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Encyclopedia > List of famous Holocaust survivors

There are many famous Holocaust survivors who survived the Nazi genocides in Europe only to go on to achievements of great fame and notability. Those listed here are, at the very least, residents of the parts of Europe occupied by the Axis powers during World War II targeted by the Holocaust who survived until the end of the Holocaust and the war. The majority of these people survived incarceration in the Nazi concentration camps, but this is not strictly necessary for the purposes of this list. Concentration camp inmates during the Holocaust The Holocaust was Nazi Germanys systematic genocide (ethnic cleansing) of various ethnic, religious, national, and secular groups during World War II. Early elements include the Kristallnacht pogrom and the T-4 Euthanasia Program established by Hitler that killed some 200,000 people. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Combatants Allies: Poland, British Commonwealth, France/Free France, Soviet Union, United States, China, and others Axis Powers: Germany, Italy, Japan, and others Casualties Military dead: 17 million Civilian dead: 33 million Total dead: 50 million Military dead: 8 million Civilian dead: 4 million Total dead: 12 million World War II... The term National Socialism has been used in self-description by a number of different political groups and ideologies, some of which have no connection with the Nazis; see National socialism (disambiguation). ... A concentration camp is a large detention centre created for political opponents, aliens, specific ethnic or religious groups, civilians of a critical war-zone, or other groups of people, often during a war. ...

  • Stanisław Ehrlich (1907-1997) - Galicia-born Polish jurist
  • Jerzy Einhorn
  • Leo Eitinger (b. in Slovakia), professor of Psychiatry at University of Oslo, known mainly for his work on late-onset psychological trauma amongst Holocaust survivors
  • Henryk Fenigstein (?-1993), Psychiatrist, Psychotherapist, well known in Canada
  • Leopold Engleitner (b. 1905)
  • Wanda Jakubowska
  • Simone Veil, French politician
  • Rudolf Vrba (born Walter Rosenberg in Slovakia, 1924) escaped from Auschwitz with Alfred Wetzler and gave the first detailed report about the workings of the camp.

Rav Yehuda Amital (born 31 October 1924), a noted Orthodox Jewish rabbi, is a Rosh Yeshiva of Yeshivat Har Etzion and a former member of Knesset. ... Photograph of Karel Ančerl. ... Aharon Appelfeld (b. ... Hannah Arendt (October 14, 1906 – December 4, 1975) was a German political theorist. ... Leo Baeck (1873-1956) Rabbi Dr. Leo Baeck (May 23, 1873, Leszno, Poland – November 2, 1956, London, England) was an outstanding 20th century German-Jewish scholar and a leader of Progressive Judaism. ... WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw Bartoszewski WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw Bartoszewski (b. ... Joseph Bau (born in 1920, Kraków Poland) is a graphic artist and poet, survivor of the Plaszow Nazi concentration camp of World War II. Biography Bau was was trained as a graphic artist at the University for Plastic Arts in Kraków, Poland. ... Bruno Bettelheim (August 28, 1903 - March 13, 1990) was a Jewish-American writer and child psychologist. ... Léon Blum Léon Blum (9 April 1872 - 30 March 1950), was the Prime Minister of France three times: from 1936 to 1937, for one month in 1938, and from December 1946 to January 1947. ... Socialism is a social and economic system (or the political philosophy advocating such a system) in which the economic means of production are owned and controlled collectively by the people. ... Sir Robert Walpole, the first Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... René Blum (Paris, 13 March 1878 - Auschwitz, 30 April 1942) was the founder of the Ballet de lOpera a Monte Carlo. He was the brother of the socialist Prime Minister of France, Leon Blum. ... Tadeusz Borowski (1922-1951) was a Polish writer and journalist, and a Holocaust survivor. ... An author is the person who creates a written work, such as a book, story, article or the like. ... George Brady , brother of Hana Brady (Bradova), was born in 1928, in Nove Mesto, Czechoslovakia. ... Hana Brady (Hana Hanička Bradová, Germanized in the tag in her suitcase as Hanna Brady) (March 3rd, 1931, Nové MÄ›sto – 1944) Jewish girl and holocaust victim. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Robert Clary Robert Clary (born March 1, 1926 as Robert Max Widerman) was a French actor of Jewish descent. ... Józef Cyrankiewicz (April 23, 1911 - January 20, 1989) was a Polish communist political figure. ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... Yehiel De-Nur or Dinur, (De-Nur means of the fire in Hebrew) was born Yehiel Feiner on May 16, 1909, in Sosnowiec (Poland), near the German border. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... Charlotte Delbo, (August 10, 1913- March 1985), was a French writer chiefly known for her haunting memoirs of her time as a prisoner in Auschwitz, where she was sent for her activities as a member of the French resistance. ... Jezry Einhorn (b. ... Leo Eitinger (1912-1996) was born in Brno, Moravia, at that time a town in the Austrian-Hungarian empire; currently the capital of Jihomoravský kraj and belonging to the Czech Republic. ... The University of Oslo (Universitetet i Oslo, in Latin Universitas Osloensis) was founded in 1811 as Universitas Regia Fredericiana (the Royal Frederick University, Norwegian Det Kongelige Frederiks Universitet), modelled after the recently established University of Berlin, and originally named after King Frederick of Denmark and Norway. ... Leopold Engleitner grew up in the Austrian imperial city of Bad Ischl and was able to meet with the emperor Franz Joseph. ... David Faber (born July 7, 1961) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... Ádám Fischer (born 1949, Budapest) is a Hungarian conductor. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Otto Frank Otto Heinrich Frank (May 12, 1889 - August 19, 1980) was the father of Anne Frank. ... Anne Frank Her handwriting, translated: This is a photo as I would wish myself to look all the time. ... Verweigerte Rückkehr, Fischer Taschenbuch Verlag Hans Frankenthal (July, 1926–December, 1999) was a German Jew born in Schmallenberg near Dortmund. ... Mans search for meaning Viktor Emil Frankl, M.D., Ph. ... Tuviah Friedman was a Nazi hunter and director of the Institute for the Documentation of Nazi War Crimes in Haifa, Israel. ... Karl Gorath (born 12 December 1912, Bad Zwischenahn, Germany) is a gay man who was arrested in 1938 and imprisoned for the crime of homosexuality at Neuengamme and Auschwitz. ... Auschwitz, in English, commonly refers to the Auschwitz concentration camp complex built near the town of Oświęcim, by Nazi Germany during World War II. Rarely, it may refer to the Polish town of Oświęcim (called by the Germans Auschwitz) itself. ... Bill Graham (January 8, 1931 – October 25, 1991) was a well-known concert promoter, beginning in the 1960s. ... Alexander Grothendieck (Berlin, March 28, 1928) is one of the most important mathematicians of the 20th century. ... Fanya Gottesfeld Heller is a noted Holocaust survivor, author and philanthropist whose life story offers hope to all who have suffered through discrimination or the horrors of war. ... Arek Hersh is a survivor of the Holocaust. ... William Herskovic (died March 3, 2006 at 91 of cancer) was a Holocaust escapee and survivor. ... Johan Huizinga (b. ... Imre Kertész (born November 9, 1929) is Jewish-Hungarian author, Holocaust concentration camp survivor, and winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2002 for writing that upholds the fragile experience of the individual against the barbaric arbitrariness of history. Kertész best-known work, Fateless (Sorstalanság) describes... The Nobel Prize in literature is awarded annually to an author from any country who has produced the most outstanding work of an idealistic tendency. The work in this case generally refers to an authors work as a whole, not to any individual work, though individual works are sometimes... An author is the person who creates a written work, such as a book, story, article or the like. ... Serge (born September 17, 1935 in Bucharest, Romania) and Beate (born February 13, 1939 in Berlin, Germany) Klarsfeld are called Nazi hunters for bringing Klaus Barbie and others to justice. ... Walter Kohn (born March 9, 1923 in Vienna, Austria) is an Austrian-born American physicist who was awarded, with John A. Pople, the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1998. ... List of Nobel Prize laureates in Chemistry from 1901 to the present day. ... Jerzy KosiÅ„ski (June 18, 1933 – May 3, 1991) was a novelist of Jewish origin, born in Łódź, Poland. ... Zofia Kossak-Szczucka (1890 - 1968), Polish author and resistance fighter, is best known for her wartime efforts to help the Polish Jews. ... Cardinal Adam KozÅ‚owiecki, S.J., (April 1, 1911 in Huta Komorowska, Poland) is Archbishop of Lusaka (Zambia) and Cardinal. ... Tom Lantos Thomas Peter Lantos (born February 1, 1928), American politician, has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1981, representing the 12th District of California (map). ... Rabbi Israel Meir Lau (born 1937 in Piotrków, Poland) is a former Ashkenazic Chief Rabbi (1993–2003) of the state of Israel. ... Primo Levi Primo Levi (July 31, 1919 - April 11, 1987) was an Italian chemist and author of memoirs, short stories, poems, and novels. ... Paul Löbe (born December 14, 1875 in Liegnitz (Schlesien), died August 3, 1967 in Bonn) was a German politician (SPD). ... Jean-Marie Cardinal Lustiger Aaron Jean-Marie Cardinal Lustiger (born September 17, 1926), French clergyman, has been Archbishop of Paris since January 1981, and has been a Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church since February 1983. ... Robert Maxwell Ian Robert Maxwell MC (June 10, 1923 – November 5, 1991), British media proprietor, rose from poverty to build a large publishing empire. ... Olivier Messiaen. ... Witold Pilecki (May 13, 1901 – May 25, 1948; pronounced [vitɔld pileʦki]; codenames Roman Jezierski, Tomasz Serafiński, Druh, Witold) was a soldier of the Second Polish Republic, founder of the resistance movement Secret Polish Army (Tajna Armia Polska) and member of the Home Army (Armia Krajowa). ... Roman PolaÅ„ski at Cannes with Adrien Brody, 2002 Roman PolaÅ„ski (born August 18, 1933) is a Franco-Polish film director and actor. ... Rubin wears the Medal of Honor he received at the White House. ... Paul RicÅ“ur (February 27, 1913, Valence - May 20, 2005, Chatenay Malabry) was a French philosopher and anthropologist best known for his attempt to combine phenomenological description with hermeneutic interpretation. ... Josef Rosensaft (1911 - 1975 was a Holocaust survivor who led the community of Jewish displaced persons (Sherit ha-Pletah through the establishment of a Central Committee of Liberated Jews that first served the interests of the refugees in Bergen-Belsen DP camp and then DP camps throughout the entire... ... Dr Kurt Schumacher (13 October 1895 - 20 August 1952), was the leader of the Social Democratic Party of Germany in the early years of the German Federal Republic. ... Balys Sruoga (February 2, 1896, Biržai district, Lithuania - October 16, 1947, Vilnius, Lithuanian poet, playwright, critic and literature theorist. ... Modern sculpture Ladders to Heaven at the Centre of Polish Sculpture in OroÅ„sko Józef Szajna (b. ... WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw Szpilman WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw Szpilman (December 5, 1911 – July 6, 2000) was a Polish pianist. ... WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw ÅšlebodziÅ„ski (b. ... Karl Kalman Targownik (June 17, 1915 - January 2, 1996) was a psychiatrist and Holocaust survivor. ... Cornelia (Corrie) ten Boom (April 15, 1892 – April 15, 1983) was a Christian Holocaust survivor who helped many Jews escape the Nazis during World War II. Born in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, she was the youngest of three sisters and one brother. ... View of the barracks at Ravensbrück Ravensbrück was a German concentration camp located 90 km north of Berlin. ... WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw Tatarkiewicz WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw Tatarkiewicz (April 3, 1886, Warsaw – April 4, 1980, Warsaw) was a Polish philosopher, historian of philosophy, historian of art, esthetician, and author of works in ethics. ... Brother Theodore Brother Theodore (born 11 November 1906 in Düsseldorf, Germany; died 5 April 2001 in New York City) was a monologuist and comedian known for rambling, stream of consciousness dialogues which he called “stand up tragedy. ... Photograph of Bruno Touschek. ... Jack Tramiel (born 1928) is a businessman, famous for founding Commodore International, manufacturer of the Commodore 64 and Commodore Amiga home computers. ... Commodore is the commonly used name for Commodore International, an electronics company who was a major player in the 1980s home computer field. ... Simone Veil Simone Veil (born Simone Annie Jacob, July 13, 1927) is a French lawyer and politician who currently serves as a member of the Constitutional Council of France. ... Dr. Rudolf Vrba Rudolf Rudi Vrba (11 September 1924 – March 27, 2006) was Professor Emeritus in the Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics at the University of British Columbia in Canada. ... Alfred Wetzler, alias Josef Lanik (1918-199?) was a Slovakian Jew who was one of the few people known to have escaped from the Auschwitz death camp. ... Jean André Wahl (1888 - 1974) was a French philosopher. ... Rabbi David Weiss Halivni is a scholar of Talmud and a Holocaust survivor, originally of Sighet, Hungary. ... Rabbi Chaim Michael Dov Weissmandl (1903-1957) became famous for his tireless efforts to the save the Jews of Slovakia from extermination at Nazi hands during the European Holocaust. ... Elie Wiesel Eliezer Wiesel (commonly known as Elie) (born September 30, 1928) is a Jewish world-renowned novelist, philosopher, humanitarian, political activist, and Holocaust survivor. ... Night Night is an autobiographical novella by Elie Wiesel based on his experience, as a young Jew, of being deported from the village of Sighet in Transylvania to the German death camp at Auschwitz, and later to the concentration camp at Buchenwald. ... Simon Wiesenthal Simon Wiesenthal, KBE, (December 31, 1908 – September 20, 2005) was an Austrian-Jewish architectural engineer who became a Nazi hunter after surviving the Holocaust. ... The term National Socialism has been used in self-description by a number of different political groups and ideologies, some of which have no connection with the Nazis; see National socialism (disambiguation). ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... The Simon Wiesenthal Center The Simon Wiesenthal Center is an international Jewish organization that declares itself to be a human rights group dedicated to preserving the memory of the Holocaust by fostering tolerance and understanding through community involvement, educational outreach and social action. ... Alfred Wetzler, alias Josef Lanik (1918-199?) was a Slovakian Jew who was one of the few people known to have escaped from the Auschwitz death camp. ... Dr. Rudolf Vrba Rudolf Rudi Vrba (11 September 1924 – March 27, 2006) was Professor Emeritus in the Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics at the University of British Columbia in Canada. ... Image:Lustig. ... Schindlers List is an Academy Award-winning 1993 movie based on the book Schindlers Ark by Thomas Keneally, published in the United States as Schindlers List and subsequently re-issued in Commonwealth countries under that name as well. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... Gladiator is a 2000 movie directed by Ridley Scott, and starring Russell Crowe and Joaquin Phoenix. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ...

Parents or ancestor were Holocaust survivors

Péter Frankl (b. ... Shlomo Ganzfried (Solomon ben Joseph Ganzfried; Hungary, 1804 to 1886) was an Orthodox rabbi and posek best known as author of the work of Halakha (Jewish law), the Kitzur Shulkhan Arukh (Hebrew: קיצור שולחן ערוך, Abbreviated Shulkhan Arukh), by which title he is also known. ... The aluminium clad east face of the Imperial War Museum North in Manchester. ... György Sándor Ligeti (born May 28, 1923) is a Jewish Hungarian composer (now living in, and a citizen of, Austria), widely seen as one of the great composers of instrumental music of the 20th century. ... Geddy Lee (30th Anniversary tour photo 2004) Geddy Lee OC (born Gary Lee Weinrib, July 29, 1953) is a Canadian musician who is the vocalist, bassist, and keyboardist for the progressive rock group Rush. ... Rush is a Canadian progressive rock band comprising bassist, keyboardist and vocalist Geddy Lee, guitarist Alex Lifeson, and drummer and lyricist Neil Peart (IPA: ). Rush formed in the summer of 1968, in Willowdale, Ontario (a northern suburb of Toronto) by Lifeson, Lee, and John Rutsey. ... poo ... Bergen-Belsen, sometimes referred to as just Belsen, was a German concentration camp in the Nazi era. ... Natalie Portman Natalie Hershlag (Hebrew: נטלי הרשלג) (born June 9, 1981), better known under her stage name, Natalie Portman (Hebrew :נטלי פורטמן), is an Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning Israeli-American actress. ... Ilan Ramon (Courtesy: NASA) Ilan Ramon (Hebrew: אילן רמון; June 20, 1954 – February 1, 2003) was a combat pilot in the Israeli Air Force and later Israels first astronaut and space shuttle payload specialist of STS-107 (Columbia) who was killed when the craft disintegrated during reentry into the Earths... Space Shuttle Columbia (NASA Orbiter Vehicle Designation: OV-102) was the first space shuttle in NASAs orbital fleet. ... Shuttle debris falling over Texas, on Time cover The Space Shuttle Columbia disaster was the disintegration of the Space Shuttle Columbia over Texas on February 1, 2003, during reentry into the Earths atmosphere on its 28th mission, STS-107. ... Art Spiegelman (born February 15, 1948) is a comics artist, editor and advocate for the medium of comics, best known for his Pulitzer Prize winning comic memoir, Maus. ... The gold medal awarded for Public Service in Journalism The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical compositions. ... A graphic novel (GN) is a long-form comic book, usually with lengthy and complex storylines, and often aimed at more mature audiences. ... Cover Maus: A Survivors Tale is a graphic novel by Art Spiegelman that recounts his fathers struggle to survive the Holocaust as a Polish Jew. ... Henry Winkler as The Fonz in Happy Days. ... Viktor Andriyovych Yushchenko (Ukrainian: Віктор Андрійович Ющенко) (born 23 February 1954) is the President of Ukraine. ...

Fictional people

Binjamin Wilkomirski was a name Bruno Grosjean (born 1941) adopted when he took on the mantle of a Holocaust survivor. ... Magneto (alias Erik Magnus Lehnsherr) is a mutant in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Sonnenschein refers to: Carl Sonnenschein, see German article Edward Adolf Sonnenschein Franz Leopold Sonnenschein, see German article Fred Sonnenschein, see Frank Zander and its de:Frank Zander Hugo Sonnenschein (1889–1953) Simone Sonnenschein, see German article Im Sonnenschein, see German article Wochenend und Sonnenschein Sonnenscheindauer, see German article see... Sunshine is an award winning 1999 film directed, written and produced by István Szabó. It follows three generations of a Jewish family during the changes to Austria-Hungary from the beginning of the 20th century to the period after World War II. The central male protagonist of all three...

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
List of famous Holocaust survivors - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (518 words)
There are many famous Holocaust survivors who survived the Nazi genocides in Europe only to go on to achievements of great fame and notability.
Those listed here are, at the very least, residents of the parts of Europe occupied by the Axis powers during World War II targeted by the Holocaust who survived until the end of the Holocaust and the war.
The majority of these people survived incarceration in the Nazi concentration camps, but this is not strictly necessary for the purposes of this list.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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