  • Correct pronunciation of Māori place-names, and the word 'Māori' itself, is important. Careless mispronunciation or Anglicization can be offensive to both Maori and non-Maori NZers - it implies a lack of respect for the land and people. Never add a plural 's' to 'Māori'. [citation needed]
  • Inviting someone for 'tea' can cause confusion (esp. South Africans). In New Zealand, 'tea' is the evening meal, and you would be expected to arrive around 6pm (depending on the season). Inviting someone to drop in for a beverage would more often be phrased "drop by for a coffee", even if they only drink tea. If you mean the beverage 'tea', it is almost always prefixed by 'cup of' to make clear the difference.

A fanny pack [also called, in the USA, a fag bag (offensive slang)], belt bag, butt bag, waist pack , belly bag or bum bag (in the United Kingdom and Australia) is an accessory often worn by travelers. ... Look up Fanny, fanny in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A sex organ, or primary sexual characteristic, narrowly defined, is any of those parts of the body (which are not always bodily organs according to the strict definition) which are involved in sexual reproduction and constitute the reproductive system in an complex organism; namely: Male: penis (notably the glans penis... The word Māori refers to the indigenous people of New Zealand and to their language. ... A Maori word now common in New Zealand English, marae refers an area of land where the Wharenui or meeting house (literally big house) sits. ... This article is about the continent. ... The word Māori refers to the indigenous people of New Zealand and to their language. ...

Europe

European redirects here. ...

Balkans

Balkan peninsula with northwest border Isonzo-Krka-Sava The Balkans is the historic and geographic name used to describe a region of southeastern China. ...

Serbia

  • Giving somebody an even number of flowers. Even numbers of flowers are used at funerals. [citation needed]
  • When saying 'cheers' and clinking your glass with someone, always look at the person in the eyes. [citation needed]
  • Pointing at something and especially someone with your index finger is common and regarded as ordinary behavior. [citation needed]
  • Serving your self an alcoholic drink. One must ask other people if they want some, serving them, and serving one's self afterward. [citation needed]
  • If you are visiting and your host is pouring spirits and you no longer wish to drink. Leave the glass full. It represents inviting wealth and prosperity into the home.[citation needed]

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In mathematics, any integer (whole number) is either even or odd. ... Clivia miniata A cluster of flowers (Clivia miniata) A Blue Summer Flower. ...

Turkey

  • In any group, elderly people should be first greeted or served.
  • Usually it is customary to stand up or at least take notice when an older person enters the room.
  • Shoes must be taken off in the foyer (not outside the house unless your shoes are dirty, e.g., muddy). Usually you will be offered a pair of slippers. Never deny slippers if your socks are not extremely clean or you have one toe popping out.
  • Close your umbrella outside. It's considered bad luck to open umbrella indoors in some regions.
  • T-V distinction is very important.
  • Placing a phone call to somebody after 22:00.
  • If you are invited to dinner, the host will insist you to eat more and more. It is a sign of hospitality. You don't need to eat much but tasting a bit from everything on the table and saying "Elinize Saglik" in Turkish (literally meaning "may your hands be healthy" in English) to show your appreciation of the taste and quality of food is expected.
  • Confusing Turkish people with Arabic people. (like Canadians don't like to be called Americans).
  • Making a fist with the thumb placed between the middle and index fingers is an offensive gesture.
  • For a man to comment (even if it is a compliment) to another person about the appearance of the latter's adult female relative (e.g., wife) might be inappropriate.
  • If you are invited to dinner, you are expected to bring something for dinner, usually dessert. Avoid bringing alcohol unless you are absolutely sure that the host drinks alcohol.
  • If they know each other well, Turkish men (mostly but also women, and men/women if they are close friends and family) greet each other by handshaking and touching or kissing the cheeks. In business, this should be avoided.
  • Some (especially, old) people believe that passing a knife directly to a person is considered bad luck. One should leave it on the table and then other should pick it up.

In sociolinguistics, a T-V distinction describes the situation wherein a language has second-person pronouns that distinguish varying levels of politeness, social distance, courtesy, familiarity, or insult toward the addressee. ...

Greece

  • Signifying "five" or even "stop" by holding up five fingers, with the palm of the hand facing the listener, especially when the palm is vertical, can be mistaken for an offensive gesture (similar to the finger). When signifying "five" the norm is to have the palm of the hand facing the speaker. Similarly for "Stop" closed fingers should be used. [16]
  • The expression "Hello" is conveyed with a raised index finger and a closed palm. The American style hand waving is considered obscene. [4]
  • "Goodbye" is indicated by facing the palm towards yourself with fingers raised and then moving the fingers up and down (this is exactly like the American version of "come here" and is therefore a serious source of confusion to Americans in Greece). [citation needed]
  • Making a fist with the thumb placed between the middle and index fingers is an offensive gesture. [citation needed]
  • Nodding and head shaking ("yes" and "no") is performed by moving the head only once. The American method of shaking the head several times is considered bizarre, uncivilized, and/or may not be understood, although it is not necessarily rude.[citation needed]
  • No is sometimes conveyed by a slight raise of the eyebrows, often accompanied by a "tsk" sound. [citation needed]
  • Greeks revere water, and they have a saying about stingy people that amounts to, "he would not even offer a glass of water." It is therefore customary when having guests to offer them water. [citation needed]

This article is about the gesture. ...

Bulgaria

  • Giving somebody an even number of flowers. Even numbers of flowers are used at funerals. This does not apply to bouquets larger than a dozen items. [citation needed]
  • When saying 'cheers' and clinking your glass with someone, always look at the person in the eyes. [citation needed]
  • When you give money to somebody, do not put them in his/her hands. If possible, you better put the money on a table or similar place close to the person. [citation needed]

In mathematics, any integer (whole number) is either even or odd. ... Clivia miniata A cluster of flowers (Clivia miniata) A Blue Summer Flower. ... In mathematics, the parity of an object refers to whether it is even or odd. ...

Central Europe

Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ...

Czech Republic and Slovakia

  • It is considered mildly impolite to wear any kind of head cover inside (hats, baseball caps etc.). [citation needed]
  • Women's last name tend to carry the appendix "-ová". For example Mr. Johnson's wife's last name would be Mrs. Johnsonová. Addressing a man with a female form of his last name (e.g., Mr. Johnsonová) is a serious faux pas. The other common ending of women's last name is "-ská" (if male form of name ending is "-ský"). [citation needed]

Croatia

  • Wearing head cover inside is considered impolite, especially if enetering church, home or public institution. Sitting down at the table with outer garments and head covered is a sign of really bad manners.
  • Not taking shoes off when entering home is impolite, only exception is if host requests to keep them on, which is a sign of respect for the guest.
  • For men to sit while women, pregnant women or senior passenager are standing in tram or bus is very impolite.
  • Confusing croatians or Croatian with serbians or Serbian and other nationalities from ex yugoslavian countries is offensive and a sign of ignorance.
  • Pointing at something and especially someone with the index finger is considered an extreme lack of good manners.
  • Showing middle finger or three fingers (thumb, index and middle finger) is considered rude and usually offensive.
  • Showing two fingers ("V" sign) or "thumb up" has got positive meaning (victory and O.K., respectivley). Showing "O" with index and thumb while other fingers are erected has got positive meaning, and is usually connected to "first class" or well prepared food.
  • For men shaking hands while wearing gloves is considered impolite. This does not apply to women.
  • Contrary to some other countries and nations (Switzerland, Serbia,...) kissing at cheeks after or while handshaking three times is extremely impolite and offensive.
  • Visiting someone's home for an event/dinner without a token gift is impolite. Strangers in unexpected visit can be excused in some occasions. If there are children in the house a visitor can only/at least bring small gift for them, usually sweets.
  • It is considered rude to use someone's first name unless You are friends or at least at similar position. Using at least proper salutation is a sign of good manners. Very casual communication (while playing a game...) can be carried out in first names.
  • Giving even number of flowers is simply not done and is very rude. Some flovers are given only at funerals and every florest will advise against them. There are no color preferences but red (roses especially) are sign of affection.
  • T-V distinction is very important.
  • Not ending any request with "please" is a sign of bad manners and can sometimes be taken as offensive. Especially if talking to female or older person.
  • When offering cigars, sweets, or similar items from a set or an assortment, it's considered extremely impolite to select one for the receiver. It's also considered very impolite to take more than one item when selecting one from the set/assortment.
  • Introducing yourself before your companion is considered rude.
  • It is impolite to begin eating before others have been served. Guests, seniors and kids are served first.

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...

Hungary

  • Simple generalizations about Eastern Europe can be considered incorrect; confusing Hungarians with Russians is particularly offensive because of Hungary's occupation by the USSR. Similarly, not knowing that Hungarians are not of Slavic origin, unlike most of the neighboring nations, and that the Hungarian language has different linguistic roots from the Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian etc. languages can be considered as rude. [citation needed]
  • In Hungary, people traditionally consider clinking their glasses/mugs when drinking beer to be impolite. It is believed this derives from a battle the Hungarians lost. Apparently, the victors enthusiastically toasted their success in beer, on the battlefield, mocking the corpses of the slain Magyars. Clinking with any other alcoholic beverage, such as wine, champagne or hard liquor is customary, however. (This custom - or rather keeping from a custom - is receding nowadays.) [citation needed]
  • When Transylvania (a region in Romania with a significant Hungarian minority) comes up in a conversation, don't react by mentioning Dracula or the Rocky Horror Picture Show. Transylvania has a particular significance in Hungarian history, and Hungarians may get offended when people recognize this region only because of a popular horror story. [citation needed]
  • When giving flowers to a lady (girl, etc.), the number of them should be odd. Unless you are in love with the lady and want to compete for her, the flowers should not be red roses. White and yellow roses are OK in Hungary, they do not have negative meaning, like in several other countries. [citation needed]

The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... Hungarian (magyar nyelv  ) is a Finno-Ugric language, and more specifically a Ugric language, unrelated to the other languages of Central Europe. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Map of Romania with Transylvania in yellow Transylvania (Romanian: or Transilvania; Hungarian: ; German: ; Serbian: or Erdelj / Ердељ) is a historical region in the center of Romania. ... Dracula is an 1897 novel by Irish author Bram Stoker, and the name of its title character, the vampire Count Dracula. ... The Rocky Horror Picture Show (first released in the United Kingdom on 14 August 1975) is a comedy-horror musical film directed by Jim Sharman from a screenplay by Sharman and Richard OBrien, who also composed the songs. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...

Poland

  • It is considered rude to use someone's first name before they introduce themselves to you or use their name first[4]. As is the case in many languages featuring a T-V distinction addressing somebody you don't know well, especially in a formal context, using the singular form of "you". [citation needed]
  • Sitting at a corner of a table is considered bad luck for an unmarried girl, as she will not find a husband. [citation needed]
  • Entering someone's home for an event/dinner without a token gift is impolite. [citation needed] This rule is rescinded among good friends, and no longer in place among younger generation of Poles.
  • Greeting guests and conducting transactions (e.g. paying the pizza delivery man) over the doorstep. This is considered unlucky: wait for the person to step inside or step outside yourself.[citation needed]
  • Dressing casually for Easter, Christmas or other family celebrations is very rude (only in little towns where Christian traditions remain strong, no longer important in bigger towns and cities).[citation needed]
  • Eating or offering horse meat, is a faux pas since to many Poles eating a horse is like eating a friend; a result of the 1000 year tradition of the Polish cavalry and the well known and admired paintings by Wojciech Kossak. [citation needed]
  • Pointing at something and especially someone with the index finger is considered an extreme lack of good manners. [citation needed]
  • When offering a cigarette, open the box and allow the receiver to take one out. Do not take the cigarette out and give by hand. It is also customary to light cigarettes, especially for women. [citation needed]
  • When offering a candy, a chocolate, a small gift toy for kids, etc. from a set or an assortment, it's considered extremely impolite to select one for the receiver. It's also considered very impolite to take more than one item when selecting one from the set/assortment. [citation needed]
  • In schools, it's rude for those children who celebrate their birthdays not to bring wrapped candy for the whole class. [citation needed]
  • For men shaking hands while wearing gloves is considered impolite. This does not apply to women. [citation needed]
  • For men to sit while women are standing. [citation needed]
  • Giving somebody an even number of flowers. Even numbers of flowers are used at funerals. This does not apply to bouquets larger than a dozen items. [citation needed]
  • Not removing the head cover indoors is considered very rude. [citation needed]
  • Sitting down to eat without removing outer garments and especially keeping your head covered (e.g. wearing a baseball cap when you eat) is considered very bad manners. [citation needed]
  • It is impolite to begin eating before others have been served. [citation needed]
  • Serving yourself an alcoholic drink. One must ask other people if they want some, serving them, and serving himself afterward. [citation needed]

In sociolinguistics, a T-V distinction describes the situation wherein a language has second-person pronouns that distinguish varying levels of politeness, social distance, courtesy, familiarity, or insult toward the addressee. ... Musculature of horse Horse meat is meat made from a horse. ... Volunteer Representative Squadron of City of Poznan in uniforms of 15th Poznan Uhlans Regiment Polish Cavalry (Polish kawaleria) can trace its origins back to the days of Mediæval mounted knights. ... Wojciech Kossak, self-portrait. ... In mathematics, any integer (whole number) is either even or odd. ... Clivia miniata A cluster of flowers (Clivia miniata) A Blue Summer Flower. ...

Eastern Europe

Eastern Europe is the eastern region of Europe variably defined. ...

Romania

  • As is the case in many languages featuring a T-V distinction addressing somebody you don't know well, especially in a formal context, using the singular form of "tu" (you). The formal "dumneavoastrǎ" must be used [citation needed]
  • Addressing somebody by their first name without their prior agreement is very rude. This formal agreement is mutual, when two (good) acquaintances agree to address each other by their fist name and by using the singular second person pronoun "tu". [citation needed]
  • It is considered impolite for men to sit while women are standing. [citation needed]
  • Giving somebody an even number of flowers. Even numbers of flowers are used at funerals. This does not apply to bouquets larger than a dozen items. [citation needed]
  • Pointing at something and especially someone with your index finger is considered an extreme lack of good manners. [citation needed]
  • Placing a phone call to somebody after 22:00. [citation needed]
  • Not removing the head cover or gloves indoors is considered very rude. [citation needed]
  • Not making eye contact while shaking hands is rude. [citation needed]
  • For men shaking hands while wearing gloves or while being seated is considered impolite. This does not apply to women. [citation needed]
  • It is considered impolite for a man to initiate a handshake with a woman. Men must wait for the woman to initiate the handshake. [citation needed]
  • Sitting down to eat without removing outer garments and especially keeping your head covered (e.g. wearing a baseball cap when you eat) is considered very bad manners. [citation needed]
  • It is impolite to begin eating before others have been served. [citation needed]
  • Serving your self an alcoholic drink. One must ask other people if they want some, serving them, and serving himself afterward. [citation needed]

In sociolinguistics, a T-V distinction describes the situation wherein a language has second-person pronouns that distinguish varying levels of politeness, social distance, courtesy, familiarity, or insult toward the addressee. ... In mathematics, any integer (whole number) is either even or odd. ... Clivia miniata A cluster of flowers (Clivia miniata) A Blue Summer Flower. ...

Russia

  • Sitting at a corner of a table is jokingly considered bad luck for an unmarried person, as it is believed he/she will not find a spouse. [citation needed]
  • Greeting guests and conducting transactions (i.e. paying the pizza delivery man) over the doorstep. This is considered unlucky. Wait for the person to step inside or step outside yourself. [citation needed]
  • For men shaking hands while wearing gloves is considered impolite. This does not apply to women.
  • Giving somebody an even number of flowers. Even numbers of flowers are used at funerals.
  • Serving your self an alcoholic drink. One must ask other people if they want some, serving them, and serving himself afterward.
  • Leaving an empty bottle on the table is considered wrong. If after pouring a drink the bottle becomes empty put it on the floor (or into trashcan if found nearby). [citation needed]
  • When passing people in a theater row, face them. It is considered rude to pass with your back (or rear) toward the other person. [citation needed]
  • Whistling indoors is considered to bring bad luck (poverty).
  • Prolonged direct eye contact may be considered aggressive or as invitation to more intimate relationships (especially with opposite sex), so it should be avoided in business relationships. [citation needed]
  • If someone enters your "personal space" (about 1 meter away from you) moving away can be considered disrespectful, but often it is best to avoid direct contact, like patting etc, except with your close friends. [citation needed]
  • Not offering pregnant women, old people and people with children a seat in public transport. [citation needed]
  • Not taking off shoes when entering an apartment and leaving them where all other shoes are unless told different by the host. [citation needed]

In mathematics, any integer (whole number) is either even or odd. ... Clivia miniata A cluster of flowers (Clivia miniata) A Blue Summer Flower. ... A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows his find. ...

Northern Europe

Northern Europe is marked in dark blue Northern Europe is a name of the northern part of the European continent. ...

Finland

Caveat: It has been noted on the discussion page that this list includes examples of common etiquette, superstitions, linguistic guidelines, preferences in terminology, cultural tendencies, local laws, regional customs and many other occurrences which are not correctly defined as faux pas. ...

Norway, Sweden, Denmark

  • Placing a phone call to somebody after 22:00. [citation needed]
  • Sitting down to eat without removing outer garments, such as a winter jacket. This also applies to headgear, although some young people like to wear their headgear almost all the time. [citation needed]
  • In some Scandinavian countries, not finishing your food implies that the food was terrible and could not be eaten. In Norway, Sweden and Denmark a person does not have to finish all of their food if someone else served, but it would be rude if they don't finish what they served themselves. [citation needed]
  • Smoking indoors is illegal in public places according to Norwegian and Swedish law and smoking indoors in private places without asking permission is considered very rude. [citation needed]
  • In Norway and Sweden it is considered very impolite not to remove one's shoes when entering someone's house and going further in than the foyer. This room is intended for exactly shoes, coats and the like. [citation needed]

...

Iceland

  • Lighting a cigarette from a candle is by some people regarded as rude, many Icelanders are fishermen and it is believed that this act "kills a fisherman". The origin comes from the custom of lighting a candle in your window when someone in your house is returning from sea, this was believed to help them find their way. Lighting something from the candle might kill the flame and subsequently the fisherman as he won't find his way home. [citation needed]
  • While at a dinner party it is considered rude to leave the table while others are still eating. [citation needed]
  • Most of the items mentioned for Norway, Sweden, Denmark and Finland also apply to Iceland. [citation needed]

Estonia

  • Cutting a slice of bread with a knife is considered disrespectful. It should be ripped with the fingers. [citation needed]

Western Europe

A common understanding of Western Europe in modern times. ...

Austria

  • In Austria it is impolite to begin eating before all others have been served, unless asked to do so by your host or hostess. [4]
  • Opening a door that someone has closed for privacy without knocking or otherwise seeking permission is considered rude and an invasion of privacy. [19]
  • As is the case in many languages featuring a T-V distinction, addressing someone with the familiar second person pronoun (du) when they should be addressed with the formal form (Sie). [17] This is becoming less strict with younger people, but should always be observed in older or more conservative circles.

In sociolinguistics, a T-V distinction describes the situation wherein a language has second-person pronouns that distinguish varying levels of politeness, social distance, courtesy, familiarity, or insult toward the addressee. ...

Belgium

  • Belgians are very reserved when it comes to money. They will not say how much money they make or have on their bank accounts. When you give someone a gift, make sure that it does not include a price tag. Giving cash is accepted however. [20]
  • The northern part of Belgium is Flanders, where Dutch is spoken. French is used in the south of Belgium, the Walloon region. There is also a relatively small German-speaking community in the east of Belgium. Both Dutch and French are spoken in Brussels. Considering Belgium to be a country where only Dutch or French is spoken is considered to be offensive. Addressing Flemish locals in French or vice versa can be sensitive in certain contexts.
  • The Flemish political party Vlaams Belang, which is the former Vlaams Blok, one of the largest parties in Flanders, is excluded from any coalition government: the cordon sanitaire. This cordon sanitaire is a very sensitive political issue. Questioning it will often have you frowned upon. [citation needed]
  • Voting preferences are not made public in Belgium, especially not if the party is Vlaams Belang. This explains the discrepancy between exit polls and actual election results. [21]

Flanders (Dutch: Vlaanderen) has several main meanings: the social, cultural and linguistical, scientific and educational, economical and political community of the Flemings; some prefer to call this the Flemish community (others refer to this as the Flemish nation) which is, with over 6 million inhabitants, the majority of all Belgians... National motto: Walon todi ! (Walloon forever!) Official languages French, German Capital Namur Minister-President Jean-Claude Van Cauwenberghe Area  - Total 16,844 km² Population  - Total (2002)  - Density 3,358,560 inhabitants 199. ... Council of the German Speaking Community in Belgium (Eupen) Flag of the German-speaking community in Belgium The German-Speaking Community of Belgium (Deutschsprachige Gemeinschaft Belgiens in German, short DGB) is one of the three federal communities in Belgium. ... Nickname: The Capital Of Europe, Comic City City of a 100 Museums Map showing the location of Brussels in Belgium Coordinates: Country Belgium Region Brussels-Capital Region Founded 797 Founded (Region) June 18, 1989 Mayor (Municipality) Freddy Thielemans Area    - City 162 (Region) km²  (62. ... Vlaams Belang (English: Flemish Interest) is a Belgian political party. ... The Flemish Block (Dutch: Vlaams Blok) was a Flemish right-wing nationalist political party which rejected the state of Belgium, calling for political independence for the Flemish half of the country. ... Cordon sanitaire derives from the French for quarantine line, and is usually a barrier that is implemented to stop a disease or something undesirable from spreading and gaining momentum. ... Vlaams Belang (English: Flemish Interest) is a Belgian political party. ...

France

  • Like in many languages featuring a T-V distinction, addressing people with the familiar "tu" (like in Middle English thou) when they should be addressed with "vous" (you) is seen as derogatory, insulting, or even aggressive. Conversely, addressing familiars with "vous" is considered snobbish and introduces distance. [22][23]
  • Assuming that people speak English without inquiry may be found unpleasant; being able to greet in French and ask whether the interlocutor speaks English is highly appreciated. [24]
  • Offering chrysanthemums is in bad taste, since they are traditionally reserved for mourners. [25]
  • Offering red roses to a hostess or for professional reasons is inappropriate, as they express passionate love. [26]
  • Not finishing one's meal implies that the food is so poor one cannot finish it, or the host does not correctly balance the quantity of food one needs. [26]
  • Serving your self wine first. One must ask other people if they want some more wine, serving them, and serving one's self afterward. If you just opened a bottle, it is customary to pour a little bit of wine in your own glass so that the little bit of cork that was dropped in the bottle when opening it doesn't go in somebody else's glass. [26]
  • Putting a piece of bread on one's plate. Leave it on the table beside the plate. (Bread is not considered a part of the meal, but rather more like salt and pepper. This is why they do not charge for bread at the restaurant.)[26]
  • Biting into the piece of bread directly (unless you have something on it -butter, pâté,...). One should break a small piece off, and put it into one's mouth. (Same reason as above). [26]
  • It is inappropriate to rest one's hands under the table or to have the elbows on the table. [26]
  • Crossing the fork and knife on the plate when the dish is finished; they should be more or less parallel or else it expresses that one hasn't eaten enough. [26]
  • Bringing a bottle of wine to a formal dinner in somebody's home suggests that the hosts are unable to provide their own wine. One may do so if you explain your hosts that you want them to discover a good wine that one likes and that they do not know . (One should not bring a "good" bottle if one is not sure if it is good - it is not a question of price of the wine, it is a question of taste.)[27]
  • Putting a loaf of bread upside down. It is a bad omen because it is said that the loaf that was put upside down by the baker was reserved for the executioner. [28]
  • Holding one's umbrella open indoors may be seen as an omen of bad luck. [29]
  • For a man, not taking off one's hat (or cap) when saluting. This was a practice of the Victorian age as it is now less practiced. [30]
  • For a man, giving a handshake while wearing a glove. Coming out of use and was also present in the early 19th century England. [31]
  • For both sexes, shaking hands with a woman in a casual context introduces distance. Embracing (holding each other loosely in the arms while lightly kissing each other's cheek) is usually expected. The number of cheek-kisses varies from region to region between 2, 3 or 4. [32]
  • Giving the American "O-K" gesture, which in France means "zero" or "worthless". [1]

In sociolinguistics, a T-V distinction describes the situation wherein a language has second-person pronouns that distinguish varying levels of politeness, social distance, courtesy, familiarity, or insult toward the addressee. ... Most modern English speakers think of thou as a relic of Shakespeares day. ... Species Chrysanthemum aphrodite Chrysanthemum arcticum Chrysanthemum argyrophyllum Chrysanthemum arisanense Chrysanthemum boreale Chrysanthemum chalchingolicum Chrysanthemum chanetii Chrysanthemum coronarium Chrysanthemum crassum Chrysanthemum glabriusculum Chrysanthemum hypargyrum Chrysanthemum indicum Chrysanthemum japonense Chrysanthemum japonicum Chrysanthemum lavandulifolium Chrysanthemum mawii Chrysanthemum maximowiczii Chrysanthemum mongolicum Chrysanthemum morii Chrysanthemum okiense Chrysanthemum oreastrum Chrysanthemum ornatum Chrysanthemum pacificum Chrysanthemum potentilloides Chrysanthemum... Wine is an alcoholic beverage produced by the fermentation of the juice of fruits, usually grapes. ... Hand gestures, i. ...

Germany

  • As is the case in many languages featuring a T-V distinction, addressing someone with the familiar second person pronoun ("Du") when they should be addressed with the formal form ("Sie") is inappropriate. [17]

In sociolinguistics, a T-V distinction describes the situation wherein a language has second-person pronouns that distinguish varying levels of politeness, social distance, courtesy, familiarity, or insult toward the addressee. ...

Ireland

  • Referring to Britain as the "Mainland". Most Irish people will consider this offensive. [citation needed]
  • Many Irish people also consider the use of term "British Isles" offensive. "These islands" is a common and acceptable replacement. [citation needed]
  • Referring to the Republic of Ireland as a part or special case of the United Kingdom rather than the independent nation that it is. [citation needed]
  • Referring to people from Dublin as "Jackeens". The term is a reference to the British Union Jack and the inference is that people from Dublin don't fly the Tricolour (Irish Flag) but, instead fly the Union Jack (British Flag). [citation needed]
  • Holding a loud conversation on a mobile phone in public such as on a bus, in a restaurant or walking down the street. Similarly having a loud or unimaginative ring-tone on a mobile phone is frowned upon.[citation needed]
  • Sending SMS messages constantly when in the company of others.[citation needed]
  • Use or even simply opening your mobile phone in the cinema.[citation needed]
  • When you are eating, cross the fork over the knife on your plates in between bites; when you're finished set them parallel on the plate with blade and tines facing away from you.
  • Do not buy gifts for work colleagues in Ireland. This would be a major social misstep and would be considered inappropriate and unprofessional.[citation needed]
  • On returning from a trip abroad, it is considered graceful to bring a food treat - usually a box of sweets - back to one's colleagues and share them around.
  • When stepping off a bus it is normal to say "Thank you" to the driver.
  • Asking a woman for her age or weight is considered rude, irrespective of your level of familiarity.[citation needed]
  • The Republic of Ireland shares many faux pas in common with the United Kingdom, many of which are listed below under the title United Kingdom. [citation needed]
  • Treating Ireland as a subcategory or special case of the United Kingdom, rather than as a separate country, as is done in the previous line, is considered offensive by many Irish people.[citation needed]

NB *See note on Irish Governments perception of the term British Isles directly below. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 53. ... Flag Ratio: 1:2 Union Jack is the commonly used name for the Union Flag of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. ... French tricolour flag A tricolour is a flag or banner having three colours, usually in approximately equal size (horizontally or vertically) and lacking additional symbols. ... SMS may refer to: Short message service, a form of text messaging on cell phones Sega Master System – an 8-bit video game console from the 1980s Seiner Majestät Schiff, His Majestys Ship in the German Kaiserliche Marine and the Austro-Hungarian Navy SMS (comics), a British comic...

Italy

  • It's forbidden to enter a church if you don't have your upper arms and (male) legs covered by clothes; for women a skirt within a couple of inches of the knee is acceptable. You will be shown outside if you wear very short sleeves or short pants in church. Locals often complain about tourists breaking this rule. [citation needed]
  • As in many languages, there are two distinct ways of addressing people; one familiar used with friends and relatives ("tu"), and one formal used with strangers and (usually) co-workers ("lei"). Thus, it's considered impolite (or even aggressive) to address people with the familiar one when the formal one is seen as appropriate. [citation needed]
  • Biting into the piece of bread directly (butter, pâté, etc should be placed on a small piece broken off, and then put whole into one's mouth). This is because hungry peasants crammed their mouths with food; the better bred were less hungry, and displaying teeth tearing off chunks of bread is not attractive to behold. [citation needed]
  • Bread must be broken with hands and not with a knife or other cutlery.[citation needed]
  • Crossing the fork and knife on the plate when the dish is finished; they should be more or less parallel (at the "four o'clock position"). [citation needed]
  • After entering, leaving one's coat without being invited to do so. One must ask first. [citation needed]
  • Putting one's hat on a bed is considered ominous by some. The common explanation is that the priest used to lay his hat on a sick person's bed when visiting to give the last rites. [citation needed]
  • Entering into a shop without greeting the proprietor. A friendly "Buongiorno" or some other polite greeting is expected, even if just browsing. [citation needed]
  • Asking for the check/bill immediately after finishing one's meal is generally seen as rude, take the time to relax and enjoy your surroundings and "un caffè". [citation needed]
  • Wearing white socks is seen as a sign of weakness or of being a "mamma's boy". [citation needed]
  • Offering chrysanthemums is in bad taste, since they are traditionally reserved for mourners.
  • Offering red roses to a hostess or for professional reasons is inappropriate, as they express passionate love.
  • Flowers, and especially roses, should always be given in odd numbers.

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

Netherlands

  • Addressing the country as Holland is considered incorrect in most parts of the Netherlands, since Holland only covers two of the provinces of the country. Although it is considered formally incorrect, few people will object to it in informal speech. [4]
  • Addressing a stranger, especially older person with the familiar second person pronoun instead of the formal form, is considered as a friendly form. Addressing someone in a formal manner is considered too formal. Most children are expected to address adults in the formal form. Business people in general always use the formal form in initial correspondence and formal correspondence, but in direct communication people will quickly insist on using first names. [citation needed] In the South, however, like in Belgium, formal pronouns are still common.
  • Not closing your umbrella before stepping inside any building, even if there is more than enough room for it open. (It is traditionally considered bad luck to open an umbrella indoors, a belief only still held by the very few Dutch people who are superstitious) [citation needed]
  • Unlike in other countries, like Russia, being asked to come and visit in the afternoon does not include an invitation to dinner. Staying longer in the expectation to be served dinner is considered rude. In general you will always announce your visit and it is considered rude to be late even 5 minutes, while it is considered unpleasant to be early more than 5 minutes.[citation needed] In the South, however, small delays are much more acceptable, occasionally leading to friction with Westerners.
  • Making fun of people is considered a way to break down formality between people, so to behave in a too formal manner being overly polite is considered a refusal to reach more friendly terms. Formality in general is considered as keeping your distance or even as coming across hypocrite.[citation needed] Making fun of complete strangers to establish familiarity, while elevated to a local pastime in the West, is less common in the South, leading to occasional friction with Westerners.
  • It is considered obligatory to kiss family and friends three times on the cheek when meeting. This is not true for the whole country. [citation needed]
  • When arriving at a birthday party you are expected to shake hands with everyone present and to congratulate everyone related to the birthday person with the birthday of that person, so e.g. children are congratulated with the birthday of their parents. [33]
  • On birthdays people are expected to bring some form of pastry to work for their co-workers. Details vary by region.[citation needed]
  • When served a cookie with tea or coffee one is expected to take and eat at most one cookie.[34]It is common for the host to close up the cookie jar and stow it after everyone has had a cookie. This does not apply in the Southern regions, where it is customary for hosts to provide more food than one would want to eat, and vaguely rude for them not to do so.

Holland is a region in the central-western part of the Netherlands. ...

Portugal

  • When greeting somebody that you haven't met before or someone that you haven't seen for a while, one must shake hands between men or, give a kiss on both cheeks between women and between men and women. This also applies when one is leaving for a long while. [citation needed]

Spain

  • At Spanish restaurants it is considered rude for the staff to bring a customer the check without the customer first requesting it. [16]
  • Using the pronoun "tú" instead of "usted" (formal you) when talking to an elder stranger might be seen as impolite. [citation needed]
  • Leaving a tip at restaurants and bares is a common practice, though not always necessarily observed, and usually a low amount. Normally you would leave the minor coins of the change when paying the bill with cash, and no tip at all when paying by credit card. [citation needed]
  • There are at least four distinct languages (Galician, Catalan, Spanish & Basque). Nearly everyone speaks the dominant language, Spanish (Castellano), but betraying ignorance of the other cultures (especially the one you happen to be in) will appear rude. Also to assume that the other 3 languages are dialects of spanish. [citation needed]
  • You should not question the political beliefs of those who want their state (usually one of the former kingdoms conquered by Castile) to be independent from Spain. There are no conquered kingdoms in the actual Spain as far as the whole country grew as a single united nation under the crowns of Castile and Aragon, this is a very controversial issue in Spain nowadays and you should show some knowledge as well as respect for their intentions. [citation needed]
  • There are some traditional issues that you should avoid to discuss about: fighting bulls ("Toros"), religion & fascism/nationalism. Regarding the last one, Spain is still divided after a relatively recent Civil War. [citation needed]
  • Be very observant and pay attention to every detail and word you hear. Spanish people will be very thankful to hear some gossip when talking about someone. [citation needed]
  • Always try to look relaxed and casual. You can speak loudly, gesture exaggeratedly, use physical contact and make your hosts laugh without making anyone feel awkward. [citation needed]
  • You have to greet (saludar) all your neighbors, even if you have never talked to them. [citation needed]
  • When greeting, women expect to receive two cheek-kisses (one in each side of their face) and men expect a hand shake. [citation needed]
  • When entering a place where there's people eating, it's polite to tell them to enjoy their meal ("que aproveche"). [citation needed]
  • When you are invited to watching a football match, which is very common, you should never criticize the host's team. Football is one of the most common subjects in arguments, as well as politics. [citation needed]

In sociolinguistics, a T-V distinction describes the situation wherein a language has second-person pronouns that distinguish varying levels of politeness, social distance, courtesy, familiarity, or insult toward the addressee. ... Galician (Galician: galego) is a language of the Western Ibero-Romance branch, spoken in Galicia. ... Catalan in Europe Catalan IPA: (català ) is a Romance language, the official language of Andorra and co-official in the Spanish autonomous communities of Balearic Islands, Valencia (under the name Valencian) and Catalonia. ... Basque (in Basque: Euskara) is the language spoken by the Basque people who inhabit the Pyrenees in North-Central Spain and the adjoining region of South-Western France. ... This article is about the international language known as Spanish. ... A former kingdom of Spain, Castile comprises the two regions of Old Castile in north-western Spain, and New Castile in the centre of the country. ... Bull ring (Plaza de Toros) La Malagueta in Málaga (Spain) Bullfighting or tauromachy (Spanish toreo, corrida de toros or tauromaquia; Portuguese tourada, corrida de touros or tauromaquia) is a tradition that involves, most of the time, professional performers (generally called in Spanish toreros or matadores and in Portuguese toureiros... Fascism is a radical political ideology that combines elements of corporatism, authoritarianism, nationalism, militarism, anti-anarchism, anti-communism and anti-liberalism. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix Nationalism is an ideology [1] that holds that a nation is the fundamental unit for human social life, and takes precedence over any other social and political principles. ...

Switzerland

  • When clinking glasses, it is an obligation to look into the eyes of the person holding the other glass. Not looking into their eyes is considered as highly disrespectful or just as being rude. [citation needed]

United Kingdom

  • Signifying "two" of something by holding up two fingers separated, with the back of the hand pointed towards the listener, can be mistaken for an offensive gesture (similar to the finger). Holding up two fingers with the hand held the other way (palm of the hand towards the listener) is perfectly acceptable (as it forms the "Peace" sign and the "V for victory" sign used during World War II). See also The V sign as an insult. [16]
  • Calling the united - but culturally and socially independent - countries (Scotland, England, Wales and Northern Ireland) "England". This may be regarded as highly offensive to everybody including the English. Sensitivity is appreciated regarding national identity (some prefer to be "English", some "British", some "Scottish", etc.). See also Subdivisions of the United Kingdom.
  • In England a small gift for the host given upon entering such as flowers for the table or wine or chocolates for the meal combined with subdued thanks is common. [4]
  • Complaining if the person who called an important meeting is late can be seen as impolite in some more traditional businesses; if they are important enough to call the meeting they are important enough to wait for. [citation needed]
  • Not offering tea or coffee to a guest. [citation needed]
  • Kissing (or hugging) people you don't know or people with whom you have been briefly acquainted (this could even include relatives of your spouse - the in-laws). [citation needed]
  • Talking (or asking) about one's personal wealth, possessions or success in business is seen as vulgar. It is generally frowned upon to ask one's work colleagues about their salary, and in some places of work it is forbidden. [citation needed]
  • Eating chips or French fries with your fingers in a restaurant is not done. Use your fork instead. You can use your fingers to eat meat if it's on the bone, such as chicken legs. Use of the fingers is acceptable when the food is served buffet style, or if you are in a fast-food establishment such as McDonalds. [citation needed]
  • Pointing directly towards someone whilst talking about them, or just pointing at people in general. [citation needed]
  • Touching someone to get their attention unless it's an emergency or touching someone without saying "excuse me" or "sorry". [citation needed]
  • Queuing is expected when there is any demand for an item. The only exception to this is a pub or bar, where finding a space at the bar displays your intention. However it is still considered rude to allow a barperson to serve you before someone who has been waiting longer than you. [citation needed]
  • In a pub or bar it is traditional to buy drinks in rounds (i.e. one person will buy for a number of others) trying to stay out of this group or offer money to the buyer can be seen as rude. Not buying a round is very rude. It is generally accepted that not everyone will stay long enough to buy a round, instead of trying to avoid being in the round it is better to accept the drink with thanks. This is done on the understanding that at a later date this might be reciprocated. [35]
  • Whereas "asking nicely" is often sufficient for politeness in the USA, tone of voice is not adequate for polite requests in the UK: you must follow requests with "please". [citation needed]
  • Summoning shop workers or servers with gestures, or particularly with snapping of fingers, is considered rude. [citation needed]
  • It is considered rude not to bag your own groceries at the check-out. This is a faux pas commonly committed by Americans, because bags are commonly packed for them by store employees in the United States. In some shops, particularly supermarkets, help with packing may be offered by the cashier before they begin checking out your items. [citation needed]
  • In Northern Ireland, asking people whether they are Catholic or Protestant is considered inflammatory. [citation needed]

This article is about the gesture. ... The V sign is a hand gesture in which the first and second fingers are raised and parted, whilst the remaining fingers are clenched. ... Motto: , traditionally rendered in Scots as Wha daur meddle wi me?[1] and in English as No one provokes me with impunity. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Motto: (Welsh for Wales forever) Anthem: Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau Capital Cardiff Largest city Cardiff Official language(s) English, Welsh Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Rhodri Morgan AM Unification    - by Gruffudd ap Llywelyn 1056  Area    - Total 20,779 km² (3rd in... Motto: [citation needed] (French for God and my right)2 Anthem: UK: God Save the Queen Regional: (de facto) Londonderry Air Capital Belfast Largest city Belfast Official language(s) English (de facto), Irish, Ulster Scots 3, NI Sign Language Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair... The United Kingdom The subdivisions of the United Kingdom are complex, multi-layered and non-uniform, varying between England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Motto: [citation needed] (French for God and my right)2 Anthem: UK: God Save the Queen Regional: (de facto) Londonderry Air Capital Belfast Largest city Belfast Official language(s) English (de facto), Irish, Ulster Scots 3, NI Sign Language Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ...

Latin America

  • In Latin American culture, it is considered impolite to "toss" objects to people instead of directly handing it to them. [36]
  • The American "come here" gesture of palm upwards with the fingers curled back is considered a romantic solicitation. [36]
  • Latin American cultures have a smaller sense of personal space than other cultures and it is considered rude to step away when someone is stepping closer. [3]

Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... --69. ... Personal space is the region surrounding each person, or that area which a person considers his domain or territory. ...

Argentina

  • Smoking is banned in indoors areas in Buenos Aires City.

Brazil

  • Flashing the American "O-K" gesture is considered inappropriate because in Brazil that gesture refers to the anus. Flipping someone off by hitting the wrist against the inside of the elbow is considered playful and not offensive (usually called giving someone a "banana"). The "thumbs up" gesture is acceptable and widely used. [1] Although, don't be too surprised if a Brazilian is gesturing with the OK gesture, as long as it is not directed to someone it's not offensive.
  • Gift giving among the opposite sex can be misinterpreted as having romantic overtures. [14]
  • When offering something, especially food, offer at least three times, and enforce the offer a bit more each time. It is considered rude if you offer something only once. As a result, it is not considered rude if you politely refuse an offer. In fact, sometimes it is offered only as politeness and there is no expectation that you will accept. [citation needed]
  • In certain parts of the country, most notably rural areas, it is considered rude to walk up to a house or apartment door and knock. The appropriate action is to stand in the yard and clap your hands. If no one comes to the door, then the visitor may approach the door, knock, and then step back away from the door and await a response. [citation needed]
  • Saying "please" with too much emphasis may be considered rude. In Brazilian Portuguese, "please" is implied by the tone of the question, and is normally used to demonstrate frustration at the lack of a proper response or action. [citation needed]
  • Although technically, Brazilians are "Americans" too, they are aware, from watching Hollywood movies, that U.S. citizens call themselves "Americans" and aren't offended if you call yourself an "American" instead of "U.S. citizen". [citation needed]
  • For men they should shake hands both when meeting and when saying goodbye. Once you know each other better, the other hand gets involved as well, either as a form of light hug or just tapping the other's side. [citation needed]
  • Not saying hello or saying goodbye can be quite rude. Foreigners are given a little more leeway, but only a little. Unfortunately, it depends a little on the context, but it is best if you make an effort to say hello or goodbye. You don't need to kiss or shake hands every time, especially if you expect to meet them again the next day. [citation needed]
  • Many Brazilians appreciate drinking beer, specially as an informal meeting between friends. If you are with other people in a table and want to serve yourself from a bottle, make sure you fill other people's glasses as well. It's not necessary to offer it or announce it - in doing so, you might interrupt somebody's conversation, what's considered ruder - so just fill it up. If you feel uncomfortable taking the bottle, just wait for someone to serve himself and, most probably, he'll serve you too. [citation needed]

Look up okay in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Chile

  • In Chile, wine is expected to be poured with the right hand. [3]
  • Smoking is banned on public transportation and in cinemas. [37]

Ecuador

  • It is polite for someone to ask permission before taking a photograph. A tip may be requested in exchange for that permission. [37]
  • Beachwear should only be worn at the beach and not in town. [37]

Mexico

  • Criticism of nepotism in business dealings. [19]
  • The color purple is associated with funeral and should be avoided when giving flowers. [4]
  • The courtesy titles "Señora" and "Señorita" (Mrs. and Miss, respectively) are taken colloquially as "Married Woman" and "Virgin Woman", as a woman is not supposed to have lost virginity unless married. Even older women should be addressed as "Señorita" if their marital status is unknown, especially in rural areas. [citation needed]
  • When an invitation is issued the invitee assumes everything will be paid for, unless clarified. Even if he/she offers to pay their part. [citation needed]
  • It's considered rude to talk about sex or bodily functions openly, even though double entendres are a common form of humor and joking. [citation needed]
  • Several kinds of food are eaten with the fingers (tacos, tortas) and it's considered snobbish to eat them with fork and knife. In case of doubt wait to see how the rest of the table eats their own. [citation needed]
  • Toasting with water is considered bad luck and, in a lesser degree, toasting with any non-alcoholic drink. [citation needed]
  • Women expect doors to be opened for them as a sign of chivalry by the closest male to them. This also applies to lighting of cigarettes and helping them to their seat. [citation needed]
  • Unless the service is really bad, tips should never be below 10% of the bill total, as they're commonly the waiter's main means of income. 15% is recommended in highly-frequented places. [citation needed]

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Nepotism Nepotism means favoring relatives because of their relationship rather than because of their abilities. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Profanity. ...

Nicaragua

  • Refusing a drink on a hot day or not praising the host for the quality of the meal is considered rude. [4]
  • Knocking softly on someone's front door. One should knock loudly on the door so that one can easily be heard. [citation needed]
  • Referring to the United States as 'America'. To Nicaraguans, they too are 'Americans'. The USA should be referred to as 'Los Estados Unidos', and in adjective form as 'estadounidense'. [citation needed]
  • Not heeding the advice of Nicaraguans urging you not to shower when you are hot, or agitado would be considered poor form. [citation needed]
  • Not heeding the advice for women not to sit on rocks... it's said to reduce their ability to procreate (the rocks are hot). [citation needed]
  • Not greeting someone when you see them in a public place (even at a distance) is considered rude. You must go up to the person, kiss him or her on the cheek (if you are female) or just kiss the female on the cheek and shake the male's hand (if you are a male). Not greeting someone is considered extremely rude. [citation needed]
  • Calling someone a nickname that might appear rude to North Americans is actually a sign of being "accepted" and "one of the gang" in Nicaragua. [citation needed]

Puerto Rico

  • Unlike in the United States, people expect to be interrupted in a conversation. Interruptions mean interest in the subject discussed, silence means polite discomfort instead of attention. If you're taking to someone else and a third person joins you, you are expected to stop what you're saying and acknowledge the newcomer.
  • Watching TV is a pretext for social interaction with friends and family. Puerto Ricans talk over TV and consider it selfish for an individual to demand quiet, especially in other people's homes. If you're interested in the content, get the subtitles or watch it later, alone.
  • Visitors' hygiene is scrutinized. You are expected to take at least one or more baths per day. In this tropical island, body odor, unshaven legs and underarms in women, bare feet, or wrinkled clothing are considered disgusting. Many men wear cologne.
  • Salsa, Merengue and even Reggaeton may seem like "sexy dancing" to outsiders, but there are unspoken rules. It is insulting to dance too close to a woman who isn't your wife or girlfriend, even if others seem to be doing it. Touching any woman in any kind of sexually suggestive manner in public is treated as animal behavior.
  • It is considered vulgar and ostentatious to open gifts in public. Gifts are never opened in front of the givers, to avoid hurting their feelings through unfair comparisons. Instead, pull the giver and the gift into a more private space, and give thanks in person rather than with a card.
  • Giving someone else your back in social situations, greeting someone with your left hand. Puerto Rican men do not hug or kiss on the cheek as a greeting, unless it is a female relative.

Venezuela

  • As in many places, it's considered rude to point at a person or even an object with the index finger. As an alternative, you may point with the whole hand. Many Venezuelans point with their lips, by aiming their head toward the direction they want to point to and puckering their lips. [citation needed]
  • Punctuality is less of a priority in Venezuela than in some other countries. In a social setting, it may be considered rude or at least overly eager to arrive at an appointment at exactly the appointed hour, so being "fashionably late" by 15 or 20 minutes would be more polite. [citation needed]
  • Coffee or a cold drink will probably be offered to guests, and it's impolite to decline. [citation needed]

North America, other than Mexico

World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ...

Canada

  • As in many other cultural areas, a number of Canadian faux pas (at least in English-speaking areas) are similar to American ones, with a few differences. [citation needed]
  • Not waiting at the end of a queue for your turn ("cutting in line") is considered extremely rude. This applies in all areas of public interaction. On public transportation, wait until everyone has exited the door before entering. Pushing through people who are trying to get out is considered extremely rude. [citation needed]
  • It is impolite to smoke in a non-smoker's home or car without first obtaining permission.
  • Spitting on the ground or blowing one's nose into anything but a tissue or handkerchief is considered gross and rude. This is at odds with other regions of the world where this is acceptable. [citation needed]
  • Failing to hold a door open for another person is seen as very impolite, especially when doing so would require no special effort. [citation needed]
  • In Quebec only, for both sexes, shaking hands in a casual context implies distance. Embracing (holding each other loosely in the arms while lightly kissing each other's cheeks, once for each side) is usually expected. [citation needed]
  • It is polite to remove your shoes when entering someone's house, or to at least ask the host if they would like you to. This practice is not common in the United States. During winter time, removing your boots is deemed mandatory. [citation needed]
  • Walking on the left side of a mall or supermarket (or similar) aisle is considered very rude and inconsiderate. It is expected that pedestrians will obey the same general rules as drivers (i.e. walk on the right of an aisle or queue).
  • Generally, it is considered rude to chew with your mouth open, and smacking or slurping is discouraged.
  • It is generally considered rude not to try to muffle a burp either with your hand or closed mouth.
  • In a public washroom, men will generally not speak to one another. Male friends will sometimes talk to each other at urinals, but generally strangers and acquaintances do not chat. In a small public washroom, people will often wait for the washroom to empty before defecating or farting.

Conversational Etiquette

  • Canadians are generally more reserved than Americans when dealing with strangers. Over-familiarity, such as is common in American customer service, is not advised as it may be interpreted as disrespectful, insincere, or gauche. Canadians tend not to share personal information with strangers. A certain amount of respectful reserve is maintained until a relationship is established. [citation needed]
  • Calling a Canadian "American" may offend.
  • Canadians pride themselves on being an inclusive society; Expressing a negative opinion about any group of people on the basis of race, color, religion, cultural customs, et cetera is considered rude or offensive; Describing someone as a "foreigner" or "alien" is pejorative, strongly implying that the person "does not belong" or "is not welcome".
  • It is dangerous to assert that someone is or is not Canadian based on their appearance - Generations of immigrants have lived in Canada for years and feel patriotic, vote, and are part of Canadian society.
  • Jingoistic displays of patriotism make Canadians extremely uncomfortable. Canadians are quietly and fiercely proud of their country, but view patriotic fervor as not appropriate for public display (except, of course, on Canada Day).
  • Canadians are generally good-humored when being lightly ribbed about living in the wilderness or the "Frozen North", or driving dog-sleds and living in igloos. But if those stereotypes are seen to be seriously held by the visitor, serious offense will be taken.

Canada Day (French: Fête du Canada) is Canadas national holiday. ...

Anglo-Franco-Canadian relations

  • French and English Canadians can be culturally divided. Expecting an English-speaking Canadian to know how to speak French well, or vice versa, can create awkwardness. However, it is more common for francophone Canadians to be fluently bilingual than Anglophone Canadians. [citation needed]
  • When initiating a discussion, it is advisable to use the language of your interlocutor. However, if you don't speak that language, make sure to inform him/her of that fact and ask if he/she understands yours. On the other hand, when you're being served (restaurants, hotels, etc), it is correct to expect English, but only in sizable cities, on the main track. Do not expect to be understood in English in smaller towns around Quebec and certain suburbs of larger cities. Try to be polite first, and excuse for not speaking French and be surprised how far that would take you. [citation needed]
  • Non-Canadians are not advised to initiate a discussion on Quebec/Canada politics due to the sensitivity of the subject. Avoid faux-pas by respecting it as you would a private family matter. Outsiders offering even good-natured criticisms or commentary about Quebec are just as likely to offend their English Canadian audience. [citation needed]
  • Brazen nationalist or separatist displays are to be avoided, as these are contentious issues. Although the maple leaf historically was used as a symbol by French-Canadians, the province adopted a modified version of the SSJB's (Société St-Jean Baptiste) flag under Maurice Duplessis, and since then the maple leaf has been suppressed in heraldry. [4]

Duplessis and the Clergy. ...

Aboriginal peoples of Canada

  • There are three distinct groups of Aboriginal peoples in Canada: First Nations (often referred to by specific tribe names), Inuit, and Métis. Care should be taken not to use the wrong term when speaking about aboriginals; for example, many Inuit consider the term Eskimo offensive, and the term Indian, while used in official areas such as the federal Department of Indian and Northern Affairs, is a controversial one that some take offense to in everyday conversation.
  • Similarly, it is important to keep in mind that many faulty stereotypes persist about First Nations people. Although traditional spiritual, cultural, lifestyle and hunting/fishing/trapping practices survive or thrive in Canadian aboriginal communities, most to all have evolved into the modern-day and often incorporate snowmobiles, rifles, motorized fishing boats, sequins and plastics, blue jeans, etc. etc. Expecting a First Nations person to be "just like in the movies" may cause a visitor to be seen as amusing, ignorant or just plain offensive. [38]
  • However, a healthy respect for traditional practices is greatly appreciated. For example, when visiting a pow-wow, it is extremely rude to touch a dancer's clothing (called regalia) or to take a photograph of a dancer without asking for, and RECEIVING, permission from the dancer. .)[39] (Remember that it can be difficult to say no politely. When asking permission to take a photograph, watch and listen for the answer, and respect the dancer's decision, whether he or she says 'sure, thanks for asking', or 'ok', or 'I'm in the middle of getting my hair done.' The first and second answers mean yes - the third is probably a no.) It is also very offensive to bring alcohol or narcotics to a pow-wow. [40]
  • Also, be mindful of interrupting. Interruptions are seen as quite rude among First Nations cultures as a general rule. [41] Particular respect should be paid to elders, First Nations people who are older and/or especially well-respected in the community. When they speak on an issue, it is unacceptable to interrupt or speak until they say they have finished, or invite others to speak or ask questions. [42]
  • Aboriginal People, like the rest of Canadians, generally have a good sense of humour and will often tell self-disparaging anecdotes or make jokes about their particular tribal group. [43] It is considered quite inappropriate to tell jokes about Aboriginals if you are not one, although it's perfectly fine to laugh if one is told by a First Nations person. [44]

Aboriginal peoples in Canada are indigenous peoples recognized in the Canadian Constitution Act, 1982 as Indians (First Nations), Métis, and Inuit. ...

United States

  • The United states is a diverse, multicultural society. As such, all of the following rules will change depending on the location, setting, and people involved. [citation needed]
  • Not looking someone directly in the eye when speaking can be seen as evasive; this is in contrast to much of the rest of the world, where looking someone directly in the eye may be rude.[citation needed]
  • Unlike some countries (e.g., Italy) money is usually handed directly to the receiver in sales transactions [citation needed]. Doing otherwise may seem standoffish. An exception is at banks where the teller will count out the money while setting it on the counter.
  • It is considered impolite to ask people how much money they earn [citation needed]. It is not considered rude to ask someone what he or she does for a living. [citation needed]
  • It is considered impolite not to cover your mouth and nose when sneezing or coughing. When someone else sneezes, it is customary to say "Bless you." (The German word for health, "Gesundheit", is also generally acceptable.) If someone says "Bless you" to you, it is customary to reply with "Thank you." [citation needed]
  • At an initial introduction, it is considered awkward to ask someone if they are married or have a boyfriend or girlfriend. [citation needed]
  • At an initial introduction, it is considered awkward to ask someone their political views. [citation needed]
  • It is considered impolite to ask a woman how old she is or inquire about her weight. [citation needed]
  • It is considered a rude violation of personal space to stand within an arm's length of another person, unless you are very close friends. In crowded situations it is tolerated, but makes some Americans uneasy. [citation needed]
  • Profane words are not allowed on broadcast television or radio. Such language is highly discouraged in formal and business settings, and also when children are present. Many people use them regularly in informal discussion, but are cautious about the use of such words around those who may be offended. Foreigners are often unaware of this as profane words are often used in English movies and music.[citation needed]
  • Emitting any powerful odor or smell, whether due to lack of hygiene, diet, or applied perfumes, can be considered a violation of others' personal space. The application of perfume or cologne may be considered embarrassingly overdone if their scent is detectable beyond the close personal proximity of the wearer. In recent years the smell of smoke from the use of tobacco products has also become socially unacceptable, except in areas specifically designated for smoking. [citation needed]
  • Getting the attention of waiters, servers or store workers with gestures or by snapping fingers, is considered offensive. [citation needed] It is better to move toward a sales clerk and say something along the lines of "Excuse me..." In a restaurant, simply making eye contact with the waiter, or eye contact with a slight smile and nod should be enough to signal your need - in crowded situations, eye contact and raising the hand casually about shoulder high with index finger extended up is fine. [citation needed]
  • Unless the service is really bad, tips should never be below 10% of the bill total, as they're commonly the waiter's main means of income. 15% is recommended in highly-frequented places.
  • Calling a Southern person a "Yankee" will be taken as an insult. Baseball fans in the Boston area may also find the term offensive due to the intense rivalry between the Boston Red Sox and New York Yankees baseball teams. This rule doesn't seem to apply to the British, however, to whom all Americans are "Yanks". It should be noted that many younger Southerners would generally not take serious offense but are more likely to respond with puzzlement, since to them, it should be quite easy to tell if someone is from the southern or northern United States. However, referring to Southerners as hillbillies, rednecks, or as generally uneducated is a major faux pas that will be deeply offensive. [citation needed]
  • Discussing the display of the Confederate flag in the South. [citation needed] The public display of this flag is very controversial, even to Southerners, and is therefore best not discussed. Some Southerners view the flag as a symbol of their heritage, while others see it as a racist symbol. It should be noted that these differences in opinion are not divided strictly along racial lines, so it is impossible to know where an individual may stand on this issue. [citation needed]
  • In most business settings, physical contact should be limited to a handshake at the beginning and end of the meeting. [citation needed]
  • When giving a handshake, the corner of your hand between the thumb and first finger should be met firmly with the other person to avoid an uncomfortable weak handshake. [citation needed]
  • It is considered polite to bring something for the host or group when invited to a dinner in someone's home. A bottle of wine is a typical gift. It is possible that the hosts may not drink due to personal beliefs or alcoholism. A guest may wish to check along the lines of "Shall I bring a bottle of wine?" However, wine is so customary that it is unlikely to offend hosts even if they do not drink themselves. Bringing a dessert is not uncommon, but only after checking with the hosts to ensure they haven't gone through the trouble of making dessert themselves. It is not considered offensive to ask if it is ok to bring things.
  • Bringing a bouquet of flowers for the hostess or wife of the host is considered polite and appreciated. Roses however, being an expression of love (particularly red roses) should be avoided unless this effect is intended. [citation needed]
  • It is considered thoughtless and impolite to give cash as a gift [citation needed], except from an adult relative to a child. A few exceptions include graduations, bar mitzvahs, and bat mitzvahs. Weddings can also be appropriate situations for cash gifts to people who are closer than acquaintances. Another exception is in sending gift cards by mail to distant family members or friends. [citation needed]
  • It is usually impolite to refer to how someone looks at all—-mentioning someone's weight is very impolite. Complimenting someone on lost weight can be acceptable if remarked upon honestly. [citation needed]
  • References to someone's ethnic or racial identity are inappropriate unless the subject is broached generally. In particular, mentioning somebody's minority status when criticizing that person is perceived as discrimination. [citation needed]
  • It is generally considered impolite to begin eating one's dinner before all seated have been served. If one's food hasn't arrived and is likely to take a long time (or already has taken a long time), it is appropriate for that person to invite the others to begin eating. Restaurants generally delay serving food to all seated until all food is prepared. [citation needed] When seated at a large banquet table (for example at a wedding reception) it can be acceptable to begin dining after those in the immediate vicinity have received their food.
  • The use of titles (Mr., "Sir", Mrs., "Ma'am", Ms. or Miss) varies regionally and perhaps ethnically; in most of the US, titles are not used in general business or social contexts between adults. However, they may still be traditional towards the top management of a company. They seem to be more commonly used in the southern US, and in the military (and in military families and communities). Use of titles by children to adults is under different rules from usage between adults (and is still regional and ethnic). For example, it's rude for a child to address a friend's parent by his or her first name unless he or she has invited you to do so. Conversely, addressing someone near to your own age group by title is usually considered stand-offish even in a professional setting. Generally how you are introduced to the person is a clue to how he should be addressed. One should be careful about using the word "Madam" to refer to a female, because the formal usage of that term (as seen in older movies) has become somewhat archaic, and the word is currently also used to refer to a female operator of a house of prostitution. [citation needed]

A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium II St. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe) (The State House, according to Oliver Wendell Holmes, is the hub of the Solar System), Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino... The Yankees-Red Sox rivalry is one of the longest and most bitter rivalries in American professional sports. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1 • 4 • 8 • 9 • 27 • 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1907–present) See Nicknames before Red Sox for disputed nicknames Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds (1901-1911) Major league titles World... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as Americans... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... In modern usage, redneck predominantly refers to a particular stereotype of whites from the Southern United States. ... This article or section should be merged with ethnic group Ethnicity is the cultural characteristics that connect a particular group or groups of people to each other. ... Human beings are defined variously in biological, spiritual, and cultural terms, or in combinations thereof. ... The word discrimination comes from the Latin discriminare, which means to distinguish between. To discriminate socially is to make a distinction between people on the basis of class or category without regard to individual merit. ... Miss is a title, typically used for an unmarried woman. ... A sex worker in Germany. ...

See Also

Intercultural competence is the ability for successful communication with people of other cultures. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Airman's Quarterly Spring 2006
  2. ^ USDOJ The First Three to Five Seconds: Understanding Arab and Muslim Americans Part II
  3. ^ a b c Erin Richards Cultural Etiquette September 19th, 2006
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Cultural Tips
  5. ^ Teaching for Inclusion
  6. ^ Susan Kurth Clot deBroissia International Gift Giving Protocol
  7. ^ a b c Wong Yee Lee Gifts in Chinese Culture
  8. ^ a b c Top Ten Guidelines to Gift-Giving in China
  9. ^ J. Sydney Jones Taiwanese Americans
  10. ^ Chinese New Year
  11. ^ a b c d Waters, Dan. Chinese Funerals (PDF).
  12. ^ Susan Kurth Clot deBroissia International Gift Giving Protocol
  13. ^ Scott Reeves Forbes Magazine July 28th, 2005
  14. ^ a b Terri Morrison The Business of Gifts
  15. ^ a b c d e f g Fodor's Tokyo Etiquette & Behavior
  16. ^ a b c d ACIS Travel Talk August 2006
  17. ^ a b c d Rebecca Falkoff Unintentional Transgressions of the Work Abroad Community Monster.com
  18. ^ What is some common Australian word usage?. The Australian Government Department of Immigration and Multicultural Affairs. Retrieved on 2006-11-11.
  19. ^ a b Terri Morrison Blunders and Faux Pas
  20. ^ De Belg laat niet graag in zijn loonzakje kijken. [1]
  21. ^ Ongeloofwaardige opiniepeiling van De Standaard/VRT [2]
  22. ^ Michel Walter Pharand. (2001) Bernard Shaw and the French, University Press of Florida. p. 113. ISBN 0813018285.
  23. ^ Hervey Sandor, Ian Higgins, Sandor G J Hervey. (2002) Thinking French Translation, Routledge (UK). p. 46. ISBN 0415255228.
  24. ^ Sally Adamson Taylor. (2004) Culture Shock! France (Culture Shock! France), Marshall Cavendish International (Asia) Pte. Ltd. ISBN 155868767X.
  25. ^ Understanding France
  26. ^ a b c d e f g Window on the World
  27. ^ Giving Gifts
  28. ^ Food and Culture
  29. ^ Almanac
  30. ^ Victorian Age Etiquette
  31. ^ Bartelby's
  32. ^ Ming TV
  33. ^ The Undutchables by Colin White &Lourie Boucke, page 135
  34. ^ The Undutchables by Colin White &Lourie Boucke, page 176
  35. ^ SIRC [3]
  36. ^ a b U.S. Institute of Languages Spanish Culture and nonverbal communication
  37. ^ a b c South American Travel tips
  38. ^ FIrst Story - Stereotypes
  39. ^ AMMSA Guide to Pow-Wow Etiquette
  40. ^ Protocol, Behavior and Celebration
  41. ^ Differential Discourse Patterns in Mainstream vs. First Nations Students in an Adult Basic Education Classroom
  42. ^ What is an Elder?
  43. ^ Aboriginal comedians
  44. ^ Anti-Native Racism, Jokes

  Results from FactBites:
 
Faux pas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (658 words)
A faux pas, (IPA /ˌfoʊˈpɑː/, plural: faux pas /ˌfoʊˈpɑː(z)/) (French for false step) is a violation of accepted, although unwritten, social rules.
Faux pas vary widely from culture to culture and what is considered good manners in one culture can be considered a faux pas in another.
If one uses faux pas with the English meaning in France, people might think it was a slight grammatical mistake with faut pas, the colloquial pronunciation of il ne faut pas, meaning must not in English.
List of faux pas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (8690 words)
Many of the faux pas of the United States and the United Kingdom are also considered faux pas in Australasian countries, particularly Australia and New Zealand.
In the Maori community of New Zealand, it is a faux pas not to remove one's shoes when entering a Maori sacred building, such as a marae.
In Poland: eating or offering horse meat, is a faux pas since to many Poles eating a horse is like eating a friend; a result of the 1000 year tradition of the Polish cavalry and the impact of well known and admired paintings by Wojciech Kossak.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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