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Encyclopedia > List of battleships of the Royal Navy

Contents

RN Ensign
Ships of the Royal Navy

A - B - C - D - E - F - G
H - I - J - K - L - M - N
O - P - Q - R - S - T - U
V - W - X - Y - Z
Image File history File links Derived from public domain images featured at: http://commons. ... Image File history File links Naval_Ensign_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... The following is a list of Royal Navy ship names by name in alphabetical order, both past and present. ... This is a section of the list of ships of the Royal Navy, including both past and present vessels. ... This is a section of the list of ships of the Royal Navy, including both past and present vessels. ... This is a section of the list of ships of the Royal Navy, including both past and present vessels. ... This portion of the list of Royal Navy ships lists all ships which have been commissioned into the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom at any point. ... This section of the list of Royal Navy ships includes both past and present vessels of the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom which have names beginning with E. In many cases a name will have been used for multiple ships over the years. ... This section of the list of Royal Navy ships includes both past and present vessels serving in the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom with names beginning with F. In many cases a name will have been used for multiple ships over the years. ... This section of the list of Royal Navy ships, including both past and present vessels of the Royal Navy, lists all ships the names of which begin with G. In many cases a name will have been used for multiple ships over the years. ... This section of the list of Royal Navy ships includes both past and present vessels of the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom. ... This section of the list of Royal Navy ships includes both past and present vessels of the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom. ... This section of the list of Royal Navy ships includes both past and present vessels of the Royal Navy. ... This section of the list of Royal Navy ships, including both past and present vessels of the Royal Navy, lists all ships the names of which begin with K. In many cases a name will have been used for multiple ships over the years. ... This section of the list of Royal Navy ships, including both past and present vessels of the Royal Navy, lists all ships the names of which begin with L. In many cases a name will have been used for multiple ships over the years. ... This section of the list of Royal Navy ships, including both past and present vessels of the Royal Navy, lists all ships the names of which begin with M. In many cases a name will have been used for multiple ships over the years. ... This section of the list of Royal Navy ships, including both past and present vessels of the Royal Navy, lists all ships the names of which begin with N. In many cases a name will have been used for multiple ships over the years. ... This section of the list of Royal Navy ships, including both past and present vessels of the Royal Navy, lists all ships the names of which begin with O. In many cases a name will have been used for multiple ships over the years. ... This section of the list of Royal Navy ships, including both past and present vessels of the Royal Navy, lists all ships the names of which begin with P. In many cases a name will have been used for multiple ships over the years. ... This section of the list of Royal Navy ships, including both past and present vessels of the Royal Navy, lists all ships the names of which begin with Q. In many cases a name will have been used for multiple ships over the years. ... This section of the list of Royal Navy ships, including both past and present vessels of the Royal Navy, lists all ships the names of which begin with R. In many cases a name will have been used for multiple ships over the years. ... This section of the list of Royal Navy ships, including both past and present vessels of the Royal Navy, lists all ships the names of which begin with S. In many cases a name will have been used for multiple ships over the years. ... This section of the list of Royal Navy ships, including both past and present vessels of the Royal Navy, lists all ships the names of which begin with T. In many cases a name will have been used for multiple ships over the years. ... This section of the list of Royal Navy ships, including both past and present vessels of the Royal Navy, lists all ships the names of which begin with U. In many cases a name will have been used for multiple ships over the years. ... This section of the list of Royal Navy ships, including both past and present vessels of the Royal Navy, lists all ships the names of which begin with V. In many cases a name will have been used for multiple ships over the years. ... This section of the list of Royal Navy ships, including both past and present vessels of the Royal Navy, lists all ships the names of which begin with W. In many cases a name will have been used for multiple ships over the years. ... This section of the list of Royal Navy ships, including both past and present vessels of the Royal Navy, lists all ships the names of which begin with X. In many cases a name will have been used for multiple ships over the years. ... This section of the list of Royal Navy ships, including both past and present vessels of the Royal Navy, lists all ships the names of which begin with Y. In many cases a name will have been used for multiple ships over the years. ... This section of the list of Royal Navy ships, including both past and present vessels of the Royal Navy, lists all ships the names of which begin with Z. In many cases a name will have been used for multiple ships over the years. ...

aircraft carriers
amphibious assault shipping
battlecruisers
battleships
corvettes and sloops
cruisers
destroyers
frigates
mine countermeasure vessels
monitors
patrol and attack craft
Royal Yachts
submarines
support ships
survey vessels
fleet bases
shore establishments
hospitals and hospital ships
air stations
aircraft wings
fleets and major commands
squadrons and flotillas

This is a list of battleships and their predecessors of the Royal Navy of England, Scotland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom. The following is a list of aircraft carriers of the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom. ... Active Ships Ocean class LPH HMS Ocean Albion class LPD HMS Albion HMS Bulwark Decommissioned Fearless class LPD HMS Fearless HMS Intrepid Centaur class LPH HMS Albion HMS Bulwark HMS Hermes Landing ships tank HMS Boxer HMS Bruiser HMS Thruster LST 3001 LST 3002 LST 3003/HMS Anzio LST 3004... This is a list of battlecruisers of the Royal Navy: Invincible class Invincible (1908) Indomitable (1907) Inflexible (1908) Indefatigable class Indefatigable (1909) New Zealand (1911) (also HMAS Australia (1911) of the Royal Australian Navy) Lion class Lion (1910) Princess Royal (1911) Queen Mary (1912) Tiger class Tiger (1913) Leopard (not... This is a list of corvette and sloop classes of the Royal Navy. ... This is a list of Royal Navy cruisers. ... This is a list of destroyer classes of the Royal Navy. ... This is a list of frigates of the Royal Navy in chronological order. ... Naval mine clearance was originally done by whatever type of vessel could easily be adapted to the task, paddle steamers proving particularly suitable due to their shallow draught. ... This is a list of monitors of the Royal Navy: Humber-class HMS Severn HMS Humber HMS Mersey Abercrombie-class HMS Abercrombie HMS Havelock HMS Raglan HMS Roberts Lord Clive-class HMS Lord Clive HMS General Craufurd HMS Earl of Peterborough HMS Sir Thomas Picton HMS Prince Eugene HMS Prince... This is a list of patrol boats of the Royal Navy. ... This is a list of Royal Yachts of the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of submarine classes of the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of support ships of the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom. ... Active Ships Antarctic patrol vessel HMS Endurance (II) Ocean survey vessels HMS Scott Coastal survey vessels HMS Roebuck HMS Gleaner Multi-purpose survey vessels HMS Echo HMS Enterprise Decommissioned Ships Antarctic patrol vessel HMS Endurance (I) Ocean survey vessels HMS Hecla HMS Hecate HMS Hydra HMS Herald Coastal survey vessels... This is a list of fleet bases of the Royal Navy. ... HMS Raleigh HMS Nelson HMS Collingwood HMS Dryad HMS Excellent ... This is a list of hospitals and hospital ships of the Royal Navy. ... This is a list of air stations of the Royal Navy. ... This is a list of Royal Navy aircraft wings. ... // Current Fleet British Fleet Past Fleets British Atlantic Fleet British Channel Fleet British East Indies Fleet British Eastern Fleet British Far East Fleet British Grand Fleet British Home Fleet British Mediterranean Fleet British Pacific Fleet British Reserve Fleet British Western Fleet Force H Past Major Commands Nore Command Plymouth Command... Port Squadrons Clyde Flotilla Devonport Flotilla Portsmouth Flotilla Type Squadrons Aircraft Carriers British 1st Aircraft Carrier Squadron British 2nd Aircraft Carrier Squadron British 3rd Aircraft Carrier Squadron British 11th Aircraft Carrier Squadron Battleships and Battlecruisers British 1st Battle Squadron British 2nd Battle Squadron British 3rd Battle Squadron British 4th Battle... For other uses, see Battleship (disambiguation). ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... Motto Latin: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) (Scots: Wha daur meddle wi me) Capital Edinburgh¹ Language(s) Gaelic, Scots Government Monarchy King/Queen  - 843-860 Kenneth I  - 1587–1625 James VI  - 1702-1714 Anne Legislature Parliament of Scotland History  - United 843  - Union of the...


Glossary

In the section listing warships of the English Navy before 1618, dates are probably listed using the contemporary English convention of the first day of the year being 25th March. Ship breaking or ship demolition involves breaking up of ships for scrap. ... In the Christian calendar, Lady Day is the Feast of the Annunciation (25 March) and the first of the four traditional Irish Quarter days and English quarter days. ...


In the sections listing warships in the English/Royal Navy from 1618 onwards, the dates have been quoted using the modern convention of the year starting on 1st January.


List of Warships of the English Navy before 1618

Where applicable, number of main guns follows name (see Rating system of the Royal Navy). Note that long-lived ships could be rearmed several times. Many earlier ships went through a "great repair", where they were essentially completely dismantled and another ship built from the remains, with the same name. This practice continued until 1739.
  • Trinity de la Tour (Trinity of the Tower) - Dismantled c. 1409, materials used for Trinity Royal
  • Goodgrace (c. 1400)
  • Le Carake (ex-Genovese Sancta Maria & Sancta Brigida, captured 1409)
  • Christopher of the Tower 5 (1410/12) - Hulk
  • Trinity Royal (c. 1412)
  • Holyghost de la Tour (ex-Spanish Santa Clara, captured c. 1413)
  • Jesus (c. 1416)
  • George (ex-Genovese ?, captured 1416) - To Venice 1424
  • Marie Hampton (ex-Genovese ?, captured 1416)
  • Marie Sandwich (ex-Genovese ?, captured 1416)
  • Andrew (ex-Genovese Galeas Negre, captured 1417)
  • Christopher (ex-Genovese Pynele, captured c. 1417) - Sold 1423
  • Peter (ex-Genovese ?, captured 1417)
  • Paul (ex-Genovese Vivande, captured 1417)
  • Agase (ex-Genovese ?, captured c. 1417) - Wrecked on mudflats c. 1418
  • Grace Dieu (1418) - Lightning and fire, 1439
  • Grace Dieu (c. 1437) - BU c. 1487
  • Peter - Abandoned 1462
  • Mary de la Tour (Mary of the Tower) 48
  • George
  • Edward Howard (c. 1466, ex-Portuguese ?, captured 1479)
  • Sovereign 141 (c. 1488) - Rebuilt 1509, last mentioned c. 1520
  • Grace Dieu 225 (1490) - Renamed Regent, burnt at the Battle of St Matthieu, 1512
  • Margaret (1505; Scottish)
  • Gabriel Royal (captured 1509)
  • Peter Pomegranate (c. 1510)
  • Mary Rose 78 (1510) - Sank 1545, refloated 1982 and preserved at Portsmouth
  • Michael 27 (1511; Scottish) - Sold to France 1514
  • Great Bark 63 (c. 1512)
  • Katherine Forteleza (captured 1512)
  • Great Nicholas (captured 1512)
  • John Baptist (captured 1512)
  • Christ (captured 1512)
  • Henri Grâce à Dieu ("Great Harry") 186 (1512) - Accidentally burned 1553
  • Great Barbara (captured 1513)
  • Great Elizabeth (captured 1514)
  • Mary Gonson (c. 1514?)
  • Jesus of Lubeck (ex-Hanseatic League Jesus von Lubeck, purchased 1544) - Sunk by Spanish 1568
  • Grand Mistress (c. 1545) - Prototype of galleon
  • Greyhound (c. 1545) - Prototype of galleon
  • Anne Gallant (c. 1545)
  • Antelope 38 (c. 1546)
  • Bull 25 (c. 1546)
  • Hart (c. 1546)
  • Tygar (c. 1546)
  • Minion
  • Elizabeth (c. 1559)
  • Triumph (c. 1561)
  • Victory (c. 1562)
  • White Bear (c. 1564) [1]
  • Foresight 37 (c. 1570)
  • Dreadnought 41 (1573) - BU 1645
  • Swiftsure (c. 1573)
  • Revenge (c. 1577)
  • Swallow (c. 1580)
  • Elizabeth Bonaventure (c. 1581)
  • Ark Raleigh 44 - Renamed Ark Royal, renamed Anne Royal, rebuilt 1608 [2]
  • Bear 40 - Sold 1629
  • Bonaventure
  • Philip and Mary 38 - Renamed Nonpareil, renamed Nonsuch, rebuilt 1603 [3]
  • Red Lion or Golden Lion 38 - Renamed Lion, rebuilt 1609 [4]
  • Hart 56
  • Rainbow 40 (c. 1586) – Rebuilt 1617 [5]
  • Tramontana (c. 1586)
  • Vanguard 40 (1586) - Rebuilt 1615 [6]
  •  ? (ex-Spanish San Felipe, captured 1587)
  • Mercury - Sold 1611
  • Defiance 46 (1590)
  • Madre de Dios (ex-Portuguese Madre de Dios, captured 1592)
  • Adventure (c. 1594) - BU c. 1645
  • Scourge of Malice (c. 1595)
  • Warspite 29 (c. 1596) - Converted to lighter 1635 [this vessel is also listed under List of Major Warships of the English Navy (1618-1642)]
  • Due Repulse 40/48 (c. 1596) – also known as Repulse', rebuilt 1610 [7]
  • St Andrew (captured 1596)
  • St Matthew (captured 1596)
  • Hope 34/38 (c. 1601) - Renamed Assurance
  • Destiny 34 (c. 1616) - Renamed Convertine

The rating system of the Royal Navy was used by the Royal Navy between the 1670s and early 19th century to categorise sailing warships according to their ability to stand in a line of battle and according to their number of guns. ... See Grace Dieu (disambiguation) for other Grace-Dieu, especially nautical, or HMS Grace Dieu The Grace Dieu was the flagship of Henry V of England. ... Henri Grâce à Dieu, nicknamed Great Harry, was an English warship of the 16th century. ... Combatants England France Commanders Edward Howard René de Clermont Strength 25 ships 22 ships The naval Battle of St Mathieu took place on 10 August 1512 during the War of the League of Cambrai, near Brest, France, between an English fleet of 25 ships commanded by Edward Howard and a... Mary Rose depicted on the Anthony Roll, a survey of Henry VIIIs navy, completed in 1546 The Mary Rose was an English Tudor warship of the carrack type and one of the first to be able to fire a full broadside of cannons. ... A model of Michael in the Royal Museum Michael (later popularly known as Great Michael) was a carrack or great ship of the Royal Scottish Navy. ... Henri Grâce à Dieu, nicknamed Great Harry, was an English warship of the 16th century. ... The first HMS Vanguard, of the British Royal Navy was a 32-gun galleon launched in 1586 from Woolwich. ...

List of Major Warships of the English Navy (1618-1642)

Number of main guns follows name (see Rating system of the Royal Navy)
These ships listed in the order of p158-159 The Ship of the Line Volume I, by Brian Lavery, pub Conways, 1983, ISBN 0-85177-252-8

The rating system of the Royal Navy was used by the Royal Navy between the 1670s and early 19th century to categorise sailing warships according to their ability to stand in a line of battle and according to their number of guns. ...

Major Ships Existing in 1618

  • Ships Royal all the ships listed (except Prince Royal) were rebuilds of earlier ships
    • Prince Royal 55 (1610)
    • White Bear 51[8] (1599) – Sold 1629
    • Merhonour 40/44 (1615) - Sold 1650
    • Anne Royal 42 (1608) – ex-Ark Royal, wrecked 1636, refloated and BU 1638?
  • Great Ships all the ships listed (except Warspite) were rebuilds of earlier ships
    • Due Repulse 40/48 (1610) – also known as Repulse', BU 1645
    • Defiance 38/40 (1615) - Sold 1650
    • Warspite 29 (1596) – Harbour service (converted to lighter) 1635
    • Red Lion 38 (1609) – also known as Lion, rebuilt 1640
    • Vanguard (1615) – Rebuilt 1631
    • Rainbow 40 (1617) – Sunk at Sheerness 1680
    • Nonsuch 38 (1603) – Sold c. 1645
  • Middling Ships all the ships listed were rebuilds of earlier ships
    • Dreadnought 30/32 (1614) - BU 1648
    • Speedwell 42 (1607) – ex-'Swiftsure, lost 1624
    • Antelope 34/38 (1618) - Burnt 1649

At least ten ships of the British Royal Navy have borne the name HMS Vanguard, meaning the forefront of an action or movement. ...

New Ships, James I

  • Great Ships
    • Constant Reformation 42 (c1619) – Joined Royalists 1648, lost 1651
    • Victory 56 (1620) – Rearmed with 56 guns by 1660, rebuilt 1666
    • Swiftsure 42 (1621) – Rebuilt 1654
    • St George 42 (1622) - Rearmed with 56 guns by 1660, renamed George, hulk 1687
    • St Andrew 42 (1622) - Rearmed with 56 guns by 1660, renamed Andrew, wrecked 1666
    • Triumph 42 (1623) - Rearmed with 64 guns by 1660, sold 1688
  • Middling Ships
    • Happy Entrance 30 (1619) - Burnt 1658
    • Garland 34 (1620) - Captured by the Netherlands at the Battle of Dungeness, 1652
    • Bonaventure/Anthony Bonaventure 32/34/36 (1621) - Captured by the Netherlands at the Battle of Dungeness, 1652, blown up 1653

The naval Battle of Dungeness took place on 10 December 1652 during the First Anglo-Dutch War near the cape of Dungeness in Kent. ... The naval Battle of Dungeness took place on 10 December 1652 during the First Anglo-Dutch War near the cape of Dungeness in Kent. ...

New Ships, Charles I

  • First Rank
    • Sovereign of the Seas 102 (1637) - Renamed Sovereign, renamed Royal Sovereign, rebuilt 1660
  • Second Rank (Great Ships)
    • Charles 44 (1632) - Wrecked 1650
    • Henrietta Maria 42 (1633) - Renamed Paragon 1650, lost 1655
    • James 48 (c. 1634) – rearmed as 60 guns by 1660, sold 1682
    • Unicorn 46 (1634) - rearmed as 56 guns by 1660, sold 1688
    • Third Rank (Middling Ships)
    • Leopard 34 (1635) - Captured by Netherlands 1653

Sovereign of the Seas HMS Sovereign of the Seas was a 17th century British Royal Navy first-rate ship of the line of 100 guns, later known as just Sovereign and then Royal Sovereign. ...

Major Rebuilds, 1618-1642

  • Vanguard 40 (1631) - Rearmed to 56, wrecked, sold 1667
  • Lion 40 (1640) – Rebuilt 1658
  • Prince Royal 70 (1641) - Rearmed to 80, rebuilt 1663

The second HMS Vanguard, of the British Royal Navy was a 56-gun ship launched in 1631, officially rebuilt from the first Vanguard but likely only sharing some of the timber and fittings. ... Eighteen vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Lion, after the lion, an animal traditionally associated with courage, and also used in several heraldric motifs representing England and the British Monarchy. ...

Other Ships, provenance of data unknown

Not listed in The Ship of the Line, by Brian Lavery
  • Mary Rose 25/26 (c. 1623) - Wrecked 1650
  • St Esprit 42
  • Swallow 34 (c. 1634)
  • Victory (1631) – [perhaps an error in the listing, as Victory of 1620 still existed]
  • Roebuck 10 (1636) - Collision 1641
  • Greyhound 12 (1636) - Blown up in action 1656
  • Expedition 14/30 (1637) - Sold 1667
  • Providence 14/30 (1637) - Wrecked 1668

Captured Ships, provenance of data unknown

Not listed in The Ship of the Line, by Brian Lavery
  • Swan (ex-Dunkirker, captured 1635) - Sunk 1638
  • Nicodemus (ex-Dunkirker, captured 1636) - Sold 1657

List of Ships-of-the-Line of the English Civil War, the Commonwealth and Protectorate (1642-1660)

The interegnum between the execution of Charles I and the Restoration of royal authority in 1660 saw the full emergence of the ship-of-the-line and its employment during the first Anglo-Dutch War.

Number of main guns follows name (see Rating system of the Royal Navy)
These ships listed in the order of p159-160 The Ship of the Line Volume I, by Brian Lavery, pub Conways, 1983, ISBN 0-85177-252-8
It should be noted that frigate at this time was a Dutch concept for the line-of-battle ship. The frigates listed here are not the type of vessel known as frigates in the 18th and 19th centuries.

The rating system of the Royal Navy was used by the Royal Navy between the 1670s and early 19th century to categorise sailing warships according to their ability to stand in a line of battle and according to their number of guns. ...

Early Frigates (Fourth Rates)

  • The First English Frigate
    • Constant Warwick 32 (1645) - BU 1666 for rebuild
  • First Group
    • Assurance 32 (1646)- Sold 1698
    • Adventure 34 (1646) - BU 1688 for rebuild
    • Nonsuch 34 (1646) - Wrecked 1664
  • Second Group
    • Dragon 32 (1647) - BU 1690 for rebuild
    • Elizabeth 32 (1647) - Burnt 1667
    • Phoenix 32 (1647) - Captured by the Netherlands at the Battle of Elba, 1652, recaptured 1652, wrecked 1664
    • Tiger 32 (1647) - BU 1681 for rebuild

At least four ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Adventure: The first Adventure, was a coller ship that accompanied HMS Resolution on a voyage to the South Pacific. ... Nine vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Nonsuch. ... Several Royal Navy ships have been called HMS Dragon The 4th Rate Dragon, in 1674, had a lieutenant called John Tyrrell, who had been appointed by King Charles II of England. ... Fifteen vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Phoenix, after the legendary phoenix bird. ... This was a tough battle probably on 7 September 1652 between a Dutch fleet under Johan van Galen and an English fleet under Richard Badiley. ... Twelve ships of the British Royal Navy have carried the name HMS Tiger, after the feline tiger. ...

Later Frigates (Fourth Rates)

  • Great Frigate (Third Rate)
    • Antelope 56 (c. 1651) - Wrecked 1652
  • Speaker class Third Rate Frigates
    • Fairfax 52 (c. 1650) - Burnt 1653
    • Speaker 50 (c. 1650) - Renamed Mary 1660
    • Fairfax 52 (c. 1653) - Wrecked 1682
    • Plymouth 52 (c. 1653)
    • Essex 48 (c. 1653) - Captured by the Netherlands at the Four Days Battle, 1666
    • Gloucester 50 (1654) - Rearmed to 54, rearmed to 60, wrecked 1682
    • Torrington 52 (c. 1654) - Renamed Dreadnought 1660, rearmed to 62, sank 1690
    • Newbury 52 (c. 1654) - Renamed Revenge 1660, condemned 1678
    • Bridgewater 52 (c. 1654) - Renamed Anne 1660, blew up 1673
    • Lyme 52 (c. 1654) - Renamed Montague 1660
    • Marston Moor 52 (c. 1654) - Renamed York 1660, wrecked 1703
    • Langport 50 (c. 1654) - Renamed Henrietta 1660, wrecked 1689
    • Tredagh 50 (c. 1654) - Renamed Resolution 1660, burnt at the St. James' Day Battle, 1666
  • Other Third Rate frigates
    • Worcester 48 (c. 1651) - Renamed Dunkirk 1660
    • Monck 52 (c. 1659)
  • Phoenix class, Fourth rate Frigates
    • Portsmouth 34 (1649) - Blew up 1689
    • Sapphire 34 (1651) - Wrecked 1671
    • Hampshire 38 (1653) - Rearmed to 46
  • Elizabeth class, Fourth rate Frigates
    • President 34 (1650) - Renamed Bonaventure 1660
    • Reserve 34 (1650)
    • Advice 34 (1650)
    • Pelican 34 (1650) - Burnt 1656
    • Centurion 34 (1650) - Wrecked 1689
    • Foresight 34 (1650) - Wrecked 1698
    • Assistance 34 (1650)
    • Laurel 34 (1651) - Rearmed to 46, wrecked 1657
    • Gainsborough 38/40 (1653) - Renamed Swallow 1660, wrecked 1692
    • Preston 40 (1653) - Renamed Antelope 1660, sold 1693
    • Nantwich 38/40 (1655) - Renamed Bredah 1660, wrecked 1666
    • Jersey 38/40 (1654) - Captured by France 1691
    • Maidstone 40/48 (1654) - Renamed Mary Rose 1660, - Captured by France 1691
  • Ruby class
    • Ruby 40 (1651) - Captured by France at the Battle at The Lizard, 1707
    • Diamond 40 (1651) - Captured by France 1693
    • Kentish 40 (1652) - Renamed Kent 1660, wrecked 1672
    • Sussex 38/40 (1652) - Rearmed to 46, blew up 1653
    • Portland 40 (1652) - Burnt to avoid capture 1692
    • Newcastle 44 (1653) - Wrecked 1703
    • Bristol 38/40 (1653) - Rearmed to 44
    • Yarmouth 44 (1653) - BU 1680
    • Taunton 40 (1654) - Renamed Crown 1660, rearmed to 48
    • Dover 40 (1654) - Rearmed to 48
    • Winsby 44 (1654) - Renamed Happy Return 1660, captured by France 1691
    • Leopard 44 (1659) - Scuttled 1699
    • Princess 34 (1660) - BU 1680

At least twelve ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Antelope. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Five ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Essex, after the county of Essex. ... Combatants England United Provinces Commanders George Monck,Duke of Albemarle Michiel de Ruyter Strength 79 ships 84 ships Casualties 10 English ships lost 4 Dutch ships lost The Four Days Battle was a naval battle of the Second Anglo-Dutch War. ... Eleven vessels, and one planned, of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Gloucester, after Gloucester, the city in England. ... Resolution in a gale by Willem van de Velde, the younger depicts the first Resolution c. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... A number of ships of the Royal Navy have bourne the name Worcester. ... The HMS Sapphire was a 32 gun, 5th rate frigate, of the Royal Navy in Newfoundland to protect the English migratory fishery. ... Several ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Hampshire after the county of Hampshire: Hampshire, launched in 1903, was a Devonshire-class armoured cruiser. ... Several ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS President, after the office of president meaning one who presides over an assembly. ... HMS Advice has been the name of a number of Royal Navy ships: HMS Advice, a pinnace 1586 - 1617 HMS Advice, a ship, 1650 - 1711 HMS Advice, a fourth-rate ship of the line 1712. ... Eight ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Centurion, after the centurions of ancient Rome. ... HMS Jersey (F72) was a J-class destroyer of the Royal Navy laid down by J. Samuel White and Company at Cowes on the Isle of Wight on 20 September 1937, launched on 26 September 1938 and commissioned on 28 April 1939. ... Combatants Britain France Commanders Richard Edwards René Duguay-Trouin Claude de Forbin Strength 5 warships 80-130 merchant ships 13 warships Casualties 1 warship destroyed, 3 captured Approx. ... Several ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Diamond. ... Eleven ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Kent, after the county of Kent. ... HMS Sussex was a British warship that sank in the Mediterranean Sea in 1694. ... The name HMS Portland has been carried by eight ships of the Royal Navy. ... There have been eight ships that have borne the name HMS Newcastle in the Royal Navy, all serving her nation with distinction. ... Six ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Bristol, after the port of Bristol. ... Several ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Yarmouth. ... Eleven vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Leopard after the leopard: The first Leopard was a 34-gun ship launched in 1635 and captured by the Dutch in 1653. ...

Large Ships

  • First Rate
    • Naseby 80 (1655) - Renamed Royal Charles 1660, captured by the Netherlands, 1667, BU
  • Second Rates
    • Richard 70 (c. 1658) - Renamed Royal James 1660, burnt 1667
    • Dunbar 64 (c. 1656) - Renamed Henry 1660, rearmed to 82, burnt 1682
    • London 64 (c. 1654) - Blown up 1665

The painting Dutch attack on the Medway, June 1667 by Pieter Cornelisz van Soest, painted c. ... Twelve ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS London, after the city of London. ...

Major Rebuilds

  • Sovereign 100 (1660) - Rebuilt 1685.
  • Swiftsure 60 (1654) – Captured by the Dutch 1667
  • Lion 48 (c. 1658) – re-armed at 60 by 1677. Sold 1698

Eighteen vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Lion, after the lion, an animal traditionally associated with courage, and also used in several heraldric motifs representing England and the British Monarchy. ...

Captures of the First Anglo-Dutch War

Not listed in The Ship of the Line, by Brian Lavery
  • Violet 44 (ex-Dutch, captured 1652) - BU 1672
  • Bear 36 (ex-Dutch Beer, captured 1652)
  • Welcome 36 (ex-Dutch, captured 1652) - Expended as fireship 1673
  • Stork (ex-Dutch Ooievaar, captured 1652) - Sold 1663
  • Ostrich/Estridge (ex-Dutch Vogelstruys, captured 1653) - Scuttled 1679
  • Elias 36 (ex-Dutch Elias, captured 1653) - Wrecked 1664
  • Mathias 38 (ex-Dutch Sint Mattheus, captured 1653) - Burnt 1667
  • Great Charity 38 (ex-Dutch Liefde, captured 1653) - Captured by Netherlands 1665
  • Indian 44 (ex-Dutch EI Roos, captured 1654) - Sold 1660

Other Captures

Not listed in The Ship of the Line, by Brian Lavery
  • Guinea 30 (ex-Royalist Charles, captured 1649, ex-merchantman Guinea Frigate) - Sold 1667
  • Convertine 40 (ex-Portuguese) - Captured by the Netherlands 1666

Other Ships (data of uncertain provenance)

Not listed in The Ship of the Line, by Brian Lavery
The listing of these ships is unreliable.
  • Worcester 50 - Burnt 1653
  • Globe 24
  • John 28
  • Fellowship 28
  • Amity 30 (ex-merchantman) - Sold 1667

A number of ships of the Royal Navy have bourne the name Worcester. ...

List of Line-of-Battle Ships of the Royal Navy (1660-1675)

The Royal Navy came formally into existence with the Restoration of Charles II (before the Interregnum, English warships had been the personal property of the monarch and were collectively termed "the King's Ships").

Number of main guns follows name (see Rating system of the Royal Navy)
These ships listed in the order of p160-162 The Ship of the Line Volume I, by Brian Lavery, pub Conways, 1983, ISBN 0-85177-252-8

The rating system of the Royal Navy was used by the Royal Navy between the 1670s and early 19th century to categorise sailing warships according to their ability to stand in a line of battle and according to their number of guns. ...

Pre-War Construction

  • Second Rates
    • Royal Oak 76 (c. 1664) - Burnt 1667
    • Royal Katherine 84 (1664)

Seven (or eleven, depending on how one counts) vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Royal Oak. ... HMS Royal Katherine was an 84-gun second-rate ship of the line, launched in 1664. ...

Second Dutch War Construction

  • Second Rate
    • Loyal London 80 (c. 1666) - Burned 1667
  • Third Rates
    • Cambridge 70 (c. 1666) - Wrecked 1694
    • Rupert 66 (c. 1666)
    • Defiance 64 (1666) - Burnt 1668
    • Warspite 70 (c. 1666)
    • Monmouth 66 (c. 1667)
  • Fourth Rates
    • Greenwich 54 (1666) - BU 1699 for rebuild
    • St Patrick 50 (1666) - Captured by the Netherlands 1667
    • St David 54 (1667) - Sank 1690, refloated, sold 1713

Twelve ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS London, after the city of London. ... Several ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Defiance: Defiance was a 3rd rate ship of the line of 74 guns. ... Several ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Warspite: Warspite, launched in 1884, was a first-class armoured cruiser scrapped between 1904 and 1906. ... The second HMS Monmouth was a 66-gun third-rate warship of the British Royal Navy, named for the town of Monmouth in Wales. ...

Inter-War Construction

  • 100-Gun Ships
    • Prince 100 (c. 1669/70) - Renamed Royal William 1692?
    • Royal James 100 (1671) - Burnt at the Battle of Solebay, 1672
    • Royal Charles 100 (1673) - Renamed Queen 1693, renamed Royal George, renamed Royal Anne 1756, BU 1767
  • 90-96-Gun Ships
    • Charles 96 (1668) - Rebuilt 1701.
    • St Michael 90 (c. 1668/69) – Rebuilt 1706 and renamed Marlborough
    • London 96 (c. 1670)
    • St Andrew 96 (c. 1670) - Renamed Royal Anne 1703, BU 1757
  • Third Rates
    • Resolution 70 (1667)
    • Edgar 72 (1668)

This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Combatants United Provinces (Netherlands) England, France Commanders Michiel de Ruyter Adriaen Banckert Willem Joseph van Ghent The Duke of York and Albany, The Earl of Sandwich, Jean II dEstrées Strength 75 ships 93 ships Casualties 1 ship destroyed, 1 captured 1 ship destroyed The naval Battle of Solebay... Two ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Royal Charles, both after King Charles II. The first Royal Charles was an 80-gun ship of the line, launched as Naseby in 1655, renamed in 1660, and captured by the Dutch in the Raid on the Medway in... Twelve ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS London, after the city of London. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Resolution. ... Eight ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Edgar. ...

Third Dutch War Construction

  • First Rate
    • Royal James 100 (1675) - Renamed Victory 1691, rebuilt 1695
  • Third Rates
    • Swiftsure 70 (1673) – rebuilt 1696
    • Harwich 70 (1674) - Wrecked 1691
    • Royal Oak 74 (c. 1674) – rebuilt 1690
    • Defiance 64 (1676) – rebuilt 1695
  • Fourth Rates
    • Oxford 54 (1674) – Enlarged 1702, rebuilt 1727
    • Kingfisher 46 (1676) - BU 1699 for rebuild
    • Woolwich 54 (1675) - BU 1702 for rebuild

The Royal Navy has had ships named HMS Swiftsure since 1573, including: Swiftsure, launched in 1804, was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line which served at the Battle of Trafalgar and was sold in 1845. ... HMS Royal Oak was a 17th century gunship of the Royal Navy, built in 1674, and rebuilt in 1690, 1713 and 1741. ... Several ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Defiance: Defiance was a 3rd rate ship of the line of 74 guns. ... HMS Oxford has been the name of at least one Royal Navy ship, named after the City of Oxford. ... HMS Kingfisher pennant number P260 completed in 1975. ...

Major Rebuilds

  • First Rate
    • Royal Prince 92 (1663) – Burnt by the Dutch 1666
  • Second Rate'
    • Victory 82 (1665) – broken up 1691
  • Third Rate
    • Montague 62 (1675) – Rebuilt 1698
  • Fourth Rate
    • Constant Warwick 42 (1675) – Captured 1691

Five ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Victory. ...

Captured Ships

  • Ruby (c. 1664, ex-French Rubis, captured 1666) – Hulk 1682, BU 1685
  • Stavoren (ex-Dutch, captured 1672) - Sold 1682
  • Arms of Rotterdam (ex-Dutch, captured 1673) – Hulk 1675. BU 1703

Other Captured Ships, where the provenance of the data is unknown

The following ships are not listed in The Ship of the Line Volume I, by Brian Lavery
  • Golden Lion 34/42 (ex-Dutch Gouden Leeuw, captured 1664)
  • Unity 34/42 (ex-Dutch Eendracht, captured 1665) - Captured by Netherlands 1667
  • Charles V 44/52 (ex-Dutch Carolus V, captured 1665) - Burnt 1667
  • Mars 44/52 (ex-Dutch Mars, captured 1665) - Sold 1667
  • (Black) Bull 34/40 (ex-Dutch Edam, captured 1665) - Captured by Netherlands 1666
  • Delfe 34/40 (ex-Dutch Delft, captured 1665) - Sold 1668
  • Zealand 34/40 (ex-Dutch Zeelandia, captured 1665) - Sold 1667
  • Young Prince 30/38 (ex-Dutch Jonge Prins, captured 1665) - Burnt 1666
  • Clove Tree 48/62 (ex-Dutch Nagelboom, captured 1665) - Captured by Netherlands 1666
  • Seven Oaks 44/52 (ex-Dutch Zevenwolden, captured 1665) - Captured by Netherlands 1666
  • West Friesland 44/54 (ex-Dutch Westfriesland, captured 1665) - Sold 1667
  • Black Spread Eagle 40/48 (ex-Dutch Groningen, captured 1665) - Sank 1666
  • Hope 34/40 (ex-Dutch Hoop, captured 1665) - Wrecked 1666
  • Guilder de Ruyter 42/48 (ex-Dutch Geldersche Ruiter, captured 1665) - Sold 1667
  • Saint Paul 34/40 (ex-Dutch Sint Paulus, captured 1665) - Sank 1666
  • Maria Sancta 42/50 (ex-Dutch Sint Marie, captured 1665) - Burnt 1666
  • Stathouse van Harlem 40/46 (ex-Dutch Raadhuis van Haarlem, captured 1667) - Scuttled 1690

Other Ships provenance of data unknown

The following ship is not listed in The Ship of the Line Volume I, by Brian Lavery
  • Falcon 42 (1666) - Captured by France 1694

List of Line-of-Battle Ships of the Royal Navy (1677-1688)

Number of main guns follows name (see Rating system of the Royal Navy)
These ships listed in the order of p162-163 The Ship of the Line Volume I, by Brian Lavery, pub Conways, 1983, ISBN 0-85177-252-8

The rating system of the Royal Navy was used by the Royal Navy between the 1670s and early 19th century to categorise sailing warships according to their ability to stand in a line of battle and according to their number of guns. ...

The Thirty Ships of 1677

  • First Rate of 100 Guns
    • Britannia 100 (c. 1682) - BU 1715
  • Second Rates of 90 Guns
    • Vanguard 90 (1678) - Wrecked in the Great Storm of 1703
    • Windsor Castle 90 (c. 1678) - Wrecked 1693
    • Duchess 90 (c. 1679) - Renamed Princess Anne 1701, renamed Windsor Castle 1702, renamed Blenheim 1706
    • Sandwich 90 (c. 1679)
    • Albemarle 90 (c. 1680) - Renamed Union 1709, BU 1749
    • Duke 90 (c. 1682) - Renamed Prince George 1701?
    • Ossory 90 (c. 1682) - Renamed Prince 1705
    • Neptune 90 (c. 1683)
    • Coronation 90 (c. 1685) - Wrecked 1691
  • Third Rates of 70 Guns
    • Anne 70 (c. 1677/78) - Burnt 1690
    • Captain 70 (c. 1678)
    • Hampton Court 70 (c. 1678)
    • Hope 70 (c. 1678) - Captured 1695
    • Lennox 70 (c. 1678)
    • Restoration 70 (1678) - Wrecked in the Great Storm of 1703
    • Berwick 70 (c. 1679)
    • Breda 70 (c. 1679) - Burnt 1690
    • Burford 70 (c. 1679)
    • Eagle 70 (1679)
    • Elizabeth 70 (c. 1679)
    • Essex 70 (1679) - BU 1736 for rebuild
    • Expedition 70 (1679) - Renamed Prince Frederick 1715, sold 1784
    • Grafton 70 (c. 1679)
    • Kent 70 (1679)
    • Northumberland 70 (1679) - Wrecked in the Great Storm of 1703
    • Pendennis 70 (c. 1678/79) - Wrecked 1689
    • Stirling Castle 70 (1679) - Wrecked in the Great Storm of 1703
    • Exeter 70 (c. 1680) - Hulked 1691
    • Suffolk 70 (c. 1680) - BU by 1765

Seven vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Britannia, after Britannia, the goddess and later personification of Britain. ... The third HMS Vanguard, of the British Royal Navy was a 90-gun three-decker second-rate built in Portsmouth and launched in 1678. ... The Great Storm of 1703 is the most severe storm ever recorded in the British Isles. ... Five ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Albemarle after George Monck, 1st Duke of Albemarle (sometimes the spelling Albermarle is seen). ... HMS Ossory the name of several Royal Navy ships, named after the Kingdom of Ossory, in Ireland, or possible Thomas Butler, Earl of Ossory. ... Nine ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Neptune after the Roman god of the ocean. ... HMS Anne, the name of at least two ships of the Royal Navy. ... At least six ships of the Royal Navy have been called HMS Captain. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Restoration. ... The Great Storm of 1703 is the most severe storm ever recorded in the British Isles. ... Several ships of the British Royal Navy have borne the name HMS Berwick, after the town on the border between England and Scotland. ... About fifteen ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Eagle, after the eagle. ... Five ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Essex, after the county of Essex. ... Two ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Grafton: The first Grafton (H89) was a G-class destroyer launched in 1935 and torpedoed in 1940. ... Eleven ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Kent, after the county of Kent. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Northumberland. ... The Great Storm of 1703 is the most severe storm ever recorded in the British Isles. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Stirling Castle. ... The Great Storm of 1703 is the most severe storm ever recorded in the British Isles. ... Five ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Exeter after the city of Exeter in Devon. ... Five ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Suffolk, after the county of Suffolk. ...

New Fourth rates (1683-1688)

  • Mordaunt 46 (c. 1681) – Built privately and purchased 1683. Wrecked 1693
  • Deptford 50 (1687) - BU 1700 for rebuild
  • St Albans 50 (1687) - Wrecked 1693
  • Sedgemoor 50 (1687) - Wrecked 1689

There have been six vessels of the Royal Navy bearing the name St Albans. ...

Major Rebuilds (1677-1688)

  • Royal Sovereign 100 (1685) – burnt by accident 1697
  • Mary 62 (1688) - Wrecked 1703
  • Tiger 44 (1681) – Rebuilt 1701
  • Bonadventure 40 (1683) – rebuilt 1699
  • Hampshire 46 (1686) - Sunk in action 26 August 1697.
  • Assistance 48 (1687) – Rebuilt 1699

Captures - Ex-Algerines

The following ships are not listed in The Ship of the Line Volume I, by Brian Lavery. the provenance of the data is unknown.
  • Marygold (ex-Algerine Marygold, captured 1677) - Wrecked 1679
  • Tiger Prize (ex-Algerine, captured 1678) - Scuttled as breakwater 1696
  • Greyhound 42 (ex-Algerine, captured 1679)
  • Golden Horse (ex-Algerine Golden Horse, captured 1681) - Scuttled 1688
  • Half Moon (ex-Algerine Half Moon, captured 1681) - Burnt 1686
  • Two Lions (ex-Algerine Two Lions, captured 1681) - Sold 1688

List of Line-of-Battle Ships of the Royal Navy (1688-1697)

Number of main guns follows name (see Rating system of the Royal Navy)
Except where stated otherwise, these ships are listed in the order of p163-165 The Ship of the Line Volume I, by Brian Lavery, pub Conways, 1983, ISBN 0-85177-252-8

The rating system of the Royal Navy was used by the Royal Navy between the 1670s and early 19th century to categorise sailing warships according to their ability to stand in a line of battle and according to their number of guns. ...

The Twenty-Seven Ships Programme of 1691

  • Two-Decker Third Rates of 80 Guns
    • Devonshire 80 (1692) - Blew up at the Battle at The Lizard, 1707
    • Cornwall 80 (1692)
    • Boyne 80 (1692) - BU by 1763
    • Russell 80 (1692)
    • Norfolk 80 (1693)
    • Humber 80 (1693)
    • Sussex 80 (1693) - Wrecked 1694
    • Torbay 80 (1693)
    • Lancaster 80 (1694)
    • Dorsetshire 80 (1694)
    • Cambridge 80 (1694/95)
    • Chichester 80 (1695)
    • Newark 80 (1695)
  • Three-Decker Third Rates of 80 Guns
    • Shrewsbury 80 (1695)
    • Cumberland 80 (1695) - Captured by France at the Battle at The Lizard, 1707, to Genoa 1715, to Spain 1717 as Principe de Asturias 70, captured by Britain at the Battle of Cape Passaro, 1718, to Austria 1720 as San Carlos, BU 1733
    • Ranelagh 80 (1697) - Renamed Princess Caroline 1728
    • Somerset 80 (1698) - BU 1740
  • Fourth rates of 60 Guns
    • Carlisle 60 (1693) - Wrecked 1696
    • Winchester 60 (1693) - Sank 1695
    • Medway 60 (1693)
    • Canterbury 60 (1693)
    • Sunderland 60 (1694) - Scuttled 1737
    • Pembroke 60 (1694) - Captured 1709
    • Gloucester 60 (1695) - BU 1731
    • Windsor 60 (1695)
    • Kingston 60 (1697)
    • Exeter 60 (1697)

Eight ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Devonshire, originally in honor of William Cavendish, 1st Duke of Devonshire, and later after the county of Devonshire (now called Devon). ... Combatants Britain France Commanders Richard Edwards René Duguay-Trouin Claude de Forbin Strength 5 warships 80-130 merchant ships 13 warships Casualties 1 warship destroyed, 3 captured Approx. ... HMS Cornwall was an 80-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched in 1692. ... Six ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Boyne after the Battle of the Boyne, 1690. ... At least four ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Russell. ... The first HMS Norfolk was an 80-gun, third-rate ship of the line. ... For other ships with the same name, see HMS Sussex. ... Four ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Torbay, after Torbay on the southwest English coast. ... There have been six ships of the Royal Navy named HMS Lancaster: The first Lancaster was a 80 gun First Rate built in 1694, then rebuilt and relaunched in 1722, and rebuilt for a third time to a 66 gun Third Rate in 1749 the second Lancaster was a East... Three ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Dorsetshire, after the traditional county of Dorsetshire. ... There have been sixteen ships named HMS Cumberland in the Royal Navy. ... Combatants Britain France Commanders Richard Edwards René Duguay-Trouin Claude de Forbin Strength 5 warships 80-130 merchant ships 13 warships Casualties 1 warship destroyed, 3 captured Approx. ... The naval Battle of Cape Passaro took place on 11 August 1718 near Cape Passaro, Sicily, when a British fleet under Admiral George Byng defeated a Spanish fleet of twenty-six men-of-war, two fireships, four bomb vessels, seven galleys and several other ships with stores and provisions under... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Somerset. ... Eight ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Medway, probably after the River Medway. ... At least six ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Pembroke. ... Eleven vessels, and one planned, of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Gloucester, after Gloucester, the city in England. ... Four ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Kingston. ... Five ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Exeter after the city of Exeter in Devon. ...

Other Third Rates

  • 70-Gun Ships, Ordered 1690
    • Breda 70 (1692) - BU 1730
    • Yarmouth 70 (1694)
    • Ipswich 70 (1694)
  • 70-Gun Ships, Ordered 1695
    • Bedford 70 (1698) – Rebuilt 1741
    • Orford 70 (1698) – Rebuilt 1712
    • Nassau 70 (1699) - Wrecked 1706
    • Revenge 70 (1699) – Renamed Buckingham 1711, hulk 1727, scuttled as a foundation 1745
  • 64-Gun Ship
    • Dreadnought 64 (1691) – Reduced to Fourth rate 1697, rebuilt 1706

HMS Breda was a 70-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched at Woolwich Dockyard in 1692. ... Several ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Yarmouth. ... Sixteen warships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Revenge. ... Six ships and one submarine of the Royal Navy have borne the name HMS Dreadnought in the expectation that they would dread nought but God. ...

Second Rates of 90 Guns, Ordered 1695

    • Association 90 (1697) - Wrecked 1707
    • Barfleur 90 (1697) – rebuilt 1716 at 80-gun ship
    • Namur 90 (1697) – rebuilt 1729
    • Triumph 90 (1698) - Renamed Prince 1714, rebuilt 1750

HMS Association was the flagship of Admiral Sir Cloudesley Shovell which sank off the Isles of Scilly in 1707 in one of the worst maritime disasters in British history. ... Two ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Barfleur after the battle of Barfleur: Barfleur, launched 1892, was a Centurion-class battleship, broken up in 1910. ... Several ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Triumph: Triumph, launched in 1764, was a 74-gun third-rate ship-of-the-line built at Woolwich. ...

Fourth Rates of 50 Guns

The split between 123 ft groups and 130 ft groups is not in Lavery, but in the previous version of this list on Wikipedia. However the split is supported by data in Lavery.
  • Ordered 1693 (123 ft group)
    • Falmouth 42 (1693) - Captured by France 1704
    • Norwich (1691) - Wrecked 1692
    • Southampton (1693) - BU 1699 for rebuild
    • Anglesea (1694) - BU 1719
  • Ordered 1693 (130 ft group)
    • Weymouth (1693) - BU 1717 for rebuild
    • Colchester (1694) - Wrecked 1704
    • Lincoln (1695) - Sank 1703
    • Coventry (1695) - Captured by France 1704, recaptured 1709
  • Ordered 1695 (130 ft group)
    • Hampshire 50 (1698) - BU 1739
    • Dartmouth 42 (1698) - BU 1714 for rebuild
    • Winchester 50 (1698) - BU 1716 for rebuild
    • Salisbury 50 (1698) - Captured by France 1703, recaptured 1708, renamed Salisbury Prize, renamed Preston 1716, BU 1739 for rebuild
    • Worcester 50 (1698) - BU 1713 for rebuild
    • Jersey 50 (1698) – Hulked 1731, sunk 1763
    • Carlisle 50 (1698) - Blew up 1700
    • Tilbury 50 (1699) - BU 1726 for rebuild
  • Other 50-Gun Ships (123 ft group)
    • Chester (1691) - Captured by France at the Battle at The Lizard, 1707
    • Chatham 50 (1691) - BU 1718 for rebuild
    • Centurion 48 (1690) - BU 1728 for rebuild
    • Norwich (1693) - BU 1712 for rebuild
    • Portland (1693) - BU 1719 for rebuild
    • Dartmouth 48 (1693) - Captured by France 1695, recaptured 1702, renamed Vigo, wrecked 1703
    • Rochester (1693) - BU 1714 for rebuild
  • Other 50-Gun Ships (130 ft group)
    • Lichfield (1695) - BU 1720 for rebuild
    • Romney (1694) - Wrecked 1707
    • Burlington (1695) - BU 1733
    • Harwich (1695) - Wrecked 1700
    • Pendennis (1695) - Captured by France 1705
    • Severn (1695) - BU 1734 for rebuild
    • Falkland (c. 1690)- Built by Holland at Newcastle, New England and purchased 1696, rebuilt 1702
    • Blackwall (1696) - Captured by France 1705
    • Guernsey (1696) - BU 1716 for rebuild
    • Nonsuch (1696) - BU 1716 for rebuild
    • Warwick (1696) - BU 1709 for rebuild

HMS Falmouth has been the name of several Royal Navy vessels: HMS Falmouth (1652), a captured Dutch ship HMS Falmouth (1693), a 4th rate HMS Falmouth (1708), a 4th rate HMS Falmouth (1752), a 4th rate HMS Falmouth (1807), a schooner HMS Falmouth (1814), a 6th rate HMS Falmouth (1860... 88. ... Several ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Lincoln HMS Lincoln, a warship active in American waters in 1701 HMS Lincoln, a Town class destroyer received from the US Navy in 1940 and scrapped in 1945. ... Seven ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Coventry, after the town of Coventry. ... Several ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Hampshire after the county of Hampshire: Hampshire, launched in 1903, was a Devonshire-class armoured cruiser. ... At least four ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Dartmouth. ... USS Claxton (DD-140), named for Thomas Claxton, was a Wickes-class destroyer in the United States Navy. ... A number of ships of the Royal Navy have bourne the name Worcester. ... HMS Jersey (F72) was a J-class destroyer of the Royal Navy laid down by J. Samuel White and Company at Cowes on the Isle of Wight on 20 September 1937, launched on 26 September 1938 and commissioned on 28 April 1939. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Combatants Britain France Commanders Richard Edwards René Duguay-Trouin Claude de Forbin Strength 5 warships 80-130 merchant ships 13 warships Casualties 1 warship destroyed, 3 captured Approx. ... HMS Chatham, 1911 - 1926, pictured circa 1914 Fifteen ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Chatham after the port of Chatham, Kent, home of the Chatham Dockyard The first Chatham was a galliot captured in 1666 during the Second Anglo-Dutch War. ... Eight ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Centurion, after the centurions of ancient Rome. ... The name HMS Portland has been carried by eight ships of the Royal Navy. ... At least four ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Dartmouth. ... Three ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Lichfield. ... There have been nine ships and one submarine of the Royal Navy named HMS Severn after the River Severn: The first Severn was a fourth rate two-decked ship of 50 guns launched in 1693 and broekn up in 1734. ... Nine vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Nonsuch. ...

Major Rebuilds

  • First Rates
    • Royal William 100 (1692) – ex-Prince, rebuilt 1719.
    • Queen 100 (1693) – ex-Royal Charles, rebuilt 1715, renamed Royal George
  • Victory 100 (1695) – ex-Royal James, burnt 1721 and BU
  • Third Rates
    • Royal Oak 70 (1690) – Rebuilt 1713
    • Defiance 64 (1695) - Rebuilt 1707
    • Swiftsure 66 (1696) – rebuilt 1716 and renamed Revenge
  • Fourth Rates
    • Dragon 46 (1690) - Rebuilt 1707.
    • Bristol 50 (1693) – Captured 1709
    • Dover 50 (1695) – Rebuilt 1716

Seven (or eleven, depending on how one counts) vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Royal Oak. ... Several ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Defiance: Defiance was a 3rd rate ship of the line of 74 guns. ... The Royal Navy has had ships named HMS Swiftsure since 1573, including: Swiftsure, launched in 1804, was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line which served at the Battle of Trafalgar and was sold in 1845. ... Several Royal Navy ships have been called HMS Dragon The 4th Rate Dragon, in 1674, had a lieutenant called John Tyrrell, who had been appointed by King Charles II of England. ... Six ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Bristol, after the port of Bristol. ...

Captured Ships, War of 1689-1697

  • Content 70 (1686) – ex-French captured 29 January 1695, hulk 1703, sold by 1714.
  • Ruby Prize 48 (16??) – ex-French captured 1695, sold 1698.
  • Trident (c. 1688) - ex-French, captured 29 January 1695, scuttled as breakwater 1701
  • Medway Prize - ex-French, captured 20 August 1697, hulk 1699, scuttled as a foundation 1712

Eight ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Medway, probably after the River Medway. ...

List of Line-of-Battle Ships of the Royal Navy (1697-1719)

Number of main guns follows name (see Rating system of the Royal Navy)
Except where stated otherwise, these ships are listed in the order of p165-169 The Ship of the Line Volume I, by Brian Lavery, pub Conways, 1983, ISBN 0-85177-252-8

The rating system of the Royal Navy was used by the Royal Navy between the 1670s and early 19th century to categorise sailing warships according to their ability to stand in a line of battle and according to their number of guns. ...

First Rates of 100 Guns, Rebuilt 1697-1719

  • Royal Sovereign 100 (1701) – BU 1768
  • Royal Anne 100 (1703) – ex-St Andrew, BU 1757
  • London 100 (1706) - Enlarged 1721 to 1,711 tons, BU 1747
  • Royal George 100 (1715) – ex-Queen, renamed Royal Anne 1756, BU 1767
  • Britannia 100 (1719) – Harbour service 1745, BU 1749
  • Royal William 100 (1719) – reduced to 84 guns, BU 1813

Twelve ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS London, after the city of London. ...

New Ships, Pre-Establishment, 1697-1706

  • Third Rates of 70 Guns
    • Northumberland 70 (1705) - Rebuilt 1721
    • Stirling Castle 70 (1705) - Rebuilt 1723
    • Resolution 70 (1705) – Run ashore 1707
    • Nassau 70 (1706) – Rebuilt 1740
    • Elizabeth 70 (1706) - Rebuilt 1737
    • Restoration 70 (1706) – Wrecked 1711
  • Fourth Rates of 60 Guns
    • Nottingham 60 (1703) – rebuilt 1719
    • Mary 60 (1704) – Rebuilt 1742 and renamed Princess Mary
    • York 60 (1706) Lengthend 1738, sunk as a breakwater 1750
  • Fourth Rate of 50 Guns, 114 ft
    • Greyhound 50 (1720) – Wrecked 1711
  • Fourth Rates of 50 Guns, 130ft group
    • Swallow 50 (1703) – Rebuilt 1719
    • Antelope 50 (1703) – Rebuilt 1741
    • Leopard 50 (1703) – Rebuilt 1721
    • Panther 50 (1703) – Rebuilt 1716
    • Newcastle 50 (1704) – Rebuilt 1732
    • Reserve 50 (1704) - Renamed Sutherland 1716, hospital ship 1741, BU 1754
    • Saint Albans 50 (1706) – Rebuilt 1737
    • Colchester 50 (1707) – Rebuilt 1721

For other ships of the same name, see HMS Northumberland. ... A number of ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Stirling Castle after Stirling Castle in Scotland, including: Stirling Castle, a 70-gun third rate, built c. ... Resolution in a gale by Willem van de Velde, the younger depicts the first Resolution c. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Nottingham. ... At least twelve ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Antelope. ... Eleven vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Leopard after the leopard: The first Leopard was a 34-gun ship launched in 1635 and captured by the Dutch in 1653. ... At least five ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Panther. ... There have been eight ships that have borne the name HMS Newcastle in the Royal Navy, all serving her nation with distinction. ... ... There have been six vessels of the Royal Navy bearing the name St Albans. ...

Rebuilds, Pre-Establishment, 1697-1706

  • Second Rates of 90 Guns
    • Prince George 90 (1701) – ex-Duke, rebuilt 1723
    • St George 90 (1701) – ex-Charles, rebuilt 1740
    • Royal Katherine 90 (1702) – Renamed Ramillies 1706, rebuilt 1749
    • Union 90 (1704) – ex-Albemarle, rebuilt 1726
    • Marlborough 90 (1706) – ex-St Michael, rebuilt 1732
    • Blenheim 90 (1709) – ex-Duchess, BU 1763
  • Third Rates of 80 Guns
    • Devonshire 80 (1704) – Blown up in action 1707
    • Chichester 80 (1706) – BU 1749
    • Cornwall 80 (1706) – Rebuilt 1726
  • Third Rates of 70 Guns
    • Resolution 70 (1698) – Foundered 1703
    • Burford 70 (1699) – Wrecked 1719
    • Eagle 70 (1699) – Wrecked 1707
    • Expedition 70 (1699) – Rebuilt 1714 and renamed Prince Frederick
    • Kent 70 (1699) – Rebuilt 1724
    • Stirling Castle 70 (1699) – Wrecked 1703
    • Suffolk 70 (1699) - Rebuilt 1719
    • Berwick 70 (1700) – Hulked 1715, BU 1723
    • Edgar 70 (1700) - Rebuilt 1709
    • Essex 70 (1700) - Rebuilt 1713
    • Grafton 70 (1700) – Captured 1707
    • Hampton Court 70 (1701) – Captured 1707
    • Lennox 70 (1701) - Rebuilt 1723
    • Northumberland| 70 (1702) – Wrecked 1703
    • Resolution 70 (1702) - Wrecked 1703
    • Elizabeth 70 (1704) - Captured 1704
  • Third Rates of 66 Guns
    • Monmouth 66 (1700) – Rebuilt 1718
    • Warspite 66 (1702) – Renamed Edinburgh, rebuilt 1721
    • Rupert 66 (1713) – Reduced to Fourth Rate 1716, BU 1740
    • Defiance 66 (1707) - Reduced to Fourth Rate 1716, hulk 1743, BU 1740
  • Fourth Rates of 60 Guns
    • Montague 60 (1698) – Rebuilt 1716
    • Monck 60 (1702) – Wrecked 1720
    • Dunkirk 60 (1704) – Rebuilt 1734
    • Plymouth 60 (1705) – Foundered 1705
    • Dreadnought 60 (1706) – Enlarged 1722, hulk 1740, BU 1748
  • Fourth Rates of 46-54 Guns
    • Advice (1698) – Captured 1711
    • Assistance (1699) - Rebuilt 1712
    • Bonadventure (1699) - Rebuilt 1711
    • Greenwich (1699) - Rebuilt 1730
    • Kingfisher (1699) – Hulked 1706, BU 1728
    • Deptford (1700) - Rebuilt 1719
    • Southampton (1700) – Hulked 1728, BU 1771
    • Reserve (1701) – Foundered 1703
    • Tiger (1702) - Rebuilt 1722
    • Falkland (1702) - Rebuilt 1720
    • Crown (1704) – Wrecked 1719
    • Ruby (1706) – Captured 1707
    • Dragon (1707) – Wrecked 1711

Four ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Prince George: The first Prince George was a 90-gun second-rate ship of the line. ... Several vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Ramillies after the battle of Ramillies: Ramillies, launched 1664 as Royal Katherine, was a 90-gun second-rate. ... Six warships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Marlborough after the Duke of Marlborough: The second-rate Saint Michael, renamed Marlborough in 1706, fought in the Seven Years War and foundered at sea in 1762. ... At least three ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Blenheim, after the Battle of Blenheim. ... Eight ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Devonshire, originally in honor of William Cavendish, 1st Duke of Devonshire, and later after the county of Devonshire (now called Devon). ... Resolution in a gale by Willem van de Velde, the younger depicts the first Resolution c. ... About fifteen ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Eagle, after the eagle. ... Eleven ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Kent, after the county of Kent. ... A number of ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Stirling Castle after Stirling Castle in Scotland, including: Stirling Castle, a 70-gun third rate, built c. ... Five ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Suffolk, after the county of Suffolk. ... Several ships of the British Royal Navy have borne the name HMS Berwick, after the town on the border between England and Scotland. ... Eight ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Edgar. ... Five ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Essex, after the county of Essex. ... Two ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Grafton: The first Grafton (H89) was a G-class destroyer launched in 1935 and torpedoed in 1940. ... Six warships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Northumberland: The first, a 70-gun third-rate launched in 1679, fought in the War of the Grand Alliance. ... Resolution in a gale by Willem van de Velde, the younger depicts the first Resolution c. ... Seven ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Monmouth, after the Welsh town. ... Several ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Warspite: Warspite, launched in 1884, was a first-class armoured cruiser scrapped between 1904 and 1906. ... Several ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Defiance: Defiance was a 3rd rate ship of the line of 74 guns. ... Four vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Dunkirk, after the Channel seaport of Dunkirk, France, site of the evacuation of 1940. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Six ships and one submarine of the Royal Navy have borne the name HMS Dreadnought in the expectation that they would dread nought but God. ... HMS Advice has been the name of a number of Royal Navy ships: HMS Advice, a pinnace 1586 - 1617 HMS Advice, a ship, 1650 - 1711 HMS Advice, a fourth-rate ship of the line 1712. ... 88. ... Twelve ships of the British Royal Navy have carried the name HMS Tiger, after the feline tiger. ... Several Royal Navy ships have been called HMS Dragon The 4th Rate Dragon, in 1674, had a lieutenant called John Tyrrell, who had been appointed by King Charles II of England. ...

1706 Establishment

  • Second Rates of 90 Guns
    • Neptune 90 (1710) - Rebuilt 1730
    • Vanguard 90 (1710) - Rebuilt 1739 and renamed Duke
    • Princess 90 (1711) – ex-Ossory, renamed Princess Royal 1728, BU 1773
    • Sandwich 90 (1712) – BU 1770
    • Barfleur| 90 (1716) – Hulked 1764, BU 1783
  • Third Rates of 80 Guns
    • Boyne 80 (1708) - Rebuilt 1739
    • Humber 80 (1708) - Rebuilt 1726 and renamed Princess Amelia
    • Russell 80 (1709) - Rebuilt 1735
    • Cumberland 80 (1710) - BU 1731 and rebuilt 1739
    • Devonshire 80 (1710) – Hulk 1740, sold 1760
    • Dorsetshire 80 (1712) – Sold 1749
    • Shrewsbury 80 (1713) – BU 1749
    • Cambridge 80 (1715) – BU 1749
    • Torbay 80 (1719) – BU 1749
    • Newark 80 (1717) – Rebuilt 1747
  • Third Rates of 70 Guns
    • Resolution 70 (1708) - Wrecked 1711
    • Captain 70 (1708) – Rebuilt 1722
    • Grafton 70 (1709) - Rebuilt 1725
    • Hampton Court 70 (1709) - Rebuilt 1744
    • Edgar 70 (1709) – Burnt 1711
    • Yarmouth 70 (1709) – Hulked 1740
    • Oxford 70 (1713) – Rebuilt 1727
    • Royal Oak 70 (1713) - Rebuilt 1741
    • Expedition 70 (1714) – Renamed Prince Frederick 1715, rebuilt 1740
    • Monmouth 70 (1718) – Rebuilt 1742
    • Revenge 70 (1718) – Rebuilt 1742
    • Suffolk 70 (1718) - Rebuilt 1739
    • Fourth Rates of 60 Guns
    • Plymouth 60 (1708) - Rebuilt 1722
    • Lion 60 (1709) - Rebuilt 1738
    • Gloucester 60 (1709) - Captured 1709
    • Rippon 60 (1712) – Rebuilt 1735
    • Montague 60 (1716) – BU 1749
    • Medway 60 (1718) – Hulk 1740, BU 1749
    • Kingston 60 (1719) – Rebuilt 1740
    • Nottingham 60 (1719) – Rebuilt 1745
  • Fourth Rates of 50 Guns, 1706 12pdr group
The statement in the previous version of this list that these ships had 12 pdr may contradict Lavery The Ship of the Line Volume I, which states that in 1716 they had 18 pdrs. The provenance of the 12 pdr claim is unknown.
    • Salisbury 50 (1707) – Rebuilt 1717
    • Falmouth 50 (1708) - Rebuilt 1729
    • Ruby 50 (1708) - Renamed Mermaid 1744, sold 1748
    • Chester 50 (1708) – Harbour service 1743, BU 1749
    • Romney 50 (1708) - Rebuilt 1726
    • Pembroke 50 (1710) - BU 1726
    • Gloucester 50 (1711) - Rebuilt 1737
    • Ormonde 50 (1711) - Renamed Dragon 1715, BU 1733 for rebuild
    • Bristol 50 (1711) - BU 1742, rebuilt 1746
    • Advice 50 (1712) - Renamed Milford 1744, sold 1749
    • Strafford 50 (1714) - BU 1733
  • Fourth Rates of 50 Guns
    • Warwick 50 (1711) - BU 1726
    • Bonadventure 50 (1711) – renamed Argyll 1715, rebuilt 1722
    • Assistance 50 (1713) - Rebuilt 1725
    • Stafford 50 (1714) – BU 1733
    • Worcester 50 (1714) - BU 1733
    • Rochester 50 (1716) – Renamed Maidstone hospital ship 1744, BU 1748
    • Dartmouth 50 (1716) – Rebuilt 1741, sold 1768
    • Panther 50 (1716) – Hulked 1743, sold 1768
    • Guernsey 50 (1717) – rebuilt 1740
    • Salisbury 50 (1717) – rebuilt 1726
    • Winchester 50 (1717) – Hulked 1744, BU 1781
    • St Albans 50 (1718) – BU 1734
    • Norwich 50 (1718) – Renamed Enterprise Fifth Rate 1744, BU 1771
    • Weymouth 50 (1719) – BU 1732
    • Deptford 50 (1719) – Sold 1725
    • Swallow 50 (1719) – BU 1728
    • Tiger 50 (1722) – Wrecked 1742

Nine ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Neptune after the Roman god of the ocean. ... Four ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Princess Royal. ... Two ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Barfleur after the battle of Barfleur: Barfleur, launched 1892, was a Centurion-class battleship, broken up in 1910. ... Six ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Boyne after the Battle of the Boyne, 1690. ... At least four ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Russell. ... There have been sixteen ships named HMS Cumberland in the Royal Navy. ... Eight ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Devonshire, originally in honor of William Cavendish, 1st Duke of Devonshire, and later after the county of Devonshire (now called Devon). ... Three ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Dorsetshire, after the traditional county of Dorsetshire. ... The bombardment of Marro Castle on Havana - Lindsay is being rowed out from the Trent to take command of the Cambridge, right HMS Cambridge has been a name held by various Royal Navy ships. ... Four ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Torbay, after Torbay on the southwest English coast. ... Resolution in a gale by Willem van de Velde, the younger depicts the first Resolution c. ... At least six ships of the Royal Navy have been called HMS Captain. ... Two ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Grafton: The first Grafton (H89) was a G-class destroyer launched in 1935 and torpedoed in 1940. ... Eight ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Edgar. ... Several ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Yarmouth. ... HMS Oxford has been the name of at least one Royal Navy ship, named after the City of Oxford. ... Seven (or eleven, depending on how one counts) vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Royal Oak. ... Seven ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Monmouth, after the Welsh town. ... Sixteen warships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Revenge. ... Five ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Suffolk, after the county of Suffolk. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Eighteen vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Lion, after the lion, an animal traditionally associated with courage, and also used in several heraldric motifs representing England and the British Monarchy. ... Eleven vessels, and one planned, of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Gloucester, after Gloucester, the city in England. ... Eight ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Medway, probably after the River Medway. ... Four ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Kingston. ... Four ships of the British Royal Navy have borne the name HMS Nottingham, after the city of Nottingham in the East Midlands. ... USS Claxton (DD-140), named for Thomas Claxton, was a Wickes-class destroyer in the United States Navy. ... HMS Falmouth has been the name of several Royal Navy vessels: HMS Falmouth (1652), a captured Dutch ship HMS Falmouth (1693), a 4th rate HMS Falmouth (1708), a 4th rate HMS Falmouth (1752), a 4th rate HMS Falmouth (1807), a schooner HMS Falmouth (1814), a 6th rate HMS Falmouth (1860... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... At least six ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Pembroke. ... Eleven vessels, and one planned, of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Gloucester, after Gloucester, the city in England. ... Several Royal Navy ships have been called HMS Dragon The 4th Rate Dragon, in 1674, had a lieutenant called John Tyrrell, who had been appointed by King Charles II of England. ... Six ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Bristol, after the port of Bristol. ... HMS Advice has been the name of a number of Royal Navy ships: HMS Advice, a pinnace 1586 - 1617 HMS Advice, a ship, 1650 - 1711 HMS Advice, a fourth-rate ship of the line 1712. ... Three ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Argyll after the region of Argyll in Scotland. ... A number of ships of the Royal Navy have bourne the name Worcester. ... At least four ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Dartmouth. ... At least five ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Panther. ... USS Claxton (DD-140), named for Thomas Claxton, was a Wickes-class destroyer in the United States Navy. ... There have been six vessels of the Royal Navy bearing the name St Albans. ... Ten ships of the Royal Navy (and several British ships not commissioned into the Navy) have been named HMS Enterprise or HMS Enterprize. ... Twelve ships of the British Royal Navy have carried the name HMS Tiger, after the feline tiger. ...

Captured Ships, War of Spanish Succession

  • Assurance 66 (1697), ex-French L'Assure 60, captured May 1702, BU 1712
  • Moderate 64 (1685) – ex-French Modere, captured 1702, sold 1713
  • Firme 70 (1699) – ex-French Ferme, captured 1702, sold 1713
  • August 70 (1699) – ex-French Auguste, captured 19 August 1705, wrecked 1716
  • Moor (1688) - ex-French Maure 54, captured 13 December 1710, scuttled as a breakwater 1716
  • Superb 64 (1708) - ex-French Superbe, captured 29 July 1710, BU 1732

Nine ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Superb. ...

Other Captured Ships (data of uncertain provenance)

Not listed in The Ship of the Line, by Brian Lavery
  • Triton (c. 1697, ex-French, captured 1702) - Sold 1709
  • Hazardous 52 (c. 1698, ex-French Hasard, captured 1703) - Wrecked 1706
  • Falkland's Prize (c. 1688, ex-French, captured 1704) - Sold 1706

Eight vessels of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Triton or HMS Tryton, after Triton, the son of Poseidon and Amphitrite, and the personification of the roaring waters: Tryton, originally French ship Triton, was a 42-gun fifth-rate captured in 1702 at the battle of Vigo Bay, and...

List of Line-of-Battle Ships of the Royal Navy (1719-1741)

Number of main guns follows name (see Rating system of the Royal Navy)
Except where stated otherwise, these ships are listed in the order of p169-171 The Ship of the Line Volume I, by Brian Lavery, pub Conways, 1983, ISBN 0-85177-252-8

The rating system of the Royal Navy was used by the Royal Navy between the 1670s and early 19th century to categorise sailing warships according to their ability to stand in a line of battle and according to their number of guns. ...

1719 Establishment

  • First Rates of 100 Guns
    • HMS Royal Sovereign 100 (1728) – BU 1768
  • Second Rates of 90 Guns
    • Prince George 90 (1723) – Burnt by accident 1768
    • Union 90 (1726) – BU 1749
    • Namur 90 (1729) – Reduced to 74 guns 1745, wrecked 1749
    • Neptune 90 (1730) – Renamed Torbay and reduced to 74 guns 1750, sold 1784
    • Marlborough 90 (1732) – Reduced to 68 guns 1752, foundered 1762
  • Third Rates of 80 Guns
    • Lancaster 80 (1722) – Rebuilt 1749
    • Princess Amelia 80 (1723) – ex-Humber, BU 1752
    • Cornwall 80 (1726) - BU 1761
    • Norfolk' 80 (1728) – renamed Princess Amelia 1755, BU 1757
    • Somerset 80 (1731) - BU 1746
    • Princess Caroline 80 (1731) – ex-Ranelagh, BU 1764
    • Russell 80 (1735) – Sunk as a breakwater 1762
  • Third Rates of 70 Guns
    • Edinburgh 70 (1721) – ex- Warspite, rebuilt 1744
    • Northumberland 70 (1721) – Rebuilt 1743
    • Burford 70 (1722) - BU 1752
    • Captain 70 (1722) - Hulked 1739, BU 1762
    • Stirling Castle 70 (1723) – Hulked 1739, BU 1771
    • Berwick 70 (1723) - Hulked 1743, BU 1763
    • Lennox 70 (1723) – Sunk as a breakwater 1756
    • Kent 70 (1724) - BU 1744
    • Grafton 70 (1725) - BU 1744
    • Ipswich 70 (1730) - Hulked 1757, BU 1764
    • Buckingham 70 (1731) - BU 1745
    • Prince of Orange 70 (1734) - Reduced to 60 guns 1748, sheer hulk 1772, sold 1810
  • Fourth Rates of 60 Guns
    • Canterbury 60 (1722) – Rebuilt 1744
    • Plymouth 60 (1722) - BU 1764
    • Sunderland 60 (1724) – Rebuilt 1744
    • Windsor 60 (1729) – Rebuilt 1745
    • Deptford 60 (1732) - Reduced to 50 guns 1752, sold 1767
    • Swallow 60 (1732) - BU 1742
    • Tilbury 60 (1733) - Burnt 1742
    • Warwick 60 (1733) - Captured 1756
    • Pembroke 60 (1733) - Wrecked 1749
    • Dunkirk 60 (1734) - Wrecked 1749
  • Fourth Rates of 50 Guns
    • Falkland 50 (1720) - Rebuilt 1744
    • Chatham 50 (1721) – Sunk as a breakwater 1749
    • Colchester 50 (1721) - BU 1742
    • Leopard 50 (1721) - BU 1739
    • Argyll 50 (1722) - Sunk as a breakwater 1748
    • Portland 50 (1723) - BU 1723
    • Assistance 50 (1725) - Sunk as a breakwater 1745
    • Romney 50 (1726) – Sold 1757
    • Salisbury 50 (1726) – Hulked 1744, sold 1749
    • Oxford 50 (1727) - BU 1758
    • 'Falmouth 50 (1729) - BU 1747
    • 'Lichfield 50 (1730) - BU 1744
    • Greenwich 50 (1730) – Wrecked 1744
    • Newcastle 50 (1732) - BU 1746

Five ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Royal Sovereign: Sovereign of the Seas, launched in 1637, was a 100-gun first-rate ship of the line. ... Four ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Prince George: The first Prince George was a 90-gun second-rate ship of the line. ... Nine ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Neptune after the Roman god of the ocean. ... Four ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Torbay, after Torbay on the southwest English coast. ... Six warships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Marlborough after the Duke of Marlborough: The second-rate Saint Michael, renamed Marlborough in 1706, fought in the Seven Years War and foundered at sea in 1762. ... There have been six ships of the Royal Navy named HMS Lancaster: The first Lancaster was a 80 gun First Rate built in 1694, then rebuilt and relaunched in 1722, and rebuilt for a third time to a 66 gun Third Rate in 1749 the second Lancaster was a East... Six ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Cornwall after the Duchy of Cornwall. ... Six ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Norfolk, from an 80-gun third-rate to todays powerful and sleek Type 23 frigate. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Somerset. ... At least four ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Russell. ... Six ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Edinburgh, for the Scottish city of Edinburgh. ... Several ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Warspite: Warspite, launched in 1884, was a first-class armoured cruiser scrapped between 1904 and 1906. ... Six warships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Northumberland: The first, a 70-gun third-rate launched in 1679, fought in the War of the Grand Alliance. ... At least six ships of the Royal Navy have been called HMS Captain. ... A number of ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Stirling Castle after Stirling Castle in Scotland, including: Stirling Castle, a 70-gun third rate, built c. ... Several ships of the British Royal Navy have borne the name HMS Berwick, after the town on the border between England and Scotland. ... Eleven ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Kent, after the county of Kent. ... Two ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Grafton: The first Grafton (H89) was a G-class destroyer launched in 1935 and torpedoed in 1940. ... HMS Buckingham on the slipway prior to launch, 1751 Various Royal Navy ships have been named HMS Buckingham, after George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham, including: HMS Buckingham (1699), third-rate of 70 guns, first ship of this name, launched at Miller yard, Deptford, 1699 as HMS Revenge, renamed HMS... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... At least six ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Pembroke. ... Four vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Dunkirk, after the Channel seaport of Dunkirk, France, site of the evacuation of 1940. ... HMS Chatham, 1911 - 1926, pictured circa 1914 Fifteen ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Chatham after the port of Chatham, Kent, home of the Chatham Dockyard The first Chatham was a galliot captured in 1666 during the Second Anglo-Dutch War. ... Six ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Colchester: The first Colchester, launched in 1654 and sunk in action in 1666. ... Eleven vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Leopard after the leopard: The first Leopard was a 34-gun ship launched in 1635 and captured by the Dutch in 1653. ... Three ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Argyll after the region of Argyll in Scotland. ... The name HMS Portland has been carried by eight ships of the Royal Navy. ... USS Claxton (DD-140), named for Thomas Claxton, was a Wickes-class destroyer in the United States Navy. ... HMS Oxford has been the name of at least one Royal Navy ship, named after the City of Oxford. ... HMS Falmouth has been the name of several Royal Navy vessels: HMS Falmouth (1652), a captured Dutch ship HMS Falmouth (1693), a 4th rate HMS Falmouth (1708), a 4th rate HMS Falmouth (1752), a 4th rate HMS Falmouth (1807), a schooner HMS Falmouth (1814), a 6th rate HMS Falmouth (1860... Three ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Lichfield. ... There have been eight ships that have borne the name HMS Newcastle in the Royal Navy, all serving her nation with distinction. ...

Non-Establishment 60-Gun Ships

  • Centurion 60 (1732) - Used by Anson in his world voyage, reduced to 50 guns 1744, BU 1769
  • Rippon 60 (1735) – BU 1751

HMS Centurion was a 60-gun ship of the line, 4th rate, of the Royal Navy, built in 1732 and was the third British naval vessel to carry the name. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

1733 Proposals

  • First Rate of 100 Guns
    • Victory 100 (1737) - Wrecked 1744
  • Second Rates of 90 Guns
    • Duke 90 (1739) – BU 1769
    • St George 90 (1740) – BU 1774
  • Third Rates of 80 Guns
    • Boyne 80 (1739) – BU 1763
    • Cumberland 80 (1739) – Reduced to 66 guns in 1747, foundered 1760
  • Third Rates of 70 Guns
    • Elizabeth 70 (1737) – BU 1766
    • Suffolk 70 (1739) - BU1765
    • Essex 70 (1740) - Wrecked 1759
    • Nassau 70 (1740) – Sold 1770
    • Prince Frederick 70 (1740) – Sold 1784
    • Bedford 70 (1741) – Hulked 1767, sold 1787
    • Royal Oak 70 (1741) - Hulked 1757, BU 1763
    • Stirling Castle 70 (1742) - Lost 1762
    • Monmouth 70 (1742) – BU 1767
    • Revenge 70 (1742) – Sold 1787
    • Captain 70 (1743) - Reduced to 64 guns 1760, storeship 1777, BU 1783
    • Berwick 70 (1743) - BU 1760
  • Fourth Rates of 60 Guns
    • Weymouth 60 (1734) - Wrecked 1745
    • Strafford 60 (1735) – Scuttled as a breakwater 1756
    • Worcester 60 (1735) - BU 1765
    • Augusta 60 (1736) - BU 1765
    • Dragon 60 (1736) - Scuttled as breakwater 1757
    • Jersey 60 (1736) – Hospital ship1771, abandoned 1783
    • Superb 60 (1736) - BU 1757
    • Lion 60 (1738) – Sold 1765
    • Kingston 60 (1740) – Sold 1762
    • Rupert 60 (1740) - BU 1769
    • Dreadnought 60 (1742) - Sold 1784
    • Medway 60 (1742) - Scuttled 1748
    • Princess Mary 60 (1742) - Sold1762
    • Exeter 60 (1744) – BU 1763
    • Nottingham 60 (1744) - Scuttled as breakwater 1773
  • Fourth Rates of 50 Guns
    • Gloucester 50 (1737) – Damaged in storm and burnt to avoid capture 1742
    • St Albans 50 (1737) - Wrecked 1744
    • Severn 50 (1739) - Captured by France 1746
    • Guernsey 50 (1740) – Hulk 17690, sold 1786
    • Hampshire 50 (1741) - BU 1766
    • Leopard 50 (1741) - BU 1761
    • Nonsuch 50 (1741) - BU 1766
    • Sutherland 50 (1741) - Sold 1770
    • Antelope 50 (1742) - Sold 1783
    • Dartmouth 50 (1741) - Blew up 1747
    • Woolwich 50 (1741) - BU 1747
    • Preston 50 (1742) – Hulk 1748, BU 1749

HMS Victory, 100, was a first-rate ship of the line of Britains Royal Navy. ... HMS Duke might refer to one of these ships of the Royal Navy: HMS Duke of Edinburgh HMS Duke of Gloucester (1813) HMS Iron Duke (1870) HMS Iron Duke (1912) HMS Iron Duke (F234) HMS Duke of Wellington HMS Duke of York (17) or to the Royal Navy training establishment... Eight ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS St George, after Saint George, the patron saint of England: HMS St George, a 60 gun ship built in 1622 and sunk in 1697 as a blockship. ... Six ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Boyne after the Battle of the Boyne, 1690. ... There have been sixteen ships named HMS Cumberland in the Royal Navy. ... Five ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Suffolk, after the county of Suffolk. ... Five ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Essex, after the county of Essex. ... Seven (or eleven, depending on how one counts) vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Royal Oak. ... A number of ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Stirling Castle after Stirling Castle in Scotland, including: Stirling Castle, a 70-gun third rate, built c. ... Seven ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Monmouth, after the Welsh town. ... Sixteen warships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Revenge. ... At least six ships of the Royal Navy have been called HMS Captain. ... Several ships of the British Royal Navy have borne the name HMS Berwick, after the town on the border between England and Scotland. ... A number of ships of the Royal Navy have bourne the name Worcester. ... Several Royal Navy ships have been called HMS Dragon The 4th Rate Dragon, in 1674, had a lieutenant called John Tyrrell, who had been appointed by King Charles II of England. ... HMS Jersey was a British Royal Navy vessel most noted for serving as a prison ship in the American Revolutionary War. ... Nine ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Superb. ... Eighteen vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Lion, after the lion, an animal traditionally associated with courage, and also used in several heraldric motifs representing England and the British Monarchy. ... Four ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Kingston. ... Six ships and one submarine of the Royal Navy have borne the name HMS Dreadnought in the expectation that they would dread nought but God. ... Eight ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Medway, probably after the River Medway. ... Five ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Exeter after the city of Exeter in Devon. ... Four ships of the British Royal Navy have borne the name HMS Nottingham, after the city of Nottingham in the East Midlands. ... Eleven vessels, and one planned, of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Gloucester, after Gloucester, the city in England. ... There have been six vessels of the Royal Navy bearing the name St Albans. ... There have been nine ships and one submarine of the Royal Navy named HMS Severn after the River Severn: The first Severn was a fourth rate two-decked ship of 50 guns launched in 1693 and broekn up in 1734. ... Several ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Hampshire after the county of Hampshire: Hampshire, launched in 1903, was a Devonshire-class armoured cruiser. ... Eleven vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Leopard after the leopard: The first Leopard was a 34-gun ship launched in 1635 and captured by the Dutch in 1653. ... Nine vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Nonsuch. ... ... HMS Antelope was a 54-gun fourth-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy that served in the Seven Years War and the American Revolutionary War. ... At least four ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Dartmouth. ...

Other Ships, provenance of data unknown

  • Eltham (c. 1736) - BU 1763

List of Line-of-Battle Ships of the Royal Navy (1741-1755)

Number of main guns follows name (see Rating system of the Royal Navy)
Except where stated otherwise, these ships are listed in the order of p171-175 The Ship of the Line Volume I, by Brian Lavery, pub Conways, 1983, ISBN 0-85177-252-8

The rating system of the Royal Navy was used by the Royal Navy between the 1670s and early 19th century to categorise sailing warships according to their ability to stand in a line of battle and according to their number of guns. ...

1741 Proposals

  • First Rates of 100 Guns
None built
  • Second Rates of 90 Guns
    • Ramillies 90 (1749) – Wrecked 1760
    • Prince 90 (1750) – BU 1750
  • Third Rates of 80 Guns
    • Newark 80 (1747) – BU 1787
  • Third Rates of 74 Guns
  • Third Rates of 66 Guns
    • Devonshire 66 (1745) - BU 1772 [9]
    • Lancaster 66 (1749) - BU 1773
  • Third Rates of 64 Guns
    • Northumberland 66 (1743) – Captured 1774
    • Edinburgh 66 (1744) – BU 1771
    • Hampton Court 66 (1744) – BU 1774
    • Kent 64 (1746) – Hulked 1760
    • Yarmouth 64 (1746) – Reduced to 60 guns in 1781, BU 1811
  • Fourth Rates of 58 Guns
    • Princess Louise 58 (1744) - BU 1766
    • Defiance 58 (1744) - Sold 1766
    • Canterbury 58 (1744) – Harbour service 1761, BU 1770
    • Sunderland 58 (1745) - Foundered 1761
    • Tilbury 58 (1744) - Foundered1757
    • Eagle 58 (1745) – Sold 1767
  • Non-Establishment 58 Gun Ship
    • Windsor 58 (1745) – Sold 1777
  • Fourth Rates of 50 Guns
    • Chester 50 (1744) - Sold 1767
    • Harwich 50 (1743) – ex-Tiger,[10] wrecked 1760
    • Winchester 50 (1744) - Sold 1769
    • Maidstone 50 (1744) – ex-Rochester,[11] wrecked 1747
    • Colchester 50 (1744) - Wrecked 1744
    • Portland 50 (1744) - Sold 1763
    • Falkland 50 (1744) – Given to victualling depot 1768
    • Salisbury 50 (1745) - Condemned 1761
    • Advice 50] (1745) - BU 1756
    • Gloucester 50 (1745) - BU 1764
    • Norwich 50 (1745) - Sold 1768
    • Ruby 50 (1745) - BU 1765
    • Colchester 50 (1746) - BU 1773
    • Lichfield 50 (1746) - Wrecked 1758
    • Panther 50 (1746) - BU 1756
  • Bristol class – Non-Establishment 50-Gun Ships
    • Bristol (1746) - BU 1768
    • Rochester (1749) - Sold 1770

Several vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Ramillies after the battle of Ramillies: Ramillies, launched 1664 as Royal Katherine, was a 90-gun second-rate. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... HMS CULLODEN Frigate, British Royal Navy, Built 1776. ... Eight ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Devonshire, originally in honor of William Cavendish, 1st Duke of Devonshire, and later after the county of Devonshire (now called Devon). ... There have been six ships of the Royal Navy named HMS Lancaster: The first Lancaster was a 80 gun First Rate built in 1694, then rebuilt and relaunched in 1722, and rebuilt for a third time to a 66 gun Third Rate in 1749 the second Lancaster was a East... Six warships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Northumberland: The first, a 70-gun third-rate launched in 1679, fought in the War of the Grand Alliance. ... Six ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Edinburgh, for the Scottish city of Edinburgh. ... Eleven ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Kent, after the county of Kent. ... Several ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Yarmouth. ... Several ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Defiance: Defiance was a 3rd rate ship of the line of 74 guns. ... About fifteen ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Eagle, after the eagle. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A submarine depot ship of the Royal Navy. ... Six ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Colchester: The first Colchester, launched in 1654 and sunk in action in 1666. ... The name HMS Portland has been carried by eight ships of the Royal Navy. ... USS Claxton (DD-140), named for Thomas Claxton, was a Wickes-class destroyer in the United States Navy. ... HMS Advice has been the name of a number of Royal Navy ships: HMS Advice, a pinnace 1586 - 1617 HMS Advice, a ship, 1650 - 1711 HMS Advice, a fourth-rate ship of the line 1712. ... Eleven vessels, and one planned, of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Gloucester, after Gloucester, the city in England. ... Six ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Colchester: The first Colchester, launched in 1654 and sunk in action in 1666. ... HMS Lichfield was a 50 gun fourth rate Royal Navy ship wrecked on the Barbary Coast of North Africa on 28 November 1758. ... At least five ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Panther. ... Six ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Bristol, after the port of Bristol. ...

1745 Establishment

  • First Rates of 100 Guns
    • Royal George 100 (1756) - Foundered 1782
    • Britannia 100 (1762) – Renamed Princess Royal 1810, St George 1812, St Barfleur 1819, BU 1825
  • Second Rates of 90 Guns
None built
  • Third Rates of 80 Guns
    • Princess Amelia 80 (1757) – Lent to customs 1788, sold 1818
  • Third Rates of 70 Guns
    • Vanguard 70 (1748) – Sold 1774
    • Somerset 70 (1748) – Wrecked 1778
    • Oxford 70 (1749) – Harbour service 1777, sunk as a breakwater 1783
    • Grafton 70 (1750) – Sold 1767
    • Swiftsure 70 (1750) – Sold 1773
    • Northumberland 70 (1750) – Renamed Leviathan storeship 1777, foundered 1779
    • Buckingham 70 (1751) – Renamed Grampus storeship 1771, lost 1778
  • Fourth Rates of 60 Guns
    • St Albans 60 (1747) – Sold 1765
    • Anson 60 (1747) - Sold 1773
    • Tiger 60 (1747) – Hulked 1760, sold 1765
    • Weymouth 60 (1752) – BU 1772
    • York 60 (1753) – BU 1772
    • Medway 60 (1755) – receiving ship 1787, BU 1811
  • Fourth Rates of 50 Guns
    • Greenwich 50 (1747) - Captured by France 1757
    • Severn 50 (1747) - Sold 1759
    • Tavistock 50 (1747) – Hulked 1761, BU 1768
    • Assistance 50 (1747) - Sold 1773
    • Newcastle 50 (1750) - Foundered 1761
    • Falmouth 50 (1752) - Abandoned aground 1765
    • Preston 50 (1757) – Sheer hulk 1785, BU 1815

HMS Royal George was a 100-gun first-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy. ... HMS Britannia (1762) was a British Royal Navy 100-gun 1st rate ship of the line which fought at the Battle of Cape St. ... Four ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Princess Royal. ... Eight ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS St George, after Saint George, the patron saint of England: HMS St George, a 60 gun ship built in 1622 and sunk in 1697 as a blockship. ... Two ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Barfleur after the battle of Barfleur: Barfleur, launched 1892, was a Centurion-class battleship, broken up in 1910. ... The fourth HMS Vanguard was a 70-gun third-rate of the British Royal navy launched in 1748. ... HMS Somerset is the name of four ships of the Royal Navy The first HMS Somerset of 1698 The second HMS Somerset of 1731 The third HMS Somerset of 1748 The name was resurrected for the fourth and current Type 23 frigate, HMS Somerset, launched in 1994. ... HMS Oxford has been the name of at least one Royal Navy ship, named after the City of Oxford. ... Two ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Grafton: The first Grafton (H89) was a G-class destroyer launched in 1935 and torpedoed in 1940. ... The Royal Navy has had ships named HMS Swiftsure since 1573, including: Swiftsure, launched in 1804, was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line which served at the Battle of Trafalgar and was sold in 1845. ... Six warships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Northumberland: The first, a 70-gun third-rate launched in 1679, fought in the War of the Grand Alliance. ... HMS Buckingham on the slipway prior to launch, 1751 Various Royal Navy ships have been named HMS Buckingham, after George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham, including: HMS Buckingham (1699), third-rate of 70 guns, first ship of this name, launched at Miller yard, Deptford, 1699 as HMS Revenge, renamed HMS... There have been six vessels of the Royal Navy bearing the name St Albans. ... Seven ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Anson, after Admiral George Anson: The first Anson was a 60-gun fourth-rate launched in 1747 and sold in 1773. ... Twelve ships of the British Royal Navy have carried the name HMS Tiger, after the feline tiger. ... Several ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS York for the county seat of Yorkshire, on the River Ouse. ... Eight ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Medway, probably after the River Medway. ... There have been nine ships and one submarine of the Royal Navy named HMS Severn after the River Severn: The first Severn was a fourth rate two-decked ship of 50 guns launched in 1693 and broekn up in 1734. ... There have been eight ships that have borne the name HMS Newcastle in the Royal Navy, all serving her nation with distinction. ... HMS Falmouth has been the name of several Royal Navy vessels: HMS Falmouth (1652), a captured Dutch ship HMS Falmouth (1693), a 4th rate HMS Falmouth (1708), a 4th rate HMS Falmouth (1752), a 4th rate HMS Falmouth (1807), a schooner HMS Falmouth (1814), a 6th rate HMS Falmouth (1860...

1745 Establishment, as Amended in 1750

  • Second Rates of 90 Guns
    • Namur 90 (1755) – Reduced to 74 in 1805, harbour service 1807, BU 1833
    • Union 90 (1755) – Hospital ship 1799, BU 1816
    • Neptune 90 (1755) – Sheer hulk 1799, BU 1816
  • Third Rate of 80 Guns
    • Cambridge 80 (1755) – Harbour service 1793, BU 1808
  • Third Rate of 70 Guns
  • Fourth Rates of 60 Guns
    • Dunkirk 60 (1754) – Harbour service 1778, sold 1792
    • Montague 60 (1757) – Sunk as a breakwater 1774

Nine ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Neptune after the Roman god of the ocean. ... The bombardment of Marro Castle on Havana - Lindsay is being rowed out from the Trent to take command of the Cambridge, right HMS Cambridge has been a name held by various Royal Navy ships. ... HMS Chichester(F59) was an aircraft direction frigate of theSalisbury class. ... Four vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Dunkirk, after the Channel seaport of Dunkirk, France, site of the evacuation of 1940. ...

1745 Establishment, as Amended in 1752

  • Fourth Rates of 60 Guns
    • Pembroke 60 (1757) – Hulked 1776, BU 1793
    • Rippon 60 (1758) – Harbour service 1801, BU 1808
  • Fourth Rate of 50 Guns
    • Chatham 50 (1758) – Harbour service 1793, renamed Tilbury 1805/10,[12] BU 1814

At least six ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Pembroke. ... HMS Chatham, 1911 - 1926, pictured circa 1914 Fifteen ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Chatham after the port of Chatham, Kent, home of the Chatham Dockyard The first Chatham was a galliot captured in 1666 during the Second Anglo-Dutch War. ...

1745 Establishment, as Amended in 1754

  • Third Rates of 70 Guns
    • Burford 70 (1757) – Sold 1785
    • Dorsetshire 70 (1757) – BU 1775
    • Boyne 70 (1766) – BU 1783

Three ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Dorsetshire, after the traditional county of Dorsetshire. ... Six ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Boyne after the Battle of the Boyne, 1690. ...

Captured Ships, War of 1739-1748

HMS Vigilant (S30) is the third Vanguard class submarine of the Royal Navy. ... Seven ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Mars, after Mars, the Roman god of war: The first Mars was a 50-gun ship, originally Dutch, captured in the Second Anglo-Dutch War in 1665, and sold in 1667. ... Eight ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Intrepid, including: The HMS Intrepid who was sunk in the Zeebrugge raid in 1918 as a blockship. ... The First Battle of Cape Finisterre was a naval battle which took place on 14 May 1747 (3 May 1747 in the Julian calendar then in use in Britain) during the War of the Austrian Succession, in the Bay of Biscay off Cape Finisterre in northwest Spain, between a British... HMS Invincible was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy which was lost in 1758 when it hit a sandbank in the East Solent. ... The First Battle of Cape Finisterre was a naval battle which took place on 14 May 1747 (3 May 1747 in the Julian calendar then in use in Britain) during the War of the Austrian Succession, in the Bay of Biscay off Cape Finisterre in northwest Spain, between a British... Six ships of the British Royal Navy, and four tenders of the RNVR, have been named HMS Isis, after the Egyptian goddess Isis. ... The First Battle of Cape Finisterre was a naval battle which took place on 14 May 1747 (3 May 1747 in the Julian calendar then in use in Britain) during the War of the Austrian Succession, in the Bay of Biscay off Cape Finisterre in northwest Spain, between a British... At least three ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Monarch: A Monarch served in the Royal Navy c. ... The Second Battle of Cape Finisterre was a naval battle which took place on 25 October 1747 (14 October 1747 in the Julian calendar then in use in Britain) during the War of the Austrian Succession, in the Bay of Biscay off Cape Finisterre in northwest Spain between a well... Eight vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Terrible: Terrible (1694), 26-gun sixth-rate Terrible (1730), 14-gun bomb vessel Terrible (1747), 74-gun third-rate captured from the French Terrible (1762), 74-gun third-rate Terrible (1785), 74-gun third-rate Terrible (1845), wooden-hulled... The Second Battle of Cape Finisterre was a naval battle which took place on 25 October 1747 (14 October 1747 in the Julian calendar then in use in Britain) during the War of the Austrian Succession, in the Bay of Biscay off Cape Finisterre in northwest Spain between a well... The Second Battle of Cape Finisterre was a naval battle which took place on 25 October 1747 (14 October 1747 in the Julian calendar then in use in Britain) during the War of the Austrian Succession, in the Bay of Biscay off Cape Finisterre in northwest Spain between a well... The Second Battle of Cape Finisterre was a naval battle which took place on 25 October 1747 (14 October 1747 in the Julian calendar then in use in Britain) during the War of the Austrian Succession, in the Bay of Biscay off Cape Finisterre in northwest Spain between a well... Two Royal Navy ships have been named Magnanime: Magnanime was a 74-gun ship, captured from the French on 31 January 1748. ...

Other Captured Ships, Provenance of Data Unknown

The First Battle of Cape Finisterre was a naval battle which took place on 14 May 1747 (3 May 1747 in the Julian calendar then in use in Britain) during the War of the Austrian Succession, in the Bay of Biscay off Cape Finisterre in northwest Spain, between a British... HMS Jason, a ship of the Royal Navy, is named after the Greek mythological character Jason. ... The First Battle of Cape Finisterre was a naval battle which took place on 14 May 1747 (3 May 1747 in the Julian calendar then in use in Britain) during the War of the Austrian Succession, in the Bay of Biscay off Cape Finisterre in northwest Spain, between a British... The Second Battle of Cape Finisterre was a naval battle which took place on 25 October 1747 (14 October 1747 in the Julian calendar then in use in Britain) during the War of the Austrian Succession, in the Bay of Biscay off Cape Finisterre in northwest Spain between a well... The Second Battle of Cape Finisterre was a naval battle which took place on 25 October 1747 (14 October 1747 in the Julian calendar then in use in Britain) during the War of the Austrian Succession, in the Bay of Biscay off Cape Finisterre in northwest Spain between a well... Several ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Glory: Glory, launched in 1899, was a Canopus-class battleship that served in World War I. She was broken up in 1922. ...

Other Ships, provenance of data unknown

  • ? 74 - Cancelled 1748
  • ? 74 - Cancelled 1748
  • Dartmouth (-) - Cancelled 1748
  • Woolwich (-) - Cancelled 1748

Still to be Structured List of Ships-of-the-Line Ships of the Royal Navy (1755–1847)

By or soon after the appointment of Baron George Anson as First Lord of the Admiralty in 1751, the system of Establishments that coverned the design of British warships was abandoned, and with the appointment of Thomas Slade and William Bately as joint holders opf the post of Surveyor of the Navy in 1755, new principles governed the composition of the battle fleet. No further three-decker 80-gun ships were built, and the 70-gun and 60-gun ships also ceased to be produced, being gradually replaced by new 74-gun and 64-gun ships. 50-gun ships were no longer considered to be fit to lie in the line, although 50-gun and 44-gun two-deckers continued to be built for cruising duties.

Number of main guns follows name (see Rating system of the Royal Navy)

The rating system of the Royal Navy was used by the Royal Navy between the 1670s and early 19th century to categorise sailing warships according to their ability to stand in a line of battle and according to their number of guns. ...

First Rate of 100 Guns

  • Victory class (Slade)
    • Victory 100 (1765) – Great repair 1801-03, Flagship at the Battle of Trafalgar 1805, 1805-08 modernised and re-rated as 98-gun Second Rate, hulked at Portsmouth 1824, dry-docked 1922, converted during the 1920s to her 1805 appearance, preserved in commission at Portsmouth as the only remaining ship of the line [14]
  • Royal Sovereign class (Williams)
    • Royal Sovereign 100 (1786) - BU 1841
  • Umpire class (Hunt)

HMS Victory is a 104-gun ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built between 1759 and 1765. ... Combatants United Kingdom First French Empire Kingdom of Spain Commanders Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson † Pierre Charles Silvestre de Villeneuve Strength 27 ships of the line and 6 others. ... HMS Royal Sovereign (1786) a 100-gun 1st rate ship of the line which served as the flagship of Admiral Collingwood at the Battle of Trafalgar. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Royal George. ... Four ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Queen Charlotte after Charlotte, queeen consort of King George III of the United Kingdom. ... Four ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Queen Charlotte after Charlotte, queeen consort of King George III of the United Kingdom. ...

Second Rates of 90 Guns (later 98 guns)

  • Sandwich class (Slade)
    • Sandwich 90 (1759) – Floating battery 1780, harbour service 1790, BU 1810
    • Blenheim 90 (1761) – Reduced to 74 in 1800, wrecked 1807
  • Ocean class (Slade)
    • Ocean 90 (1761) – Modified version of the Sandwich Class, sold 1793
  • London class (Slade)
    • London 90 (1766) – BU 1811
  • Barfleur class (Slade, based on Royal William)
    • Barfleur 90 (1768) – BU 1819 [15]
    • Prince George 90 (1772) - BU 1839
    • Princess Royal 90 (1773) - BU 1807
    • Formidable 90/98 (1777) - BU 1813
  • Queen class (Bately)
    • Queen 90 (1769) – Reduced to 74 in 1811, wrecked 1821
  • Duke class (Williams)
    • Duke 98 (1777) - BU 1843
    • St George 98 (1785) - Wrecked 1811
    • Glory 98 (1788) - BU 1825
    • Atlas 98 (1782) - BU 1821
  • Revived London class (Slade)
    • Prince 98 (1788) - BU 1837
    • Impregnable 98 (1786) - Wrecked 1799
    • Windsor Castle 98 (1790) - BU 1839
  • Boyne class (Hunt)
    • Boyne 98 (1790) – Caught fire by accident and blew up at Spithead 1 May 1795
    • Prince of Wales 98 (1794) – BU 1822.
  • Dreadnought class (Henslow)
    • Dreadnought 98 (1801) - BU 1857.
    • Neptune 98 (1797) - BU 1818.
    • Temeraire 98 (1798) - BU 1838.

For other ships of the same name, see HMS Sandwich. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Blenheim. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Ocean. ... Twelve ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS London, after the city of London. ... Two ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Barfleur after the battle of Barfleur: Barfleur, launched 1892, was a Centurion-class battleship, broken up in 1910. ... Four ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Prince George: The first Prince George was a 90-gun second-rate ship of the line. ... Four ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Princess Royal. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Formidable. ... HMS Queen was a 98-gun second-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Duke. ... HMS St George was a 98-gun second rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched in 1785 at Portsmouth. ... Several ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Glory: Glory, launched in 1899, was a Canopus-class battleship that served in World War I. She was broken up in 1922. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Atlas. ... HMS Prince ( 1788) a 98-gun 2nd rate ship of the line which fought at the Battle of Trafalgar. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Impregnable. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Windsor Castle. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Boyne. ... For other ships with the same name, see HMS Prince of Wales. ... As quarantine ship, mid-1800s HMS Dreadnought was a second-rate of 98 guns of the Royal Navy. ... HMS Neptune (1797 at Deptford) was a 98-gun 2nd rate ship of the line which fought at the Battle of Trafalgar. ... The fighting Téméraire, tugged to her last berth to be broken up by J. M. W. Turner, 1838. ...

To be Structured

  • Arc en Ciel (c. 1745, ex-French, captured 1756) - Sold 1759
  • Dublin class
    • Dublin 74 (1757) - First British "74". BU 1784
    • Norfolk 74 (1757) - BU 1774
    • Shrewsbury 74 (1758) - Condemned 1783
    • Lennox 74 (1758) - Scuttled 1784
    • Warspite 74 (1758) - BU 1802
    • Resolution 74 (1758) - Wrecked 1759
    • Mars 74 (1759) - Sold 1784
  • America 60 (1757) - BU 1771
  • Conqueror 68/70 (1758) - Wrecked 1760
  • Temple 68 (1758) - Sank 1762
  • Edgar class
    • Edgar 60/64 (1758) - Scuttled 1774
    • Panther 60 (1758) - BU 1813
    • Firm 60 (1759) - Sold 1791
  • Fame 74 (1759) - Renamed Guilford c. 1799, sold 1814
  • Hero 74 (1759) - BU 1810
  • Hercules class
    • Hercules 74 (1759) - Sold 1784
    • Thunderer 74 (1760) - Wrecked 1780
  • Formidable 80 (ex-French, captured 1759)
  • Valiant class
    • Valiant (1759) - BU 1826
    • Triumph (1764) - BU 1850
  • Bellona class
    • Bellona 74 (1760) - BU 1814
    • Dragon 74 (1760) - Sold 1784
    • Superb 74 (1760) - Wrecked 1783
    • Kent 74 (1762) - Sold 1784
    • Defence 74 (1763) - Wrecked 1811
  • Essex class
    • Essex 64 (1760) - Sold 1779/99
    • Africa 64 (1761) - Sold 1774
  • Arrogant class
    • Arrogant 74 (1761) - BU 1810
    • Cornwall 74 (1761) - Scuttled/Burnt 1780
    • Edgar 74 (1779) - BU 1835
    • Goliath 74 (1781) - Razéed to 58 guns 1813, BU 1815
    • Zealous 74 (1785) - BU 1816
    • Audacious 74 (1785) - BU 1815
    • Elephant 74 (1786) - Razéed to 58 guns 1818, BU 1830
    • Bellerophon 74 (1786) - Sold 1836
    • Saturn 74 (1786) - Razéed to 58 guns 1813, BU 1868
    • Vanguard 74 (1787) - BU 1821
    • Excellent 74 (1787) - Razéed to 58 guns 1820, BU 1835
    • Illustrious 74 (1789) - Wrecked 1795
  • Romney (1762) - Wrecked 1804
  • Ramillies class
    • Ramillies 74 (1763) - Fire 1782
    • Terrible 74 (1762) - Fire 1781
    • Robust 74 (1764) - BU 1817
    • Russell 74 (1764) - Sold 1811
    • Invincible 74 (1765) - Wrecked 1801
    • Prince of Wales 74 (1765) - BU 1783
    • Monarch 74 (1765) - BU 1813
    • Magnificent 74 (1766) - Wrecked 1804
    • Marlborough 74 (1767) - Wrecked 1800
  • Albion 74 (1763) - Wrecked 1797
  • St Albans class
    • St Albans 64 (1764) - BU 1814
    • Augusta 64 (1763) - Burnt 1777
  • Exeter class
    • Exeter 64 (1763) - Burnt 1784
    • Europa 64 (1765) - BU 1814
    • Trident 64 (1768) - Sold 1816
    • Prudent 64 (1768) - Sold 1814
  • Asia 64 (1764) - BU 1804
  • Ardent class
    • Ardent 64 (1764) - Captured 1779, recaptured 1782, sold 1784
    • Raisonnable 64 (1768) - BU 1815
    • Agamemnon 64 (1781) - Wrecked 1809
    • Belliqueux 64 (1781) - BU 1816
    • Stately 64 (1784)
    • Nassau 64
    • Indefatigable 64/44 (1784) - BU 1816
  • Intrepid class
    • Intrepid 64 (1770) - Sold to BU 1828.
    • Monmouth 64 (1772) - BU 1818.
    • Defiance 64 (1772) - Sank 1780.
    • Nonsuch 64 (1774) - BU 1802.
    • Ruby 64 (1776) - BU 1821.
    • Vigilant 64 (1774) - BU 1816.
    • Eagle 64 (1774) - BU 1812.
    • America 64 (1777) - BU 1807.
    • Anson 64 (1781) - Wrecked 1807.
    • Polyphemus 64 (1782) - BU 1827.
    • Magnanime 64 (1780) - BU 1813.
    • Sampson 64 (1781) - Sold to BU 1832.
    • Repulse 64 (1780) - Wrecked 1800.
    • Diadem 64 (1782) - BU 1832.
    • Standard 64 (1782) - BU 1816.
  • Ajax 74 (1765) - Sold 1785
  • Hibernia 74 (1765)
  • Suffolk 74 (1765) - BU 1803
  • Warwick (1767) - Sold 1802
  • Egmont 74 (1768) - BU 1799
  • Elizabeth class
    • Elizabeth 74 (1769) - BU 1797
    • Resolution 74 (1770) - BU 1813
    • Cumberland 74 (1774) - BU 1804
    • Berwick 74 (1775) - Captured by France 1795, recaptured and wrecked, 1805
    • Bombay Castle 74 (1782) - Wrecked 1796
    • Powerful 74 (1783) - BU 1812
    • Defiance 74 (1783) - BU 1817
    • Swiftsure 74 (1787) - Captured by France 1801, same name, recaptured at the Battle of Trafalgar, 1805, renamed Irresistible 1805, BU 1816
  • Royal Oak class
    • Royal Oak 74 (1769) - BU 1815
    • Bedford 74 (1775) - BU 1817
    • Hector 74 (1774) - BU 1816
    • Vengeance 74 (1774) - BU 1816
    • Sultan 74 (1775) - BU 1816
    • Montague 74 (1779) - BU 1818
  • Salisbury class
    • Salisbury (1769) - Wrecked 1796
    • Centurion (1774) - Sank 1824, refloated, BU 1825
  • Portland class
    • Portland (1770) - Sold 1817
    • Bristol (1775) - BU 1810
    • Renown (1774) - BU 1794
    • Isis (1774) - BU 1810
    • Leopard (1790) - Wrecked 1814
    • Hannibal 50 (1779) - Captured by France 1782
    • Jupiter 50 (1778) - Wrecked 1808
    • Leander 53 (1780) - Captured by France 1798, captured by Russia 1799, returned to Britain, converted to hospital ship 1806, renamed Hygeia 1813, sold 1817
    • Adamant (1780) - BU 1814
    • Assistance (1781) - Wrecked 1802
    • Europa 50 (1783) - Sold 1814
  • Albion class
    • Grafton 74 (1771) - BU 1816
    • Alcide 74 (1779) - BU 1817
    • Fortitude 74 (1780) - BU 1820
    • Irresistible 74 (1782) - BU 1806
  • Conqueror 74 (1773) - BU 1794
  • Eagle 60/74? (1774)
  • Centurion 50 (1774) - BU 1823
  • Experiment class
    • Experiment (1774) - Captured by France 1779
    • Medusa (1785) - Wrecked 1798
  • Culloden class
    • Culloden 74 (1776) - Wrecked 1781
    • Thunderer 74 (1783) - BU 1814
    • Venerable 74 (1784) - Wrecked 1804
    • Terrible 74 (1785) - BU 1836
    • Victorious 74 (1785) - BU 1803
    • Ramillies 74 (1785) - BU 1850
    • Hannibal 74 (1786) - Captured by France 1801
    • Theseus 74 (1786) - BU 1814
  • Lion 64 (1777) - Sold for BU 1837
  • Alfred class
    • Alfred 74 (1778) - BU 1814
    • Alexander 74 (1778) - BU 1819
    • Warrior 74 (1781) - BU 1857
  • Inflexible 64 (1780)
  • Gibraltar 80 (1749, ex-Spanish Fenix, captured 1780) - BU 1836
  • Princess Caroline (ex-Dutch, captured 1780) - Scuttled 1799
  • Rotterdam (ex-Dutch, captured 1781) - Sold 1806
  • Anson 64 (1781) - Razéed to 44-gun frigate 1794, wrecked 1807
  • Grampus class
    • Grampus (1782) - BU 1794
    • Cato (1782) - Disappeared 1782
    • Trusty (1782) - BU 1815
  • Irresistible 74 (1782)
  • Diadem 64 (1782) - BU 1832
  • Ganges class
    • Ganges 74 (1782) - Ex-East Indiaman? BU 1816
    • Culloden 74 (1783) - BU 1813
    • Tremendous 74 (1784) - Sold 1897
  • Caesar 74 (ex-French César, captured 1782) - Blew up 1782
  • Glory/Glorious 74 (1756, ex-French Glorieux, captured 1782)
  • Argonaut 64 (ex-French Jason, captured 1782)
  • Indefatigable 64 (1784)
  • Majestic 74 (1785) - Razéed to 58 guns 1813, BU 1816
  • Captain 74 (1787)
  • Colossus 74 (1787)
  • Orion 74 (1787)
  • Caesar 80 (1793) - BU 1821

Converted Indiamen Five ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Dublin. ... The second HMS Norfolk was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, displacing 1,556 tons. ... Several ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Warspite: Warspite, launched in 1884, was a first-class armoured cruiser scrapped between 1904 and 1906. ... Resolution in a gale by Willem van de Velde, the younger depicts the first Resolution c. ... Seven ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Mars, after Mars, the Roman god of war: The first Mars was a 50-gun ship, originally Dutch, captured in the Second Anglo-Dutch War in 1665, and sold in 1667. ... Nine vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Conqueror. ... Eight ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Edgar. ... At least five ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Panther. ... HMS Fame was a British Royal Navy ship. ... Six ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Hero, invoking the concept of the hero. ... Five ships of the British Royal Navy have borne the name HMS Hercules, after the Greek and Roman hero Hercules. ... Six ships of the British Royal Navy have been called HMS Thunderer: The first Thunderer was a 74-gun third-rate launched in 1760 and wrecked 1780. ... At least two ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Formidable. ... Six vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Valiant. ... Several ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Triumph: Triumph, launched in 1764, was a 74-gun third-rate ship-of-the-line built at Woolwich. ... The second HMS Bellona of the Royal Navy was a 74-gun third-rate, a prototypical ship of the line used in the Napoleonic wars. ... Several Royal Navy ships have been called HMS Dragon The 4th Rate Dragon, in 1674, had a lieutenant called John Tyrrell, who had been appointed by King Charles II of England. ... Nine ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Superb. ... Eleven ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Kent, after the county of Kent. ... HMS Defence was a 3rd rate ship of the line of 74 guns, built in 1763 for the Royal Navy. ... Five ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Essex, after the county of Essex. ... Six ships of the British Royal Navy ships have been named HMS Africa, after the continent of Africa. ... HMS Cornwall was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched at Deptford in 1761. ... Eight ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Edgar. ... For other ships with the same name, see HMS Goliath. ... For other ships with the same name, see HMS Zealous. ... Three ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Audacious. ... A third-rate ship of the line with 2 gun decks and a complement of 74 guns. ... Napoleon Bonaparte on board the Bellerophon in Plymouth Sound by Sir Charles Lock Eastlake, painted 1815. ... The fifth HMS Vanguard, was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy. ... There have been five ships in the Royal Navy to bear the proud name Illustrious, and as her name suggests, she and her predecessors have had an illustrious history. ... Several vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Ramillies after the battle of Ramillies: Ramillies, launched 1664 as Royal Katherine, was a 90-gun second-rate. ... Eight vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Terrible: Terrible (1694), 26-gun sixth-rate Terrible (1730), 14-gun bomb vessel Terrible (1747), 74-gun third-rate captured from the French Terrible (1762), 74-gun third-rate Terrible (1785), 74-gun third-rate Terrible (1845), wooden-hulled... At least four ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Russell. ... HMS Invincible, built in 1765, was a long service, 1,631 ton, third rate ship of the line in the British Royal Navy. ... Seven ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Prince of Wales, after the Prince of Wales. ... At least three ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Monarch: A Monarch served in the Royal Navy c. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Magnificent. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Marlborough. ... The first HMS Albion was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy. ... There have been six vessels of the Royal Navy bearing the name St Albans. ... Five ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Exeter after the city of Exeter in Devon. ... HMS Europa, a ship of the Royal Navy, is named after the Greek mythological character Europa. ... HMS Ardent was a 64-gun, third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy. ... HMS Raisonnable was a 64-gun 3rd rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, named for the ship of the same name captured from the French in 1758. ... HMS Agamemnon was a Royal Navy third-rate ship of the line with an armament of 64 guns. ... HMS Indefatigable was originally built as a 64-gun two-decked ship of the line for the British Royal Navy. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Intrepid. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Monmouth. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Defiance. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Nonsuch. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Ruby. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Vigilant. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Eagle. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS America. ... HMS Anson was launched in 1781 at Plymouth by Georgina, Duchess of Devonshire, was a small two-decker 64-gun third-rate. ... HMS Polyphemus a 64-gun 3rd rate ship of the line that fought at Copenhagen and Trafalgar. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Magnanime. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Sampson. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Repulse. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Diadem. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Standard. ... HMS Ajax, launched in 1765 at Portsmouth dockyard, was a 74-gun ship of the line of the Royal Navy. ... Four ships of the Royal Navy have borne the name HMS Hibernia after the Latin name of Ireland. ... Five ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Suffolk, after the county of Suffolk. ... Resolution in a gale by Willem van de Velde, the younger depicts the first Resolution c. ... There have been sixteen ships named HMS Cumberland in the Royal Navy. ... HMS Berwick was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line built at Portsmouth Dockyard in 1775. ... Multiple ships have born the name HMS Powerful. ... HMS Defiance was a 3rd rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, of 74 guns, built in 1783. ... The Swiftsure was a 74-gun ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built in Deptford from 1787 to 1787 under plans by engineer Wells. ... Combatants United Kingdom First French Empire Kingdom of Spain Commanders Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson † Pierre Charles Silvestre de Villeneuve Strength 27 ships of the line and 6 others. ... Seven (or eleven, depending on how one counts) vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Royal Oak. ... Nine ships of the British Royal Navy have borne the name HMS Hector, named after the Trojan hero Hector in the Iliad. ... Eight vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Vengeance. ... USS Claxton (DD-140), named for Thomas Claxton, was a Wickes-class destroyer in the United States Navy. ... Eight ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Centurion, after the centurions of ancient Rome. ... The name HMS Portland has been carried by eight ships of the Royal Navy. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Bristol. ... HMS Renown is a ship name used by the Royal Navy. ... Six ships of the British Royal Navy, and four tenders of the RNVR, have been named HMS Isis, after the Egyptian goddess Isis. ... HMS Leopard was a British 50-gun 4th rate involved in the Chesapeake-Leopard Affair. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Hannibal. ... Three ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Jupiter, after the Roman god Jupiter. ... HMS Leander was a fourth rate 50-gun ship of the Royal Navy, launched at Chatham on 1 July 1780. ... Several ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Adamant. ... HMS Europa, a ship of the Royal Navy, is named after the Greek mythological character Europa. ... Two ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Grafton: The first Grafton (H89) was a G-class destroyer launched in 1935 and torpedoed in 1940. ... HMS Alcide is the name of several Royal Navy vessels. ... At least two ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Irresistible: An Irresistible served in the Royal Navy c. ... About fifteen ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Eagle, after the eagle. ... Eight ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Centurion, after the centurions of ancient Rome. ... HMS Culloden was a Royal Navy third-rate ship of the line built in Deptford in 1776. ... HMS Thunderer (1783 at Rotherhither) a 74-gun 3rd rate ship of the line which fought at Trafalgar. ... Four ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Venerable: The first Venerable, launched in 1784, was a 74-gun third-rate. ... Eight vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Terrible: Terrible (1694), 26-gun sixth-rate Terrible (1730), 14-gun bomb vessel Terrible (1747), 74-gun third-rate captured from the French Terrible (1762), 74-gun third-rate Terrible (1785), 74-gun third-rate Terrible (1845), wooden-hulled... The first HMS Victorious was launched at Blackwall, London in 1785. ... Several vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Ramillies after the battle of Ramillies: Ramillies, launched 1664 as Royal Katherine, was a 90-gun second-rate. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Hannibal. ... HMS Theseus was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy. ... HMS Lion was a 64-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy launched on September 3, 1777 at Portsmouth Dockyard. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Four ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Warrior. ... Several ships of the Royal Navy have been called HMS Inflexible. ... Seven ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Gibraltar, after the colony of Gibraltar. ... HMS Anson was launched in 1781 at Plymouth by Georgina, Duchess of Devonshire, was a small two-decker 64-gun third-rate. ... Ten vessels of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Grampus after two members of the dolphin family (Delphinidae): Grampus griseus, also known as Rissos Dolphin, and Orcinus orca, also known as the Killer Whale. ... At least two ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Irresistible: An Irresistible served in the Royal Navy c. ... There have been at least three ships of the Royal Navy named HMS Diadem. ... HMS Ganges was an 74-gun 3rd rate frigate of the Royal Navy launched on March 30, 1782 on the Thames. ... HMS CULLODEN Frigate, British Royal Navy, Built 1776. ... Four ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Caesar, after the famous Roman general and dictator Julius Caesar. ... HMS Argonaut (F56) was a Leander-class frigate of the Royal Navy. ... HMS Indefatigable was originally built as a 64-gun two-decked ship of the line for the British Royal Navy. ... Four ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Majestic. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... The first HMS Colossus was a 74-gun ship of the line in the British Royal Navy. ... HMS Orion (1787 at Deptford) a 74-gun 3rd rate ship of the line which fought at the Battle of the Nile and at Trafalgar where, with Ajax, she forced the surrender of the French ship Intrépide (74). ... Four ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Caesar, after the famous Roman general and dictator Julius Caesar. ...

  • Calcutta (1795) - Ex-Warley. Captured by France 1805
  • Grampus (1795) - Ex-Ceres.
  • Hindostan (1795) - Ex-Born.
  • Abergavenny (1795) - Ex-Earl of Abergavenny. Sold 1807
  • Malabar (1795) - Ex-Royal Charlotte. Sank 1796
  • Glatton (1795) - Scuttled 1830
  • Coromandel (1795) - Ex-Winterton. Sold 1813
  • Madras (1795) - Ex-Lascelles. Sold 1807
  • Weymouth (1795) - Ex-Earl Mansfield. Wrecked 1800
  • Malabar (1798) - Ex-Cuvera. Renamed Coromandel 1815, BU 1853
  • Hindostan (1798) - Ex-Admiral Rainier. Renamed Dolphin 1819, renamed Justitia 1831, sold 1855

Ships of the line Five ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Calcutta, after the Indian city of Calcutta (now Kolkota). ... Ten vessels of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Grampus after two members of the dolphin family (Delphinidae): Grampus griseus, also known as Rissos Dolphin, and Orcinus orca, also known as the Killer Whale. ... HMS Glatton HMS Glatton was a 64-gun 4th rate ship of the line. ... The HMS Coromandel was a ship in the British Royal Navy. ...

  • Foudroyant 80 (1798) - Wrecked 1897
  • Achille 74 (1798) - Sold 1865
  • Kent 74 (1798)
  • Ajax (c. 1798)
  • Antelope class
    • Antelope (1802) - BU 1845
    • Diomede (1798) - BU 1815
    • Grampus (1802) - Sold 1832
  • Foudroyant 80
  • Tigre 80
  • Dragon 74
  • Minotaur 74
  • Northumberland 74 (1798)
  • Renown 74
  • Haarlem 64
  • Hector 64
  • Conqueror 74 (1801)

Captures of the Revolutionary War For other ships with the same name, see HMS Foudroyant. ... The fourth ship of the Royal Navy to have been named HMS Achille, after the Greek hero Achilles. ... Eleven ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Kent, after the county of Kent. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... At least twelve ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Antelope. ... Three ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Diomede: HMS Diomede (1781), a fourth-rate ship of the line completed in 1781, and broken up in 1815 HMS Diomede (1919), a Danae class light cruiser which captured a German surface raider in World War II HMS Diomede (F16... HMS Grampus was a 50-gun ship of the line of the Royal Navy. ... Two Royal Navy ships have been named Foudroyant: Foudroyant was an 80-gun ship, captured from the French on 28 February 1758. ... Several Royal Navy ships have been called HMS Dragon The 4th Rate Dragon, in 1674, had a lieutenant called John Tyrrell, who had been appointed by King Charles II of England. ... HMS Minotaur fought at the Battle of the Nile and the Battle of Trafalgar. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Northumberland. ... HMS Renown was a sailing ship of the line in the late 1700s later renamed the Royal Oak. ... Nine ships of the British Royal Navy have borne the name HMS Hector, named after the Trojan hero Hector in the Iliad. ...

  • Formidable 74 (ex-French, captured 1795), renamed Belleisle. Fought at Trafalgar. BU 1814
  • Brakel (c. 1784, ex-Dutch, captured 1796) - Sold 1814
  • Tromp (c. 1779, ex-Dutch, captured 1796) - Sold 1815
  • Camperdown 70 (ex-Dutch Jupiter, captured 1797)
  • Alkmaar (c. 1783, ex-Dutch, captured 1797) - Sold 1815
  • Canopus 80 (ex-French Franklin, captured 1798) - Sold 1887
  • Donegal 74 (ex-French Hoche, captured 1798) - BU 1845
  • Hercules 74 (ex-French Hercule, captured 1798)
  • Guerrière (1753, ex-French Guerriere, captured 1798)
  • Broederschap (c. 1769, ex-Dutch, captured 1799) - Renamed Broaderscarp, BU 1805
  • Batavier (c. 1779, ex-Dutch, captured 1799) - BU 1823
  • Beschermer (c. 1784, ex-Dutch, captured 1799) - Sold 1838

British ships At least two ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Formidable. ... HMS Belleisle was a Royal Navy third rate ship of the line. ... Several vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Camperdown after the battle of Camperdown in 1797: Camperdown, was a third rate 64-gun ship captured from the Dutch (who called her the Jupiter) at the battle of Camperdown. ... The Franklin was a French ship of the line designed by engineer Jacques-Noël Sané. She was captured by the fleet of counter-Admiral Nelson at the Battle of the Nile, and commissioned in the Royal Navy as HMS Canopus. ... Five ships of the British Royal Navy have borne the name HMS Hercules, after the Greek and Roman hero Hercules. ... Two ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Guerriere. ...

  • Colossus'' 74 (1803)
  • Hibernia 110 (1804) - Sold 1902
  • Fame 74 (1805) - BU 1817
  • Cumberland 74 (1807) - Renamed Fortitude
  • Sultan 74 (1807) - BU 1864
  • Invincible 74 (1808)
  • Caledonia class - 120-gun First Rates
    • Caledonia 120 (1808) - Renamed Dreadnought, BU 1875
    • Britannia 120 (1820) - BU 1869
    • Prince Regent 120 (1823) - Converted to screw, BU 1873
    • Neptune 102 (1827) - Renamed Royal George, sold 1875
    • Royal William 72 (1833) - Laid down as 120-gunner. Burnt 1899
    • Waterloo 120 ((1833) was laid down as the broadened Caledonia class 3-decker in 1827, and cut down to an 89 gun 2-decker and converted to steam in 1859, and was renamed Conqueror in 1862. In 1877 she was renamed Warspite and served as a training ship at Greenhithe/Woolwich. She was burnt in 1918.
    • St George 91 (1840) - Sold 1883
    • Trafalgar 91 (1841) - Laid down as 106-gunner. Sold 1906
  • Boyne 98 (1810) - Renamed Excellent 1834, BU 1861
  • Impregnable 98 (1810) - Sold 1906
  • Armada class 74-gun Third Rates. The most numerous class of British capital ships ever built, with forty vessels being completed to this design.
    • Vindictive
    • Cressy (1810) - Rearmed to 50 guns, BU 1832
    • Poictiers
    • Egmont (1810) - Sold 1875
    • Hogue (1811) - Later converted to 60-gun screw blockship. BU 1865
    • Armada
    • Vengeur
    • Conquestador
    • Redoubtable
    • Pitt
    • Mulgrave
    • Ajax (1809) - Later converted to 60-gun screw blockship. BU 1864
    • Berwick
    • Egmont
    • Edinburgh (1811) - Later converted to 60-gun screw blockship. Sold 1866
    • Clarence (1812) - Renamed Centurion 1826 and cut down to 50 guns, BU 1828
    • Scarborough
    • Asia
    • Rodney
    • Duncan
    • Indus (1812) - Renamed Bellona 1818
    • Dublin
    • Stirling Castle
    • Medway
    • America
    • Anson
    • Barham
    • Rippon
    • Blenheim (1813) - Later converted to 60-gun screw blockship. BU 1865
    • Pembroke (1812) - Later converted to 60-gun screw blockship. Renamed Forte 1889, then Pembroke again 1891, sold 1905.
    • Cornwall (1812)
    • Devonshire (1812) - BU c. 1870
    • Gloucester (1812)
    • Benbow
    • Marathon
    • Hercules
    • Cornwallis (1813) - converted to 60-gun screw blockship 1854-55, BU 1957.
    • Agincourt (1817) - renamed Vigo 1865, BU 1885.
    • Boscawen - re-ordered as an 80-gun ship 1817.
    • Hero (1816) - renamed Wellington 1816, sold 1908.
    • Russell (1822) - converted to 60-gun screw blockship 1854-55, BU 1865.
  • Black Prince class 74-gun Third Rates. Note that, while Wellesley belonged officially to this class, plans meant for her construction were lost in 1812 when aboard the Java which was captured by the Americans; so in practice she was built to the lines of the Cornwallis (see above).
    • Black Prince (1816) - BU 1855.
    • Wellesley (1815) - became a training ship, renamed Cornwall 1868, sunk by the Luftwaffe 1940 (the only ship-of-the-line ever to be sunk in an air attack).
    • Hawke (1820) - converted to 60-gun screw blockship 1854-55, BU 1865.
    • Melville (1817) - sold 1873.
  • Hannibal 74 (1810)
  • Minden 74 (1810)
  • Chatham 74 (1812)
  • Jupiter class
    • Jupiter 50 (1813) - BU 1870
    • Salisbury (1814) - Sold 1837
    • Romney (1815) - Sold 1845
    • Isis 50 (1819) - Sold 1867
  • Nelson class
    • Nelson 120 (1814) - 1859-60 cut down to 91 gun 2-decker and converted to screw, 1867 given to New South Wales Government and fitted as school ship, 1898 sold, 1928 BU. No sea service as either sail or steam line-of-battle ship.
    • St Vincent 120 (1815) - Sold 1906
    • Howe 120 (1815) - BU 1854
  • Hercules 80 (1815)
  • Defence 74 (1815) - BU 1857
  • Wellesley 74 (1815) - Renamed Cornwall, sunk by air attack in WW2

Captures of the Napoleonic War HMS Colossus a 74-gun 3rd rate ship of the line which fought at Trafalgar where she helped force the surrender of the Spanish ship Bahamas (74) and the French Swift-Sure (74). ... HMS Hibernia was a Royal Navy 110-gun first rate ship of the line. ... Ships named Fame: Fame known as the “FAME” of Watford, was a small vessel which joined or was taken by the Royalist Fleet under Prince Rupert in the spring of 1649. ... There have been sixteen ships named HMS Cumberland in the Royal Navy. ... Six ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Invincible. ... HMS Britannia was a 120 gun first rate of the Royal Navy which was laid down in 1813 and launched on October 20, 1820. ... At least two ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Prince Regent. ... Nine ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Neptune after the Roman god of the ocean. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Waterloo. ... Five vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Trafalgar, after the Battle of Trafalgar: Trafalgar (1820), first-rate later renamed to Camperdown Trafalgar (1841), first-rate Trafalgar (1887), battleship Trafalgar (D77), destroyer Trafalgar (S107), submarine This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other... Six ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Boyne after the Battle of the Boyne, 1690. ... Ten ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Impregnable: Impregnable was a 98-gun second-rate ship of the line launched in 1789 and wrecked in 1799 near Chichester. ... There have been at least three ships of the Royal Navy named HMS Cressy. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Hogue. ... The HMS Ajax, third of the name, was launched in 1809, and was a 74-gun third-rate battleship. ... Six ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Edinburgh, for the Scottish city of Edinburgh. ... There have been at least two ships of the Royal Navy named HMS Indus. ... At least three ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Blenheim, after the Battle of Blenheim. ... At least six ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Pembroke. ... HMS Cornwall was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, completed in 1812. ... Eight ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Devonshire, originally in honor of William Cavendish, 1st Duke of Devonshire, and later after the county of Devonshire (now called Devon). ... Eleven vessels, and one planned, of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Gloucester, after Gloucester, the city in England. ... At least two ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Cornwallis, after Admiral Sir William Cornwallis. ... Five ships of the Royal Navy have been called HMS Agincourt, named after the Battle of Agincourt of 1415, and construction of another was started but not completed. ... HMS Boscawan 70 guns, 3rd rate Ship of the line, built at Woolwich Royal Dockyard. ... Six ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Hero, invoking the concept of the hero. ... At least four ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Russell. ... Five ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Black Prince, after Edward, the Black Prince (1330-1376), the eldest son of King Edward III of England. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Cornwall. ... At least nineteen ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Hawke. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Hannibal. ... HMS Minden was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, named after the German town Minden. ... HMS Chatham, 1911 - 1926, pictured circa 1914 Fifteen ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Chatham after the port of Chatham, Kent, home of the Chatham Dockyard The first Chatham was a galliot captured in 1666 during the Second Anglo-Dutch War. ... Three ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Jupiter, after the Roman god Jupiter. ... USS Claxton (DD-140), named for Thomas Claxton, was a Wickes-class destroyer in the United States Navy. ... Six ships of the British Royal Navy, and four tenders of the RNVR, have been named HMS Isis, after the Egyptian goddess Isis. ... Four vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS St Vincent. ... Several ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Howe, after Admiral Richard Howe: Howe, launched 1860, was a 121-gun ship of the line, renamed Bulwark, and then renamed Impregnable in 1886. ... HMS Hercules was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy. ... Several ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Defence: Defence, launched in 1763, fought in many battles in the American Revolutionary War, the French Revolutionary Wars and the Napoleonic Wars. ...

  • French 80-gun ships of Le Tonnant class:
  • Brave (ex-French Le Formidable, captured 1805) - BU 1816
  • Alexandre (ex-French L'Alexandre, captured 1806) - Sold 1822
  • French 74-gun ships of Le Téméraire class:
    • Duquesne (ex-French Le Duquesne, captured 1803)
    • Implacable 74 (ex-French Le Duguay-Trouin, captured 1805) - Scuttled 1949
    • Mont Blanc (ex-French Le Mont Blanc, captured 1805) - Sold 1819.
    • Scipion (ex-French Le Scipion, captured 1805) - BU 1819.
    • Maida (ex-French Le Jupiter, captured 1806) - Sold 1814
    • Brave (ex-French Le Brave, captured 1806) - Foundered 1806
    • Marengo (ex-French Le Marengo, captured 1806) - BU 1816
    • Abercrombie (ex-French Le d'Hautpoult, captured 1809) - Sold 1817
    • Genoa (ex-French Le Brillant, captured 1814 on stocks) - BU 1838
  • French 74-gun ship of Le Pluton class:
    • Rivoli (ex-French Le Rivoli, captured 1812) - BU 1819

British ships HMS Brave (F94) was a Type 22 frigate of the Royal Navy. ... Eight ships of the French Navy have been named in honour of Abraham Duquesne: a 74-gun ship of the line (1787-1803) A captured Russian 73-gun ship, used as a school ship (1811-1814) A 86-gun ship (1811-1814) a 74-gun ship of the line (1814... HMS Implacable was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy. ... Mont-Blanc was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the French Navy. ... The Scipion was a 74-gun French ship of the line. ...

  • Minotaur 74 (1816) - Renamed Hermes
  • Agincourt 74 (1817) - Sold 1884
  • Malabar 74 (1818)
  • Hastings 74 (1819) - Converted to East Indiaman, converted to 60-gunner. Converted to screw 1855, sold 1886
  • Canopus class
    • Ganges 84 (1821) - Sold 1929
    • Asia 84 (1824) - Flagship at the Battle of Navarino, 1827, sold 1908
    • Vengeance 84 (1824) - Sold 1897
    • Formidable 84 (1825) - Sold 1906
    • Powerful 84 (1826) - BU 1860-64
    • Clarence 84 (1827) - Renamed Goliath, burnt 1884
    • Bombay 84 (1828) - Converted to screw 1861, burnt 1864
    • Thunderer 84 (1831) - Sold 1901
    • Monarch 84 (1832) - BU 1862-66
  • Russell 60 (1822) - Laid down as 74-gunner. BU 1865
  • Carnatic 72 (1823) - Sold 1914
  • Princess Charlotte 104 (1825) - Sold 1875
  • Imaun (1826) - BU 1863
  • Liverpool 74 (1826)
  • London 104 (1828) - Renamed Royal Adelaide, sold 1905
  • Calcutta 84 (1831) - Sold 1908
  • Vanguard class
    • Vanguard 78 (1835) - BU 1875
    • Collingwood 80 (1841) - Converted to screw 1861, sold 1867
    • Goliath 80 (1842) - Converted to screw 1857, burnt 1875
    • Superb 80 (1842) - BU 1869
    • Meeanee 60 (1848) - Laid down as Madras 80. Converted to screw 1857, BU 1906
    • Centurion 80 (1844) - Converted to screw 1855/56, sold 1870
    • Lion 80 (1847) - Converted to screw 1859, sold 1905
    • Colossus 80 (1848) - Converted to screw 1854, sold 1867
    • Mars 80 (1848) - Converted to screw 1855, sold 1929
    • Majestic 80 (1853) - BU 1868
    • Brunswick 80 (1855) - Sold 1867
    • Irresistible 80 (1859) - Sold 1894
  • Royal Frederick 86 (1839) - Laid down as 110-gunner. Renamed Queen, BU 1871
  • Indus 80 (1839) - Sold 1898
  • Hindustan 80 (1841) - Renamed Fisgard 1905, sold 1921
  • Albion 90 (1842) - Converted to screw 1861, BU 1884
  • Cumberland 70 (1842) - Burnt and BU 1889
  • Boscawen 70 (1844) - Laid down as 74-gunner. Was to be named Indefatigable. Burnt and BU 1914
  • Sans Pareil 81 (1851) - Sold 1867
    • Irresistible 80 (1859) - Sold 1894

Several ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Minotaur after a Greek mythological figure, the Minotaur Minotaur - Sail battleship which fought at the battles of the Nile and Trafalgar. ... Five ships of the Royal Navy have been called HMS Agincourt, named after the Battle of Agincourt of 1415, and construction of another was started but not completed. ... HMS Ganges was an 84-gun 2nd rate of the Royal Navy launched on November 10, 1821 at Bombay Dockyard. ... Combatants United Kingdom France Russia Ottoman Empire Ottoman Vilayet of Egypt Ottoman Vilayet of Tunisia Commanders Edward Codrington(C-in-C) Henri de Rigny L. Heyden Ibrahim Pasha (C-in-C) Amir Tahir Pasha(Adm comm) Moharram Bey Capitan Bey Strength 10 battleships, 10 frigates, 4 brigs, 2 schooners, 1... Eight vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Vengeance. ... At least two ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Formidable. ... Multiple ships have born the name HMS Powerful. ... Six ships of the British Royal Navy have been called HMS Thunderer: The first Thunderer was a 74-gun third-rate launched in 1760 and wrecked 1780. ... At least three ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Monarch: A Monarch served in the Royal Navy c. ... At least four ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Russell. ... HMS Princess Charlotte was a 44-gun Royal Navy frigate built during the War of 1812 at the Kingston Royal Naval Dockyard in Kingston, Ontario. ... Seven ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Liverpool after the city of Liverpool: The first Liverpool was a fifth-rate frigate with a modest displacement of 681 tons. ... Twelve ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS London, after the city of London. ... Five ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Calcutta, after the Indian city of Calcutta (now Kolkota). ... The sixth HMS Vanguard, of the British Royal Navy was a 78-gun second-rate ship of the line, built in 1835 at Pembroke Dock. ... Four ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Collingwood, after Admiral Collingwood. ... A number of ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Goliath after the Biblical giant, Goliath. ... Nine ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Superb. ... Eight ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Centurion, after the centurions of ancient Rome. ... Eighteen vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Lion, after the lion, an animal traditionally associated with courage, and also used in several heraldric motifs representing England and the British Monarchy. ... Four ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Colossus: Colossus (1787) - A 74-gun sail battleship of the Leviathan class, launched at Gravesend. ... Seven ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Mars, after Mars, the Roman god of war: The first Mars was a 50-gun ship, originally Dutch, captured in the Second Anglo-Dutch War in 1665, and sold in 1667. ... Four ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Majestic. ... At least two ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Irresistible: An Irresistible served in the Royal Navy c. ... HMS Indus (1839) was an 80-gun second-rate of the Royal Navy, launched on 16th March 1839. ... At least two ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Hindustan. ... The sixth HMS Albion was a 90-gun second-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy. ... There have been sixteen ships named HMS Cumberland in the Royal Navy. ... HMS Boscawan 70 guns, 3rd rate Ship of the line, built at Woolwich Royal Dockyard. ... Three ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Sans Pareil. ... At least two ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Irresistible: An Irresistible served in the Royal Navy c. ...

List of Unarmoured Steam Line-of-Battle Ships of the Royal Navy (1847-61)

Ships have been listed by class as in Lambert.[16]


Ships Converted to Steam Line-of-Battle Ships

  • Duke of Wellington class 3-deckers, 131 guns
    • Duke of Wellington 131 (1852) (ex-Windsor Castle) - Sold 1904
    • Marlborough 131 (1855) - Sank 1924
    • Royal Sovereign 121 (1857) - Converted to turret ship, sold 1885
    • Prince of Wales 121 (1860) - BU 1916
  • Royal Albert class 3-decker, 121 guns
    • Royal Albert 121 (1854) - Sold 1883
  • Windsor Castle class 3-decker, 102 guns, laid down as Queen class 116 guns
    • Windsor Castle 102 (1858) - ex-Victoria - Sold 1908
  • Orion class 2-deckers, 91 guns, laid down as 80 gun ships
    • Orion 91 (1854) - BU 1867
    • Hood 91 (1859) - Sold 1888/1904
    • Edgar 80 (-) never laid down
  • Caesar class 2-decker, 91 guns
    • Caesar 91 (1853) - Sold 1870
  • Algiers class 2-decker, 91 guns, improved Albion class
    • Algiers 91 (1854) - Sold 1870
  • Princess Royal class 2-deckers, 91 guns, laid down as Albion class
    • Princess Royal 91 (1853) - Sold 1872
    • Hannibal 91 (1854) - Sold 1904
  • Rodney class 2-deckers, 91 guns
    • Rodney 91 (1833) - Converted to screw 1860, BU 1882
    • Nile 91 (1830) - Converted to screw 1854, burnt 1956
    • London 91 (1840) - Converted to screw 1858, sold 1884
  • Nelson class 2-decker, 91 guns, originally Nelson class 3-decker 120 guns
    • Nelson 91 (1814) - Laid down as 120-gunner. Converted to steam and cut down to 2-decker 1859-60. 1867, fitted as schoolship for New South Wales. Sold 1898. BU 1928. No service as sail or steam line-of-battle ship
  • Royal George class 2-deckers, 89 guns, originally Caledonia class 3-decker 120 guns
    • Prince Regent 89 (1823) - cut down to 92 gun 2 decker 1841-7, converted to screw 1860-61, BU 1873
    • Royal George 89 (1827) - converted to steam 120-gun 3-decker 1852-53, poop and forecastle removed Dec 1854, making her 102 gun 3-decker, cut down to 89 gun 2-decker 1860, sold 1875
  • Saint George class 2-deckers, 89 guns, originally broadened Caledonia class 3-decker 120 guns
    • St George 89 (1840) - Sold 1883
    • Royal William 89 (1833) - Burnt 1899
    • Neptune 89 (1827) - sold 1875
    • Waterloo 120 (1833) - converted 1859, renamed Conqueror 1862, 1877 renamed Warspite and served as a training ship at Greenhithe/Woolwich. Burnt 1918.
    • Trafalgar 91 (1841) - Sold 1906
  • Albion class 2-deckers, 91 guns, originally Albion class 2-deckers 90 guns
    • Albion 91 (1842) - Converted to screw 1861, BU 1884
    • Aboukir 91 (1848) - Sold 1878
    • Exmouth 91 (1854) - Sold 1905
  • Queen class 2-deckers, 86 guns, originally Queen class 3-decker 120 guns
    • Queen 86 (1839) - BU 1871
    • Frederick William (ex-Royal Frederick) 86 (1860) - renamed Worcester 1876, BU 1953
  • Cressy class 2-decker, 80 guns
    • Cressy 80 (1853) - Sold 1867
  • Majestic class 2-deckers, 80 guns, originally Vanguard class 2-deckers 80 guns
    • Goliath 80 (1842) - Converted to screw 1857, burnt 1875
    • Collingwood 80 (1841) - Converted to screw 1861, sold 1867
    • Centurion 80 (1844) - Converted to screw 1855/56, sold 1870
    • Mars 80 (1848) - Converted to screw 1855, sold 1929
    • Lion 80 (1847) - Converted to screw 1859, sold 1905
    • Majestic 80 (1853) - BU 1868
    • Meeanee 80 (1848) - Laid down as Madras 80. Converted to screw 1857, BU 1906
    • Colossus 80 (1848) - Converted to screw 1854, sold 1867
    • Brunswick 80 (1855) - Sold 1867
    • Irresistible 80 (1859) - Sold 1894
  • Bombay class 2-decker, 80 guns, ex-Canopus class
    • Bombay 84 (1828) - Converted to screw 1861, burnt 1864
  • San Pareil class 2-decker, 70 guns
    • Sans Pareil 81 (1851) - Sold 1867
  • Blenheim class 2-deckers, 60 guns blockships, ex-74s
    • Ajax 60 (1809) - Laid down as 74-gunner. BU 1864
    • Blenheim 60 (1813) - Laid down as 74-gunner. BU 1865
    • Edinburgh 60 (1811) - Laid down as 74-gunner. Sold 1866
    • Hogue 60 (1811) - Laid down as 74-gunners. BU 1865
  • Cornwallis class 2-deckers, 60 guns blockships, ex-74s
    • Cornwallis 60 (1813) - Laid down as 74-gunner. BU 1957
    • Hastings 74 (1819) - Converted to East Indiaman, converted to 60-gunner. Converted to screw 1855, sold 1886
    • Hawke 60 (1820) - Laid down as 74-gunner. BU 1865
    • Pembroke 60 (1812) - Laid down as 74-gunner. Renamed Forte, sold 1905
    • Russell 60 (1822) - Laid down as 74-gunner. BU 1865

HMS Duke of Wellington was a 131 gun first-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy. ... Six warships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Marlborough after the Duke of Marlborough: The second-rate Saint Michael, renamed Marlborough in 1706, fought in the Seven Years War and foundered at sea in 1762. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Royal Sovereign. ... HMS Prince of Wales was a 121-gun screw-propelled first-rate ship of the line built in 1860 commanded by Commander Joseph Watson, converted to a training ship and renamed Britannia in 1869. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Orion. ... Four ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Caesar, after the famous Roman general and dictator Julius Caesar. ... Four ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Princess Royal. ... The Hannibal (left foreground) lies aground and dismasted at the Battle of Algeciras. ... Six ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Rodney, at least the last five after Admiral George Brydges Rodney. ... At least two ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Nile after the Battle of the Nile. ... HMS London was a 2nd rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy. ... At least two ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Prince Regent. ... The first and most famous HMS Royal George was a First-rate Ship of the Line of the Royal Navy, built at Woolwich Dockyard in 1756. ... Nine ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Neptune after the Roman god of the ocean. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Waterloo. ... Five vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Trafalgar, after the Battle of Trafalgar: Trafalgar (1820), first-rate later renamed to Camperdown Trafalgar (1841), first-rate Trafalgar (1887), battleship Trafalgar (D77), destroyer Trafalgar (S107), submarine This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other... The sixth HMS Albion was a 90-gun second-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy. ... HMS. Aboukir. ... HMS Exmouth, Pennant number F84, was an anti-submarine warfare frigate of theBlackwood class. ... There have been at least three ships of the Royal Navy named HMS Cressy. ... A number of ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Goliath after the Biblical giant, Goliath. ... Four ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Collingwood, after Admiral Collingwood. ... Eight ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Centurion, after the centurions of ancient Rome. ... Seven ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Mars, after Mars, the Roman god of war: The first Mars was a 50-gun ship, originally Dutch, captured in the Second Anglo-Dutch War in 1665, and sold in 1667. ... Eighteen vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Lion, after the lion, an animal traditionally associated with courage, and also used in several heraldric motifs representing England and the British Monarchy. ... Four ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Majestic. ... Four ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Colossus: Colossus (1787) - A 74-gun sail battleship of the Leviathan class, launched at Gravesend. ... At least two ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Irresistible: An Irresistible served in the Royal Navy c. ... Three ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Sans Pareil. ... The HMS Ajax, third of the name, was launched in 1809, and was a 74-gun third-rate battleship. ... At least three ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Blenheim, after the Battle of Blenheim. ... Six ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Edinburgh, for the Scottish city of Edinburgh. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Hogue. ... At least two ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Cornwallis, after Admiral Sir William Cornwallis. ... At least nineteen ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Hawke. ... At least six ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Pembroke. ... At least four ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Russell. ...

Ships Laid Down as Steam Line-of-Battle Ships

  • Victoria class, 3-deckers, 121 guns
    • Victoria 121 (1859) - Sold 1892
    • Howe 110 (1860) - Renamed Impregnable. Sold 1921
  • Saint Jean D'Acre class 2-decker, 101 guns
    • St Jean d'Acre 101 (1853) - Sold 1875
  • Conqueror class 2-deckers, 101 guns
    • Conqueror 101 (1855) - Wrecked 1861
    • Donegal 101 (1858) - Renamed Vernon 1886, sold 1925
  • Duncan class 2-deckers, 101 guns
    • Duncan 101 (1859) - Sold 1910
    • Gibraltar 101 (1860) - Renamed Grampian 1888, sold 1899
  • Agamemnon class 2-decker, 91 guns
  • James Watt class 2-deckers, 91 guns
    • James Watt 91 (1853) Sold 1875
    • Victor Emanuel 91 (1855) - ex-Repulse. Sold 1899
    • Edgar 91 (1858)
    • Hero 91 (1858) - Sold 1871
  • Renown class 2-deckers, 91 guns
    • Revenge 91 (1859) - BU 1923
    • Renown 91 (1857) - Sold 1870
    • Atlas 91 (1860) - BU 1904
    • Anson 91 (1860) - BU 1904
  • Defiance class 2-decker, 91 guns
    • Defiance 91 (1861) - Sold 1931

For other ships of the same name, see HMS Victoria. ... HMS Howe in the late 19th Century HMS Howe was a screw Royal Navy 110-gun 1st rate ship of the line, named after Admiral Richard Howe. ... Nine vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Conqueror. ... The Duncan class of 101-gun two-decker steam line-of-battle ships are considered by Professor Andrew Lambert to have been the final statement of the British design progress for steam two-deckers. ... The Duncan class of 101-gun two-decker steam line-of-battle ships are considered by Professor Andrew Lambert to have been the final statement of the British design progress for steam two-deckers. ... The Duncan class of 101-gun two-decker steam line-of-battle ships are considered by Professor Andrew Lambert to have been the final statement of the British design progress for steam two-deckers. ... The Royal Naval battleship H.M.S Agamemnon was ordered by the Admiralty in 1849, in response to the perceived threat from France by their possession of ships of the Napoleon class. ... Eight ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Edgar. ... Six ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Hero, invoking the concept of the hero. ... Sixteen warships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Revenge. ... HMS Renown is a ship name used by the Royal Navy. ... Seven ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Anson, after Admiral George Anson: The first Anson was a 60-gun fourth-rate launched in 1747 and sold in 1773. ... HMS Defiance was the last wooden line-of-battle ship launched for the Royal Navy. ... The Bulwark class were the final class of wooden line-of-battle ships laid down for the Royal Navy. ... The Bulwark class were the final class of wooden line-of-battle ships laid down for the Royal Navy. ... For other ships with the same name, see HMS Repulse. ... HMS Zealous was one of the three ships (the others being HMS Royal Alfred and HMS Repulse) forming the second group of wooden second-rate warships selected in 1860 for conversion to broadside ironclads in response to the perceived threat to Britain offered by the increase in French warship building. ... HMS Royal Alfred was a broadside ironclad frigate of the Victorian era, serving with the Royal Navy. ... HMS Royal Oak was begun as a 91-gun two-deck steam ship-of-the-line. ... The Prince Consort class of line-of-battle ships were laid down in 1860 as 91-gun wooden second-rates, but were approved in 1861 for conversion to broadside ironclad frigates. ... HMS Prince Consort was laid down at Pembroke as the 91-gun second rate battleship HMS Triumph, but her name was changed in February 1862 in memory of the recently deceased Prince Albert. ... The Prince Consort class of line-of-battle ships were laid down in 1860 as 91-gun wooden second-rates, but were approved in 1861 for conversion to broadside ironclad frigates. ... HMS Ocean was the last of the Royal Navys Prince Consort class battleships to be completed. ... The Prince Consort class of line-of-battle ships were laid down in 1860 as 91-gun wooden second-rates, but were approved in 1861 for conversion to broadside ironclad frigates. ... HMS Caledonia was a broadside ironclad of the Prince Consort class. ... The Prince Consort class of line-of-battle ships were laid down in 1860 as 91-gun wooden second-rates, but were approved in 1861 for conversion to broadside ironclad frigates. ...

List of Ironclad Line-of-Battle Ships of the Royal Navy (1860–1882)

Sea-going Ironclads (1860–1882)

  • Warrior class broadside ironclads
    • Warrior (1860) - Preserved Portsmouth
    • Black Prince (1861) - Renamed Emerald 1903, renamed Impregnable III 1910, sold for BU 1923
  • Defence class broadside ironclads
    • Defence (1861)
    • Resistance (1861)
  • Hector class broadside ironclads
    • Hector (1862)
    • Valiant (1863)
  • Achilles (1863) broadside ironclad
  • Minotaur class broadside ironclads
    • Minotaur (1863)
    • Agincourt (1865)
    • Northumberland (1866)
  • Prince Consort class broadside ironclads (converted from Bulwark class 2-deckers)
  • Royal Oak (1862) broadside ironclad (converted from Bulwark class 2-decker)
  • Royal Alfred (1864) central-battery ironclad (converted from Bulwark class 2-decker)
  • Research (1863) central-battery ironclad
  • Enterprise (1864) central-battery ironclad
  • Favorite (1864) central-battery ironclad
  • Zealous (1864) central-battery ironclad (converted from Bulwark class 2-decker)
  • Repulse (1868) central-battery ironclad (converted from Bulwark class 2-decker)
  • Lord Clyde class broadside ironclads
    • Lord Clyde (1864)
    • Lord Warden (1865)
  • Pallas (1865) central-battery ironclad
  • Bellerophon (1865) central-battery ironclad
  • Penelope (1867) central-battery ironclad
  • Hercules (1868) central-battery ironclad - Sold for BU 1932
  • Monarch (1868) masted turret-ship
  • Captain class masted turret-ship
    • Captain (1869) - Sank 1870
  • Audacious class central-battery ironclads
    • Audacious (1869)
    • Invincible (1869)
    • Iron Duke (1870)
    • Vanguard (1870)
  • Swiftsure class central-battery ironclads
    • Swiftsure (1870) - Sold for BU 1908
    • Triumph (1870) - Sold for BU 1921
  • Sultan (1870) central-battery ironclad
  • Devastation class mastless turret-ship
    • Devastation (1871) - Sold for break up (BU) 1908
    • Thunderer (1872) mastless turret-ship - Sold for BU 1909
  • Alexandra (1875) central-battery ironclad - Sold for BU 1908
  • Temeraire (1876) central-battery ironclad with barbettes
  • Superb class (intended for Ottoman Empire) central-battery ironclads
    • Superb (launched as Hamidieh, renamed) (1875)
    • (Ottoman Messudieh)
  • Neptune (1874) (ex-Independencia) masted turret-ship - Sold for BU 1903
  • Dreadnought (1875) mastless turret-ship - Sold for BU 1908
  • Inflexible (1876) central citadel turret-ship - Sold for BU 1903
  • Ajax class central citadel turret-ships

HMS Warrior sometime during the 1860s The two-ship Warrior class was a revolutionary British Royal Navy battleship design of the mid 19th century. ... HMS Warrior (1860) (also known as Vernon III and Oil Fuel Hulk C77) was the worlds first ocean-going iron-hulled armoured battleship. ... HMS Black Prince, launched 27 February 1861, was the third ship of that name to serve with the British Royal Navy. ... The Defence Class of ironclad battleships were the class which historically immediately followed the first two British ironclads, HMS Warrior and HMS Black Prince. ... HMS Defence was the lead ship of the Defence Class of 1859, her sister ship being HMS Resistance. ... HMS Resistance was the second and last ship of the Defence Class to be commissioned. ... The Hector class battleships, HMS Hector and HMS Valiant, were the class which immediately followed the Defence class into service with the Royal Navy. ... The Royal Navy broadside ironclad HMS Hector was commissioned at Portsmouth in January 1864. ... The fourth HMS Valiant was a British Royal Navy ironclad of the Hector class. ... The broadside ironclad HMS Achilles was the third member of the 1861 programme, was described as an ironclad frigate, and was originally projected as a modified Warrior. ... The Minotaur class battleships were essentially enlarged versions of HMS Achilles with heavier armament and armour, and more powerful engines. ... HMS Minotaur was a British Royal Navy ironclad of the Minotaur class. ... HMS Agincourt was one of three Minotaur class ironclad frigates. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Northumberland. ... The Prince Consort class of line-of-battle ships were laid down in 1860 as 91-gun wooden second-rates, but were approved in 1861 for conversion to broadside ironclad frigates. ... The Bulwark class were the final class of wooden line-of-battle ships laid down for the Royal Navy. ... HMS Prince Consort was laid down at Pembroke as the 91-gun second rate battleship HMS Triumph, but her name was changed in February 1862 in memory of the recently deceased Prince Albert. ... HMS Caledonia was a broadside ironclad of the Prince Consort class. ... HMS Ocean was the last of the Royal Navys Prince Consort class battleships to be completed. ... HMS Royal Oak was begun as a 91-gun two-deck steam ship-of-the-line. ... The Bulwark class were the final class of wooden line-of-battle ships laid down for the Royal Navy. ... HMS Royal Alfred was a broadside ironclad frigate of the Victorian era, serving with the Royal Navy. ... The Bulwark class were the final class of wooden line-of-battle ships laid down for the Royal Navy. ... HMS Research was a small ironclad warship, converted from a wooden-hulled sloop and intended as an experimental platform in which to try out new concepts in armament and in armour. ... The seventh HMS Enterprise of the Royal Navy was a sloop of war launched in 1864 at Deptford Dockyard. ... HMS Favorite was one of the three wooden warships of moderate dimension (the others being HMS Research and HMS Enterprise) selected by Sir Edward Reed for conversion to broadside ironclads in response to the increased tempo of French warship building. ... HMS Zealous was one of the three ships (the others being HMS Royal Alfred and HMS Repulse) forming the second group of wooden second-rate warships selected in 1860 for conversion to broadside ironclads in response to the perceived threat to Britain offered by the increase in French warship building. ... The Bulwark class were the final class of wooden line-of-battle ships laid down for the Royal Navy. ... For other ships with the same name, see HMS Repulse. ... The Bulwark class were the final class of wooden line-of-battle ships laid down for the Royal Navy. ... The Lord Clyde class battleships, which class consisted of HMS Lord Clyde and HMS Lord Warden, were wooden-hulled ironclad frigates, designed by Sir Edward Reed, and promoted by the Board of Admiralty for economic reasons, in order to make use of the large stocks of seasoned timber available in... HMS Lord Clyde was a wooden broadside ironclad built at Pembroke dockyard, a sister to HMS Lord Warden. ... HMS Lord Warden was the second and final ship to be completed of the Lord Clyde class. ... For other ships with the same name, see HMS Pallas. ... HMS Bellerophon was a Victorian central battery ironclad battleship of the Royal Navy; she was a major step forward in design technology as compared to previous classes in terms of engine power, armament, armour, hull design and seaworthiness. ... HMS Penelope was the last small ironclad to be commissioned in the Royal Navy. ... HMS Hercules was a central-battery ironclad of the Royal Navy in the Victorian era, and was the first warship to mount a main armament of 10 inches calibre. ... The HMS Monarch was the first sea-going warship to carry her guns in turrets, and the first British warship to carry guns of 12-inch calibre. ... For Captain-class battleship, see HMS Captain (1869). ... HMS Captain was a revolutionary masted turret ship of the Royal Navy launched in 1869, and capsized the following year with tremendous loss of life. ... The Audacious class battleships were designed by Sir Edward Reed at the request of the Board of Admiralty to serve as second-class battleships on distant foreign stations. ... The ironclad battleship HMS Audacious was the nameship of an experimental class of armoured battleships designed to expand on the success of HMS Warrior built ten years before. ... HMS Invincible was an Audacious class ironclad battleship of the Royal Navy. ... See HMS Iron Duke for other ships of the same name. ... The seventh HMS Vanguard of the British Royal Navy iron Audacious-class central battery ironclad battleship, launched in 1870. ... The Swiftsure class battleships of the late Victorian era were broadside ironclads designed and built specifically for service as Flagships on the Pacific station. ... The HMS Swiftsure, launched 1903, was the lead ship of her class of pre-Dreadnought battleships. ... HMS Triumph was a Swiftsure class ironclad battleship that was launched in 1870 and commissioned in 1873. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Sultan. ... The two British Devastation-class battleships of the 1870s were the first class of ocean-going capital ship which did not carry sails, and the first which mounted the entire main armament on top of the hull rather than inside it. ... HMS Devastation in 1896. ... HMS Thunderer was a British Royal Navy Devastation-class battleship. ... HMS Alexandra was a broadside ironclad of the Victorian Royal Navy. ... HMS Temeraire was an ironclad battleship of the Victorian Royal Navy which was unique in that she carried her main armament partly in the traditional broadside battery, and partly in barbettes on the upper deck. ... HMS Superb was designed by Sir Edward Reed for the Turkish Navy, and was built in Britain by Thames Ironworks under the name of Hamidieh. ... Nine ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Neptune after the Roman god of the ocean. ... The second HMS Dreadnought of the British Royal Navy was a turret ironclad battleship built at Pembroke Dockyard, Wales. ... For other ships with the same name, see HMS Inflexible. ... The Ajax class of battleships consisted of two ships, HMS Ajax and HMS Agamemnon. ... HMS Agamemnon was an Ajax class battleship, the sister-ship of HMS Ajax. ... HMS Ajax was the first of the Ajax class battleships to be laid down, but was completed one day later than her sister-ship, HMS Agamemnon. ...

Coastal Service Ironclads

  • Royal Sovereign (1862) turret-ship (converted from Duke of Wellington class 3-decker)
  • Prince Albert (1864) turret-ship
  • Scorpion class masted turret-ships
    • Scorpion (1863)
    • Wivern (1863
  • Cerberus class turret-ships
    • Cerberus (1868) (Victoria)
    • Magdala (1870) (India)
  • Abyssinia (1870) turret-ship
  • Glatton (1871) turret-ship
  • Hotspur (1870) turret-ship
  • Rupert (1872) turret-ship - Sold for BU 1907
  • Belleisle class (intended for Ottoman Empire) central battery ships
    • Belleisle (launched as Peki-Shereef, renamed) (1876)
    • Orion (planned name: Boordhi-Zaffer) (1879)
  • Conqueror class turret-ships

For other ships of the same name, see HMS Royal Sovereign. ... HMS Prince Albert was designed and built as a shallow-draught coast-defence ship, and was the first British warship to carry her main armament in turrets. ... The two ships of the Scorpion class, HMS Scorpion and HMS Wivern, were the first warships ever which were built to the order of a foreign country and subsequently acquired for service in the Royal Navy. ... HMS Scorpion, a 2750-ton ironclad turret ship built at Birkenhead, England, was one of two sisters secretly ordered from the Laird shipyard by the Confederate States of America government in 1862. ... HMS Wivern was a 2750-ton ironclad turret ship built at Birkenhead, England, one of two sisters secretly ordered from the Laird shipyard by the Confederate States of America government in 1862. ... Cerberus class battleships were a class of warship in the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom in the latter half of the 19th Century. ... HMVS Cerberus was an turret ship with a breastwork & a monitor deck warship launched in 1868 to defend the Australian colony of Victoria. ... HMS Magdala was a breastwork monitor, the sister ship of HMS Cerberus, and was built specifically to serve as harbour defence ship at Bombay (now Mumbai). ... HMS Abyssinia was a breastwork monitor ordered, designed and built by the Dudgeon shipyard specifically for the defence of the harbour at Bombay (Mumbai). ... For other ships with the same name, see HMS Glatton. ... For other ships with the same name, see HMS Hotspur. ... HMS Rupert was a battleship of the Victorian Royal Navy, whose principal weapon was designed to be her ram. ... The two ships of the Belleisle class, HMS Belleisle and HMS Orion, originally built in Britain for the Turkish Navy, were taken over by the Royal Navy in 1878. ... For other uses, see Ottoman (disambiguation). ... For other ships with the same name, see HMS Belleisle. ... For other ships with the same name, see HMS Orion. ... The Conqueror class battleships were ironclad warships which served in the Victorian Royal Navy, and whose main weapon was designed to be the ram. ... HMS Conqueror was an ironclad battleship of the Victorian Royal Navy, whose main armament was an armoured ram. ... HMS Hero was the second and final ship of the Conqueror class of battleships. ...

List of Battleships of the Royal Navy (1882-1945)

Pre-Dreadnoughts (1882-1906)

  • Colossus class central citadel turret-ships the first RN ships rated as battleships
    • Colossus (1882) - Sold for BU 1908
    • Edinburgh (1882) (ex-Majestic) - Sold for BU 1910
  • Admiral class
    • Collingwood (1882) - Sold for BU 1909
    • Rodney (1884) - Sold for BU 1909
    • Howe (1885) - Sold for BU 1910
    • Camperdown (1885) - Sold for BU 1911
    • Anson (1886) - Sold for BU 1909
    • Benbow (1885) - Sold for BU 1909
  • Victoria class
    • Victoria (1887) (ex-Renown) - Rammed 1893
    • Sans Pareil (1887)
  • Trafalgar class
  • Royal Sovereign class
    • Royal Sovereign (1891) - Sold for BU 1913
    • Empress of India (1891) - Scuttled 1913
    • Repulse (1892) - Sold for BU 1911
    • Ramillies (1892) - Sold for BU 1913
    • Resolution (1892) - Sold for BU 1914
    • Revenge (1892) - Renamed Redoubtable 1915, sold for BU 1919
    • Royal Oak (1892) - Sold for BU 1914
  • Hood (1891) (near-sister to Royal Sovereign class) - Scuttled 1914
  • Centurion class
    • Centurion (1892)
    • Barfleur (1892)
  • Renown (1895) - Sold for BU 1914
  • Majestic class
    • Magnificent (1894) Sold for BU 1921
    • Majestic (1895) - Torpedoed 1915
    • Prince George (1895) - Sank 1921
    • Victorious (1895) - Sold for BU 1922
    • Jupiter (1895) - Sold for BU 1920
    • Mars (1896) - Sold for BU 1921
    • Hannibal (1896) - Sold for BU 1920
    • Caesar (1896) - Sold for BU 1921
    • Illustrious (1896) - Sold for BU 1920
  • Canopus class
    • Canopus (1897)
    • Goliath (1898) - Torpedoed 1915
    • Albion (1898)
    • Ocean (1898) - Mined 1915
    • Glory (1899)
    • Vengeance (1899)
  • Formidable class
  • London class (modified Formidable class)
    • London (1899)
    • Bulwark (1899)
    • Venerable (1899)
    • Queen (1902)
    • Prince of Wales (1902) - Sold for BU 1920
  • Duncan class
    • Russell (1901) - Mined 1916
    • Albemarle (1901)
    • Montagu (1901) - Aground and abandoned, 1906/07
    • Duncan (1901)
    • Cornwallis (1901) - Torpedoed 1917
    • Exmouth (1901)
  • King Edward VII class
    • Commonwealth (1903) - Sold for BU 1921
    • King Edward VII (1903) - Mined 1916
    • Dominion (1903) - Sold for BU 1921
    • Hindustan (1903) - Sold for BU 1921
    • New Zealand (1904) - Renamed Zealandia 1911, sold for BU 1921
    • Britannia (1904) - Torpedoed 1918
    • Africa (1905) - Sold for BU 1920
    • Hibernia (1905) - Sold for BU 1921
  • Swiftsure class
    • Swiftsure (1903) (ex-Chilean Constitucion, taken over 1903) - Sold for BU 1920
    • Triumph (1903) (ex-Chilean Libertad, taken over 1903) - Torpedoed 1915
  • Lord Nelson class

The Colossus class battleships were ironclad warships, carrying their main armament in turrets, which served in the Victorian Royal Navy. ... HMS Colossus (1882) The second HMS Colossus was a Colossus class second-class battleship, launched in 1882 and commissioned in 1886. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Edinburgh. ... The British Royal Navys pre-dreadnought Admiral-class battleships of the 1880s was a followed the pattern of the Devastation class in having the main armament on centre-line mounts with the superstructure in between. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Collingwood. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Rodney. ... HMS Howe was a Victorian era battleship of the Royal Navy, and was the last of the Admiral class to be completed. ... HMS Camperdown was an Admiral class battleship of the UK Royal Navy. ... HMS Anson was a Victorian era battleship of the Royal Navy, and was the last member of the Admiral class to be laid down. ... For other ships with the same name, see HMS Benbow. ... The Royal Navys Victoria class (or Sans Pareil class) battleships of the 1880s were the first class which used triple expansion steam engines, previous battleships using single expansion steam engines. ... HMS Victoria was one of two Victoria-class battleships of the Royal Navy. ... HMS Sans Pareil was a Victoria Class battleship of the British Royal Navy. ... The two Trafalgar-class battleships of the British Royal Navy were late nineteenth century ironclad warships. ... HMS Trafalgar was one of two Trafalgar class battleships. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Nile. ... The Royal Sovereign class was an eight-ship class of pre-Dreadnought battleships of the British Royal Navy. ... For other ships with the same name, see HMS Repulse. ... HMS Resolution was a Royal Sovereign-class battleship of the Royal Navy. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Revenge. ... The second warship to be named HMS Hood was a modified Royal Sovereign-class battleship of the Royal Navy, and the last of the eight built. ... The Majestic class was a nine-ship class of pre-Dreadnought battleships, built under the Spencer Programme (named after the First Sea Lord, John Poyntz Spencer, 5th Earl Spencer). ... HMS Magnificent was one of the nine Majestic-class battleships of the Royal Navy (RN). ... HMS Majestic was a Majestic-class pre-Dreadnought battleship of the Royal Navy, built at Portsmouth Dockyard and commissioned into the Channel Squadron in December 1895. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Prince George. ... The third ship to be named HMS Victorious had the most quiet of careers. ... HMS Jupiter was a Majestic-class pre-Dreadnought battleship of the Royal Navy launched on November 18, 1895. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Hannibal. ... HMS Caesar was a Majestic-class pre-dreadnought battleship of the Royal Navy, named after the Roman military and political leader Julius Caesar. ... The third HMS Illustrious of the Royal Navy was a Majestic-class pre-dreadnought, launched in 1896. ... The Canopus-class was a six-ship class of pre-Dreadnought battleships of the Royal Navy designed by Sir William White. ... HMS Canopus was a pre-Dreadnought battleship of the British Royal Navy, built at Portsmouth Dockyard and laid down on the 4 January 1897, launched 21 June 1898 and completed in December 1899. ... HMS Goliath was one of the six Canopus-class battleships built by the Royal Navy in the late 19th century. ... HMS Albion was a Canopus-class pre-Dreadnought battleship of approximately 14,000 tonnes, with a main armament of 4 x 12 inch guns and was built by the Thames Ironworks and Shipbuilding Co. ... The fourth HMS Ocean was a battleship displacing 12,950 tons and armed with four 12-inch and twelve six-inch guns. ... HMS Implacable The Royal Navys Formidable class of battleships were an eight-ship class of pre-Dreadnoughts built in the late 1890s. ... HMS Formidable (1898) was the lead ship of the Formidable class of battleship and the third of four to have the name HMS Formidable to serve in the British Royal Navy. ... HMS Irresistible was a Formidable-class battleship of the British Royal Navy, built at the Chatham shipyards that served in the First World War before it was sunk in an attenpt to capture the Dardanelles, a narrow strait in the north-western Turkey at 18 March 1915. ... HMS Implacable was a Formidable-class battleship of the British Royal Navy. ... HMS Implacable The Royal Navys Formidable class of battleships were an eight-ship class of pre-Dreadnoughts built in the late 1890s. ... HMS London (1899) was a Formidable class of battleship in the British Royal Navy. ... HMS Bulwark belonged to a sub-class of the Formidable-class of battleships of the British Royal Navy known as the London class. ... HMS Venerable was a Formidable-class battleship of the Royal Navy. ... HMS Queen (1902) was a Formidable class of battleship in the British Royal Navy. ... HMS Prince of Wales was a Formidable-class battleship of the British Royal Navy. ... HMS Cornwallis The Duncan-class were pre-dreadnoughts. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Russell. ... HMS Albemarle was a pre-Dreadnought Duncan-class battleship of the Royal Navy, named after George Monck, 1st Duke of Albemarle. ... HMS Cornwallis was a pre-Dreadnought Duncan-class battleship of the Royal Navy. ... The King Edward VII class was a class of battleships launched by the Royal Navy between 1903 and 1905 in response to the emerging navies of Japan and the USA. The navies of these two nations were smaller, but their ships possessed superior secondary armament, a key part of a... HMS Commonwealth, was a member of the King Edward VII class of British Royal Navy battleships. ... HMS King Edward VII, named after King Edward VII, was a battleship of the British Royal Navy. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Hindustan. ... The sixth HMS Britannia of the British Royal Navy was a pre-Dreanought battleship of the King Edward VII class, launched in 1904. ... The most recent HMS Africa was a pre-Dreadnought battleship of the Royal Navy; the last battleship constructed at Chatham Dockyard, England - subsequent classes being too large for the yard. ... HMS Hibernia was a King Edward VII-class battleship of Britains Royal Navy, the last generation of British pre-dreadnoughts. ... Swiftsure class battleships were a class of pre-World War I British battleship. ... HMS Swiftsure, launched 1903, was the lead ship of her class of pre-Dreadnought battleships. ... HMS Triumph was a Swiftsure-class pre-Dreadnought battleship of the Royal Navy. ... The Lord Nelson class was a class of two battleships built by the Royal Navy between 1905 and 1908. ... HMS Agamemnon was a Lord Nelson class battleship launched in 1906 and completed in 1908, at a cost of £1,652,347. ... The HMS Lord Nelson served in 1914 in the English Channel. ...

Dreadnoughts (1906-1910)

The sixth HMS Dreadnought of the Royal Navy was a revolutionary battleship which entered service in 1906. ... The Bellerophon class battleships consisted of three ships built in 1906 and 1907 for the Royal Navy. ... HMS Bellerophon was a dreadnought of the Royal Navy, the lead ship of her class, built in Portsmouth and launched 27 July 1907, and which fought at the Battle of Jutland in 1916. ... Categories: Stub | Royal Navy battleships ... HMS Temeraire was a Bellerophon-class battleship in the Royal Navy that was commissioned on August 24, 1907. ... The St Vincent class consisted of three ships laid down in 1908, and completed between May 1909 and April 1910. ... The HMS was the lead ship of the St. ... HMS Collingwood was a -class battleship of the Royal Navy. ... Categories: Naval stubs | Royal Navy battleships ... The Neptune class of battleships of the British Royal Navy was originally intended to include three ships, but the second and third were given thicker armour and changed in other ways, and usually characterized as Colossus-class vessels. ... HMS Neptune was a Royal Navy dreadnought, intended to be the lead ship of three Neptune-class battleships, but the subsequent two ships had thicker armour and were reclassified as the Colossus class. ... The Colossus class of two battleships of the British Royal Navy were among the first dreadnoughts following the original Dreadnought. ... HMS Colossus of the British Royal Navy was the nameship of her class of dreadnoughts. ... HMS Hercules was a Colossus-class battleship built by Palmers, launched on May 10, 1910, and commissioned on July 31, 1911 at Portsmouth. ...

Super-Dreadnoughts (1910-1945)

  • Orion class
    • Orion (1910)
    • Monarch (1911)
    • Conqueror (1911)
    • Thunderer (1911)
  • King George V class
    • King George V (1911)
    • Centurion (1911)
    • Audacious (1912)
    • Ajax (1912)
  • Iron Duke class
    • Iron Duke (1912)
    • Marlborough (1912)
    • Benbow (1913)
    • Emperor of India (1913)
  • Agincourt (1913)
  • Erin (1913)
  • Canada (1913)
  • Queen Elizabeth class
    • Queen Elizabeth (1913)
    • Warspite (1913)
    • Barham (1914)
    • Valiant (1914)
    • Malaya (1915)
  • Revenge class (originally Royal Sovereign class)
  • (planned N3 battleships - never built)
  • Nelson class
    • Nelson (1925)
    • Rodney (1925)
  • King George V class
    • King George V (1939)
    • Prince of Wales (1939)
    • Duke of York (1940)
    • Anson (1940)
    • Howe (1940)
  • Temeraire or Lion class
    • Lion (not completed)
    • Temeraire (not completed)
    • Conqueror (planned)
    • Thunderer (planned)
  • Vanguard (1944) - the last Battleship completed for the Royal Navy

The Orion class battleships were four super-dreadnoughts — the first ships of that type — of the Royal Navys. ... HMS Orion was a battleship of the Royal Navy, launched in 1910, the lead ship of her class and the first super-dreadnought. In World War I she served in the 2nd Battle Squadron of the Grand Fleet based at Scapa Flow and fought at the battle of Jutland, 31... HMS Monarch was an Orion-class battleship of the Royal Navy. ... HMS Conquerer was an Orion class battleship of the Royal Navy. ... HMS Thunderer was an Orion class battleship of the Royal Navy. ... The King George V class battleships immediately followed the Orion class battleship, were of slightly bigger displacement with which small enhancements were incorporated into the design. ... The first HMS King George V was a King George V-class of 1911 dreadnought, with a displacement of 23,400 tonnes and an armament of ten 13. ... HMS Centurion was the second battleship of the King George V class, built at HM Dockyard, Devonport. ... HMS Audacious was a King George V class battleship of the Royal Navy. ... HMS Ajax was a King George V-class battleship (one of four ships of the class), built at Scotts shipyard at Greenock on the River Clyde. ... The Iron Duke class battleships of the Royal Navy were four battleships, Benbow, Emperor of India, Iron Duke, and Marlborough. ... HMS Iron Duke was a battleship of the Royal Navy, the lead ship of her class, named in honour of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington. ... HMS Marlborough was an Iron Duke-class battleship of the Royal Navy, named in honour of John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, and launched in 1912. ... HMS Benbow was an Iron Duke-class battleship of the Royal Navy, named in honour of Admiral John Benbow and launched in 1913. ... HMS Emperor of India was an Iron Duke-class battleship of the Royal Navy. ... HMS Agincourt was a World War One Dreadnought battleship of the Royal Navy. ... Crew members - 1914 HMS Erin was originally ordered for the navy of the Ottoman empire and named Reshadiye, she was built by Vickers and designed by Sir George Thurston. ... HMS Canada was a battleship, sometimes identified as a member of the Iron Duke class originally ordered by the government of Chile as Valparaiso. ... The Queen Elizabeth class battleships were five super-dreadnoughts of the Royal Navy, named in honour of Elizabeth I of England. ... HMS Queen Elizabeth was the lead ship of the Queen Elizabeth-class of Dreadnought battleships, named in honour of Elizabeth I of England. ... HMS Warspite was a Queen Elizabeth-class battleship of the British Royal Navy. ... HMS Barham was a Queen Elizabeth-class battleship of the Royal Navy named after Admiral Charles Middleton, 1st Baron Barham, built at the John Brown shipyards in Clydebank, and launched in 1914. ... HMS Valiant was a Queen Elizabeth-class battleship of the Royal Navy built at the Fairfield shipyards in Glasgow and launched in November 1914. ... HMS Malaya was a Queen Elizabeth class battleship of the Royal Navy built by Armstrong Whitworth and launched in March 1915. ... The Revenge-class battleships were five battleships of the Royal Navy, ordered as World War I loomed on the horizon, and launched in 1914–1916. ... HMS Royal Oak was a Revenge-class battleship of the British Royal Navy, torpedoed in Scapa Flow by the German submarine U-47 on 14 October 1939. ... HMS Royal Sovereign, launched in May 1915, was a Revenge-class battleship of the Royal Navy. ... HMS Revenge was the name ship of the Revenge class of battleships of the Royal Navy, the ninth to bear the name. ... HMS Resolution was a Revenge-class battleship of the Royal Navy. ... HMS Ramillies (pennant number 07) was a Revenge-class battleship of the Royal Navy, named after the Battle of Ramillies. ... The N3 battleship was a planned battleship for the Royal Navy after World War I. They were never built because of the Washington Naval Treaty signed in 1921 which prevented an arms race between the major naval powers. ... HMS Nelson For the Battleship class in the Cosmic Era of Gundam, see Nelson class battleship (Gundam) The Nelson class were battleships of the British Royal Navy built shortly following the Washington Naval Treaty in 1922. ... HMS Nelson was a Nelson-class battleship of the Royal Navy active in World War II. She was named in honour of Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson, the victor at the Battle of Trafalgar. ... HMS Rodney was a Nelson-class battleship of the Royal Navy. ... One of the KGV battleships, HMS Prince of Wales (1941) This article is about the 1939 class. ... The second HMS King George V was the name ship of her class of battleships. ... HMS Prince of Wales was a King George V-class battleship of the Royal Navy, built at the Cammell Laird shipyard in Birkenhead, England. ... HMS Duke of York was a King George V-class battleship of the Royal Navy, and the second of the name, the predecessor having been a 4-gun cutter purchased in 1763 and sold in 1766. ... HMS Anson was a King George V-class battleship of the Royal Navy, named after Admiral George Anson. ... HMS Howe was a King George V-class battleship of the Royal Navy, named after Admiral Richard Howe. ... The Lion class of battleships were to be a development of the British King George V class battleships. ... HMS Vanguard was a Fully Armoured Battlecruiser of the Royal Navy. ...

See also

List of battlecruisers of the Royal Navy This is a list of battlecruisers of the Royal Navy: Invincible class Invincible (1908) Indomitable (1907) Inflexible (1908) Indefatigable class Indefatigable (1909) New Zealand (1911) (also HMAS Australia (1911) of the Royal Australian Navy) Lion class Lion (1910) Princess Royal (1911) Queen Mary (1912) Tiger class Tiger (1913) Leopard (not...


 
 

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