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Encyclopedia > List of computer term etymologies

This is a list of the origins of computer-related terms (i.e. a list of computer term etymologies). It relates to both computer hardware and computer software. Etymology is the study of the origins of words. ... Computer hardware is the physical part of a computer, including the digital circuitry, as distinguished from the computer software that executes within the hardware. ... A screenshot of computer software running in Windows XP. Software fundamentally is the unique image or representation of physical or material alignment that constitutes configuration to or functional identity of a machine, usually a computer. ...


Names of many computer terms, especially computer applications, often relate to the function they perform, e.g., a compiler is an application that compiles (programming language source code into the computer's machine language). There are other terms however whose history would indicate that it had less to do with the functionality, and hence are of etymological value. This article lists such terms. A diagram of the operation of a typical multi-language compiler. ... Source code (commonly just source or code) is any series of statements written in some human-readable computer programming language. ... A system of codes directly understandable by a computers CPU is termed this CPUs native or machine language. ...


For a list of the origins of names of computer companies see List of company name etymologies. For a complete list of etymological topics see Lists of etymologies. This is a list of company names with their name origins explained. ... This is a list of etymological lists. ...


A - B - C - D - F - G - H - K - L - M - N - O - P - R - S - T - V - W - Z


A

  • ABEND - this term is short for abnormal end, and refers to a program stopping prematurely due to a bug. It is more commonly associated with mainframe programs, as this is its origin. Another purported origin of the term is that ABEND is called "abend" because it is what system operators do to the computer late on Friday when they want to call it a day, and hence is from the German word "Abend" meaning "Evening". This is untrue.
Originally this name was chosen by an author just because it was a catchy name. Soon enough, it was suggested that the name was indeed appropriate, because its founders got started by applying patches to code written for NCSA's httpd daemon. The result was "a patchy" server.
  • awk - a computer pattern/action language, name made up of the surnames of its authors Alfred V. Aho, Peter J. Weinberger, and Brian W. Kernighan

An ABEND (or abnormal end or abend) is an abnormal termination of software, a Crash or lossage. ... The terms computer program, software program, applications program, system software, or just program are used to refer to either an executable program by both lay people and computer programmers or the collection of source code from which an executable program is created (eg, compiled). ... A computer bug is an error, flaw, mistake, failure, or fault in a computer program that prevents it from working as intended, or produces an incorrect result. ... Ada is a structured, statically typed imperative computer programming language designed by a team led by Jean Ichbiah of CII Honeywell Bull during 1977–1983. ... Ada Lovelace Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace (December 10, 1815 – November 27, 1852) is mainly known for having written a description of Charles Babbages early mechanical general-purpose computer, the analytical engine. ... Apache HTTP Server is a free software/open source web server for Unix-like systems, Microsoft Windows, Novell NetWare and other platforms. ... The Apache Software Foundation (ASF) is a non-profit corporation (classified as 501(c)3 in the United States) to support Apache software projects, including the Apache HTTP Server. ... In computing, a patch is a small piece of software designed to update or fix problems with a computer program. ... The Beckman Institute, current Headquarters of the NCSA The National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) is one of the five original centers in the National Science Foundations Supercomputer Centers Program and a unit of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. ... The NCSA HTTPd was a web server originally developed at the NCSA by Robert McCool and a list of others. ... In Unix and other computer multitasking operating systems, a daemon is a computer program that runs in the background, rather than under the direct control of a user; they are usually instantiated as processes. ... AWK is a general purpose computer language that is designed for processing text based data, either in files or data streams. ... Dr. Alfred V. Aho is a computer scientist. ... Peter J. Weinberger is a computer scientist who worked at AT&T Bell Labs and contributed to the design of the pioneering AWK programming language (he is the W in AWK). ... Brian Kernighan¹ (born 1942) is a computer scientist who worked at the Bell Labs and contributed to the design of the pioneering AWK and AMPL programming languages. ...

B

  • Bon programming language - Bon was created by Ken Thompson and named after his wife Bonnie. However according to an encyclopedia quotation in Bon's manual, it was named after a religion whose rituals involve the murmuring of magic formulas. [2]
  • booting or bootstrapping - The term booting or bootstrapping a computer was inspired by the story of the Baron Munchhausen where he pulls himself out of a swamp by the straps on his boots.
The term is often (but erroneously) credited to Grace Hopper. In 1946, she joined the Harvard Faculty at the Computation Laboratory where she traced an error in the Harvard Mark II to a moth trapped in a relay. This bug was carefully removed and taped to the log book. (See picture).
However, use of the word "bug" to describe defects in mechanical systems dates back to at least the 1870s. Thomas Edison, for one, used the term in his notebooks.
  • byte - the term was coined by Werner Buchholz in 1956 during the early design phase for the IBM Stretch computer. It was coined by mutating the word bite so it would not be accidentally misspelled as bit.

B was the name of a programming language developed at Bell Labs. ... Ken Thompson Kenneth Thompson (born February 4, 1943) is a pioneer of computer science notable for his contributions to the development of the C programming language and the UNIX operating system. ... BCPL (Basic Combined Programming Language) is a computer programming language that was designed by Martin Richards of the University of Cambridge (1966) as a response to difficulties with its predecessor CPL during the 1960s. ... BIT is an acronym for: Bangalore Institute of Technology Bilateral Investment Treaty Bhilai Institute of Technology - Durg Birla Institute of Technology - Mesra Battles in Time (Doctor Who magazine) Category: ... Claude Elwood Shannon (April 30, 1916 - February 24, 2001) has been called the father of information theory, and was the founder of practical digital circuit design theory. ... Look up Portmanteau word in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The binary numeral system (base 2 numerals) represents numeric values using two symbols, typically 0 and 1. ... In mathematics and computer science, a numerical digit is a symbol, e. ... John Wilder Tukey (June 16, 1915 - July 26, 2000) was a statistician. ... Bon was a programming language created by Ken Thompson while he worked on the MULTICS operating system. ... An Internet payphone loading Windows XP In computing, booting is a bootstrapping process that starts operating systems when the user turns on a computer system. ... Look up bootstrapping in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Dorés caricature of Münchhausen Karl Friedrich Hieronymus, Freiherr von Münchhausen (11 May 1720 – 22 February 1797) was a German baron who in his youth was sent to serve as page to Anthony Ulrich II, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg and later joined the Russian military. ... A computer bug is an error, flaw, mistake, failure, or fault in a computer program that prevents it from working as intended, or produces an incorrect result. ... The terms computer program, software program, applications program, system software, or just program are used to refer to either an executable program by both lay people and computer programmers or the collection of source code from which an executable program is created (eg, compiled). ... Grace Hopper Rear Admiral Grace Murray Hopper (December 9, 1906 – January 1, 1992) was an American computer scientist and naval officer. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... The Harvard Mark II was an electromechanical computer built at Harvard University under the direction of Howard Aiken and was finished in 1947. ... A moth is an insect closely related to the butterfly. ... Automotive style miniature relay A relay is an electrical switch that opens and closes under control of another electrical circuit. ... Download high resolution version (740x615, 93 KB)Photo of first Computer bug, public domain image from US Navy. ... // Events and Trends Technology The invention of the telephone (1876) by Alexander Graham Bell. ... Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847 – October 18, 1931) was an American inventor and businessman who developed many devices which greatly influenced life in the 20th century. ... A byte is commonly used as a unit of storage measurement in computers, regardless of the type of data being stored. ... The IBM 7030, also known as Stretch, was IBMs first attempt at building a supercomputer. ...

C

C++ creator Bjarne Stroustrup called his new language "C with Classes" and then "new C". Because of which the original C began to be called "old C" which was considered insulting to the C community. At this time Rick Mascitti suggested the name C++ as a successor to C. In C the '++' operator increments the value of the variable it is appended to, thus C++ would increment the value of C.
  • Cookie - A packet of information that travels between a browser and the web server.
The term was coined by web browser programmer Lou Montulli after the term "magic cookies" used by Unix programmers.

Wikibooks has a book on the topic of C Programming The C programming language (often, just C) is a general-purpose, procedural, imperative computer programming language developed in the early 1970s by Dennis Ritchie for use on the Unix operating system. ... B was the name of a programming language developed at Bell Labs. ... C++ (generally pronounced /si plÊŒs plÊŒs/) is a general-purpose, high-level programming language with low-level facilities. ... Object-oriented programming (OOP) is a computer programming paradigm in which a software system is modeled as a set of objects that interact with each other. ... Wikibooks has a book on the topic of C Programming The C programming language (often, just C) is a general-purpose, procedural, imperative computer programming language developed in the early 1970s by Dennis Ritchie for use on the Unix operating system. ... In computer science and mathematics, a variable (sometimes called a pronumeral) is a symbol denoting a quantity or symbolic representation. ... An HTTP cookie, or a Web cookie, is a parcel of text sent by a server to a web browser and then sent back unchanged by the browser each time it accesses that server. ... Icons for Web browser shortcuts on an Apple computer (Safari, Internet Explorer, and Firefox). ... Lou Montulli is a programmer who is well known for his work in producing web browsers. ... In computer programming, a magic cookie or cookie is a token or short packet of data passed between communicating programs, where the data is typically not meaningful to the recipient program. ... Unix or UNIX is a computer operating system originally developed in the 1960s and 1970s by a group of AT&T Bell Labs employees including Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, and Douglas McIlroy. ...

D - F

  • Daemon - a process in an operating system that runs in the background.
It is falsely considered an acronym for Disk And Execution MONitor. According to the original team that introduced the concept, "the use of the word daemon was inspired by the Maxwell's daemon of physics and thermodynamics (an imaginary agent which helped sort molecules of different speeds and worked tirelessly in the background)" [3]. The earliest use appears to have been in the phrase "daemon of Socrates", which meant his "guiding or indwelling spirit; his genius", also a pre-Christian equivalent of the "Guardian Angel", or, alternatively, a demigod (bearing only an etymological connection to the word "demon"). The term was embraced, and possibly popularized, by the Unix operating systems: various local (and later Internet) services were provided by daemons. This is exemplified by the BSD mascot, John Lasseter's drawing of a friendly imp (copyright Marshall Kirk McKusick). Thus, a daemon is something that works magically without anyone being much aware of it.
  • finger - Unix command that provides information about users logged into a system
Les Earnest wrote the finger program in 1971 to solve the need of users who wanted information on other users of the network. Prior to the finger program, the only way to get this information was with a who program that showed IDs and terminal line numbers for logged-in users, and people used to run their fingers down the "who" list. Earnest named his program after this concept.

In Unix and other computer multitasking operating systems, a daemon is a computer program that runs in the background, rather than under the direct control of a user; they are usually instantiated as processes. ... James Clerk Maxwell (13 June 1831 – 5 November 1879) was a Scottish mathematical physicist, born in Edinburgh. ... Unix or UNIX is a computer operating system originally developed in the 1960s and 1970s by a group of AT&T Bell Labs employees including Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, and Douglas McIlroy. ... Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD, sometimes called Berkeley Unix) is the Unix derivative distributed by the University of California, Berkeley starting in the 1970s. ... John A. Lasseter (born January 12, 1957 in Hollywood, California) is an American animator and the chief creative officer at Pixar Animation Studios and Walt Disney Feature Animation. ... IMP may be a word: Imp, a fantasy creature. ... Marshall Kirk McKusick (b. ... Debian, organized by the Debian Project, is a widely used distribution of free software developed through the collaboration of volunteers from around the world. ... A Linux distribution is a Unix-like operating system comprising the Linux kernel and other assorted free software/open-source software, and possibly proprietary software. ... Look up Portmanteau word in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Ian Murdock is the founder of the Debian project and the commercial Progeny Debian distribution. ... This article is about the text editor. ... Notepad is the standard text editor for Microsoft Windows A text editor is a piece of computer software for editing plain text. ... In computer networking, the Name/Finger protocol and the Finger user information protocol are simple network protocols for the exchange of human-oriented status and user information. ... Unix or UNIX is a computer operating system originally developed in the 1960s and 1970s by a group of AT&T Bell Labs employees including Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, and Douglas McIlroy. ... Lester Donald Earnest was born in the United States on December 17, 1930. ... who is a Unix-command which creates almost the same output as the Unix-command w; it shows you users currently logged in a system. ... Foobar is a common placeholder name used in computer programming. ... Look up FUBAR in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

G

Gnu is also a species of African antelope. Founder of the GNU project Richard Stallman liked the name because of the humour associated with its pronunciation and was also influenced by the song The Gnu Song [4], by Flanders and Swann which is a song sung by a gnu. Also it fitted into the recursive acronym culture with "GNU's Not Unix".
  • Google - search engine on the web.
The name started as a jokey boast about the amount of information the search-engine would be able to search. It was originally named 'Googol', a word for the number represented by 1 followed by 100 zeros. The word was originally invented by Milton Sirotta, nephew of mathematician Edward Kasner in 1938 during a discussion of large numbers and exponential notation. After the founders, Stanford grad students Sergey Brin and Larry Page, presented their project to an investor, they received a cheque made out to 'Google' !
  • Gopher - a distributed document search and retrieval network protocol on the internet
The source of the name is claimed to be three-fold: first, that it is used to "go-for" information; second, that it does so through a menu of links analogous to gopher holes; and third, that the mascot of the protocol authors' organization, the University of Minnesota, is Goldy the Gopher.
The name comes from a command in the Unix text editor ed that takes the form g/re/p meaning search globally for a regular expression and print lines where instances are found. "Grep" like "Google" is often used as a verb, meaning "to search".

For other uses, see: Gentoo (disambiguation) Gentoo Linux is a Linux distribution. ... A Linux distribution is a Unix-like operating system comprising the Linux kernel and other assorted free software/open-source software, and possibly proprietary software. ... Modern Genera Aptenodytes Eudyptes Eudyptula Megadyptes Pygoscelis Spheniscus For extinct genera, see Systematics Penguins (order Sphenisciformes, family Spheniscidae) are an order of aquatic, flightless birds living in the Southern Hemisphere. ... GNU (pronounced ) is a free operating system consisting of a kernel, libraries, system utilities, compilers, and end-user applications. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... GNU (pronounced ) is a free operating system consisting of a kernel, libraries, system utilities, compilers, and end-user applications. ... Richard Matthew Stallman (frequently abbreviated to RMS) (born March 16, 1953) is the founder of the free software movement, the GNU Project, the Free Software Foundation, and the League for Programming Freedom. ... Flanders and Swann were British actor and singer Michael Flanders (1922–1975) and composer and linguist Donald Swann (1923–1994) who joined forces to write and perform comic songs in the two-man revues At The Drop Of A Hat and At The Drop Of Another Hat. ... A recursive acronym is an acronym (or occasionally, a backronym) which refers to itself in the expression for which it stands, similar to a recursive abbreviation. ... Google Inc. ... Look up googol in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Milton Sirotta (c. ... Gopher is a distributed document search and retrieval network protocol designed for the Internet. ... Gopher may mean: Gopher (animal), including: True gopher, i. ... Goldy the Gopher is the team mascot The Minnesota Golden Gophers are the college sports team for the University of Minnesota Twin Cities. ... grep is a command line utility originally written for use with the Unix operating system. ... A command line interface or CLI is a method of interacting with a computer by giving it lines of textual commands (that is, a sequence of characters) either from keyboard input or from a script. ... The text editor ed was the original standard on the Unix operating system. ...

H - K

Founder Jack Smith got the idea of accessing e-mail via the web from a computer anywhere in the world. When Sabeer Bhatia came up with the business plan for the mail service, he tried all kinds of names ending in 'mail' and finally settled for Hotmail as it included the letters "HTML" - the markup language used to write web pages. It was initially referred to as HoTMaiL with selective upper casing.
  • i18n - short for internationalization.
"18" is for the number of letters between the i and the n. The term l10n (for localization) has failed to catch on to the same degree, but is used by some.
ICQ is not an acronym. It is a play on the phrase "I seek you".
Jakarta was the name of the conference room at Sun where most of the meetings between Sun and Apache took place. The conference room was most likely named after Jakarta, the capital city of Indonesia, which is located on the northwest coast of the island of Java.
Originally called "D", but with the connotation of a near-failing mark on a report card the language was renamed Oak by Java-creator James Gosling, from the tree that stood outside his window. The programming team at Sun had to look for a substitute name as there was already another programming language called Oak. "Java" was selected from a list of suggestions, primarily because it is a popular slang term for coffee, especially that grown on the island of Java. As the programmers drank a lot of coffee, this seemed an appropriate name.
When created by programmers at MIT in the 1970s, they wanted a name that respesented true security for the project, so they named it after the Greek mythology character kerberos, (also spelled Cerberus), the mythical three-headed canine guarding Hades' gates. The reference to Greek mythology is most likely because Kerberos was developed as part of Project Athena.

Hotmail is a free webmail e-mail service, which is accessible via a web browser. ... MSN (or the Microsoft Network) is a collection of Internet services provided by Microsoft. ... Jack Smith, along with Sabeer Bhatia, founded the web-based free e-mail service Hotmail, in 1995. ... Sabeer Bhatia is a co-founder of Hotmail. ... A British pillar box. ... An example of HTML code with syntax highlighting and line numbers In computing, HyperText Markup Language (HTML) is a predominant markup language for the creation of web pages. ... Internationalization and localization are means of adapting products such as publications or software for non-native environments, especially other nations and cultures. ... The ICQ Logo ICQ is an instant messaging computer program, owned by Time Warners America Online subsidiary. ... A screenshot of PowWow, one of the first instant messengers with a graphical user interface Instant messaging is the act of instantly communicating between two or more people over a network such as the Internet. ... The Jakarta Project creates and maintains open source software for the Java platform. ... Sun Microsystems, Inc. ... The Apache Software Foundation (ASF) is a non-profit corporation (classified as 501(c)3 in the United States) to support Apache software projects, including the Apache HTTP Server. ... Insert non-formatted text hereInsert non-formatted text hereÞ Wikimedia servers architecture The term Web server can mean one of two things: A computer that is responsible for accepting HTTP requests from clients, which are known as Web browsers, and serving them Web pages, which are usually HTML documents and... Java is an object-oriented programming language developed by James Gosling and colleagues at Sun Microsystems in the early 1990s. ... The Java Servlets API, invented by Sun Microsystems [1], allows a software developer to add dynamic content to a web server using the Java platform. ... JavaServer Pages (JSP) is a Java technology that allows software developers to dynamically generate HTML, XML or other types of documents in response to a Web client request. ... Jakarta (also Djakarta or DKI Jakarta), formerly known as Sunda Kelapa, Jayakarta and Batavia is the capital and largest city of Indonesia. ... Java (Indonesian, Javanese, and Sundanese: Jawa) is an island of Indonesia, and the site of its capital city, Jakarta. ... Java is an object-oriented programming language developed by James Gosling and colleagues at Sun Microsystems in the early 1990s. ... A programming language is an artificial language that can be used to control the behavior of a machine (often a computer). ... James Gosling James Gosling (born May 19, 1955 near Calgary, Alberta, Canada) is a famous software developer, best known as the father of the Java programming language. ... Sun Microsystems, Inc. ... Java coffee is a coffee produced on the island of Java. ... Kerberos is a computer network authentication protocol which allows individuals communicating over an insecure network to prove their identity to one another in a secure manner. ... A computer network is a system for communication between computers. ... Authentication (Greek: αυθεντικός, from authentes=author) is the act of establishing or confirming something (or someone) as authentic, that is, that claims made by or about the thing are true. ... A cryptographic protocol is an abstract or concrete protocol that performs a security-related function and applies cryptographic methods. ... Windows 2000 (also referred to as Win2K or W2K) is a preemptible and interruptible, graphical, business-oriented operating system that is designed to work with either uniprocessor or symmetric multi-processor (SMP) 32-bit Intel x86 computers. ... Windows XP is a line of operating systems developed by Microsoft for use on general-purpose computer systems, including home and business desktops, notebook computers, and media centers. ... Mapúa Institute of Technology (MIT, MapúaTech or simply Mapúa) is a private, non-sectarian, Filipino tertiary institute located in Intramuros, Manila. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ... // Greek mythology consists in part of a large collection of narratives that explain the origins of the world and detail the lives and adventures of a wide variety of gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Project Athena was a joint project of MIT, Digital Equipment Corporation, and IBM. It was launched in 1983, and research and development ran through June 30, 1991, eight years after it began. ...

L

Linux creator Linus Torvalds originally used the Minix operating system on his computer, didn't like it, liked MS-DOS less, and started a project to develop an operating system that would address the problems of Minix. Hence the working name was Linux (Linus' Minix). He thought the name to be too egotistical and planned to name it Freax (free + freak + x). His friend Ari Lemmke encouraged Linus to upload it to a network so it could be easily downloaded. Ari gave Linus a directory called linux on his FTP server, as he did not like the name Freax.
Some say it is an acronym for Local Integrated Software Architecture, others that it was named after the daughter of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, and that the acronym was invented later to fit the name, expanding the acronym to Let's Invent Some Acronym.

Linux (also known as GNU/Linux) is a Unix-like computer operating system. ... The kernel is the central part in most computer operating systems because of its task, which is the management of the systems resources and the communication between hardware and software components. ... GNU (pronounced ) is a free operating system consisting of a kernel, libraries, system utilities, compilers, and end-user applications. ... Linus Benedict Torvalds (born December 28, 1969 in Helsinki, Finland) is a Finnish software engineer best known for initiating the development of Linux. ... This article is about the operating system in general. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Microsofts disk operating system, MS-DOS, was Microsofts implementation of DOS, which was the first popular operating system for the IBM PC, and until recently, was widely used on the PC compatible platform. ... Ari Lemmke (born December 12, 1963) is the person who gave Linux its name. ... The term FTP server can mean one of two things: a computer responsible for serving any kind of files, via the File Transfer Protocol to FTP clients which can also web browsers; a software program that implements the FTP protocol and is working as a daemon serving any kind of... Apple Lisa The Apple Lisa was a revolutionary personal computer designed at Apple Computer during the early 1980s. ... Apple Computer, Inc. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Steven Paul Jobs (born February 24, 1955 in San Francisco), is the co-founder and CEO of Apple Computer and was the CEO of Pixar until their acquisition by Disney. ... Lotus Software (called Lotus Development Corporation before its acquisition by IBM) is an American software company with its headquarters in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Mitch Kapor Mitch Kapor (center) with Bill Gates and Fred Gibbons, during their time working on developing applications for the Apple Macintosh, 1984 Mitchell David Kapor (born 1950) is the founder of Lotus Development Corporation and the designer of Lotus 1-2-3, the killer application often credited with making... A drawing of a girl sitting in the lotus position Zen Buddhist Kodo Sawaki in lotus position The Lotus position (Sanskrit: Padmasanam -- lotus posture) is a painful cross-legged sitting posture which originated in representations and meditative practices of Hinduism. ... The Sanskrit language ( , ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, and one of the 22 official languages of India. ... Transcendental Meditation or TM is a trademarked form of meditation developed in 1955 by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, a disciple of Brahmananda Saraswati. ... Maharishi Mahesh Yogi Maharishi Mahesh Yogi (born Mahesh Prasad Varma in 1911) is the creator of Transcendental Meditation (TM) and leader of the Transcendental Meditation Movement. ...

M

from McIntosh, a popular type of apple. Jef Raskin, a computer scientist, is credited with this naming.
from "Mac", a shortened form of Macintosh and a commonly-used name for the Macintosh computer system (see elsewhere on this page), and "OS", the common abbreviation for "operating system".
Coined by Donald Michie in his 1968 paper Memo Functions and Machine Learning.
When Marc Andreessen, founder of Netscape, created a browser to replace the Mosaic browser, it was internally named Mozilla (Mosaic-Killer, Godzilla). When Netscape's Navigator source code was made open source, Mozilla was the internal name for the open source version.

The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac. The Macintosh or Mac, is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple Computer. ... The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac. The Macintosh or Mac, is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple Computer. ... Apple Computer, Inc. ... This article is about the apple; for other uses, see McIntosh/MacIntosh (disambiguation) The McIntosh (Mac) is an apple cultivar with red and green skin, a tart flavor and tender, white flesh. ... Jef Raskin outdoors, photographed by his son Aza Raskin. ... Mac OS, which stands for Macintosh Operating System, is a series of graphical user interface-based operating systems developed by Apple Computer for their Macintosh line of computer systems. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac. The Macintosh or Mac, is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple Computer. ... The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac. The Macintosh or Mac, is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple Computer. ... The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac. The Macintosh or Mac, is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple Computer. ... Memoization is a technique used to speed up computer programs by storing the results of functions for later reuse, rather than recomputing them. ... In computer science, a subroutine (function, procedure, or subprogram) is a sequence of code which performs a specific task, as part of a larger program, and is grouped as one, or more, statement blocks; such code is sometimes collected into software libraries. ... Look up cache in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Donald Michie was born on 11 November 1923, and was educated at Rugby School and Balliol College, Oxford. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Mozilla logo Mozilla Firefox is a computer term that has had many different uses, though all of them have been related to Netscape Communications Corporation and its related application software. ... Icons for Web browser shortcuts on an Apple computer (Safari, Internet Explorer, and Firefox). ... Netscape Communicator was a proprietary Internet suite produced by Netscape Communications Corporation. ... Marc Andreessen (born April 26, 1971 in Cedar Falls, Iowa) is the chair of Opsware, a software company. ... Netscape Communications Corporation was the publisher of the Netscape Navigator web browser as well as many other internet and intranet client and server software products. ... Mosaic is a World Wide Web browser and Gopher client developed at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) beginning in 1992, and officially ending on January 7, 1997. ... now. ... Open source refers to projects that are open to the public and which draw on other projects that are freely available to the general public. ...

N - O

  • Nerd - A colloquial term for a computer person, especially an obsessive, singularly-focused one.
Earlier spelling of the term is "Nurd" and the original spelling is "Knurd", but the pronunciation has remained the same. The term originated at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in the late 1940s. Students who partied, and rarely studied were called "Drunks", while the opposite - students who never partied and always studied were "Knurd" ("Drunk" spelled backwards). The term was also (independently) used in a Dr. Seuss book, and on the TV show Happy Days, giving it international popularity.
  • Nibble - Also spelled nybble. The name used to describe four bits, which is half an octet (8 bits, the size of a byte in most computers).
Novell, Inc. was originally Novell Data Systems co-founded by George Canova. The name was suggested by George's wife who mistakenly thought that "Novell" meant "new" in French.
Larry Ellison, Ed Oates and Bob Miner were working on a consulting project for the CIA (Central Intelligence Agency). The code name for the project was called Oracle (the CIA evidently saw this as a system that would give answers to all questions). The project was designed to use the newly written SQL database language from IBM. The project eventually was terminated but they decided to finish what they started and bring it to the world. They kept the name Oracle and created the RDBMS engine.

Look up nerd in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, or RPI, is a coeducational private university in Troy, New York, near Albany, founded in 1824 by Stephen Van Rensselaer. ... Theodor Seuss Geisel (March 2, 1904 – September 24, 1991), better known by his pen name, Dr. Seuss, was a famous American writer and cartoonist best known for his childrens books, particularly The Cat in the Hat. ... Happy Days was a popular American television sitcom that originally aired between 1974 and 1984 on the ABC television network. ... A nibble (or less commonly, nybble) is the computing term for the aggregation of four bits, or half an octet (an octet being an 8-bit byte). ... BIT is an acronym for: Bangalore Institute of Technology Bilateral Investment Treaty Bhilai Institute of Technology - Durg Birla Institute of Technology - Mesra Battles in Time (Doctor Who magazine) Category: ... An octet is a group consisting of eight (8) elements, but it has several more specific meanings (usually given by a specific field or application): Music In music, an octet is a musical ensemble consisting of eight instruments or a musical composition written for it. ... A byte is commonly used as a unit of storage measurement in computers, regardless of the type of data being stored. ... NetWare is a network operating system developed by Novell, Inc. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Novell was also the name of a road bicycle racing team. ... oracle, see Oracle (disambiguation) An Oracle database, strictly speaking, consists of a collection of data managed by an Oracle database management system or DBMS. The term Oracle database sometimes refers — imprecisely — to the DBMS software itself. ... A relational database management system (RDBMS) is a database management system (DBMS) that is based on the relational model as introduced by Edgar F. Codd. ... Lawrence Joseph Ellison (born August 17, 1944) is the co-founder and CEO of Oracle Corporation, a major database software company. ... The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an intelligence agency of the United States Government. ... An oracle is a person or agency considered to be a source of wise counsel or prophetic opinion; an infallible authority, usually spiritual in nature. ... SQL (commonly expanded to Structured Query Language — see History for the terms derivation) is the most popular computer language used to create, modify, retrieve and manipulate data from relational database management systems. ... now. ...

P

The term comes from paku paku which is a Japanese onomatopoeia (written version of a noise) used for noisy eating; similar to chomp chomp. The game was released in Japan with the name Puck-Man, and released in the US with the name Pac-Man, fearing that kids may deface a Puck-Man cabinet by changing the P to an F.
  • PCMCIA - a type of (external) expansion card, about the size of a credit card.
PCMCIA cards were developed by the Personal Computer Memory Card International Association (an international standards association) as a standard for devices such as modems and external hard disk drives to be connected to notebook computers. Over time, the acronym PCMCIA has come to mean the form factor used for wireless networking cards on notebook computers. (A twist on the acronym is People Can't Memorize Computer Industry Acronyms).
The fifth microprocessor in the 80x86 series. It would have been called i586 or 80586, but Intel decided to name it Pentium (penta = five) after it lost a trademark infringement lawsuit against AMD (the judgment was that numbers like "286", "386", and "486" could not be trademarked). According to Intel, Pentium conveys a meaning of strength, like titanium.
Since some early Pentium chips contained a mathematical precision error, it has been jokingly suggested that the reason for the chip being named Pentium rather than 586 was that Intel chips would calculate 486 + 100 = 585.99999948.
Perl was originally named Pearl, after the "pearl of great price" of Matthew 13:46. Larry Wall, the creator of Perl, wanted to give the language a short name with positive connotations and claims to have looked at (and rejected) every three- and four-letter word in the dictionary. He even thought of naming it after his wife Gloria. Before the language's official release Wall discovered that there was already a programming language named Pearl, and changed the spelling of the name. Although the original manuals suggested the backronyms "Practical Extraction and Report Language" and "Pathologically Eclectic Rubbish Lister", these were intended humorously.
Originally called "Personal Home Page Tools" by creator Rasmus Lerdorf, it was rewritten by developers Zeev Suraski and Andi Gutmans who gave it the recursive name "PHP Hypertext Preprocessor". Lerdorf currently insists the name should not be thought of as standing for anything, for he selected "Personal Home Page" as the name when he did not forsee PHP evolving into a general-purpose programming language.
  • Pine - e-mail client
Acronym for "Program for Internet News & Email". It is also a recursive acronym for "Pine Is Not Elm" (in reference to Elm, another email client)
  • Ping - computer network tool used to detect hosts
The author of ping, Mike Muuss, named it after the pulses of sound made by a sonar called a "ping". Later Dave Mills provided the backronym "Packet Internet Groper".

Pac-Man is an arcade game developed by Namco and licensed for distribution by Midway Games in 1979. ... A video arcade (known as an amusement arcade in the United Kingdom) is a place where people play arcade video games. ... Look up onomatopoeia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Portable Computer Cards (PC cards) are interchangeable peripherals designed to be inserted into laptop computers in order to enable extra hardware functions. ... A modem (a portmanteau constructed from modulate and demodulate) is a device that modulates an analog carrier signal to encode digital information, and also demodulates such a carrier signal to decode the transmitted information. ... Typical hard drives of the mid-1990s. ... Laptop with touchpad. ... Form factor refers to the linear dimensions and configuration of a device as distinguished from other measures of size (for example Gigabytes; a measure of storage size): in computing, form factor is used to describe the size and format of PC motherboards (see AT, ATX, BTX), but also of hard... Pentium logo, with MMX enhancement The Pentium is a fifth-generation x86 architecture microprocessor by Intel. ... Microprocessors, including an Intel 80486DX2 and an Intel 80386. ... Intel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC, SEHK: 4335), founded in 1968 as Integrated Electronics Corporation, is an American multinational corporation that is best known for designing and manufacturing microprocessors and specialized integrated circuits. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. ... General Name, Symbol, Number titanium, Ti, 22 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 4, 4, d Appearance silvery metallic Atomic mass 47. ... Perl, also Practical Extraction and Report Language (a backronym, see below) is a dynamic procedural programming language designed by Larry Wall and first released in 1987. ... An interpreter is a computer program that executes other programs. ... Scripting languages (commonly called scripting programming languages or script languages) are computer programming languages created to shorten the traditional edit-compile-link-run process. ... The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον) is one of the four Gospel accounts of the New Testament. ... Larry Wall (b. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... PHP is an open-source, reflective programming language. ... Scripting languages (commonly called scripting programming languages or script languages) are computer programming languages created to shorten the traditional edit-compile-link-run process. ... Zeev Suraski is an Israeli programmer, PHP developer and co-founder of Zend Technologies. ... Andi Gutmans is an Israeli programmer, PHP developer and co-founder of Zend Technologies. ... Pine is a powerful freeware e-mail client: the University of Washingtons Program for Internet News & Email. ... An e-mail client (or mail user agent [MUA]) is a computer program that is used to read and send e-mail. ... Elm, a text-based e-mail client commonly found on Unix systems, became popular as one of the first e-mail clients to use curses-like screen displays, and as a utility with freely-available source code. ... ping in a Windows 2000 command window ping is a computer network tool used to test whether a particular host is reachable across an IP network. ... Michael John Muuss (October 16, 1958 - November 20, 2000) was author of the freeware network tool Ping. ... The F70 type frigates (here, La Motte-Picquet) are fitted with VDS (Variable Depth Sonar) type DUBV43 or DUBV43C tugged sonars SONAR (SOund Navigation And Ranging) â€” or sonar â€” (British ASDIC) is a technique that uses sound propagation under water to navigate or to detect other vessels. ... David L. Mills (born June 3, 1938) was the first head of the Internet Architecture Board. ... PKZIP is an archiving tool originally written by the late Phil Katz, and marketed by his company PKWARE, Inc. ... In computer science and information theory, data compression or source coding is the process of encoding information using fewer bits (or other information-bearing units) than an unencoded representation would use through use of specific encoding schemes. ... The ZIP file format is a popular data compression and archival format. ... Phil Katz, shown in 1994, holds a computer disk containing compression software made by his company, PKWare Inc. ... Python is an interpreted programming language created by Guido van Rossum in 1990. ... An interpreter is a computer program that executes other programs. ... Scripting languages (commonly called scripting programming languages or script languages) are computer programming languages created to shorten the traditional edit-compile-link-run process. ... Monty Pythons Flying Circus (also known as Flying Circus, MPFC or just Monty Python during the fourth season) was a popular, surreal BBC sketch comedy show from Monty Python, and the groups initial claim to fame. ...

R

Radio buttons got their name from the preset buttons in radio receivers. When one used to select preset stations on a radio receiver physically instead of electronically, depressing one preset button would pop out whichever other button happened to be pushed in.
Company founder Marc Ewing was given the Cornell lacrosse team cap (with red and white stripes) while at college by his grandfather. People would turn to him to solve their problems, and he was referred to as "that guy in the red hat". He lost the cap and had to search for it desperately. The manual of the beta version of Red Hat Linux had an appeal to readers to return his Red Hat if found by anyone.
Based on the surnames of the authors of this algorithm -- Ron Rivest, Adi Shamir and Len Adleman.

A group of radio buttons, with one choice selected, in Windows XP A pair of radio buttons in Apples Mac OS X A radio button is a type of graphical user interface widget that allows the user to choose one of a predefined set of options. ... GUI can refer to the following: GUI is short for graphical user interface, a term used to describe a type of interface in computing. ... Widget is a general-purpose term, or placeholder name, for any unspecified device, including those that have not yet been invented. ... For the device which is a tuner (radio) and a amplifier and/or loudspeaker, see receiver (home stereo). ... Red Hat Linux was one of the most popular Linux distributions, assembled by Red Hat. ... A Linux distribution is a Unix-like operating system comprising the Linux kernel and other assorted free software/open-source software, and possibly proprietary software. ... Red Hat, Inc. ... Marc Ewing is the enterprising creator and originator of the Red Hat brand of software, most notably the Red Hat range of Linux operating system distributions. ... Cornell redirects here. ... For other uses, see Lacrosse (disambiguation). ... In cryptography, RSA is an algorithm for public-key encryption. ... Square with symmetry group D4 Symmetry is a characteristic of geometrical shapes, equations, and other objects; we say that such an object is symmetric with respect to a given operation if this operation, when applied to the object, does not appear to change it. ... Flowcharts are often used to represent algorithms. ... Public key cryptography is a form of cryptography which generally allows users to communicate securely without having prior access to a shared secret key, by using a pair of cryptographic keys, designated as public key and private key, which are related mathematically. ... Professor Ron Rivest Professor Ronald Linn Rivest (born 1947, Schenectady, New York) is a cryptographer, and is the Andrew and Erna Viterbi Professor of Computer Science at MITs Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. ... Adi Shamir at the CRYPTO 2003 conference. ... Leonard Adleman Leonard Adleman (born December 31, 1945) is a theoretical computer scientist and professor of computer science and molecular biology at the University of Southern California. ...

S

  • Samba software - a free implementation of Microsoft's networking protocol. The name samba comes from inserting two vowels into the name of the standard protocol that Microsoft Windows network file system use, called SMB (Server Message Block). The author searched a dictionary using grep for words containing S M and B in that order; the only matches were Samba and Salmonberry.
The company was called "Santa Cruz Operation", as its office was in Santa Cruz, California.
  • sed - stands for stream editor, used for textual transformation of a sequential stream of text data. It is modelled after the ed editor.
  • shareware - coined by Bob Wallace to describe his word processor PC-Write in early 1983. Prior to this Jim Button and Andrew Fluegelman called their distributed software "user supported software" and "freeware" respectively, but it was Wallace's terminology that stuck.
While registering the domain, Slashdot-creator Rob Malda wanted to make the URL silly, and unpronounceable ("http://slashdot.org" gets pronounced as "h t t p colon slash slash slash dot dot org") Alternatively, many say that the Slashdot(/.) name refers to the *NIX command line interpretation of the "root" directory, or a play on the website being the "root" of all tech news.
  • Sosumi - one of the system sounds introduced in Apple Computer's System 7 operating system in 1991.
Apple Computer had a long litigation history with Apple Records, the Beatles' recording company. Fearing that the ability to record musical sound would cause yet more legal action, the Apple legal department allegedly ordered the sound to be renamed from its original, musical name. So the developers changed the name to Sosumi ("So sue me"). Depending on who was asked, they quipped that it was Japanese for either "absence of sound" or "a light pleasing tone".
  • Spam - unwanted repetitious messages, such as unsolicited bulk e-mail
The term spam is derived from the Monty Python SPAM sketch, set in a cafe where everything on the menu includes SPAM luncheon meat. While a customer plaintively asks for some kind of food without SPAM in it, the server reiterates the SPAM-filled menu. Soon, a chorus of Vikings join in with a song: "SPAM, SPAM, SPAM, SPAM, SPAM, lovely SPAM, wonderful SPAM", over and over again, drowning out all conversation. (Hormel Food's position on the use of the term is at http://www.spam.com/ci/ci_in.htm )
  • SPIM - a simulator for a virtual machine closely resembling the instruction set of MIPS processors, is simply MIPS spelled backwards. MIPS stands for Millions of Instructions Per Second, from way back when that was something to boast of. In recent time, SPIM has also come to mean SPam sent over Instant Messaging.
  • Swing - a graphics library for Java.
Swing was the code-name of the project that developed the new graphic components (the successor of AWT). It was named after swing, a style of dance band jazz that was popularized in the 1930s and unexpectedly revived in the 1990s. Although an unofficial name for the components, it gained popular acceptance with the use of the word in the package names for the Swing API, which begin with javax.swing.

Samba logo. ... The Microsoft Corporation, commonly known as just Microsoft, (NASDAQ: MSFT&selected= MSFT MSFT, HKSE: 4338&WidCoAbbName=&Month=&langcode=e 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual sales of US$44. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Tarantella, Inc. ... Unix or UNIX is a computer operating system originally developed in the 1960s and 1970s by a group of AT&T Bell Labs employees including Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, and Douglas McIlroy. ... Tarantella, Inc. ... Tarantella, Inc. ... Santa Cruz is the county seat of Santa Cruz County, California, United States. ... The title of this article should be sed. ... The text editor ed was the original standard on the Unix operating system. ... Look up shareware in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Bob Wallace (died 2003), was the ninth Microsoft employee, inventor of the term shareware, creator of the word processing program PC-Write, founder of the software company Quicksoft and a online drug guru who devoted much time and money into the research of psychedelic drugs. ... Jim Button (born James Knopf--knopf meaning button in German) is considered by many to be one of the fathers of shareware (so named by fellow software veteran Peter Norton). ... Andrew Cardoza Fluegelman (born November 27, 1943--presumably died July 6, 1985) was a programmer and attorney best known as the inventor of what is now known as the shareware business model for software marketing. ... Slashdot (often abbreviated to /.) is a popular technology-related website/Forum updated many times daily, with articles that are often short summaries of stories on other websites, links to those stories, and provisions for readers to comment on each story. ... A weblog (now more commonly known as a blog) is a web-based publication consisting primarily of periodic articles (normally, but not always, in reverse chronological order). ... Sosumi is one of the system sounds introduced in Apple Computers Macintosh System 7 operating system in 1991, an extremely short sample of a xylophone, which gained notoriety in computer folklore as a cheeky response to a long-running Apple Corps v. ... Apple Computer, Inc. ... Apple Computer, Inc. ... Apple Records logo, featuring a Granny Smith apple. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Python team. ... Terry Jones, Eric Idle, and Graham Chapman in the Monty Python skit Spam. Spam is a popular Monty Python sketch, first broadcast in 1970. ... Look up spam, SPAM in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... SPIM is a simulated assembly language written for MIPS architecture R2000 and R3000 processors, copyrighted by James R. Larus. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A screenshot of PowWow, one of the first instant messengers with a graphical user interface Instant messaging is the act of instantly communicating between two or more people over a network such as the Internet. ... Swing is a graphics library for Java. ... The Abstract Windowing Toolkit (AWT) is Javas platform_independent windowing, graphics, and user_interface widget toolkit. ... Wikibooks has more about this subject: Swing Dancing The term swing dance is commonly used to refer either to a group of dances developing during the swing era (late 1920s to 1940s) or to the current dances and dance scenes centred on swing dancing. ... Jazz is an original American musical art form originating around the start of the 20th century in New Orleans, rooted in Western music technique and theory and marked by the profound cultural contributions of African Americans. ...

T - V

Tomcat was the code-name for the JSDK 2.1 project inside Sun. Tomcat started off as a servlet specification implementation by James Duncan Davidson who was a software architect at Sun. Davidson had initially hoped that the project would be made open-source, and since most open-source projects had O'Reilly books on them with an animal on the cover, he wanted to name the project after an animal. He came up with Tomcat since he reasoned the animal represented something that could take care of and fend for itself.
  • Troff - a document processing system for Unix
Troff stands for "typesetter roff", although many people have speculated that it actually means "Times roff" because of the use of the Times font family in troff by default. Troff has its origins from Roff, an earlier formatting program, whose name is a contraction of "run off".
The term is derived from the classical myth of the Trojan Horse. Analogously, a Trojan horse appears innocuous (or even to be a gift), but in fact is a vehicle for bypassing security.
When Bell Labs pulled out of MULTICS (MULTiplexed Information and Computing System), which was originally a joint Bell Labs/GE/MIT project, Ken Thompson of Bell Labs, soon joined by Dennis Ritchie, wrote a simpler version of the operating system. They needed the OS to run the game Space War which had been compiled under MULTICS. The new OS was called UNICS - UNIplexed operating and Computing System by Brian Kernighan. An alternative spelling was Eunuchs, it being a sort of 'reduced' MULTICS. It was later shortened to Unix.
  • vi - a text editor, initialism for visual, a command in the ex editor which helped users to switch to the visual mode from the ex mode.
  • Vim - a text editor, acronym for Vi improved after Vim added several features over the vi editor. Vim however had started out as an imitation of Vi and was expanded as Vi imitation.
The term virus was first used in print by Fred Cohen in his 1984 paper "Experiments with Computer Viruses", where he credits Len Adleman with coining it. Although Cohen's use of virus may have been the first academic use, it had been in the common parlance long before that. A mid-1970s science fiction novel by David Gerrold, When H.A.R.L.I.E. was One, includes a description of a fictional computer program called VIRUS that worked just like a virus (and was countered by a program called ANTIBODY). The term "computer virus" also appears in the comic book "Uncanny X-Men" No. 158, published in 1982.

Tomcat Logo Tomcat functions as a servlet container developed at the Apache Software Foundation. ... Insert non-formatted text hereInsert non-formatted text hereÞ Wikimedia servers architecture The term Web server can mean one of two things: A computer that is responsible for accepting HTTP requests from clients, which are known as Web browsers, and serving them Web pages, which are usually HTML documents and... The Jakarta Project creates and maintains open source software for the Java platform. ... Sun Microsystems, Inc. ... Mandriva Linux is an example of open source. ... Programming Perl is a classic OReilly book. ... BJP o you bum ... Troff is a document processing system developed by AT&T for the Unix operating system. ... Unix or UNIX is a computer operating system originally developed in the 1960s and 1970s by a group of AT&T Bell Labs employees including Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, and Douglas McIlroy. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... In the context of computer software, a Trojan horse is a malicious program that is disguised as or embedded within legitimate software. ... 19th century etching of the Trojan Horse The Trojan Horse is part of the myth of the Trojan War, as told in Virgils Latin epic poem The Aeneid. ... Ubuntu is a desktop Linux distribution, based on Debian GNU/Linux. ... Debian, organized by the Debian Project, is a widely used distribution of free software developed through the collaboration of volunteers from around the world. ... Linux (also known as GNU/Linux) is a Unix-like computer operating system. ... Canonical Ltd is a private company founded (and funded) by South African entrepreneur Mark Shuttleworth for the promotion of Free Software projects. ... Ubuntu, pronounced: (oo-BOON-too), is a sub-Saharan African ethic or ideology focusing on peoples allegiances and relations with each other. ... Unix or UNIX is a computer operating system originally developed in the 1960s and 1970s by a group of AT&T Bell Labs employees including Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, and Douglas McIlroy. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The correct title of this article is vi. ... Notepad is the standard text editor for Microsoft Windows A text editor is a piece of computer software for editing plain text. ... Ex (disambiguation) ex, short for EXtended, was a line editor for UNIX. It was an advanced version of the standard UNIX editor ed, included in the Berkeley Software Distribution. ... Vim, which stands for Vi IMproved, is an open-source, multiplatform text editor extended from vi. ... Notepad is the standard text editor for Microsoft Windows A text editor is a piece of computer software for editing plain text. ... The correct title of this article is vi. ... In computer security, computer virus is a self-replicating computer program that spreads by inserting copies of itself into other executable code or documents. ... The terms computer program, software program, applications program, system software, or just program are used to refer to either an executable program by both lay people and computer programmers or the collection of source code from which an executable program is created (eg, compiled). ... One of the few solid theoretical results in the study of computer viruses is Cohens 1987 demonstration that there is no algorithm that can perfectly detect all possible viruses. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Leonard Adleman Leonard Adleman (born December 31, 1945) is a theoretical computer scientist and professor of computer science and molecular biology at the University of Southern California. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... David Gerrold, born Jerrold David Friedman (January 24, 1944), is an award-winning science fiction author who started his career in 1966 as a college student by submitting an unsolicited story outline for the television series Star Trek. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

W - Z

Coined by Ward Cunningham, the creator of the wiki concept, who named them for the "wiki wiki" or "quick" shuttle buses at Honolulu Airport. Wiki wiki was the first Hawaiian term he learned on his first visit to the islands. The airport counter agent directed him to take the wiki wiki bus between terminals.
The name 'worm' was taken from a 1970s science fiction novel by John Brunner entitled The Shockwave Rider. The book describes programs known as "tapeworms" which spread through a network for the purpose of deleting data. Researchers writing an early paper on experiments in distributed computing noted the similarities between their software and the program described by Brunner, and adopted that name.
X derives its name as a successor to a pre-1983 window system called W (the W Window System). X follows W in the alphabet.
Yahoo!'s history site says the name is an acronym for "Yet Another Hierarchical Officious Oracle", but some remember that in its early days (mid-1990s), when Yahoo! lived on a server called akebono.stanford.edu, it was glossed as "Yet Another Hierarchical Object Organizer." The word "Yahoo!" was originally invented by Jonathan Swift and used in his book Gulliver's Travels. It represents a person who is repulsive in appearance and action and is barely human. Yahoo! founders Jerry Yang and David Filo selected the name because they considered themselves yahoos.
The file format was created by Phil Katz, and given the name by his friend Robert Mahoney. The compression tool Phil Katz created was called PKZIP. Zip means "speed", and they wanted to imply their product would be faster than ARC and other compression formats of the time.

A wiki (IPA: <WICK-ee> or <WEE-kee>[1]) is a type of website that allows visitors to easily add, remove, or otherwise edit and change some available content, sometimes without the need for registration. ... Skip Ellis defined groupware as computer-based systems that support groups of people engaged in a common task (or goal) and that provide an interface to a shared environment. It is also known as Collaborative software. ... Oh Yes, Hes Ward Cunningham! Howard Cunningham redirects here. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A computer worm is a self-replicating computer program, similar to a computer virus. ... The terms computer program, software program, applications program, system software, or just program are used to refer to either an executable program by both lay people and computer programmers or the collection of source code from which an executable program is created (eg, compiled). ... In computer security, computer virus is a self-replicating computer program that spreads by inserting copies of itself into other executable code or documents. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... John Brunner John Kilian Houston Brunner (September 24, 1934 – August 26, 1995) was a prolific British author of science fiction novels and stories. ... The Shockwave Rider is a science fiction novel by John Brunner, originally published in 1975, notable for its heros use of computer cracking skills to escape pursuit in a dystopian future, and for the coining of the word worm to describe a program that propagates itself through a computer... KDE 3. ... A windowing system is a graphical user interface (GUI) which uses the window as one of its primary metaphors. ... For the use of the term raster in radio regulation, see frequency raster. ... The W Window System is a graphical windowing system and precursor in name and concept to the modern X Window System. ... Yahoo! - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... A web directory is a directory on the World Wide Web. ... Jonathan Swift Jonathan Swift (November 30, 1667 – October 19, 1745) was an Anglo-Irish priest, satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer, and poet famous for works like Gullivers Travels, A Modest Proposal, A Journal to Stella, The Drapiers Letters, The Battle of the Books, and A Tale of a Tub. ... Gulliver Exhibited to the Brobdingnag Farmer by Richard Redgrave Gullivers Travels (1726, amended 1735) is a novel by Jonathan Swift that is both a satire on human nature and a parody of the travellers tales literary sub-genre. ... The ZIP file format is a popular data compression and archival format. ... A file format is a particular way to encode information for storage in a computer file. ... Phil Katz, shown in 1994, holds a computer disk containing compression software made by his company, PKWare Inc. ... PKZIP is an archiving tool originally written by the late Phil Katz, and marketed by his company PKWARE, Inc. ...

See also

Lists of etymologies This is a list of etymological lists. ...


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Computer (Linux Reviews) (5975 words)
Therefore, computers with capability and complexity ranging from that of a personal digital assistant to a supercomputer are all able to perform the same computational tasks as long as time and storage capacity are not considerations.
In most cases, computer instructions are simple: add one number to another, move some data from one location to another, send a message to some external device, etc. These instructions are read from the computer's memory and are generally carried out (executed) in the order they were given.
Computer operating systems and applications were modified to include the ability to define and access the resources of other computers on the network, such as peripheral devices, stored information, and the like, as extensions of the resources of an individual computer.
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