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Encyclopedia > List of ethicists
Ethics
Theoretical

Meta-ethics
Normative · Descriptive
Consequentialism
Deontology
Virtue ethics
Ethics of care
Good and evil · Morality Ethics is the branch of axiology – one of the four major branches of philosophy, alongside metaphysics, epistemology, and logic – which attempts to understand the nature of morality; to define that which is right from that which is wrong. ... In philosophy, meta-ethics or analytic ethics [1] is the branch of ethics that seeks to understand the nature of ethical properties, and ethical statements, attitudes, and judgments. ... Normative ethics is the branch of the philosophical study of ethics concerned with classifying actions as right and wrong, as opposed to descriptive ethics. ... Descriptive ethics, also known as comparative ethics, is the study of peoples beliefs about morality. ... Consequentialism refers to those moral theories which hold that the consequences of a particular action form the basis for any valid moral judgment about that action. ... Deontological ethics or deontology (Greek: δέον (deon) meaning obligation or duty) is an approach to ethics that focuses on the rightness or wrongness of actions themselves, as opposed to the rightness or wrongness of the consequences of those actions. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The ethics of care movement is a movement in twentieth century normative ethical theory that is largely inspired by the work of psychologist Carol Gilligan. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Morality (from the Latin manner, character, proper behavior) has three principal meanings. ...

Applied

Bioethics · Medical
Engineering · Environmental
Human rights · Animal rights
Legal · Media
Business · Marketing
Religion · War
Applied ethics takes a theory of ethics, such as utilitarianism, social contract theory, or deontology, and applies its major principles to a particular set of circumstances and practices. ... Bioethics is the ethics of biological science and medicine. ... Medical ethics is primarily a field of applied ethics, the study of moral values and judgments as they apply to medicine. ... Engineering ethics is the field of ethics describing the obligations of those who are professional engineers to their clients or employers, and their obligations to society as a whole. ... Environmental ethics is the part of environmental philosophy which considers the ethical relationship between human beings and the natural environment. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Animal liberation redirects here. ... Legal ethics refers to an ethical code governing those in the practice of law. ... Business ethics is a form of the art of applied ethics that examines ethical principles and moral or ethical problems that can arise in a business environment. ... Marketing ethics is the area of applied ethics which deals with the moral principles behind the operation and regulation of marketing. ... Just War theory is a doctrine of military ethics studied by moral theologians, ethicists and international policy makers which holds that a conflict can and ought to meet the criteria of philosophical, religious or political justice, provided it follows certain conditions. ...

Core issues

Justice · Value
Right · Duty · Virtue
Equality · Freedom · Trust
Free will · Consent
Moral responsibility This article is about the concept of justice. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see Universalism (disambiguation). ... Duty is a term loosely appliedDuty to any action (or course of action) whichDutyDuty is regarded as morally incumbent, apart from personal likes and dislikes or any external compulsion. ... Personification of virtue (Greek ἀρετή) in Celsus Library in Ephesos, Turkey Virtue (Latin virtus; Greek ) is moral excellence of a person. ... Egalitarianism (derived from the French word égal, meaning equal or level) is a political doctrine that holds that all people should be treated as equals from birth. ... For other uses, see Freedom. ... For other uses, see Trust. ... Free-Will is a Japanese independent record label founded in 1986. ... Consent (as a term of jurisprudence) is a possible justification against civil or criminal liability. ... Almanac · Categories · Glossaries · Lists · Overviews · Portals · Questions · Site news · Index Art | Culture | Geography | Health | History | Mathematics | People | Philosophy | Science | Society | Technology Wikipedia is an encyclopedia written by its users in over 200 languages worldwide. ...

Key thinkers

Confucius · Mencius
Aristotle · Aquinas
Hume · Kant
Bentham · Mill
Kierkegaard · Nietzsche
Hare · Rawls  · Nozick Confucius (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kung-fu-tzu), lit. ... Mencius (Romanization; 孟子, pinyin: Mèng Zǐ; Wade-Giles: Meng Tzu; most accepted dates: 372 – 289 BCE; other possible dates: 385 – 303/302 BCE) was a Chinese philosopher who was arguably the most famous Confucian after Confucius himself. ... For other uses, see Aristotle (disambiguation). ... Aquinas redirects here. ... This article is about the philosopher. ... Kant redirects here. ... Jeremy Bentham (IPA: ) (26 February [O.S. 15 February 15] 1748) – June 6, 1832) was an English jurist, philosopher, and legal and social reformer. ... John Stuart Mill (20 May 1806 – 8 May 1873), British philosopher, political economist, civil servant and Member of Parliament, was an influential liberal thinker of the 19th century. ... Søren Aabye Kierkegaard (IPA: , but usually Anglicized as ;  ) 5 May 1813 – 11 November 1855) was a prolific 19th century Danish philosopher and theologian. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) (IPA: ) was a nineteenth-century German philologist and philosopher. ... R.M. Hare Richard Mervyn Hare (March 21, 1919 – January 29, 2002) was an English moral philosopher, who held the post of Whites Professor of Moral Philosophy at the University of Oxford from 1966 until 1983. ... John Rawls (February 21, 1921 – November 24, 2002) was an American philosopher, a professor of political philosophy at Harvard University and author of A Theory of Justice (1971), Political Liberalism, Justice as Fairness: A Restatement, and The Law of Peoples. ... Robert Nozick (November 16, 1938 – January 23, 2002) was an American philosopher and Pellegrino University Professor at Harvard University. ...

Lists

List of ethics topics
List of ethicists To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

This box: view  talk  edit

List of ethicists including religious or political figures recognized by those outside their tradition as having made major contributions to ideas about ethics, or raised major controversies by taking strong positions on previously unexplored problems. For other uses, see Ethics (disambiguation). ...


All are known for an ethical work or problem, but a few are primarily authors or satirists, or known as a mediator, politician, futurist or scientist, rather than as an essayist or philosopher. Some controversial figures are included, some of whom you may see as bad examples. A few are included because their names have become synonymous with certain ethical debates, but only if they personally elaborated an ethical theory justifing their actions. The following are lists of authors and writers: By name A – B – C – D – E – F – G – H – I – J – K – L – M – N – O – P – Q – R – S – T – U – V – W – X – Y – Z By type of writing or genre List of biographers List of childrens literature... List of satirists and satires Below is a list of writers, cartoonists and others known for their involvement in satire - humorous social criticism. ... Mediator may refer to: A neutral party who assists in negotiations and conflict resolution, the process being known as mediation By analogy, someone who channels contact between mortals and divinity; e. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... Future studies reflects on how today’s changes (or the lack thereof) become tomorrow’s reality. ... This article is about the profession. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ...

Contents

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Top of pageSee alsoExternal links

A

Abaelardus and Heloïse surprised by Master Fulbert, by Romanticist painter Jean Vignaud (1819) Pierre Abélard (in English, Peter Abelard) or Abailard (1079 – April 21, 1142) was a French scholastic philosopher. ... John Stevens Cabot Abbott (September 18, 1805 - June 17, 1877), an American writer, was born in Brunswick, Maine, in 1805. ... Mortimer Adler around 1963 Mortimer Jerome Adler (December 28, 1902 – June 28, 2001) was an American aristotelian philosopher and author. ... Aquinas redirects here. ... For other uses, see Ambrose (disambiguation). ... Andronicus of Rhodes (c. ... Gertrude Elizabeth Margaret Anscombe (March 18, 1919 – January 5, 2001) (known as Elizabeth Anscombe, published as G. E. M. Anscombe) was a British analytic philosopher, a theologian and a pupil of Ludwig Wittgenstein. ... For other uses, see Aristotle (disambiguation). ... Aristoxenus (Greek: Ἀριστόξενος) of Tarentum (4th century BC) was a Greek peripatetic philosopher, and writer on music and rhythm. ... This article is about Ashoka, the emperor. ... Augustinus redirects here. ... Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus (called the Wise) (April 26, 121[2] – March 17, 180) was Roman Emperor from 161 to his death in 180. ... (Persian: ابن سينا) (c. ...

B

Franz Xaver von Baader (March 27, 1765 – May 23, 1841), was a German philosopher and theologian. ... For other persons named Francis Bacon, see Francis Bacon (disambiguation). ... Samuel Bailey (1791-1870), British philosopher and author, was born at Sheffield in 1791. ... Friedrich Eduard Beneke (February 17, 1798 - 1854), was a German psychologist. ... Jeremy Bentham (IPA: ) (26 February [O.S. 15 February 15] 1748) – June 6, 1832) was an English jurist, philosopher, and legal and social reformer. ... Reverend Fr. ... Maurice Blanchot (September 27, 1907-February 20, 2003) was a French philosopher, literary theorist and writer of fiction. ... Dietrich Bonhoeffer [] (February 4, 1906 – April 9, 1945) was a German Lutheran pastor, theologian, participant in the German Resistance movement against Nazism, and a founding member of the Confessing Church. ... Not to be confused with George Boolos. ... Nathan Braun is a Canadian author and activist in the vegetarian movement. ... Martin Buber (8 February 1878 – 13 June 1965) was an Austrian-Israeli-Jewish philosopher, translator, and educator, whose work centered on theistic ideals of religious consciousness, interpersonal relations, and community. ... Siddhartha and Gautama redirect here. ... Mario Augusto Bunge (born September 21, 1919, Buenos Aires) is an Argentinian philosopher and physicist mainly active in Canada. ...

C

Confucius (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kung-fu-tzu), lit. ... Randy Cohen is a U.S. writer and humorist now best known as the author of The Ethicist, a column originating in The New York Times Magazine and syndicated throughout the U.S. and Canada. ...

D

Professor Sir Partha Dasgupta, FBA, FRS, is the Frank Ramsey Professor of Economics at the University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, and a fellow of St Johns College, Cambridge. ... Abraham ben David was a Jewish, French commentator on the Talmud. ... Hugo de Garis (born 1947, Sydney, Australia) became an associate professor of computer science at Utah State University. ... There is more than one Philip Doddridge important to history: Philip Doddridge (Nonconformist) Philip Doddridge (Virginia) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Elliot N. Dorff (born 24 June 1943) is a Conservative rabbi, a professor of Jewish theology at the University of Judaism in California (where he is also Rector), author, and a bio-ethicist. ... Ronald Dworkin (born 1931) is an American legal philosopher, and currently professor of Jurisprudence at University College London and the New York University School of Law. ...

E

Epicure redirects here. ... Rudolf Eucken Rudolf Christoph Eucken (January 5, 1846 - September 15, 1926) was a frisian philosopher, and the winner of the 1908 Nobel Prize for Literature. ...

F

Johann Albert Fabricius (November 11, 1668 - April 30, 1736), was a German classical scholar and bibliographer. ... Ismail Raji Al-Faruqi Ismail Raji al-Faruqi (January 1, 1921 – May 27, 1986), renowned Palestinian-American philosopher who is widely recognized as an authority on Islam and comparative religion. ... Nosson Zvi (Nota Hirsh) Finkel (1849-1927), was born in Lithuania and died in the British Mandate of Palestine. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Owen Flanagan, Ph. ... Joseph Fletcher (1905-1991) was an American professor who founded the theory of situational ethics in the 1960s, and was a pioneer in the field of bioethics. ... Philippa Ruth Foot (1920-), born in Bosanquet, is a British philosopher, most notable for her works in ethics. ... William Klass Frankena (June 21, 1908, Manhattan, Montana - October 22, 1994, Ann Arbor, Michigan) was an American philosopher, professor and chair of philosophy at the University of Michigan, and author of several introductory textbooks on moral philosophy and the philosophy of education. ... Alexander Campbell Fraser (September 3, 1819 _ 1914) was a Scottish philosopher. ... R. Edward Freeman (December 18, 1951 - ) is an American economist and professor of business administration at the Darden School of the University of Virginia; he has also taught at the University of Minnesota and the Wharton School. ... Erich Fromm Erich Pinchas Fromm (March 23, 1900 – March 18, 1980) was an internationally renowned Jewish-German-American social psychologist, psychoanalyst, and humanistic philosopher. ...

G

Raimond Gaita (born 1946) is Professor of Philosophy at the Australian Catholic University and Kings College London. ... Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (October 2, 1869 – January 30, 1948) (Devanagari: मोहनदास करमचन्द गांधी), called Mahatma Gandhi, was the charismatic leader who brought the cause of Indias independence from British colonial rule to world attention. ... Abu Hamid Muhammad ibn Muhammad al-Ghazali (born 1058 in Tus, Khorasan province of Persia, modern day Iran, died 1111, Tus) was a Persian Muslim theologian and philosopher, known as Algazel to the western medieval world. ... Allan Gibbard (b. ... Carol Gilligan (1936– ) is an American feminist, ethicist, and psychologist best known for her work with and against Lawrence Kohlberg on ethical community and ethical relationships, and certain subject-object problems in ethics. ... Peter Goldie is a British philosopher working mainly on ethics and aesthetics. ... Victor Gollancz (April 9, 1893–February 8, 1967) was a British publisher, socialist, and humanitarian. ... &t:For the actor Thomas Hill see Thomas Hill. ... Stanley Grenz Stanley James Grenz (January 7, 1950 Alpene MI _ March 11, 2005) was an American Christian theologian and ethicist in the Baptist tradition. ... Hugo Grotius (Huig de Groot, or Hugo de Groot; Delft, 10 April 1583 – Rostock, 28 August 1645) worked as a jurist in the Dutch Republic and laid the foundations for international law, based on natural law. ... Tenzin Gyatso is the fourteenth and current Dalai Lama. ... This article is about the Dalai Lama lineage. ...

H

For the computer game, see Hamurabi. ... R.M. Hare Richard Mervyn Hare (March 21, 1919 – January 29, 2002) was an English moral philosopher, who held the post of Whites Professor of Moral Philosophy at the University of Oxford from 1966 until 1983. ... John Charles Harsanyi (Hungarian: Harsányi János) (born May 29, 1920 in Budapest, Hungary; died August 9, 2000 in Berkeley, California, United States) was a Hungarian- Australian-American economist and Nobel Laureate. ... Robert Schirokauer Hartman (January 27, 1910 - September 20, 1973) was a logician and philosopher. ... Stanley Hauerwas (b. ... Henry Hazlitt (November 28, 1894 - July 8, 1993) was a libertarian philosopher, economist and journalist for The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, and Newsweek, among other publications. ... Paul Hawken is an environmentalist, entrepreneur, journalist, and best-selling author. ... Erich Heller (March 27, 1911 — November 5, 1990); British essayist; one of the most important twentieth-century thinkers on the human condition. ... Claude Adrien Helvétius (February 26, 1715 - December 26, 1771) was a French philosopher and litterateur. ... Frank Patrick Herbert (October 8, 1920 – February 11, 1986) was a critically acclaimed and commercially successful American science fiction author. ... Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel (January 11, 1907, Warsaw, Poland – December 23, 1972) was considered by many to be one of the most significant Jewish theologians of the 20th century. ... Hierocles of Alexandria, Neoplatonist writer, flourished c. ... James Hinton (1822 - December 16, 1875) was an English surgeon and author. ... Wau Holland, ca. ... Hans-Hermann Hoppe (born September 2, 1949) is an Austrian school economist, an anarcho-capitalist (libertarian) philosopher, and a professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. ... This article is about the philosopher. ... Patrick Hunout is a researcher and policymaker who in 1999 created The International Scope Review, one of the largest peer-reviewed academic journals in the economic and social sciences. ... John Peters Humphrey (April 30, 1905 – May 14, 1995) was a Canadian legal scholar, jurist, and human rights advocate. ... The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (also UDHR) is a declaration adopted by the United Nations General Assembly (A/RES/217, December 10, 1948), outlining basic human rights. ... Francis Hutcheson was the name of a famous father and son: Francis Hutcheson (philosopher) (1694-1746) Francis Hutcheson (songwriter) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Thomas Henry Huxley PC, FRS (4 May 1825 Ealing – 29 June 1895 Eastbourne, Sussex) was an English biologist, known as Darwins Bulldog for his advocacy of Charles Darwins theory of evolution. ...

I

Lauri Ingman (1868-1934) was a Finnish theologian, clergyman and politician. ... Alija Izetbegovic, former president of Bosnia and Herzegovina Alija Izetbegović (August 8, 1925 _ October 19, 2003) was a Bosnian Muslim activist, philosopher, and politician, president of Bosnia and Herzegovina from 1990 to 1996 and member of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina from 1996 to 2000, and author of...

J

Jane Jacobs, OC, O.Ont (May 4, 1916 – April 25, 2006) was an American-born Canadian urbanist, writer and activist. ... Paul Janet (April 30, 1823 - October 1899) was a French philosopher and writer. ... Francis Jeffrey, Lord Jeffrey (October 23, 1773 - January 26, 1850) was a Scottish judge and literary critic. ... Théodore Simon Jouffroy (July 6, 1796 - February 4, 1842) was a French philosopher. ...

K

Kant redirects here. ... Rushworth M. Kidder founded the Institute for Global Ethics in 1990, and is the author of Moral Courage and How Good People Make Tough Choices: Resolving the Dilemmas of Ethical Living. ... Søren Aabye Kierkegaard (IPA: , but usually Anglicized as ;  ) 5 May 1813 – 11 November 1855) was a prolific 19th century Danish philosopher and theologian. ... Israel Meir Kirzner (Yisroel Mayer Kirzner) (born February 13, 1930) is a leading economist in the Austrian School. ... Lawrence Kohlberg (October 25, 1927 – January 19, 1987) was an American psychologist. ... Chris Marion Korsgaard is a professor at Harvard University. ... Dr. David C. Korten is an author and leader within the anti-globalization movement. ... Prince Peter (Pyotr) Alexeyevich Kropotkin (Russian: ) (December 9, 1842–February 8, 1921) was one of Russias foremost anarchists and one of the first advocates of anarchist communism: the model of society he advocated for most of his life was that of a communalist society free from central government. ... The Reverend Father Hans Küng (born March 19, 1928 in Sursee, Canton of Lucerne), is an eminent Swiss theologian, and a prolific author. ...

L

Aldo Leopold (January 11, 1887 - April 21, 1948) was a United States ecologist, forester, and environmentalist. ... Emmanuel Levinas (January 12, 1906 - December 25, 1995) was a Jewish philosopher originally from Kaunas in Lithuania, who moved to France where he wrote most of his works in French. ... For other persons named John Locke, see John Locke (disambiguation). ... Moshe Chaim Luzzatto (also Moses Chaim, Moses Hayyim, also Luzzato) (1707-1746), also known by the Hebrew acronym as the RAMCHAL (also RAMHAL), was a prominent Italian Jewish rabbi, mystic, and philosopher best remembered today for his ethical treatise Mesillat Yesharim (Path of the Just). ...

M

Machiavelli redirects here. ... For other people named John Mackie, see John Mackie. ... Mao redirects here. ... Marcion of Sinope (ca. ... James Martineau (April 21, 1805 - January 11, 1900) was an English philosopher. ... John Henry McDowell (born 1942) is a contemporary philosopher, formerly a fellow of University College, Oxford and now University Professor at the University of Pittsburgh. ... Donella Dana Meadows (March 13, 1941 Elgin, Illinois, USA - February 20, 2001, New Hampshire) was a pioneering environmental scientist, a teacher and writer. ... Sir Peter Brian Medawar (February 28, 1915 – October 2, 1987) was a Brazilian-born English scientist best known for his work on how the immune system rejects or accepts organ transplants. ... Mencius (Romanization; 孟子, pinyin: Mèng Zǐ; Wade-Giles: Meng Tzu; most accepted dates: 372 – 289 BCE; other possible dates: 385 – 303/302 BCE) was a Chinese philosopher who was arguably the most famous Confucian after Confucius himself. ... Menedemus, (c. ... Fatima Mernissi is a contemporary Moroccan feminist writer. ... James Mill James Mill (April 6, 1773 - June 23, 1836), Scottish historian, economist and philosopher, was born at Northwater Bridge, in the parish of Logie-Pert, Angus, Scotland, the son of James Mill, a shoemaker. ... John Stuart Mill (20 May 1806 – 8 May 1873), British philosopher, political economist, civil servant and Member of Parliament, was an influential liberal thinker of the 19th century. ... Carol Moore is an ethicist and systems theorist best known for her theories of secession and her analysis of Mahatma Gandhis methods as an intuitive systems theorist. She is considered an influential critic of globalization; Although not widely read or followed in the protest-oriented wing of the anti_globalization... George Edward Moore George Edward Moore, also known as G.E. Moore, (November 4, 1873 - October 24, 1958) was a distinguished and hugely influential English philosopher who was educated and taught at the University of Cambridge. ...

N

Thomas Nagel (born July 4, 1937, in Belgrade, Serbia) is University Professor of Philosophy and Law at New York University and member of the Board of Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica. ... Nasr is an internationally acclaimed scholar [1]. Seyyed Hossein Nasr, (Persian: سيد حسين نصر) A lifelong student and follower of Frithjof Schuon, Persian philosopher and renowned scholar of comparative religion, is a prominent authority in the fields of Islamic esoterism, sufism, philosophy of science, and metaphysics. ... Helmut Richard Niebuhr (1894-1962) was an American Christian ethicist best known for his 1951 book Christ and Culture and his 1960 book Radical Monotheism and Western Culture. ... Karl Paul Reinhold Niebuhr (June 21, 1892 – June 1, 1971) was a Protestant theologian best known for his study of the task of relating the Christian faith to the reality of modern politics and diplomacy. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) (IPA: ) was a nineteenth-century German philologist and philosopher. ... Carlos Santiago Ninor (1943-1993) was an Argentine moral, legal and political philosopher. ... Karl Immanuel Nitzsch (September 21, 1787 - August 21, 1868), was a Lutheran church leader. ... David Lloyd Norton (March 27, 1930- July 24, 1995) was an American philosopher. ... Robert Nozick (November 16, 1938 – January 23, 2002) was an American philosopher and Pellegrino University Professor at Harvard University. ... Martha Nussbaum Martha Nussbaum (born Martha Craven on May 6, 1947) is an American philosopher with a particular interest in ancient Greek and Roman philosophy, political philosophy and ethics. ...

O

John Cardinal OConnor John Joseph Cardinal OConnor, (January 15, 1920 – May 3, 2000) was the eleventh bishop (eighth archbishop) of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, serving from 1984 until his death in 2000. ... Onora Sylvia ONeill, Baroness ONeill of Bengarve CBE (born 23 August 1941) is a cross-bench member of the House of Lords. ...

P

Blaise Pascal (pronounced ), (June 20 [[1624 // ]] – August 19, 1662) was a French mathematician, physicist, and religious philosopher. ... Bahya ibn Paquda (also: Pakuda) Full name: Bahya ben Joseph ibn Pakuda, known to Talmud scholars (in Hebrew) as the Rabbeinu Bechaya (Our Rabbi Behaya), was a Jewish philosopher and rabbi who lived at Saragossa, Spain, in the first half of the eleventh century. ... Derek Parfit (born December 11, 1942) is a British philosopher who specializes in problems of personal identity, rationality and ethics, and the relations between them. ... Craig Paterson (born 2 October 1959) is a former Scottish footballer who played for Hibernian, Rangers and Motherwell. ... Philip Pettit - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Philo (20 BC - 50 AD), known also as Philo of Alexandria and as Philo Judaeus And as Yedidia, was a Hellenized Jewish philosopher born in Alexandria, Egypt. ... For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... Richard Price (February 23, 1723 – April 19, 1791), was a Welsh moral and political philosopher. ... Prodicus of Ceos (Πρόδικος Pródikos, born c. ...

Q

Marcus Fabius Quintilianus (c. ...

R

Fazlur Rahman Malik (Urdu: فضل الرحمان ملک) (September 21, 1919 – July 26, 1988) was a well-known scholar of Islam; M. Yahya Birt of the Association of Islam Researchers described him as probably the most learned of the major Muslim thinkers in the second-half of the twentieth century, in terms of both... Ayn Rand (IPA: , February 2 [O.S. January 20] 1905 – March 6, 1982), born Alisa Zinovyevna Rosenbaum (Russian: ), was a Russian-born American novelist and philosopher. ... John Rawls (February 21, 1921 – November 24, 2002) was an American philosopher, a professor of political philosophy at Harvard University and author of A Theory of Justice (1971), Political Liberalism, Justice as Fairness: A Restatement, and The Law of Peoples. ... The Right Honourable Martin John Rees, Baron Rees of Ludlow, FRS (born 23 June 1942) is a professor of astronomy. ... George Croom Robertson (March 10, 1842 - 1892) was a Scottish philosopher. ... W. D. Ross was a philosopher, known for work in ethics. ... Murray Newton Rothbard (March 2, 1926 – January 7, 1995) was an influential American economist, historian and natural law theorist belonging to the Austrian School of Economics who helped define modern libertarianism. ... Rousseau redirects here. ... Upper: Steel-plate engraving of Ruskin as a young man, made circa 1845, scanned from print made circa 1895. ... Bertrand Arthur William Russell, 3rd Earl Russell, OM, FRS, (18 May 1872 – 2 February 1970), was a British philosopher, logician, mathematician, advocate for social reform, and pacifist. ...

S

Portrait of the Marquis de Sade by Charles-Amédée-Philippe van Loo (c. ... Edward Wadie Saïd, Arabic: , , (1 November 1935 – 25 September 2003) was a Palestinian-American literary theorist and Palestinian activist. ... The Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (Hindi: , English: ), also known as the Sangh or the RSS, is a Hindu nationalist organization in India. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Image:Bigphotojonralstonsaulcc. ... Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (born 1956-12-10 in Boston, Massachusetts) is a philosopher who works in moral theory, meta-ethics, the history of ethics, and epistemology and has written extensively in these areas. ... Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, D.H.L., Hebrew Union College, Cincinnati; Brooklyn Chabad Ordination 1947. ... Friedrich Schiller “Schiller” redirects here. ... Friedrich Daniel Ernst Schleiermacher Friedrich Daniel Ernst Schleiermacher (IPA [ˈʃlaɪəmaxÉ™]) (November 21, 1768 – February 12, 1834) was a German theologian and philosopher known for his impressive attempt to reconcile the criticisms of the Enlightenment with traditional Protestant orthodoxy. ... Karl Wilhelm Friedrich von Schlegel (March 10, 1772 - January 11, 1829), German poet, critic and scholar, was the younger brother of August Wilhelm von Schlegel. ... Moritz Schlick around 1930 Moritz Schlick ( )(April 14, 1882–June 22, 1936) was a German philosopher and the founding father of logical positivism and the Vienna Circle. ... Frank Schmalleger is the director of the Justice Research Association. ... Arthur Schopenhauer (February 22, 1788 – September 21, 1860) was a German philosopher best known for his work The World as Will and Representation. ... Albert Schweitzer, M.D., OM, (January 14, 1875 – September 4, 1965), was an Alsatian theologian, musician, philosopher, and physician. ... Amartya Kumar Sen CH (Hon) (Bengali: Ômorto Kumar Shen) (born 3 November 1933), is an Indian economist, philosopher, and a winner of the Bank of Sweden Prize in Economic Sciences (Nobel Prize for Economics) in 1998, for his contributions to welfare economics for his work on famine, human development theory... Lucius Annaeus Seneca (often known simply as Seneca, or Seneca the Younger) (c. ... Russ Shafer-Landau (born 1963) is a professor of Philosophy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... Henry Sidgwick Henry Sidgwick (May 31, 1838–August 28, 1900) was an English philosopher. ... Georg Simmel Georg Simmel (March 1, 1858 – September 28, 1918, Berlin, Germany) was one of the first generation of German sociologists. ... For other persons named Peter Singer, see Peter Singer (disambiguation). ... Burrhus Frederic Skinner (March 20, 1904 – August 18, 1990), Ph. ... John Jameison Carswell Smart, or Jack Smart, (born 1920, M.A. (Glasgow, 1946), B.Phil (Oxford, 1948)) is a Scottish-Australian philosopher. ... For other persons named Adam Smith, see Adam Smith (disambiguation). ... Margaret Anne Ganley Somerville, AM, FRSC (born April 13, 1942) is an Australian/Canadian ethicist and academic. ... Baruch de Spinoza (‎, Portuguese: , Basque: , Latin: ) (November 24, 1632 – February 21, 1677) was a Dutch philosopher of Portuguese Jewish origin. ... John Shelby Spong (born 16 June 1931 in Charlotte, North Carolina, U.S.) is the retired Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Newark (based in Newark, New Jersey). ... Charles Leslie Stevenson (1908-1979) was an American philosopher primarily concerned with ethics, philosophy of language, and meaning. ... Dugald Stewart. ... Joannes Stobaeus, so called from his native place Stobi in Macedonia, was the compiler of a valuable series of extracts from Greek authors. ... Jeffrey Stout is a writer, an ethicist, and a scholar of religion. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Sir Leslie Stephen (November 28, 1832 – February 22, 1904) was an English author and critic, the father of two famous daughters, Virginia Woolf and Vanessa Bell. ... David Friedrich Strauss (January 27, 1808 - February 8, 1874), was a German theologian and writer. ... Dr. Sun Yat-sen Traditional Chinese: 孫中山; Pinyin: SÅ«n Zhōngshān; or Sun Yixian (Pinyin: SÅ«n Yìxiān) (November 12, 1866 – March 12, 1925) was a Chinese revolutionary and political leader often referred to as the father of modern China. Sun played an instrumental role in the...

T

Jenny Teichman is an Australian/British philosopher, writing mostly on ethics. ... Judith Jarvis Thomson (born 1929) is an American moral philosopher and metaphysician. ... Paul Johannes Tillich (August 20, 1886 – October 22, 1965) was a German-American theologian and Christian existentialist philosopher. ... Xunzi Xún Zǐ (荀子, or Hsün Tzu c. ...

U to Z

Johann Georg Walch (June 17, 1693 - January 13, 1775), was a German theologian. ... William George Ward (March 21, 1812 - July 6, 1882), was an English Roman Catholic theologian, whose career illustrates the development of religious opinion at a time of crisis in the history of English religious thought. ... Otto Weininger (April 3, 1880 – October 4, 1903) was an Austrian philosopher. ... William Whewell In later life William Whewell (May 24, 1794 – March 6, 1866) was an English polymath, scientist, Anglican priest, philosopher, theologian, and historian of science. ... Philip Wicksteed (October 25, 1844 - March 18, 1927) was an English economist closely associated with the Austrian School. ... Susan Wolf is an ethical philosopher. ... Christian Wolff (less correctly Wolf; also known as Wolfius) (January 24, 1679 - April 9, 1754) was a German philosopher. ... William Wollaston (1659-1724), English philosophical writer, was born at Coton-Clanford in Staffordshire, on March 26 1659. ... Xenocrates of Chalcedon (396 - 314 BC) was a Greek philosopher and scholarch or rector of the Academy from 339 to 314 BC. Removing to Athens in early youth, he became the pupil of the Socratic Aeschines, but presently joined himself to Plato, whom he attended to Sicily in 361. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Theodor Zwinger (August 2, 1533 - March 10, 1588), was a Swiss scholar. ...

See also

This is an alphabetical list of notable economists, that is, experts in the social science of economics. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... This is a list of notable political scientists. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ethicist - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (305 words)
An ethicist is one whose judgement on ethics and ethical codes has come to be trusted by some community, and (importantly) is expressed in some way that makes it possible for others to mimic or approximate that judgement.
The term jurist describes an ethicist whose judgement on law becomes part of a legal code, or otherwise has force of law.
The list of ethicists demonstrates the extreme range of people who have made, or contributed to, ethical debates.
List of ethics topics - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (527 words)
This list of ethics topics puts articles relevant to well-known ethical (right and wrong, good and bad) debates and decisions in one place - including practical problems long known in philosophy, and the more abstract subjects in law, politics, and some professions and sciences.
It lists also those core concepts essential to understanding ethics as applied in various religions, some movements derived from religions, and religions discussed as if they were a theory of ethics making no special claim to divine status.
The list also includes articles on non-ethics topics or fictional works or part of works that include a substantial ethical debate; These are fairly obviously distinguished from ethical concepts by name alone.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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