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Encyclopedia > List of atheists
Part of a series on
Atheism

Concepts
Religion · Nontheism
Antireligion · Antitheism
Agnosticism · Humanism
Metaphysical naturalism
Weak and strong atheism
Implicit and explicit atheism
Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 – July 8, 1822; pronounced ) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets of the English language. ... The Necessity of Atheism is a treatise on atheism by Percy Bysshe Shelley, published anonymously in 1811 while he was a student at University College, Oxford. ... Atheist redirects here. ... Nontheism is a term that covers a range of both religious and nonreligious attitudes characterized by the absence of—or the rejection of—theism or any belief in a personal god or gods. ... Antireligion is opposition to some or all religions in some or all contexts. ... Antitheism (sometimes anti-theism) is active opposition to theism. ... Agnosticism (Greek: α- a-, without + γνώσις gnōsis, knowledge; after Gnosticism) is the philosophical view that the truth value of certain claims — particularly metaphysical claims regarding theology, afterlife or the existence of God, gods, deities, or even ultimate reality — is unknown or, depending on the form of agnosticism, inherently unknowable due to... Secular humanism is a humanist philosophy that upholds reason, ethics, and justice, and specifically rejects the supernatural and the spiritual as warrants of moral reflection and decision-making. ... Metaphysical naturalism is any worldview in which nature is all there is and all things supernatural (which stipulatively includes as well as spirits and souls, non-natural values, and universals as they are commonly conceived) do not exist. ... Strong atheism is a term generally used to describe atheists who accept as true the proposition, gods do not exist. Weak atheism refers to any type of non-theism which falls short of this standard. ... Implicit atheism and explicit atheism are subcategories of atheism coined by George H. Smith (1979, p. ...


History
History of atheism
Enlightenment · Freethought
Although the term atheism originated in the 16th century, based on Ancient Greek ἄθεος godless, denying the gods, ungodly[1] and open admission to positive atheism in modern times was not made earlier than in the late 18th century, atheistic ideas and beliefs, as well as their political influence, have a... The word Enlightment redirects here. ... Freethought is a philosophical viewpoint that holds that beliefs should be formed on the basis of science and logical principles and not be compromised by authority, tradition, or any other dogma. ...


Arguments
Against religion · For nontheism
Against god · Criticism
The criticism of religion includes criticism of the concept of religion, the validity of religion, the practice of religion, and the consequences of religion for humanity. ... Religious belief refers to a faith or creed concerning the supernatural, sacred, or divine. ... Criticism of atheism is made chiefly by theistic sources, though some forms of atheism also receive criticism from nontheistic sources. ...


Demographics
Atheism · Irreligion
Famous atheists · State atheism
Discrimination · Persecution It is difficult to quantify the number of atheists in the world. ... This section does not cite its references or sources. ... State atheism is the official promotion of atheism by a government, often accompanied by active suppression of religious belief and practice. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial quota... Many atheists have experienced persecution, mainly from Christians and Muslims. ...

Atheism Portal · v  d  e 
Revisions and sourced additions are welcome.

Atheists are persons who either affirm the nonexistence of gods[1] or simply do not believe in a god.[2] When defined more broadly, atheists are those without a belief in deities,[3] alternatively called nontheists.[4] Atheist redirects here. ... Arguments for and against the existence of God have been proposed by philosophers, theologians, and others. ... This article is about the term Deity in the context of mysticism and theology. ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Nontheism is a term that covers a range of both religious and nonreligious attitudes characterized by the absence of—or the rejection of—theism or any belief in a personal god or gods. ...


Persons listed here have either been specifically identified as an "atheist" by a reliable source, or have expressed a position that is uncontroversially regarded as atheistic (that is, they have affirmed the nonexistence of gods). Note that, due to divergences in definition and usage, those who have merely expressed nonbelief in gods are not universally regarded as atheists. Such persons are not listed here without specific identification as an "atheist" in a reliable source, but may be found in the list of nontheists. // A nontheist is any person who does not believe in the existence of a deity. ...


Excluded from this list are persons who have denied being an atheist, or who choose a label besides atheist for themselves with regards to their position on the existence of deities (such as agnostic), even if they have been identified elsewhere as atheists. Persons who have merely expressed skepticism about the existence of deities or who have criticized religion are excluded. Such sentiments are insufficient to identify someone as an atheist. Thomas Huxley, coiner of the term agnostic. ... This article is about the psychological term. ...

Contents



List

Activists and educators

Ali


Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x1600, 225 KB) Op deze afbeelding staat een (voormalig) lid van de van VVD afgebeeld. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x1600, 225 KB) Op deze afbeelding staat een (voormalig) lid van de van VVD afgebeeld. ... Ayaan Hirsi Ali, MA ( ; Somali: ; born Ayaan Hirsi Magan 13 November 1969[2] in Mogadishu, Somalia) is a Dutch feminist and political writer, daughter of the Somali scholar, politician, and revolutionary opposition leader Hirsi Magan Isse. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 236 × 318 pixelsFull resolution (236 × 318 pixel, file size: 11 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)George Jacob Holyoake in later life. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 236 × 318 pixelsFull resolution (236 × 318 pixel, file size: 11 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)George Jacob Holyoake in later life. ... George Jacob Holyoake (April 13, 1817 - January 22, 1906), English secularist and co-operator, was born in Birmingham, England. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 605 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1614 × 1600 pixel, file size: 611 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 605 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1614 × 1600 pixel, file size: 611 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Prince Peter (Pyotr) Alexeyevich Kropotkin (Russian: ) (December 9, 1842–February 8, 1921) was one of Russias foremost anarchists and one of the first advocates of anarchist communism: the model of society he advocated for most of his life was that of a communalist society free from central government. ... Download high resolution version (1071x1359, 162 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1071x1359, 162 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Margaret Higgins Sanger (September 14, 1879 – September 6, 1966) was an American birth control activist, an advocate of negative eugenics, and the founder of the American Birth Control League (which eventually became Planned Parenthood). ... Pietro Acciarito (1871 - 1943) was an Italian anarchist. ... Anarchist redirects here. ... Umberto I, King of Italy or Humbert I of Italy (Umberto Ranieri Carlo Emanuele Giovanni Maria Ferdinando Eugenio di Savoy), (14 March 1844 – 29 July 1900) was the King of Italy from 9 January 1878 until his death. ... Zackie Achmat (born Abdurazzack Achmat in 1962) is a South African activist of Malay Muslim descent, most widely known as founder and chairman of Treatment Action Campaign. ... The Treatment Action Campaign is a South African grassroots pressure group which was founded by Zackie Achmat, an HIV-positive activist who refused anti-retroviral treatment (ARVs) until they were universally available. ... Clark Davis Adams (July 23, 1969 – May 21, 2007) was a prominent American freethought leader and activist. ... Ayaan Hirsi Ali, MA ( ; Somali: ; born Ayaan Hirsi Magan 13 November 1969[2] in Mogadishu, Somalia) is a Dutch feminist and political writer, daughter of the Somali scholar, politician, and revolutionary opposition leader Hirsi Magan Isse. ... The Dutch (Ethnonym: Nederlanders meaning Lowlanders) are the dominant ethnic group[1] of the Netherlands[2]. They are usually seen as a Germanic people. ... Feminism is a social theory and political movement primarily informed and motivated by the experience of women. ... Murlidhar Devidas Amte (born December 24, 1914), or Baba Amte, as he is fondly known, was born in Wardha in a family of jagirdars. ... Natalie Angier is a science writer for the New York Times. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Dan Barker (born June 25, 1949) is a prominent American atheist activist who served as a Christian preacher and musician for 17 years, but left Christianity in 1984. ... Peter Leslie Brearey (23 December 1939 - 7 May 1998) was a British secularist, socialist and journalist. ... Yaron Brook is the current president and executive director of the Ayn Rand Institute (since 2000). ... Richard Carrier Richard Carrier M.A., M.Phil. ... For other uses of The Freethinker, see The Freethinker (disambiguation). ... The National Secular Society is an organisation of the United Kingdom which promotes secularism. ... Atheist Alliance International (AAI) is an alliance of 58 atheist organisations around the world, 48 of which are located in the United States. ... Joseph Edamaruku on the cover page of his popular book Kristhuvum Krishnanum Jeevichirunnilla Joseph Edamaruku (popularly identified by his surname Edamaruku) is a well known journalist and a militant rationalist from Kerala. ... Sanal Edamaruku is the founder-president of Rationalist International and the president of the Indian Rational Association[1]. He is the editor of the internet publication of Rationalist International. ... INDIAN RATIONALIST ASSOCIATION The Indian Rationalist Association (IRA)with head quarters in New Delhi and several branches and thousands of members all over the country is one of the largest and most vibrant freethought organizations in the world. ... Reginald Vaughn Finley, Sr. ... David D. Friedman (b. ... Annie Laurie Gaylor is co-founder of the Freedom From Religion Foundation and, with her husband Dan Barker, is the current co-president. ... The Freedom From Religion Foundation is an American Freethought organization based in Madison, Wisconsin. ... Emma Goldman, circa 1910 Emma Goldman (June 27, 1869 – May 14, 1940) was an anarchist known for her political activism, writing, and speeches. ... Libertarian Communism redirects here. ... Feminists redirects here. ... Atheist redirects here. ... Goparaju Ramachandra Rao (aka Gora) (November 15, 1902-1975) was an Indian atheist leader. ... Atheist Centre is an institution founded by Goparaju Ramachandra Rao (aka Gora)(1902-1975) and Saraswathi Gora (1912) to initiate social change in rural Andhra Pradesh based on the ideology of Gandhism and Atheism. ... Andhra redirects here. ... Saraswathi Gora (1912-2006) was an atheist-social worker from Vijayawada in Andhra Pradesh, India. ... Social activists are people who act as the conscience and voice of many individuals within a society. ... Atheist Centre is an institution founded by Goparaju Ramachandra Rao (aka Gora)(1902-1975) and Saraswathi Gora (1912) to initiate social change in rural Andhra Pradesh based on the ideology of Gandhism and Atheism. ... In South Asias caste system, an untouchable, dalit, or achuta is a person outside of the four castes, and considered below them. ... Caste systems are traditional, hereditary systems of social classification, that evolved due to the enormous diversity in India (where all three primary races met, not by forced slavery but by immigration). ... John William Gott was the last person in Britain to be sent to prison for blasphemy. ... E. Haldeman-Julius, né Emanuel Julius (1889 - 1951) was a socialist reformer and publisher, most noted for publishing the Little Blue Books. ... The Appeal to Reason was a left-wing alternative newspaper that endorsed the Socialist Party of America. ... Erkki Hartikainen (b. ... George Jacob Holyoake (April 13, 1817 - January 22, 1906), English secularist and co-operator, was born in Birmingham, England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about secularism. ... Ellen Johnson is the current president of American Atheists. ... The American Atheists logo, based on the atomic model. ... Edwin Frederick Kagin, J.D., (born November 26, 1940) is an attorney at law in Union, Kentucky, and the founder of Camp Quest, the first secular summer camp in the United States for the children of freethinkers. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article concerns secularity, that is, being secular, in various senses. ... Summer camp is a supervised program for children and/or teenagers conducted (usually) during the summer months in some countries. ... Dave Kong speaking at a rally. ... Prince Peter (Pyotr) Alexeyevich Kropotkin (Russian: ) (December 9, 1842–February 8, 1921) was one of Russias foremost anarchists and one of the first advocates of anarchist communism: the model of society he advocated for most of his life was that of a communalist society free from central government. ... Social Darwinism is the idea that Charles Darwins theory can be extended and applied to the social realm, i. ... Dr. Paul Kurtz Paul Kurtz (born December 21, 1925 in Newark, New Jersey) is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at the University at Buffalo (SUNY), but is best known for his prominent role in the United States skeptical community. ... Joseph Lewis (11 June 1889 - 1962) was an American freethinker, and atheist who was born in Montgomery, Alabama. ... Hemant Mehta is a prominent atheist who promotes a conciliatory attitude between theists and atheists. ... I Sold My Soul on eBay is the account of what atheist Hemant Mehta encountered on his visits to a variety of Christian churches. ... The Secular Student Aliance logo Founded in May of 2000, The Secular Student Alliance (SSA) is the only independent, democratically structured organization in the U.S. that serves the needs of secular high school and college students. ... Taslima Nasrin Taslima Nasrin (Bengali: ), also spelled Taslima Nasreen and popularly refrerred to as Taslima, her first name rather than Nasreen (born 25 August 1962 in Mymensingh, Bangladesh) is a Bengali Bangladeshi author, feminist human rights activist and secular humanist exiled in Kolkata, India. ... Secular humanism is a humanist philosophy that upholds reason, ethics, and justice, and specifically rejects the supernatural and the spiritual as warrants of moral reflection and decision-making. ... The Rev. ... For other uses, see Doctor. ... For information on the type of fish called Lawyer, see the article on Burbot. ... School districts are a form of special-purpose district in the United States (amongst some other places) which serves to operate the local public primary and secondary schools. ... The Pledge of Allegiance is a promise or oath of allegiance to the United States and the its national flag. ... Constantines Conversion, depicting the conversion of Emperor Constantine the Great to Christianity, by Peter Paul Rubens. ... The Establishment Clause of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution states that: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion Together with the Free Exercise Clause, (or prohibiting the free exercise thereof), these two clauses make up what are commonly known as the religion clauses. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... Madalyn Murray OHair (April 13, 1919 – September 29, 1995) was an American atheist and activist. ... The American Atheists logo, based on the atomic model. ... Constantines Conversion, depicting the conversion of Emperor Constantine the Great to Christianity, by Peter Paul Rubens. ... The National Secular Society is an organisation of the United Kingdom which promotes secularism. ... James Randi (born August 7, 1928), stage name The Amazing Randi, is a stage magician and scientific skeptic best known as a challenger of paranormal claims and pseudoscience. ... Asa Philip Randolph (April 15, 1889 – May 16, 1979) was a prominent twentieth century African-American civil rights leader and founder of the first black labor union in the United States. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... The civil rights movement in the United States has been a long, primarily nonviolent struggle to bring full civil rights and equality under the law to all citizens of United States. ... Ron Reagan in 2007 Ronald Prescott Reagan (born May 20, 1958, Los Angeles, California, USA), usually known as Ron Reagan, is the son of the late former President of the United States Ronald Reagan and his wife Nancy. ... The Creative Coalition is a nonprofit, (501(c)(3)) nonpartisan, politically-active group formed of members of the American film entertainment industry. ... Reagan redirects here. ... For other uses, see Rationalism (disambiguation). ... This article is about secularism. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Terry Sanderson is the head coach and general manager of the Toronto Rock of the National Lacrosse League. ... Margaret Higgins Sanger (September 14, 1879 – September 6, 1966) was an American birth control activist, an advocate of negative eugenics, and the founder of the American Birth Control League (which eventually became Planned Parenthood). ... For other uses, see Birth control (disambiguation). ... The American Birth Control League was founded by Margaret Sanger in 1921 at the First American Birth Control Conference in New York City. ... This article is about Planned Parenthood Federation of America. ... Vinayak Damodar Savarkar Vināyak Dāmodar Sāvarkar (Marathi: विनायक दामोदर सावरकर) (May 28, 1883 – February 26, 1966) was an Indian politician and activist, who is credited with developing the Hindu nationalist political ideology Hindutva. ... Bhagat Singh (Punjabi: ਭਗਤ ਸਿੰਘ بھگت سنگھ, IPA: ) (September 27, 1907[1] –March 23, 1931) was an Indian freedom fighter, considered to be one of the most influential revolutionaries of the Indian independence movement. ... Barbara Smoker Barbara Smoker (born 1923) is a British humanist activist and freethought advocate. ... For other uses of The Freethinker, see The Freethinker (disambiguation). ... Marie Souvestre (1830-1905) was a feminist educator who sought to develop independent minds in young women. ... David Takayoshi Suzuki, CC, OBC, Ph. ... Polly Toynbee (born Mary Louisa Toynbee on December 27, 1946) is a journalist and writer in the United Kingdom, and has been a columnist for The Guardian newspaper since 1998. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ...


Authors

[187] Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Isaac Asimov (January 2?, 1920?[1] – April 6, 1992), pronounced , originally Исаак Озимов but now transcribed into Russian as Айзек Азимов [1], was a Russian-born American author and professor of biochemistry, a highly successful writer, best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. ... Sir Arthur Charles Clarke, CBE, Sri Lankabhimanya (16 December 1917 – 19 March 2008) was a British (lived in Sri Lanka since 1956) science fiction author, inventor, and futurist, most famous for the novel 2001: A Space Odyssey, written in collaboration with director Stanley Kubrick, a collaboration which led also to... Image File history File links ErnestHemingway. ... Image File history File links ErnestHemingway. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 — July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Christopher Eric Hitchens (born April 13, 1949) is a British-American author, journalist and literary critic. ... Joseph Martin McCabe (12 November 1867 - 10 January 1955) was a well-known atheist. ... This work is copyrighted. ... This work is copyrighted. ... Arthur Bob Miller (October 17, 1915 – February 10, 2005) was an American playwright and essayist. ... Terry Pratchett during his visit to Poland on 6 June 2004. ... Terry Pratchett during his visit to Poland on 6 June 2004. ... Terence David John Pratchett, OBE (born 28 April 1948) is a British fantasy and science fiction author, best known for his Discworld series. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 427 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (984 × 1380 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 427 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (984 × 1380 pixel, file size: 2. ... Philip Pullman CBE (born October 19, 1946) is a British writer. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Sir Ahmed Salman Rushdie (born June 19, 1947) is an Indian-British novelist and essayist. ... Image File history File links Josesaramago. ... Image File history File links Josesaramago. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... David Aaronovitch (born July 8, 1954) is a British journalist, broadcaster, and author. ... Douglas Noël Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001) was an English author, comic radio dramatist, and musician. ... The cover of the first novel in the Hitchhikers series, from a late 1990s printing. ... Tariq Ali Tariq Ali (Urdu: طارق علی) (born October 21, 1943) is a British-Pakistani writer and filmmaker [1]. He is a member of the editorial committee of the New Left Review, and regularly contributes to The Guardian, Counterpunch, and the London Review of Books, He is the author of Pirates Of... Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 – August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. ... Eric Clifford Ambler OBE (28 June 1909 - 22 October 1998) was an influential English writer of spy novels who introduced a new realism to the genre. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... The spy fiction genre (sometimes called political thriller) first arose just before the First World War, at about the same time, the first organized intelligence agencies were being formed. ... For the gay mens lifestyle magazine, see Genre (magazine). ... Isaac Asimov (January 2?, 1920?[1] – April 6, 1992), pronounced , originally Исаак Озимов but now transcribed into Russian as Айзек Азимов [1], was a Russian-born American author and professor of biochemistry, a highly successful writer, best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Iain Menzies Banks (officially Iain Banks, born on 16 February 1954 in Dunfermline, Fife) is a Scottish writer. ... Pierre Francis Berton, CC, O.Ont, BA, D.Litt (July 12, 1920 – November 30, 2004) was a noted Canadian author of non-fiction, especially Canadiana and Canadian history, and was a well-known television personality and journalist. ... Seal of the Order of Canada The Order of Canada is Canadas highest civilian honour, with membership awarded to those who exemplify the Orders Latin motto Desiderantes meliorem patriam, which means (those) desiring a better country (Hebrews 11. ... The Order of Ontario is an award given in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Canadiana is a term referring to things related to the country of Canada. ... Canada is a nation of 31 million inhabitants occupying almost all of the northern half of the North American continent. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... Wilfrid Scawen Blunt Wilfrid Scawen Blunt (August 17, 1840–September 10, 1922) was a British poet and writer. ... William Boyd is the name of four notable people: William Boyd (writer) William Boyd (actor), better known as Hopalong Cassidy William Boyd (bassist) William C. Boyd, the US immunologist See also: Billy Boyd This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the... Coimbatore   (Tamil: ), also known as Kovai (Tamil: ), is a major industrial city in India. ... Marshall David Brain (b. ... HowStuffWorks is a website created by Marshall Brain but now owned by the Convex Group. ... Howard Brenton (born December 13, 1942) is an English playwright, who was educated at St Catharines College, Cambridge. ... The Romans in Britain is a stage play by Howard Brenton that comments upon imperialism and the abuse of power. ... Brigid Antonia Brophy (born June 12, 1929, in London, England; died August 7, 1995, in Louth, Lincolnshire, England) was an English novelist, essayist, critic, biographer, and dramatist. ... Alan Charles Brownjohn (born 28 July 1931) is a British poet and novelist. ... Jason Burke is an author and journalist with the British Sunday newspaper The Observer, where he is currently Europe editor. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Lawrence Bush is author of six books of Jewish fiction and non-fiction and most recently provided updating and commentary for the millennial edition of Leo Rostens classic, The Joy of Yiddish. ... Mary Franeis Butts (December 13, 1890 - March 5, 1937) was a British modernist writer. ... For Christian theological modernism, see Liberal Christianity and Modernism (Roman Catholicism). ... João Cabral de Melo Neto (1920-1999) was born in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil, and is considered one of the greatest Brazilian poets of all time. ... Angela Carter (May 7, 1940 – February 16, 1992) was an English novelist and journalist, known for her post-feminist magical realist and science fiction works. ... Luigi Cascioli is an Italian atheist and author of the book The Fable of Christ. ... Sir Arthur Charles Clarke, CBE, Sri Lankabhimanya (16 December 1917 – 19 March 2008) was a British (lived in Sri Lanka since 1956) science fiction author, inventor, and futurist, most famous for the novel 2001: A Space Odyssey, written in collaboration with director Stanley Kubrick, a collaboration which led also to... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... The Rationalist Press Association is an organisation of the United Kingdom, founded on 26 May 1899 to promote freedom of thought and inquiry and the principles of rationalism, defined as the mental attitude which unreservedly accepts the supremacy of reason and aims at establishing a system of philosophy and ethics... Francis Claud Cockburn (pronounced ) (1904-1981) was a renowned radical British journalist, who was controversial for his communist and stalinist sympathies. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... George Douglas Howard Cole (September 25, 1889 - January 14, 1959) was an English journalist and economist, closely associated with the development of Fabianism. ... A political theorist is someone who engages in political theory. ... Alan Greenspan, former chairman, United States Federal Reserve. ... Dame Ivy Compton-Burnett D.B.E. (1884 – August 27, 1969) was an English novelist. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... Edmund Cooper (April 30, 1926 - March 11, 1982) was a poet and prolific writer of science fiction and detective novels, published under his own name and several pen names. ... Harry Summerfield Hoff (August 4, 1910 - 5 September 2002) was an English novelist, writing under the name William Cooper. ... Jim Crace (born March 1, 1946 in Hertfordshire, England) is a contemporary English writer. ... Anthony (A.M.) Daniels (1949-) is an English writer and retired physician (prison doctor and psychiatrist), who frequently uses the pen name Theodore Dalrymple. ... Rhys Davies (1901-1978) (born Vivian Rees Davies) was a Welsh novelist and short story writer, who wrote in the English language. ... Isaac Deutscher (3 April 1907 – 19 August 1967), British journalist, historian and political activist of Polish-Jewish birth, became well-known as the biographer of Leon Trotsky and Joseph Stalin and as a commentator on Soviet affairs. ... For the politician, see John Diamond, Baron Diamond. ... Ruth Dudley-Edwards is an Irish historian, crime novelist, journalist and broadcaster. ... Carol Ann Duffy Carol Ann Duffy (born December 23, 1955) is a British poet, playwright and freelance writer born in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Turan Dursun (1934–1990), was a Turkish scholar of Islam and a mufti who later turned atheist and wrote several books critical of Islam in the Turkish language. ... Greg Egan (August 20, 1961, Perth, Western Australia) is an Australian computer programmer and science fiction author. ... Note that this partial list contains some authors whose works of fantastic fiction would today be called science fiction, even if they predate, or did not work in that genre. ... Barbara Ehrenreich (born August 26, 1941, in Butte, Montana) is a prominent liberal American writer, columnist, feminist, socialist and political activist. ... Mary Ann (Marian) Evans (22 November 1819 – 22 December 1880), better known by her pen name George Eliot, was an English novelist. ... Harlan Jay Ellison (born May 27, 1934) is a prolific American writer of short stories, novellas, teleplays, essays, and criticism. ... Note that this partial list contains some authors whose works of fantastic fiction would today be called science fiction, even if they predate, or did not work in that genre. ... Screenwriters, scenarists, or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies and television programs are made. ... Gavin Buchanan Ewart (1916 - 1995) was a British poet who is best known for contributing to Geoffrey Grigsons New Verse at the age of seventeen. ... Oriana Fallaci Oriana Fallaci (born July 29, 1930) is an Italian journalist , author, and political interviewer. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... Vardis Fisher (Annis, Idaho, USA, 1895-1968) was a writer best known for historical novels of the old west and the monumental twelve-volume Testament of Man, novels which depicted episodes in the history of humans from cave man times to the present. ... Robert Fisk during a lecture at Carleton University, Canada, 2004 Robert Fisk (born July 12, 1946 in Maidstone, Kent) is a British journalist and is currently a Middle East correspondent for the British newspaper The Independent. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Free Inquiry is a bi-monthly journal of secular humanist opinion and commentary, published by the Council for Secular Humanism. ... Ken Follett (born June 5, 1949) is a British author of thrillers and historical novels. ... Paul Foot, campaigning journalist Paul Mackintosh Foot (8 November 1937 in Palestine – 18 July 2004 at Stansted Airport) was a British investigative journalist, political campaigner, author, and long-time member of the Socialist Workers Party (SWP). ... Edward Morgan Forster, OM (January 1, 1879 – June 7, 1970), was an English novelist, short story writer, and essayist. ... The Order of Merit is a British and Commonwealth Order bestowed by the Monarch. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... An essayist is an author who writes compositions which can be about any particular subject. ... John Robert Fowles John Robert Fowles (March 31, 1926 – November 5, 2005) was an English novelist and essayist. ... The French Lieutenants Woman is a 1969 novel by John Fowles. ... The Magus, cover painting by Tom Adams The Magus is the first novel by British author John Fowles, but actually the second to be published, following the success of The Collector (1963). ... Frederick James Furnivall (February 4, 1825 - July 2, 1910), English philologist and editor, was born at Egham, Surrey, the son of a surgeon who made his fortune from running the private lunatic asylum at Great Fosters there. ... The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is the most successful dictionary of the English language, (not to be confused with the one-volume Oxford Dictionary of English, formerly New Oxford Dictionary of English, of... Alex Garland (born 1970) is a British novelist and screenwriter. ... The Beach (1996) is a novel by Alex Garland about backpackers in Thailand. ... 28 Days Later is a 2002 British post-apocalyptic science fiction horror film directed by Danny Boyle and starring Cillian Murphy, Naomie Harris and Christopher Eccleston. ... Sunshine is a 2007 science fiction film directed by Danny Boyle from a screenplay by Alex Garland. ... Constance Garnett (née Black) (December 19, 1861 - December 17, 1946) was an English translator whose translations of nineteenth-century Russian classics first introduced them on a wide basis to the English public. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) The 19th century lasted from 1801 to 1900 in the Gregorian calendar (using the Common Era system of year numbering). ... Nadine Gordimer (born 20 November 1923) is a South African novelist and writer, winner of the 1991 Nobel Prize in literature and 1974 Booker Prize. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ... René-François-Armand Prudhomme (1839–1907), a French poet and essayist, was the first person to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, in 1901, in special recognition of his poetic composition, which gives evidence of lofty idealism, artistic perfection and a rare combination of the qualities of both heart... Linda Grant (b. ... Robert von Ranke Graves (24 July 1895 – 7 December 1985) was an English poet, scholar, and novelist. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... The Greek Myths (1955) is a comprehensive anthology of Greek mythology, published in two volumes. ... I, Claudius is a novel by Robert Graves, (ISBN 067972477X) first published in 1934, dealing sympathetically with the life of the Roman Emperor Claudius and the history of the Julio-Claudian Dynasty and Roman Empire, from Julius Caesars assassination in 44 BC to Caligulas assassination in 41 AD... This article is about the writer. ... For other Orders see Order of Merit (disambiguation). ... The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... This article is in need of attention. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is a person who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... Screenwriters, scenarists, or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies and television programs are made. ... Travel writing is a literary genre related to the essay and to the guidebook. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Germaine Greer (born January 29, 1939) is an Australian-born writer, broadcaster and retired academic, widely regarded as one of the most significant feminist voices of the 20th century. ... Jan Guillou at the Swedish Book- and Library Convention in Gothenburg, Sweden Jan Oscar Sverre Lucien Henri Guillou (pron. ... Daniel Handler (born February 28, 1970) is an American writer, screenwriter, and accordionist. ... A pen name or nom de plume is a pseudonym adopted by an author. ... Lemony Snicket is a pseudonym used by author Daniel Handler in his book series A Series of Unfortunate Events, as well as a character in that series. ... Secular humanism is a humanist philosophy that upholds reason, ethics, and justice, and specifically rejects the supernatural and the spiritual as warrants of moral reflection and decision-making. ... A Series of Unfortunate Events is a childrens book series of thirteen novels written by Daniel Handler under the pseudonym of Lemony Snicket, and illustrated by Brett Helquist. ... For other persons named Sam Harris, see Sam Harris (disambiguation). ... Sam Harris began writing The End of Faith in what he has described as a period of collective grief and stupefaction following the September 11, 2001 attacks. ... Letter to a Christian Nation is a non-fiction book by Sam Harris, written in response to feedback he received following the publication of his first book The End of Faith. ... At the 63rd World Science Fiction Convention in Glasgow, August 2005 Harry Harrison (born Henry Maxwell Dempsey, March 12, 1925 in Stamford, Connecticut) is an American science fiction author who has lived in many parts of the world including Mexico, England, Denmark and Italy. ... The Streets of Ashkelon is a science fiction short story by Harry Harrison. ... Tony Harrison (born April 30, 1937) is an English poet. ... Simon James Heffer (born July 18, 1960) is an English journalist and writer. ... Zoë Heller (born 1965) is a British journalist and novelist. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 — July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... Dorothy Coade Hewett, (May 21, 1923 – August 25, 2002), was an Australian feminist poet, novelist, librettist, and playwright. ... Christopher Eric Hitchens (born April 13, 1949) is a British-American author, journalist and literary critic. ... God is not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything (published in the United Kingdom as God is Not Great: The Case Against Religion) is a non-fiction book by author and journalist Christopher Hitchens. ... Thomas Jefferson Hogg (1792 - 1862) was a British biographer. ... Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 – July 8, 1822; pronounced ) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets of the English language. ... The Necessity of Atheism is a treatise on atheism by Percy Bysshe Shelley, published anonymously in 1811 while he was a student at University College, Oxford. ... Reginald John (R.J.) Hollingdale (October 20, 1930 - September 28, 2001) was best known as a biographer, and a translator of German philosophy and literature, especially the works of Friedrich Nietzsche, Goethe, E.T.A. Hoffman, Lichtenberg, and Schopenhauer. ... Michel Houellebecq (pronounced ) (real name Michel Thomas), born 26 February 1958, on the French island of Réunion is a controversial, award-winning French novelist. ... Mick Hume (born 1959) is a British journalist and former organiser of the Revolutionary Communist Party. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... Spiked is a British Internet magazine focusing on politics, culture and society. ... Alfred Edward Housman (March 26, 1859 - April 30, 1936), usually known as A.E. Housman, was an English poet and classical scholar, now best known for his cycle of poems A Shropshire Lad. ... Stanley Edgar Hyman was a literary critic who wrote primarily about critical methods: the distinct strategies critics use in approaching literary texts. ... Literary criticism is the study, discussion, evaluation, and interpretation of literature. ... Susan Jacoby (born 1945) is an American author. ... Born Cardiff, South Wales, UK July 27, 1973. ... Sir Simon Jenkins (born June 10, 1943) is a British newspaper columnist currently associated with The Guardian after fifteen years with News International titles. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... // Journalism is the discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The British honours system is a means of rewarding individuals personal bravery, achievement or service to the United Kingdom. ... Sunanda Tryambak Joshi (b. ... Literary criticism is the study, discussion, evaluation, and interpretation of literature. ... Sir Ludovic Kennedy shown on the cover of his book All In The Mind: A Farewell To God Sir Ludovic Henry Coverley Kennedy (born 3 November 1919) is a British journalist, broadcaster, and author. ... For mercy killings not performed on humans, see Animal euthanasia. ... Paul Krassner (April 9, 1932) was the founder, editor and a frequent contributor to the freethought magazine The Realist, first published in 1958. ... Freethought is a philosophical viewpoint that holds that beliefs should be formed on the basis of science and logical principles and not be compromised by authority, tradition, or any other dogma. ... ... Counterculture (also counter-culture) is a sociological word used to describe the values and norms of behavior of a cultural group, or subculture, that run counter to those of the social mainstream of the day,[1] the cultural equivalent of political opposition. ... Pär Lagerkvist. ... René-François-Armand Prudhomme (1839–1907), a French poet and essayist, was the first person to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, in 1901, in special recognition of his poetic composition, which gives evidence of lofty idealism, artistic perfection and a rare combination of the qualities of both heart... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Philip Arthur Larkin, CH, CBE, FRSL, (9 August 1922 – 2 December 1985) was an English poet, novelist and jazz critic. ... The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order. ... Commanders Badge of the Order of the British Empire The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is an order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions, in order of seniority: Knight or Dame Grand Cross... The Royal Society of Literature is the senior literary organisation in Britain. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Marghanita Laski (October 24, 1915 – February 6, 1988) was an English journalist and novelist. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... Rutka Laskier (1929–1943) was a Jewish teenager from Poland who is best known for her 1943 diary chronicling four months of her life during the Holocaust. ... Auschwitz (Konzentrationslager Auschwitz) was the largest of the Nazi German concentration camps. ... Annelies Marie Anne Frank ( ) (June 12, 1929 – early March 1945) was a German-born Jewish girl from the city of Frankfurt, who wrote a diary while in hiding with her family, the Van Pels family and Fritz Pfeffer in Amsterdam during the German occupation of the Netherlands in World War... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... Giacomo Leopardi, Count (June 29, 1798 – June 14, 1837) is generally considered, along with such figures as Dante, Petrarca, Ariosto and Tasso, to be among Italys greatest poets and one of its greatest thinkers. ... This article is about the philosophical position. ... Primo Michele Levi (July 31, 1919 – April 11, 1987) was a Jewish Italian chemist, Holocaust survivor and author of memoirs, short stories, poems, and novels. ... Auschwitz, in English, commonly refers to the Auschwitz concentration camp complex built near the town of Oświęcim, by Nazi Germany during World War II. Rarely, it may refer to the Polish town of Oświęcim (called by the Germans Auschwitz) itself. ... Georg Christoph Lichtenberg (1 July 1742 – 24 February 1799) was an 18th-century German scientist, satirist and Anglophile. ... Portrait of Pierre Loti, by Henri Rousseau, 1891 Louis Marie Julien Viaud (January 14, 1850 - June 10, 1923) was a French sailor and writer, who used the pseudonym Pierre Loti. ... This article is about the author. ... Franco Lucentini (Rome, 1920 - Turin, 2002) was an Italian writer, journalist, translator and editor of anthologies. ... The cover of MacCaigs Selected Poems Norman MacCaig (14 November 1910 – 23 January 1996) was a Scottish poet. ... Heather Mallick (born 1959) is a Toronto-based columnist and author who, until December, 2005, wrote for the Canadian newspaper The Globe and Mail. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... William Somerset Maugham, CH (January 25, 1874 – December 16, 1965) was an English playwright, novelist, and short story writer. ... The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order. ... Charles Maurras (April 20, 1868 Martigues Bouches-du-Rhône France – November 16, 1952) was a French author, poet, and critic. ... Reactionary (or reactionist) is a political epithet, generally used as a pejorative, originally applied in the context of the French Revolution to counter-revolutionaries who wished to restore the real or imagined conditions of the monarchical Ancien Régime. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Joseph Martin McCabe (12 November 1867 - 10 January 1955) was a well-known atheist. ... Mary Therese McCarthy (June 21, 1912 – October 25, 1989) was an American author and critic. ... Ian McEwan CBE (born June 21, 1948) is a British novelist. ... Coimbatore   (Tamil: ), also known as Kovai (Tamil: ), is a major industrial city in India. ... The Man Booker Prize for Fiction, also known in short as the Booker Prize, is a literary prize awarded each year for the best original full-length novel, written in the English language, by a citizen of either the Commonwealth of Nations or the Republic of Ireland. ... China Tom Miéville (born September 6, 1972, Norwich) is a British fantastic fiction writer. ... Arthur Bob Miller (October 17, 1915 – February 10, 2005) was an American playwright and essayist. ... A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is a person who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... An essayist is an author who writes compositions which can be about any particular subject. ... American literature refers to written or literary work produced in the area of the United States and Colonial America. ... For the 1996 film, see The Crucible (1996 film). ... A View from the Bridge is a play by Arthur Miller originally produced as a one-act verse drama on Broadway in 1955. ... All My Sons is the name of a 1947 play by Arthur Miller. ... For other uses, see Death of a Salesman (disambiguation). ... David Mills is an atheist author who argues that science and religion cannot be successfully reconciled. ... This article is about the writer. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... For information about The Times satire Queens Counsel, see Queens Counsel (comic strip). ... For the musician, see Sikiru Ayinde Barrister. ... Rumpole of the Bailey is a British television series created and written by British writer and barrister Sir John Mortimer, QC and starring Leo McKern as Horace Rumpole, an aging London barrister who defends any and all clients. ... Owen Martin OHagan, was an Irish journalist, born June 23, 1950. ... This article is about John Oswald an 18th century political revolutionary. ... The Bloomsbury Group was an English collective of loving friends and relatives who lived in or near London during the first half of the twentieth century. ... Camille Anna Paglia (born April 2, 1947 in Endicott, New York) is an American social critic, author and teacher. ... ... Matthew Parris (born August 7, 1949 in Johannesburg) is a journalist and former Conservative politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Pier Paolo Pasolini (March 5, 1922 – November 2, 1975) was an Italian poet, intellectual, film director, and writer. ... A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... Literati redirects here. ... Director Herbert Brenon with actress Alla Nazimova on the set of War Brides, 1916 A director is a person who directs the making of a film. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... Harold Pinter, CH, CBE (born 10 October 1930) is an English playwright, screenwriter, poet, actor, director, author, and political activist. ... The Birthday Party is the second play by Harold Pinter. ... The Caretaker is a play by the Nobel Laureate Harold Pinter, first published in 1959. ... The Homecoming is a play by Harold Pinter, first published in 1965. ... Betrayal is a play written by Harold Pinter in 1978. ... René-François-Armand Prudhomme (1839–1907), a French poet and essayist, was the first person to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, in 1901, in special recognition of his poetic composition, which gives evidence of lofty idealism, artistic perfection and a rare combination of the qualities of both heart... Terence David John Pratchett, OBE (born 28 April 1948) is a British fantasy and science fiction author, best known for his Discworld series. ... The definition of a fantasy author is somewhat diffuse, and a matter of opinion - Jules Verne considered H. G. Wells to be a fantasy author - and there is considerable overlap with science fiction authors and horror fiction authors. ... 1867 edition of Punch, a ground-breaking British magazine of popular humour, including a good deal of satire of the contemporary social and political scene. ... This article is about the novels. ... Philip Pullman CBE (born October 19, 1946) is a British writer. ... Coimbatore   (Tamil: ), also known as Kovai (Tamil: ), is a major industrial city in India. ... The trilogy (U.K versions), in order of succession from left to right. ... Craig Raine (3 December 1944 - ) is an English poet and critic born in Bishop Auckland, County Durham. ... Martian poetry. ... Ayn Rand (IPA: , February 2 [O.S. January 20] 1905 – March 6, 1982), born Alisa Zinovyevna Rosenbaum (Russian: ), was a Russian-born American novelist and philosopher. ... This article is about the philosophy of Ayn Rand. ... Derek Raymond Derek Raymond (born Robert William Arthur Cook) (12 June 1931 - 30 July 1994) was an English writer, credited with being the founder of English noir. ... Hardboiled crime fiction is a uniquely American style pioneered by Dashiell Hammett, refined by Raymond Chandler, and endlessly imitated since by writers such as Mickey Spillane. ... Claire Rayner (born Claire Berenice Berk to Jewish parents in London on January 22, 1931) is a British journalist best-known for her role for many years as an agony aunt. ... Obe can mean: Obe, in Afghanistan Ebenezer Obe, a Nigerian musician. ... An agony aunt is an advice columnist at a magazine or newspaper. ...


Ron Reagan in 2007 Ronald Prescott Reagan (born May 20, 1958, Los Angeles, California, USA), usually known as Ron Reagan, is the son of the late former President of the United States Ronald Reagan and his wife Nancy. ... The Creative Coalition is a nonprofit, (501(c)(3)) nonpartisan, politically-active group formed of members of the American film entertainment industry. ... Reagan redirects here. ... Stan Rice ([[1942] - December 9, 2002) was an American poet and artist and husband of writer Anne Rice (married 1961). ... San Francisco State University (commonly referred to as San Francisco State, SF State, State and SFSU) is a public university located in the southwestern San Francisco, California, bordering Lake Merced and Lowell High School, near Fort Funston and Daly City, near the San Mateo County line. ... Anne Rice (born on October 4, 1941) is a best-selling American author of gothic and later religious themed books. ... Sir Ahmed Salman Rushdie (born June 19, 1947) is an Indian-British novelist and essayist. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... René-François-Armand Prudhomme (1839–1907), a French poet and essayist, was the first person to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, in 1901, in special recognition of his poetic composition, which gives evidence of lofty idealism, artistic perfection and a rare combination of the qualities of both heart... Dan Savage speaking at Bradley University Daniel Keenan Savage (born October 7, 1964[1] near Chicago, Illinois, United States) is an openly gay American sex advice columnist, author, media pundit, journalist, and newspaper editor. ... Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 – July 8, 1822; pronounced ) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets of the English language. ... Romantics redirects here. ... Keats redirects here. ... Byron redirects here. ... The Necessity of Atheism is a treatise on atheism by Percy Bysshe Shelley, published anonymously in 1811 while he was a student at University College, Oxford. ... Michael Shermer Michael Shermer (born September 8, 1954 in Glendale, California) is a science writer, historian of science, founder of The Skeptics Society, and editor of its magazine Skeptic, which is largely devoted to investigating and debunking pseudoscientific and supernatural claims. ... The Skeptics Society is a nonprofit organization devoted to promoting scientific skepticism and resisting the spread of pseudoscience, superstition, and irrational beliefs. ... Joan Smith (born 1953 in London) is an United Kingdom novelist, journalist and human rights activist, who is a former chair of the Writers in Prison committeee in the English section of International PEN. Smith read Latin at the University of Reading in the early 1970s. ... WARREN ALLEN SMITH BIOGRAPHICAL – Official Website wasm@mac. ... George Warrington Steevens (1869 - 1900), journalist and miscellaneous writer, born at Sydenham, and educated at City of London School and Oxford, took to journalism, in which he distinguished himself by his clearness of vision and vivid style. ... Robert Louis (Balfour) Stevenson (November 13, 1850–December 3, 1894), was a Scottish novelist, poet and travel writer, and a representative of neo-romanticism in English literature. ... For other uses, see Treasure Island (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (disambiguation). ... Matthew C. Taibbi (born February 3, 1970), an American journalist and political writer. ... This article is about the magazine. ... John Orley Allen Tate (November 19, 1899 - February 9, 1979) was an American poet, essayist, and social commentator, and Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress, 1943 - 1944. ... The Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress is appointed by the United States Librarian of Congress and earns a stipend of $35,000 a year. ... Vladimir Tendryakov Владимир Федорович Тендряков (December 5, 1923-August 3, 1984, Moscow) was a Russian writer. ... Tiffany Ellsworth Thayer (March 1, 1902–23 August 1959) was an American author and founder of the Fortean Society. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... The Fortean Society was started in Britain in 1931 by Tiffany Thayer in order to promote the ideas of Charles Fort. ... Bill Thompson (born 1960) is a technology writer best known for his weekly column on BBC online and his appearances on Go Digital, a radio show on the BBC World Service. ... James Thomson (1834 - 1882) was a Scottish poet, best known for his long poem The City of Dreadful Night (1874). ... The City of Dreadful Night is a long poem by the Scottish poet James B.V. Thomson, published in 1880 in a book entitled Thomson, who sometimes used the pseudonym Bysshe Vanolis — in honour of Percy Bysshe Shelley and Novalis — was a thorough pessimist, suffering from lifelong melancholia and Spain... Nicholas Osborne Tomalin (30 October 1931 - 17 October 1973) was a British journalist and writer. ... Winifred (Freda) Utley was a British scholar and author, born on January 23, 1898, London, England, and died on January 21, 1978, Washington, DC. A card-carrying British Communist by age 28, Winifred Utley had begun to reverse her stance on the worldwide Communist movement by the time her husband... Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ... For the string game, see Cats cradle. ... Ethel Lilian Voynich, née Boole (May 11, 1864, County Cork, Ireland - July 27, 1960, New York City) was a novelist and musician, and a supporter of several revolutionary causes. ... Francis James Baird Wheen (born 22 January 1957) is a British writer and journalist. ... Leonard Woolf (November 25, 1880 – August 14, 1969) married Virginia Woolf in 1912. ... Gao Xingjian (pron. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... A dramatist is an author of dramatic compositions, usually plays. ... René-François-Armand Prudhomme (1839–1907), a French poet and essayist, was the first person to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, in 1901, in special recognition of his poetic composition, which gives evidence of lofty idealism, artistic perfection and a rare combination of the qualities of both heart...


Business


Download high resolution version (528x640, 58 KB)Stephen Girard Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs TITLE: Stephen Girard CALL NUMBER: PGA - Newsam, A.--Stephen Girard (A size) [P&P] REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-28644 (b&w film copy neg. ... Download high resolution version (528x640, 58 KB)Stephen Girard Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs TITLE: Stephen Girard CALL NUMBER: PGA - Newsam, A.--Stephen Girard (A size) [P&P] REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-28644 (b&w film copy neg. ... Stephen Girard Stephen Girard (May 20, 1750–December 26, 1831) was an American philanthropist and banker. ... John Baskerville (January 28, 1706 - January 8, 1775) was a printer in Birmingham, a member of the Royal Society of Arts, and an associate of some of the members of the Lunar Society. ... A type foundry is a company that designs and/or distributes typefaces. ... Larry Flynt in 2007 Larry Claxton Flynt, Jr. ... Stephen Girard Stephen Girard (May 20, 1750–December 26, 1831) was an American philanthropist and banker. ... Portrait of Allan Pinkerton from Harpers Weekly, 1884 Allan Pinkerton (August 25, 1819 – July 1, 1884) was a U.S. detective and spy, best known for creating the Pinkerton Agency, the first detective agency of the United States. ... Gumshoe redirects here. ... Spy and Secret agent redirect here. ... The Pinkerton National Detective Agency was a security guard agency established in the United States in 1850 by Allan Pinkerton. ... Graeme Samuel commenced as head of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission in July 2003. ... Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is the sixth-largest country in the world, the only country to occupy an entire continent, and the largest in the region of Australasia/Oceania. ... The ACCC Logo The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) is an independent Australian commonwealth government authority established in 1995 from the amalgamation of the Australian Trade Practices Commission (TPC) and the Prices Surveillance Authority, to protect consumer rights, business rights and obligations, perform industry regulation and price monitoring and... Nils Gösta Christer Sturmark, born 7 September 1964 in Danderyd, Stockholm County, is a Swedish author, IT-entrepreneur and prominent debater on religion and humanism in Swedish media. ... Information and communication technology spending in 2005 Information Technology (IT), as defined by the Information Technology Association of America (ITAA), is the study, design, development, implementation, support or management of computer-based information systems, particularly software applications and computer hardware. ... Humanisterna (the Humanists) is the largest humanist/rationalist organisation in Sweden with over 3,000 members. ... Will Wyatt (born January 7, 1942) is a British television producer and executive. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Mark Elliot Zuckerberg (born May 14, 1984) is an American entrepreneur. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... Facebook is a social networking website that was launched on February 4, 2004. ...


Comedians


David Tynan OMahoney (July 6, 1936–March 10, 2005), better known as Dave Allen, was an Irish comedian, popular in the United Kingdom and Australia in the 1960s and 1970s. ... This image is the cover of the George Carlin novel Napalm And Silly Putty It is part of the page Napalm And Silly Putty on this site. ... This image is the cover of the George Carlin novel Napalm And Silly Putty It is part of the page Napalm And Silly Putty on this site. ... George Denis Patrick Carlin[15] (born May 12, 1937) is a Grammy-winning American stand-up comedian, actor, and author. ... Ricky Dene Gervais (born 25 June 1961) is a triple Golden Globe-, double Emmy- and seven-time BAFTA award-winning English comedian, writer, actor and former New Romantic musician from Reading, Berkshire. ... David Tynan OMahoney (July 6, 1936–March 10, 2005), better known as Dave Allen, was an Irish comedian, popular in the United Kingdom and Australia in the 1960s and 1970s. ... Keith Philip George Allen (born 2 June 1953) is a Welsh comedian, actor, singer and writer. ... Lily Rose Beatrice Allen (born May 2, 1985) is a British singer-songwriter best known for songs such as Smile and LDN. She is the daughter of actor/musician Keith Allen and film producer Alison Owen. ... For the American radio talk show host, see Will Anderson. ... B. J. Novak in a stand-up comedy routine at Olde English sketch comedy in June 2007. ... For the documentary about Jerry Seinfeld, see Comedian (film). ... The Australian Broadcasting Corporation or ABC is Australias national non-profit public broadcaster. ... The Glass House was a half-hour Australian comedy talk show which screened on the ABC from 2001 to 2006. ... Matt Besser was born on September 22, 1967, in Little Rock, Arkansas. ... For the documentary about Jerry Seinfeld, see Comedian (film). ... Abie Philbin Bowman is an Irish columnist and comedian. ... Marcus Brigstocke (born 8 May 1973) is an English comedian and satirist who has worked extensively in stand-up comedy, television and radio. ... For the documentary about Jerry Seinfeld, see Comedian (film). ... List of satirists below - writers, cartoonists and others known for their involvement in satire - humourous social criticism. ... The Late Edition is a British television program broadcast on BBC 4. ... George Denis Patrick Carlin[15] (born May 12, 1937) is a Grammy-winning American stand-up comedian, actor, and author. ... For the documentary about Jerry Seinfeld, see Comedian (film). ... Adam Carolla (born May 27, 1964) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American comedian, comedy writer, radio personality, television personality and actor. ... James Anthony Patrick Carr (born September 15, 1972 in Limerick, Ireland [1]) is an Irish comedian known for his deadpan, satirical and often dark humour. ... Patrick Condell (born November 1, 1951) is an English stand up comedian, writer, playwright, secularist and atheist. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... B. J. Novak in a stand-up comedy routine at Olde English sketch comedy in June 2007. ... This article is about secularism. ... For other persons named David Cross, see David Cross (disambiguation). ... Benjamin Charles Elton (born 3 May 1959) is an English comedian, writer and director. ... Janeane Garofalo (born September 28, 1964) is an American stand-up comedian, actress, political activist, writer and former co-host on Air America Radios The Majority Report. ... Ricky Dene Gervais (born 25 June 1961) is a triple Golden Globe-, double Emmy- and seven-time BAFTA award-winning English comedian, writer, actor and former New Romantic musician from Reading, Berkshire. ... The Office is a British television comedy series, created, written and directed by Ricky Gervais and Stephen Merchant, and first aired in the UK on BBC Two on July 9, 2001. ... Kathy Griffin (born November 4, 1960) is an Emmy Award-winning American stand-up comedian, producer, actress, and gay icon. ... Robin Ince (born 1969) is an English stand-up comedian, actor and writer. ... Dominic John Joly (born 15 November 1967)[1] is an award-winning British television comedian and journalist. ... Trigger Happy TV is a British hidden camera television show, created, produced by and starring Dom Joly, originally aired on the British television channel Channel 4. ... Dermot Morgan (3 March 1952 – 28 February 1998) was an Irish schoolteacher-turned-comedian and actor, who achieved international renown as Father Ted Crilly in the Channel 4 sitcom Father Ted. ... Father Ted was a popular 1990s television situation comedy set around the lives of three priests on the extremely remote (and completely fictional) Craggy Island off the west coast of Ireland. ... Patton Oswalt (born January 27, 1969 in Portsmouth, Virginia) is an American actor, writer, voiceover artist, and professional comedian. ... Linda Smith Linda Smith (29 January 1958 – 27 February 2006) was an English stand-up comic and comedy writer. ... Julia Sweeney (born October 10, 1959 in Spokane, Washington) is an American actress and comedian who lives in Hollywood, California. ... SNL redirects here. ... This article is about the anarchist comedian. ... The Mark Thomas Comedy Product was a television show that ran on Channel 4 from February 1996 to May 2002. ... This article is about the British television station. ... Gene Weingarten Gene Weingarten, born in New York in 1951, is a humor writer and journalist. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ...


Film, radio, television and theatre


Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1800 × 2400 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1800 × 2400 pixel, file size: 1. ... Alicia Christian Jodie Foster (born November 19, 1962) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress, director and producer. ... Image File history File links Katharine_Hepburn_in_The_Philadelphia_Story_trailer. ... Image File history File links Katharine_Hepburn_in_The_Philadelphia_Story_trailer. ... Katharine Houghton Hepburn (May 12, 1907 – June 29, 2003) was an American actress of film, television and stage. ... Image File history File links Ian_McKellen. ... Image File history File links Ian_McKellen. ... Sir Ian Murray McKellen, CH, CBE (born 25 May 1939) is an English stage and screen actor, the recipient of the Tony Award and two Oscar nominations. ... Steven Andrew Soderbergh (born January 14, 1963 in Atlanta, Georgia) is an American film producer, screenwriter, cinematographer, editor, and Oscar-winning director. ... Mary Adams was a producer and administrator in the BBC. She was instrumental in setting up BBCs television service both before and after World War II. Mary Adams gained a first class degree in Botany at Cardiff University. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Phillip Adams AO (born 26 July 1939) is an Australian broadcaster, film producer, writer, humanist, social commentator and satirist. ... For other persons named Robert Altman, see Robert Altman (disambiguation). ... Brannon Braga at a 2006 lecture Brannon Braga (born August 14, 1965 in Bozeman, Montana) is an American television producer and screenwriter who is mostly known for his significant contributions to the Star Trek series since 1990. ... The starship Enterprise (NX-01) Star Trek: Enterprise is a science fiction television series set in the Star Trek universe. ... James Broadbent (born May 24, 1949) is an Academy Award-winning English theatre, film and television actor. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organization that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... Jeremy Brock was born 1962 in Newcastle, England to widow Barbara Brock, wife of Benjamin Brock of the Porclelain Knight Toliteries fortune. ... Categories: Movie stubs | 1997 films | Best Actress Oscar Nominee (film) ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organization that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... For the novel, see The Last King of Scotland. ... Not to be confused with Darren Brown. ... Bertrand Arthur William Russell, 3rd Earl Russell, OM, FRS, (18 May 1872 – 2 February 1970), was a British philosopher, logician, mathematician, advocate for social reform, and pacifist. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Max Ernst. ... Richard Carleton Richard Carleton (born 1943 in Bowral, New South Wales, died 7 May 2006 in Beaconsfield, Tasmania) was an Australian television journalist most noted for his work on 60 Minutes. ... 60 Minutes premiered 11 February 1979. ... Adam Carolla (born May 27, 1964) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American comedian, comedy writer, radio personality, television personality and actor. ... Loveline is a syndicated radio call-in program in the United States, Canada and Mexico, offering medical and relationship advice to listeners, often with the assistance of guests, including actors and members of popular bands. ... The Man Show was a half hour comedy television show on Comedy Central. ... Adithya, born on the 6th April,is an Indian movie actor who appeares in Tamil and Malayalam films. ... Asia Carrera (born Jessica Steinhauser[1][2] on August 6, 1973 in New York City) is a former American pornographic actress. ... Noël Coward Sir Noel Peirce Coward (spelling his forename Noël with the diaeresis was an affectation of later life, and Peirce is the correct spelling) (December 16, 1899 - March 26, 1973) was an English actor, playwright, and composer of popular music. ... Russell T Davies (real name: Russell Davies, born April 27, 1963) is a television producer and writer. ... This article is about the television series. ... Cigarette Smoking Man William Bruce Davis (b. ... Cancer man redirects here. ... The X-Files is an American Peabody, Golden Globe and Emmy Award-winning science fiction television series created by Chris Carter, which first aired on 10 September 1993, and ended on 19 May 2002. ... Stanley Donen (born April 13, 1924) is an American film director and choreographer hailed by David Quinlan as the King of the Hollywood musicals. His most famous work is Singin in the Rain, which he co-directed with Gene Kelly. ... Seven Brides for Seven Brothers - Movie CD cover Seven Brides for Seven Brothers is a musical film released in 1954. ... For other uses, see Singin in the Rain. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Amanda Donohoe (born June 29, 1962) is an English actress. ... David Edgar (b. ... Brian Flemming Brian Flemming (born 6 June 1966) is an American film director and playwright. ... The God Who Wasnt There is a documentary written and directed by Brian Flemming which questions the existence of Jesus and examines evidence that supports the theory that the historical Jesus did not exist. ... Alicia Christian Jodie Foster (born November 19, 1962) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress, director and producer. ... Paul Edward Valentine Giamatti (born June 6, 1967) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... Peter Greenaway, CBE (born 5 April 1942) is a Welsh-born English [1] film director. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Director Herbert Brenon with actress Alla Nazimova on the set of War Brides, 1916 A director is a person who directs the making of a film. ... Sir David Hare (born June 5, 1947) is an English dramatist and director. ... Katharine Houghton Hepburn (May 12, 1907 – June 29, 2003) was an American actress of film, television and stage. ... Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the Academy Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognize an actress who has delivered an outstanding performance while working within the film industry. ... Penn Fraser Jillette (born March 5, 1955 in Greenfield, Massachusetts) is an American comedian, illusionist, juggler and writer known for his work with fellow illusionist Teller in the team known as Penn & Teller. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Bullshit! (also known as Penn & Teller: Bullshit!) is an American, Emmy-nominated documentary television series, running since 2003 on the premium cable channel Showtime. ... Kelly, of the RRS, at a debate at Calvary Baptist Church in Manhattan, May 5, 2007. ... Sarah Kane (February 3, 1971 – February 20, 1999) was an English playwright. ... Skandar Amin Casper Keynes (born 5 September 1991) is an English actor. ... The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe poster. ... Michael Kinsley (born March 9, 1951 in Detroit, Michigan) is a veteran American political journalist and commentator, currently serving as Editorial and Opinion Editor at the Los Angeles Times (since April 2004) (though he announced in July 2005 that he would assume a reduced, but as-yet-undefined, role). ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... The word commentator has many different meanings. ... NBC news anchor Tom Brokaw A news presenter is, broadly speaking, a person that presents a news show on television or radio. ... Jerzy Kawalerowicz (born January 19, 1922) is a Polish film director. ... Nigella Lucy Lawson (born January 6, 1960) is an English journalist, cookery writer and television presenter. ... A list of some prominent writers on food, cooking, dining, and cultural history related to food. ... Tom Leykis Thomas Joseph Leykis (born August 1, 1956 in New York, New York) is the host of a radio talk show syndicated in the United States of America by CBS Radio. ... Kevin Macdonald (born October 28, 1967) is a Scottish documentary film director, best known for One Day in September (2000) and Touching the Void (2003). ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organization that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... For the novel, see The Last King of Scotland. ... Touching the Void is a 2003 documentary film based on the book of the same name by Joe Simpson about Simpsons and Simon Yates disastrous and near fatal attempt to climb the 6,344 metre (20,813 foot) Siula Grande in the Peruvian Andes in 1985. ... Seth Woodbury MacFarlane (born October 26, 1973) is a two-time Emmy-winning American comedian, animator, screenwriter, producer, actor, voice actor, and composer. ... The Smiths, from left to right: Roger, Francine, Stan, Klaus, Hayley, and Steve. ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... Paul Mazursky (born April 25, 1930) is an American actor and film director. ... Sir Ian Murray McKellen, CH, CBE (born 25 May 1939) is an English stage and screen actor, the recipient of the Tony Award and two Oscar nominations. ... Stephen Merchant (born 24 November 1974 in Bristol) is an English Emmy, Golden Globe, British Comedy Award and BAFTA-award winning writer, director, and comedic actor. ... The Office is a British television comedy series, created, written and directed by Ricky Gervais and Stephen Merchant, and first aired in the UK on BBC Two on July 9, 2001. ... For other uses, see George Meyer (disambiguation). ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Warren Mitchell (born 14 January 1926) is an English actor. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Cillian Murphy[1] (born 25 May 1976) is an Irish film and theatre actor. ... Bruce Parry (born March 17, 1969) is a former British Royal Marine instructor who presents the documentary program Tribe (known as Going Tribal in the United States), co-produced by the BBC and the Discovery Channel. ... The Corps of Royal Marines, usually just known as the Royal Marines (RM), are the United Kingdoms amphibious forces and a core component of the countrys Rapid Reaction Force. ... Tribe (UK), also known as Going Tribal (US), is a documentary television series co-produced by the BBC and the Discovery Channel, and hosted by Bruce Parry. ... Julia Phillips (April 7, 1944 – January 1, 2002) was an Academy Award-winning film producer and author. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Sarah Polley (born January 8, 1979) is a Canadian actress, singer, Genie Award-winning film director and Academy Award-nominated screenwriter. ... Fyfe Robertson (19 August 1902 — 4 February 1987) was a Scottish television journalist. ... Griff Rhys Jones (born 16 November 1953) is a British comedian, writer and actor. ... Andy Serkis (born 20 April 1964) is an English actor and director best known for his work with Peter Jackson. ... The Lord of the Rings movie trilogy consists of three live action films, directed by Peter Jackson. ... Don Siegel (October 26, 1912 - April 20, 1991) was an influential American film director. ... Steven Andrew Soderbergh (born January 14, 1963 in Atlanta, Georgia) is an American film producer, screenwriter, cinematographer, editor, and Oscar-winning director. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Traffic is a film directed by Steven Soderbergh that explores the intricacies of the illegal drug trade from a number of perspectives: user, enforcer, politician and trafficker. ... Erin Brockovich is a 2000 movie which dramatizes the story of Erin Brockovichs first fight against the West Coast energy giant PG&E. The film was directed by Steven Soderbergh and featured superstar Julia Roberts in the lead role for which she won the Academy Award for Best Actress. ... Oceans Eleven is a 2001 remake of the 1960 Rat Pack caper film of the same name. ... The correct title of this article is . ... David Robert Starkey (born January 3, 1945) is one of Englands best-known historians, and a specialist in the Tudor period. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... For other uses, see Historian (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Tudor (disambiguation). ... Joseph Michael Straczynski (born July 17, 1954) is an award-winning American writer/producer of television series, novels, short stories, comic books, and radio dramas. ... Babylon 5 is an epic American science fiction television series created, produced, and largely written by J. Michael Straczynski. ... Teller (born Raymond Joseph Teller February 14, 1948) is an American illusionist, comedian and writer best known as the silent half of the comedy magic duo known as Penn & Teller, along with Penn Jillette. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Bullshit! (also known as Penn & Teller: Bullshit!) is an American, Emmy-nominated documentary television series, running since 2003 on the premium cable channel Showtime. ... Kenneth Peacock Tynan (April 2, 1927 - July 26, 1980), was an influential and often controversial British theatre critic and writer. ... Ram Gopal Varma born April 7, 1962) is an Indian film director, writer and film producer from Andhra Pradesh. ... Wynford Vaughan-Thomas (1908-1987) was born Wynford Lewis John Thomas in Swansea in 1908. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... Paul Verhoeven (IPA: [pʌul vɛrhuvən]) (born July 18, 1938 in Amsterdam) is a Dutch film director, screenwriter, and film producer. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organization that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... RoboCop is a 1987 science-fiction, action movie and satire of business-driven capitalism, directed by Paul Verhoeven. ... For other uses, see Total recall (disambiguation). ... Basic Instinct is a 1992 thriller film, directed by Paul Verhoeven and written by Joe Eszterhas. ... For other uses, see Starship Troopers (disambiguation). ... Joss Hill Whedon (born Joseph Hill Whedon[3] on June 23, 1964 in New York) is an Academy Award-nominated American writer, director, executive producer, and creator of the well-known television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Angel, and Firefly. ... Buffyverse is a term coined by fans of Joss Whedons first two television shows to refer to the shared fictional universe in which they are set. ... Gene Wilder (born Jerome Silberman on June 11, 1933) is an American actor who is best known for his role as Willy Wonka, his collaborations with Mel Brooks in Blazing Saddles, The Producers, and Young Frankenstein, and his four movies with Richard Pryor: Silver Streak, Stir Crazy, See No Evil... Willy Wonka is a character in the classic Roald Dahl childrens book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and its sequel Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator. ... Robyn Williams is an Australian science journalist and radio broadcaster who has been interviewer and host of the Science Show on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation since 1975, Ockhams Razor (created 1984) and In Conversation (created 1997). ... Edward Henry Willis, Baron Willis (January 13, 1914[1] - December 22, 1992[1]), commonly known as Ted Willis, was a British television dramatist who was also politically active in support of the Labour Party. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ...


Historians

  • G. E. M. de Ste. Croix (1910–2000): British historian, specializing in examining the classical era from a historical materialist perspective.[311]
  • Constantine Fitzgibbon (1919–1983): Irish-American historian and novelist.[312]
  • George Grote (1794–1871): English classical historian, best known in the field for a major work, the voluminous History of Greece, still read.[313]
  • Robin Lane Fox (1946–): English academic and historian, currently a Fellow of New College, Oxford, Lecturer in Ancient History at Exeter College, Oxford and University Reader in Ancient History.[314]
  • Tony Parker (1923–1996): English oral historian, whose work was dedicated to giving a voice to British and American society's most marginalised figures.[315]


Aardappeleters (The Potato Eaters) by Vincent Van Gogh, 1885. ... Robert Louis Constantine Lee-Dillon Fitzgibbon (Massachusetts 8 June 1919 - Dublin 25 March 1983) was a notable historian and novelist. ... George Grote George Grote (November 17, 1794 - June 18, 1871) was an English classical historian. ... For other uses, see Historian (disambiguation). ... Robin Lane Fox (born 1946) is an English academic and historian, currently a Fellow of New College, Oxford, and University Reader in Ancient History. ... This article is about the French basketball player. ...


Military


Marshal of the Royal Air Force William Sholto Douglas, 1st Baron Douglas of Kirtleside, GCB, MC, DFC, RAF, (December 23, 1893 - October 29, 1969) was a senior figure in the Royal Air Force up to and during World War II. Born in Headington, Oxfordshire he was educated at Tonbridge School... Marshal of the RAF sleeve/shoulder insignia Marshal of the Royal Air Force was the highest rank in the Royal Air Force. ... Badge of a Companion of the Order of the Bath (Military Division) Ribbon of the Order of the Bath The Most Honourable Order of the Bath (formerly The Most Honourable Military Order of the Bath)[1] is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on May 18, 1725. ... The Military Cross (MC) is the third level military decoration awarded to officers and (since 1993) other ranks of the British Army and formerly also to officers of other Commonwealth countries. ... The Distinguished Flying Cross is a military decoration awarded to personnel of the United Kingdoms Royal Air Force and other services, and formerly to officers of other Commonwealth countries, for an act or acts of valour, courage or devotion to duty whilst flying in active operations against the enemy... RAF redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Music

Rimsky-Korsakov


Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x756, 189 KB) Björk at the w:Hurricane Festival Photographer: Zach Klein (http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x756, 189 KB) Björk at the w:Hurricane Festival Photographer: Zach Klein (http://www. ... This article is about the musician. ... Greydon Square is an American hip hop artist. ... Image File history File links NARK.jpg‎ This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less. ... Image File history File links NARK.jpg‎ This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less. ... Nikolai Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov Nikolai Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov (Russian: , Nikolaj Andreevič Rimskij-Korsakov), also Nikolay, Nicolai, and Rimsky-Korsakoff, (March 6 (N.S. March 18), 1844 – June 8 (N.S. June 21) 1908) was a Russian composer, one of five Russian composers known as The Five, and was later a... Roy Bailey (born 20 October 1935, in London), is a British socialist folk singer. ... Socialism is a social and economic system (or the political philosophy advocating such a system) in which the economic means of production are owned and controlled collectively by the people. ... Folk music, in the original sense of the term, is music by and of the people. ... Matthew James Bellamy (born June 9, 1978 in Cambridge, England)[1] is the guitarist, vocalist, and pianist in the alternative/progressive rock group Muse. ... For other uses, see Muse (disambiguation). ... This article is about the musician. ... Isaac Brock (born on July 9, 1975 in Issaquah, Washington) is the lead singer, guitarist, and songwriter for the American indie rock band Modest Mouse, as well as his side project band, Ugly Casanova. ... Modest Mouse is an North-American indie rock band formed in 1993 in Issaquah, Washington by singer/lyricist/guitarist Isaac Brock, drummer Jeremiah Green, bassist Eric Judy, and guitarist Dann Gallucci. ... Geoffrey Burgon (16 July 1941 - ) is a British composer, famous for television and film themes. ... Ferruccio Busoni Ferruccio Busoni (April 1, 1866 – July 27, 1924) was an Italian composer, pianist, music teacher and conductor. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... A pianist is a person who plays the piano. ... A conductor conducting at a ceremony A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... Greydon Square is an American hip hop artist. ... Wayne Michael Coyne (born January 13, 1961[1]) is the lead singer, guitarist, and principal songwriter for the band The Flaming Lips. ... The Flaming Lips (formed in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma in 1983) are an American alternative rock band. ... Justin Currie on stage with Del Amitri at the Guildhall in Southampton, May 16, 2002 Justin Currie (born December 11, 1964 in Glasgow, Scotland, UK) is a British singer and songwriter, best known as the founder member of the successful band Del Amitri and - along with Iain Harvie - is one... The original Del Amitri line-up as seen on the cover of Melody Maker magazine in February 1985 Del Amitri are a British pop-rock guitar band, formed in Glasgow, Scotland in 1982. ... Frederick Albert Theodore Delius CH (January 29, 1862, – June 10, 1934) was an English composer born in Bradford in the West Riding of Yorkshire in the north of England. ... The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order. ... Ani DiFranco (IPA: ) (born Angela Maria Difranco on September 23, 1970) is a singer, guitarist, and songwriter. ... Brian Eno (pronounced IPA: ) born on 15 May 1948 in Woodbridge, Suffolk, England) is an English electronic musician, music theorist and record producer. ... For other uses, see Electronic music (disambiguation). ... Music theory is a field of study that investigates the nature or mechanics of music. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... Ambient music is a musical genre in which sound is more important than notes. ... Fenriz (born Leif Nagell on November 28, 1971), later changed to Gylve Fenris Nagell, is best known as the drummer and lyricist for the two-piece Norwegian black metal band Darkthrone. ... This article is about the musical genre. ... Darkthrone is a prominent Norwegian black metal band formed in 1987. ... Liam Gallagher (born William John Paul Gallagher on September 21, 1972, Burnage, Manchester, England) is an English singer and tambourine player of the band Oasis. ... Oasis are an English rock band that formed in Manchester in 1991. ... Noel Thomas David Gallagher (born May 29, 1967 in Longsight, Manchester, England) is an English songwriter, guitarist and occasional vocalist with the Manchester rock band Oasis. ... Oasis are an English rock band that formed in Manchester in 1991. ... Robert Frederick Xenon Geldof[1], KBE[2], known as Bob Geldof (born 5 October 1951) [3], is an Irish singer, songwriter, actor and political activist. ... Live Aid was a multi-venue rock music concert held on July 13, 1985). ... Official Live8 DVD, released in November 2005 Live 8 was a series of concurrent benefit concerts that took place on 2 July 2005, in the G8 states and in South Africa. ... For the Canadian writer and television journalist, see David Gilmour (writer), for the jazz guitarist see David Gilmore. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic or space rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... Dave Godin (1936-October 15, 2004) was an English fan of American soul music. ... The Verve see A Northern Soul This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Gregory Walter Graffin, Ph. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Bad Religion is a seminal American punk rock band, formed in Southern California in 1980 by Jay Bentley (bass), Greg Graffin (vocals), Brett Gurewitz (guitars) and Jay Ziskrout (drums). ... Zoology (from Greek: ζῴον, zoion, animal; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the biological discipline which involves the study of animals. ... Kathleen Hanna (b. ... Le Tigre (album) Le Tigre (shirt) Le Tigre is a feminist electro post-punk band formed in 1998 by Kathleen Hanna. ... Leoš Janáček in 1928 Leoš Janáček ( ; July 3, 1854 in Hukvaldy, Moravia, then Austrian empire – August 12, 1928 in Ostrava, then Czechoslovakia) was a Czech composer. ... The Glagolitic Mass (also called Slavonic Mass; in Czech Glagolská mše and sometimes Mša glagolskaja) usually refers to a particular composition for soloists, chorus and orchestra by Leoš Janáček. ... Alex Kapranos (born Alexander Paul Kapranos Huntley, March 20, 1972) is an English musician of part Greek descent. ... Franz Ferdinand is the name of: Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, the presumptive heir to the throne of Austria. ... Linton Kwesi Johnson (aka LKJ) (born 24 August 1952, in Chapelton, Jamaica) is a British-based Dub poet. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Lemmy (born Ian Fraser Kilmister on December 24, 1945, also known as Ian Willis, Lemmy Kilmister, and Lemmy von Motörhead), is an English singer and bass guitarist, most famous for being the founding member of the heavy metal band Motörhead. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... A sunburst-colored Fender Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass[1][2]; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played primarily with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... This article is about the genre. ... This article is about the band. ... Till Lindemann (b. ... Industrial metal is a musical genre that draws elements from industrial music and heavy metal music. ... For other uses, see Ramstein. ... == Headline text ==. Emcee LynxAND JAYSHREE SARMA FROM NAIROBI KENYA A DANCER, RJ AND EMCEE FOR SEVERAL SHOWS, HER MOST MEMORABLE ANCHORING JOB WAS IN 2005 FOR uSTAD zAKIR HUSSEIN WORLD RENOWNED TABLA MAESTRO ,, A FORMER ANGELS DANCE MEMBER AND PRESENTER AT EAST FM He uses music to advocate for... Anarchist redirects here. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... Pantheism (Greek: πάν ( pan ) = all and θεός ( theos ) = God) literally means God is All and All is God. It is the view that everything is of an all-encompassing immanent abstract God; or that the universe, or nature, and God are equivalent. ... Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, CBE (b. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... Master of the Queens Music (or Master of the Kings Music) is a prestigious post in the Royal Household of the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. ... George Melly (born: 17 August 1926 in Liverpool, England) is a British jazz and blues singer. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Blues music redirects here. ... Napalm Death are a grindcore/death metal band from Birmingham, England. ... Grindcore, often shortened to grind, is an evolution of crust punk, most commonly associated with death metal, a very different though similarly extreme style of music. ... This article is about the musical genre. ... Nikolai Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov Nikolai Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov (Russian: , Nikolaj Andreevič Rimskij-Korsakov), also Nikolay, Nicolai, and Rimsky-Korsakoff, (March 6 (N.S. March 18), 1844 – June 8 (N.S. June 21) 1908) was a Russian composer, one of five Russian composers known as The Five, and was later a... Scheherazade (Шехерезада in Cyrillic, Šekherezada in transliteration), Op. ... This article is about the American composer. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Rodgers and Hart was the songwriting team consisting of Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart. ... Rodgers (left) and Hammerstein (right), with Irving Berlin (middle) and Helen Tamiris, watching auditions at the St. ... Ned Rorem (born October 23, 1923) is a noted American composer and diarist. ... Eric Sams (1926—Sept. ... Wayne Richard Wells (born November 4, 1965 or 1975), better known by his stage name Wayne Static, is an American musician, and currently the singer, guitarist, keyboardist, and programmer for the industrial metal band Static-X. Wayne Static was born in Muskegon, Michigan and graduated from Western Michigan University. ... Static-X are an industrial metal band from Los Angeles, California, USA. Formed in 1994, they are signed to Warner Bros. ... This article is about the German composer of tone-poems and operas. ... Tracey Thorn (born September 26, 1962, in Brookmans Park, Hertfordshire) is an English pop singer and songwriter. ... Everything but the Girl Is a song composed and written by Tyler Buckkie of Ontario. ... Sir Michael Kemp Tippett, OM (2 January 1905 – 8 January 1998) was one of the foremost English composers of the 20th century. ... The Order of Merit is a British and Commonwealth Order bestowed by the Monarch. ...


Philosophy


Portrait of Diderot by Louis-Michel van Loo, 1767 Denis Diderot (October 5, 1713 – July 31, 1784) was a French philosopher and writer. ... Paul Heinrich Dietrich Baron dHolbach Source: german Wikipedia de:Bild:Paul Heinrich Dietrich Baron dHolbach. ... Paul Heinrich Dietrich Baron dHolbach Source: german Wikipedia de:Bild:Paul Heinrich Dietrich Baron dHolbach. ... Baron dHolbach Paul-Henri Thiry, baron dHolbach (1723 – 1789) was a German-French author, philosopher and encyclopedist. ... Image File history File links Karl_Marx. ... Image File history File links Karl_Marx. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818 – March 14, 1883) was a 19th century philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (532x839, 94 KB) Nietzsche by Walter Kaufmann The Fourth Edition ISBN 0-691-01983-5 Princeton Paperbacks Friedrich Nietzsche 1882 One of five photographies by photographer Gustav Schultze, Naumburg, taken early September 1882. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (532x839, 94 KB) Nietzsche by Walter Kaufmann The Fourth Edition ISBN 0-691-01983-5 Princeton Paperbacks Friedrich Nietzsche 1882 One of five photographies by photographer Gustav Schultze, Naumburg, taken early September 1882. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) (IPA: ) was a nineteenth-century German philosopher and philologist. ... Bertrand Arthur William Russell, 3rd Earl Russell, OM, FRS, (18 May 1872 – 2 February 1970), was a British philosopher, logician, mathematician, advocate for social reform, and pacifist. ... John Anderson (1893-1962) was a Scottish born philosopher who occupied the post of Challis Professor of Philosophy at Sydney University in the years 1927-1958. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... The University of Sydney, established in 1850, is the oldest university in Australia, and it is located in Sydney, the capital city of the state of New South Wales. ... Religious studies is the designation commonly used in the English-speaking world for a multi-disciplinary, secular study of religion that dates to the late 19th century in Europe (and the influential early work of such scholars as Friedrich Max Müller, in England, and Cornelius P. Tiele, in the... The Iowa State University of Science and Technology (ISU) is a public land-grant and space-grant university located in Ames, Iowa, USA. Iowa State has produced a number of astronauts, Nobel laureates, Pulitzer Prize winners and a variety of other notable individuals in their respective fields. ... Alfred Jules Ayer (October 29, 1910 - June 27, 1989), better known as simply A. J. Ayer (and called Freddie by friends), was a British philosopher. ... Logical positivism grew from the discussions of Moritz Schlicks Vienna Circle and Hans Reichenbachs Berlin Circle in the 1920s and 1930s. ... Julian Baggini Julian Baggini is a British philosopher and writer. ... Mikhail Alexandrovich Bakunin (Russian: Михаил Александрович Бакунин, Michel Bakunin on the grave in Bern), (May 18 (30 N.S.), 1814 – June 19 (July 1 N.S.), 1876) was a well-known Russian revolutionary, and often considered one of the “fathers of modern anarchism. Born in the Russian Empire to a family of Russian... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... Anarchist redirects here. ... La Beauvoir redirects here; also see: Beauvoir (disambiguation). ... Simon Blackburn (born 1944) is a British academic philosopher also known for his efforts to popularise philosophy. ... For other uses, see Camus. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... For other uses, see Literature (disambiguation). ... Rudolf Carnap (May 18, 1891, Ronsdorf, Germany – September 14, 1970, Santa Monica, California) was an influential philosopher who was active in central Europe before 1935 and in the United States thereafter. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... Moritz Schlick around 1930 The Vienna Circle (in German: der Wiener Kreis) was a group of philosophers who gathered around Moritz Schlick when he was called to the Vienna University in 1922, organized in a philosophical association named Verein Ernst Mach (Ernst Mach Society). ... Logical positivism grew from the discussions of Moritz Schlicks Vienna Circle and Hans Reichenbachs Berlin Circle in the 1920s and 1930s. ... Robert Todd Carroll (1945-), Ph. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... Sacramento City College (SCC) is a two-year community college located in Sacramento, California, USA (). SCC is part of the Los Rios Community College District and had enrollment of 21,729 for the Fall 2004 semester. ... The Skeptics Dictionary is a web site with a collection of cross-referenced skeptical essays by Robert Todd Carroll, PhD. It primarily exposes claims that its editors consider pseudoscientific (sometimes in a pseudoskeptical fashion though). ... Avram Noam Chomsky (born December 7, 1928) is an American linguist, philosopher, political activist, author, and lecturer. ... “MIT” redirects here. ... Auguste Comte (full name: Isidore Marie Auguste François Xavier Comte; January 17, 1798 - September 5, 1857) was a French thinker who coined the term sociology. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge [1]) is the scientific or systematic study of society, including patterns of social relationships, social interaction, and culture[2]. Areas studied in sociology can range from the analysis of brief contacts between anonymous... André Comte-Sponville (born 1952) is a French philosopher, proponent of atheism and materialism. ... “Condorcet” redirects here. ... Benedetto Croce (February 25, 1866 - November 20, 1952) was an Italian critic, idealist philosopher, and politician. ... Gilles Deleuze (IPA: ), (January 18, 1925 – November 4, 1995) was a French philosopher of the late 20th century. ... Daniel Clement Dennett (born March 28, 1942 in Boston, Massachusetts) is a prominent American philosopher whose research centers on philosophy of mind, philosophy of science and philosophy of biology, particularly as those fields relate to evolutionary biology and cognitive science. ... Cover of Breaking the Spell Breaking the Spell: Religion as a Natural Phenomenon (published 2006) is a book by the American philosopher Daniel C. Dennett, which attempts a scientific analysis of the origins of religion and of its pros and cons. ... Diagoras the Atheist of Melos was a Greek poet and sophist of the 5th century BC. He became an atheist after an incident that happened against him went unpunished by the gods. ... The term ancient Greece refers to the periods of Greek history in Classical Antiquity, lasting ca. ... A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... Sophist redirects here. ... Milos (formerly Melos and before Athenian massacre and recolonization in 416 BC, Malos — Greek, Μήλος — not related to the Modern Greek word μήλο – milo = apple, which has the same spelling excluding the trailing sigma) is a volcanic island in the Aegean Sea. ... Portrait of Diderot by Louis-Michel van Loo, 1767 Denis Diderot (October 5, 1713 – July 31, 1784) was a French philosopher and writer. ... This article is about the 18th-century French encyclopaedia. ... Theodore Ted Michael Drange (b. ... Paul Edwards, born Paul Eisenstein, (September 2, 1923-December 9, 2004) was an Austrian-American moral philosopher. ... This article refers to the philosopher. ... Anthony Clifford Grayling MA, DPhil (Oxon) FRSA (born 3 April 1949) is a British philosopher and author. ... Affiliations: Russell Group, EUA, N8 Group, NWUA, Worldwide Universities Network (WUN), Association of Commonwealth Universities Website: http://www. ... Claude Adrien Helvétius (February 26, 1715 - December 26, 1771) was a French philosopher and litterateur. ... This article discusses utilitarian ethical theory. ... Jeremy Bentham (IPA: ) (26 February [O.S. 15 February 15] 1748) – June 6, 1832) was an English jurist, philosopher, and legal and social reformer. ... Baron dHolbach Paul-Henri Thiry, baron dHolbach (1723 – 1789) was a German-French author, philosopher and encyclopedist. ... The term encyclopedist is usually used for a group of French philosophers who collaborated in the 18th century in the production of the Encyclopédie, under the direction of Denis Diderot. ... For other persons named David Lewis, see David Lewis (disambiguation). ... Peter Lipton Peter Lipton (October 9, 1954 – November 25, 2007) was the Hans Rausing Professor and Head of the Department of History and Philosophy of Science at Cambridge University, and a fellow of Kings College, until his unexpected death in November 2007. ... Philosophy of science is the study of assumptions, foundations, and implications of science, especially in the natural sciences and social sciences. ... Theory of knowledge redirects here: for other uses, see theory of knowledge (disambiguation) Epistemology (from Greek επιστήμη - episteme, knowledge + λόγος, logos) or theory of knowledge is a branch of philosophy concerned with the nature and scope of knowledge. ... For other people named John Mackie, see John Mackie. ... In philosophy, meta-ethics or analytic ethics [1] is the branch of ethics that seeks to understand the nature of ethical properties, and ethical statements, attitudes, and judgments. ... In meta-ethics, moral skepticism is a theory which maintains either that ethical claims are generally false, or else that we cannot sufficiently justify any ethical claims, and must therefore maintain doubt about whether they are true or false. ... Theism is the belief in the existence of one or more divinities or deities. ... Michael L. Martin, Ph. ... For the similarly named institution in Chestnut Hill, see Boston College. ... Harriet Martineau Harriet Martineau (June 12, 1802 - June 27, 1876) was an English writer and philosopher, renowned in her day as a controversial journalist, political economist, abolitionist and life-long feminist. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818 – March 14, 1883) was a 19th century philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ... Das Kapital (Capital, in the English translation) is an extensive treatise on political economy written by Karl Marx in German. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Colin McGinn (born 1950) is a British philosopher currently working at the University of Miami. ... A phrenological mapping of the brain. ... Church of Étrépigny. ... This article is about the sacrament. ... Julien Offray de La Mettrie (December 25, 1709 - November 11, 1751) was a French physician and philosopher, the earliest of the materialist writers of the Enlightenment. ... For other uses, see Doctor. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... This article primarily focuses on the general concepts of matter and existence. ... The word Enlightment redirects here. ... Cognitive science is usually defined as the scientific study either of mind or of intelligence (e. ... John Stuart Mill (20 May 1806 – 8 May 1873), British philosopher, political economist, civil servant and Member of Parliament, was an influential liberal thinker of the 19th century. ... Kai Nielsen is adjunct professor of philosophy at Concordia University in Montreal and professor emeritus of philosophy at the University of Calgary. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: [1]) varies. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... This article is about Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... Arch marking south entrance to campus during the winter. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) (IPA: ) was a nineteenth-century German philosopher and philologist. ... Beyond Good and Evil (German: Jenseits von Gut und Böse), subtitled Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future (Vorspiel einer Philosophie der Zukunft), is a book by the German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, first published in 1886. ... Morality (from the Latin manner, character, proper behavior) has three principal meanings. ... This article concerns secularity, that is, being secular, in various senses. ... Eternal return or sometimes eternal recurrence is a concept originating from ancient Egypt and developed in the teachings of Pythagoras. ... The cover for the first part of the first edition. ... For the novel, see God is Dead (novel). ... The Gay Science [German: Die fröhliche Wissenschaft (la gaya scienza)], is a book written by Friedrich Nietzsche, first published in 1882 and followed by a second edition, which was published after the completion of Thus Spoke Zarathustra and Beyond Good and Evil, in 1887. ... Piergiorgio Odifreddi (Born in Cuneo, July 13, 1950), is an Italian mathematician, logician and afficianado of the history of science, who is also extremely active as a popular science writer and essayist. ... Michel Onfray (born January 1, 1959 in Argentan, Orne, France) is a French philosopher. ... Poster advertising free courses at the Université The Université populaire de Caen (Popular University of Caen) is a free university created in October 2002 by Michel Onfray in the north-western French city of Caen. ... Professor Graham Oppy (born October 6, 1960 ) is an Australian philosopher and Associate Dean of Research at Monash University. ... Robert Menzies Building at the Clayton Campus Monash University is a public university with campuses located in Australia, Malaysia and South Africa. ... Leonard Peikoff circa 1970 Leonard Peikoff (born 1933) is an Objectivist philosopher and author. ... Herman Philipse (b. ... James Rachels (1941-2003) was one of the leading philosophers of the 20th century. ... Bertrand Arthur William Russell, 3rd Earl Russell, OM, FRS, (18 May 1872 – 2 February 1970), was a British philosopher, logician, mathematician, advocate for social reform, and pacifist. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... For other uses, see Literature (disambiguation). ... George Santayana George Santayana (December 16, 1863, Madrid – September 26, 1952, Rome), was a philosopher, essayist, poet, and novelist. ... Jean-Paul Charles Aymard Sartre (June 21, 1905 – April 15, 1980), normally known simply as Jean-Paul Sartre (pronounced: ), was a French existentialist philosopher and pioneer, dramatist and screenwriter, novelist and critic. ... Existentialism is a philosophical movement that posits that individuals create the meaning and essence of their lives, as opposed to deities or authorities creating it for them. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is a person who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... For other uses, see Literature (disambiguation). ... In philosophy, “existence precedes essence”, at the most basic level of understanding, is based on the idea of existence without essence. ... Arthur Schopenhauer (February 22, 1788 – September 21, 1860) was a German philosopher best known for his work The World as Will and Representation. ... Published in 1819, The World as Will and Representation, sometimes translated as The World as Will and Idea (original German title: Die Welt als Wille und Vorstellung), is the central work of Arthur Schopenhauer. ... John Rogers Searle (born July 31, 1932 in Denver, Colorado) is the Slusser Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley, and is noted for contributions to the philosophy of language, philosophy of mind and consciousness, on the characteristics of socially constructed versus physical realities, and on practical reason. ... Sather Tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... For other persons named Peter Singer, see Peter Singer (disambiguation). ... This article discusses utilitarian ethical theory. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... A man holds a monkey with a limb missing by a rope around her neck, a scene epitomizing the idea of animal ownership. ... Bioethics is the ethics of biological science and medicine. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... George H. Smith is a libertarian author. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Western Michigan University (abbr. ... William Lane Craig William Lane Craig (born August 23, 1949) is an American philosopher, theologian, New Testament historian, and Christian apologist. ... Johann Kaspar Schmidt (October 25, 1806 – June 26, 1856), better known as Max Stirner (the nom de plume he adopted from a schoolyard nickname he had acquired as a child because of his high brow Stirn), was a German philosopher, who ranks as one of the literary grandfathers of nihilism... The Ego and Its Own (German: Der Einzige und sein Eigentum; also translated as The Individual and His Property; a literal translation would read The Sole One and His Property) is the main work by German philosopher Max Stirner, published in 1844. ... This article is about Theodorus the Atheist from Cyrene. ... Bernard Arthur Owen Williams (September 21, 1929 – June 10, 2003) was a British philosopher, widely cited as the most important British moral philosopher of his time. ... The British Academy is the United Kingdoms national academy for the humanities and the social sciences. ... Portrait of Sherwin Wine. ... Movement of Humanistic Judaism founded by Rabbi Sherwin Wine. ... Ignosticism is a word coined by Rabbi Sherwin Wine to indicate one of two related views about the existence of God. ... Slavoj Žižek (pronounced: ) (born 21 March 1949) is a Slovenian sociologist, postmodern philosopher, and cultural critic. ... Sociology is the study of the social lives of humans, groups and societies. ... Postmodernity (also called post-modernity or the postmodern condition) is a term used by philosophers, social scientists, art critics and social critics to refer to aspects of contemporary art, culture, economics and social conditions that are the result of the unique features of late 20th century and early 21st century... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... A cultural critic is a critic of a given culture, usually as a whole and typically on a radical basis. ...


Politics and law


Image File history File links Charles_Bradlaugh. ... Image File history File links Charles_Bradlaugh. ... Charles Bradlaugh (26 September 1833 _ 30 January 1891) was a political activist and one of the most famous English atheists of the 19th century. ... Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev[1] (Russian: , IPA: ; born 2 March 1931) is a Russian politician. ... Image File history File links Giuseppe Garibaldi, an Italian soldier. ... Image File history File links Giuseppe Garibaldi, an Italian soldier. ... Giuseppe Garibaldi (July 4, 1807 – June 2, 1882) was an Italian patriot and General of the Risorgimento. ... Drawing of Gilbert Romme Source: [1] URL: [2] Believed This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Drawing of Gilbert Romme Source: [1] URL: [2] Believed This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Drawing of Gilbert Romme Gilbert Romme (March 26, 1750-June 17, 1795) was a French politician. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Stark delivers his response to President George W. Bushs 2005 State of the Union address. ... Guy Aldred (November 5, 1886-October 17, 1963) was an English anarchist communist and a prominent member of the Anti-Parliamentary Communist Federation (APCF). ... The Anti-Parliamentary Communist Federation (APCF) was a communist group in Britain. ... Subhasini Ali is an Indian politician and a member of the Communist Party of India (Marxist). ... Marxism is the political practice and social theory based on the works of Karl Marx, a 19th century philosopher, economist, journalist, and revolutionary, along with Friedrich Engels. ... The All India Democratic Womens Association (in Hindi: अखिल भरतिय जनवादी महिला समिति), is the womens wing of the Communist Party of India (Marxist). ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Speaker of the House of Lords Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist... Nottingham North is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The British Humanist Association is an organisation of the United Kingdom which promotes Humanism. ... The National Secular Society is an organisation of the United Kingdom which promotes secularism. ... Salvador Isabelino Allende Gossens[1] (June 26, 1908 – September 11, 1973) was President of Chile from November 1970 until his death during the coup détat of September 11, 1973. ... William Crawford Anderson (1877 - 25 February 1919) was a British socialist politician. ... The Union of Democratic Control was a British pressure group formed in 1914 to press for a more responsive foreign policy. ... Julio Anguita González (born 1941). ... Clement Richard Attlee, 1st Earl Attlee, KG, OM, CH, PC (3 January 1883 – 8 October 1967) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1945 to 1951. ... The insignia of a knight of the Order of the Garter. ... For other Orders see Order of Merit (disambiguation). ... The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order. ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... NHS redirects here. ... There are three main interpretations of the idea of a welfare state: the provision of welfare services by the state. ... Prominent Maoists International tendencies Parties Related subjects Robert Bruce Bob Avakian (b. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Edward Bibbens Aveling (29 November 1849 – 2 August 1898) was an English Marxist and partner of Eleanor Marx, the daughter of Karl Marx. ... Marxism is the political practice and social theory based on the works of Karl Marx, a 19th century philosopher, economist, journalist, and revolutionary, along with Friedrich Engels. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818 – March 14, 1883) was a 19th century philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ... Eleanor Marx (16th January 1855 – 31st March 1898) was a Marxist author and political activist. ... Uri Avnery (Hebrew: , also transliterated Uri Avneri, born September 10, 1923 in Beckum, Germany as Helmut Ostermann), is a German Jewish-born Israeli journalist, left-wing peace activist, and former Knesset member, who was originally a member of the right-wing Revisionist Zionist movement. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... Left wing redirects here. ... The Israeli peace camp is a self-described collection of movements which claim to strive for peace with the Arab neighbours of Israel (including the Palestinians, Syria and Lebanon) and encourage co-existence with the Arab citizens of Israel. ... Type Unicameral Speaker of the Knesset Dalia Itzik, Kadima since May 4, 2006 Deputy Speaker Majalli Wahabi, Kadima since May 4, 2006 Members 120 Political groups Kadima Labour-Meimad Shas Likud Last elections March 28, 2006 Meeting place Knesset, Jerusalem, Israel Web site www. ... Leo Charles Lynton Blair (1923 - 19??) is the father of Tony Blair, current Prime Minister of Great Britain. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... A prime minister is the most senior minister of cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... Elizabeth Margaret Braddock JP (24 September 1899, Zante Street, Liverpool–13 November 1970), better known as Bessie Braddock, was a British Labour politician. ... A justice of the peace (JP) is a puisne judicial officer appointed by means of a commission to keep the peace. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Charles Bradlaugh (26 September 1833 _ 30 January 1891) was a political activist and one of the most famous English atheists of the 19th century. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the Arrested Development episode, see Public Relations (Arrested Development episode). ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... Douglas Campbell in 2002 Main article: Michigan gubernatorial election, 2006 Douglas Campbell (born March 31, 1959)[1] was a two time (2002 and 2006) candidate for Governor of Michigan. ... Jennifer Granholm during the 2006 campaign Dick DeVos, the GOP candidate for governor. ... Michael Cashman (right) with Ian McKellen at the Gay Rights March on Manchester in protest of Section 28 in 1988. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Colin Robert Challen (born June 12, 1953) British politician. ... The Labour Party is a centre-left or social democratic political party in Britain (see British politics), and one of the United Kingdoms three main political parties. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... Nicholas William Peter Clegg, known as Nick Clegg, (born 7 January 1967) is the British Member of Parliament for Sheffield Hallam and Liberal Democrat Home Affairs Spokesman. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long... Dimitris Christofias (Greek: Δημήτρης Χριστόφιας) is a chubby Cypriot politician who is the General Secretary of AKEL and the President of the House of Representatives (Cypriot Parliament). ... Greek Cypriot refers to the Greek-speaking population of Cyprus. ... Georges Clemenceau, by Nadar. ... Robert Finlayson Cook (28 February 1946 – 6 August 2005) was a politician in the British Labour Party. ... Kirk can mean church in general or The Church of Scotland in particular. ... This article is about the country. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... For the Olympic athlete, see James Connolly (athletics). ... Socialism is a social and economic system (or the political philosophy advocating such a system) in which the economic means of production are owned and controlled collectively by the people. ... Vaso ÄŒubrilović was born in Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1897. ... For the Scottish rock band, see Franz Ferdinand (band). ... Meghnad Jagdishchandra Desai, Baron Desai (born 10 July 1940) is a British economist, writer and Labour politician. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Right Honourable Frank Gordon Dobson (born March 15, 1940) is a British politician and member of Parliament for Holborn and St. ... The Labour Party is a centre-left or social democratic political party in Britain (see British politics), and one of the United Kingdoms three main political parties. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Holborn & St. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Herbert Albert Laurens Fisher (21 March 1865–18 April 1940) was an English historian, educator, and Liberal politician. ... For other Orders see Order of Merit (disambiguation). ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... Donald Findlay QC, (born March 17, 1951 in Cowdenbeath, Fife) is a leading Scottish advocate and a former vice-chairman of Rangers Football Club. ... For information about The Times satire Queens Counsel, see Queens Counsel (comic strip). ... An advocate is one who speaks on behalf of another, especially in a legal context. ... For information about The Times satire Queens Counsel, see Queens Counsel (comic strip). ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Peerage (disambiguation). ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... Michael Mackintosh Foot (born 23 July 1913) is an English politician and writer. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Giuseppe Garibaldi (July 4, 1807 – June 2, 1882) was an Italian patriot and General of the Risorgimento. ... Italian unification, also known as Risorgimento (resurrection), was a historical process by which the Kingdom of Sardinia (ruled by the Savoy dynasty with Turin as its capital) gradually conquered the Italian peninsula, including the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, the Duchy of Modena, the Grand Duchy of Tuscany, the Duchy... Sir George Dashwood Taubman Goldie (May 20, 1846–August 20, 1925) was an English administrator who played a role in the founding of Nigeria. ... The Royal Niger Company was a mercantile company chartered by the British government in the nineteenth century. ... WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw GomuÅ‚ka (February 6, 1905, Krosno – September 1, 1982) was a Polish Communist leader. ... Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev[1] (Russian: , IPA: ; born 2 March 1931) is a Russian politician. ... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the 1957 Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... Roy Sydney George Hattersley, Baron Hattersley, PC (born December 28, 1932) is a British Labour Party politician, published author and journalist from Sheffield, England. ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... The Labour Party is a centre-left or social democratic political party in Britain (see British politics), and one of the United Kingdoms three main political parties. ... William George Hayden AC (born 23 January 1933), Australian politician and 21st Governor-General of Australia, was born in Brisbane, Queensland, the son of an American-born sailor of Irish descent. ... Theodor Herzl, in his middle age. ... This article is about Zionism as a movement, not the History of Israel. ... (Arthur Leslie Noel) Douglas Houghton, Baron Houghton of Sowerby PC CH (August 11, 1898 – May 2, 1996) was a British Labour politician, Houghton was born in Derbyshire and fought in the First World War, survived the horrors of the Battle of the Somme, and secured for himself a post in... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... State atheism is the official promotion of atheism by a government, often accompanied by active suppression of religious belief and practice. ... Robert Hughes, Baron Hughes of Woodside (born January 3, 1932), is a British Labour politician. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Leonilde Iotti, commonly known as Nilde Iotti (April 10, 1920 - December 4, 1999) was an Italian politician, the first woman to became president of the Italian Chamber of Deputies for three consecutive legislatures from 1979 to 1992. ... Mr. ... Arguing against capitalism, Speakers Corner, October 31, 2004 The Socialist Party of Great Britain, also known as the SPGB, is a small Marxist party, which is emphatically not Leninist. ... The Communist Party of Great Britain (CPGB) was the largest communist party in the United Kingdom, though it never became a mass party like the Communist parties of France and Italy. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Peerage (disambiguation). ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... Sir Reginald Fleming Johnston (1874–1938) was a Scottish academic, diplomat and pedagogue and the teacher of Pu Yi, the last emperor of China, and later appointed as commissioner of British-held Weihaiwei. ... Puyi (traditional Chinese: ; simplified Chinese: ) (February 7, 1906–October 17, 1967) of the Manchu Aisin-Gioro ruling family was the last Emperor of China between 1908 and 1924 (ruling as the Xuantong Emperor (宣統皇帝) between 1908 and 1911, and non-ruling emperor between 1911 and 1924), the twelfth emperor of the... For the volcano in Indonesia, see Emperor of China (volcano). ... Weihai (威海; pinyin: wēihǎi, also Weihaiwei) is a seaport city on the Bohai Gulf in north-east Shandong province, China. ... M. Karunanidhi (Tamil: ) or Karunanidhi Muthuvel generally referred to as M.K (Tamil: )and Dr. Kalaingar (கலைஞர்), is the present Chief Minister of Tamil Nadu. ... List of All Chief Ministers of Tamil Nadu See also Tamil Nadu Chief Ministers of India Links Categories: ‪India-related stubs‬ | ‪Government of India‬ | ‪Indian politicians‬ | ‪State political office-holders in India‬ | ‪Tamil Nadu‬ ... Khrushchev redirects here. ... CCCP redirects here. ... Joseph Stalin, first General Secretary The General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (First Secretary in 1953-1966) was the title synonymous with leader of the Soviet Union after Vladimir Lenins death in 1924. ... Oona Tamsyn King (born October 22, 1967, in Sheffield) is a British politician. ... Bethnal Green and Bow is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Neil Gordon Kinnock, Baron Kinnock, PC (born 28 March 1942) is a British politician. ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Leader of the Opposition in the United Kingdom is the politician who leads Her Majestys Most Loyal Opposition. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Term of office from December 23, 1995 until Incumbent Profession Journalist Political party SLD First Lady Jolanta Kwaśniewska Date of birth November 15, 1954 Place of birth Białogard, Poland Date of death Place of death Aleksander Kwaśniewski (pronounced: [alεksandεr kʋaɕɲefskʲi]) is a Polish politician and the current President of... Following are the successive heads of state of Poland. ... Vladimir Lenin Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (Russian: Влади́мир Ильи́ч Ле́нин), original surname Ulyanov (Улья́нов) (April 22 (April 10 (O.S.)), 1870 – January 21, 1924), was a Russian revolutionary, the leader of the Bolshevik party, the first Premier of the Soviet Union, and the founder of the ideology of Leninism. ... Kenneth Robert Livingstone (born 17 June 1945) is the outgoing Mayor of London, a post he has held from its creation in 2000 until 2008. ... This article is about the elected mayor of Greater London. ... Aleksandr Grigoryevich Lukashenko or Alyaksandar Ryhoravich Lukashenka (Belarusian: , Russian: ) (born August 30, 1954 at Kopys, Vitebsk voblast) has been the President of Belarus since 1994. ... Heather Lynn Mac Donald is a conservative author (a fellow at the Manhattan Institute and contributing editor to the New York City Journal) and former lawyer. ... The Manhattan Institute for Policy Research is an influential New York City-based free market think tank established in 1978. ... Angus John Gus Macdonald, Baron Macdonald of Tradeston, CBE, PC (born August 20, 1940), is a British Labour politician. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... John Alston Maxton, Baron Maxton (born May 5, 1936) was a Labour backbench Member of Parliament in the British House of Commons Maxton is a nephew of the former Independent Labour Party leader, James Maxton. ... Violet Georgina Milner (née< Maxse) (1872-1958) was an Edwardian society Lady and, later, editor of the political monthly, National Review. ... The Edwardian period or Edwardian era in the United Kingdom is the period 1901 to 1910, the reign of King Edward VII. It is sometimes extended to include the period to the start of World War I in 1914 or even the end of the war in 1918. ... Not to be confused with the present-day American publication of the same name, National Review was launched in 1883 as a platform for the British Conservative Party. ... MiloÅ¡ević redirects here. ... Anthem:  Serbia() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Slovak, Romanian, Croatian, Rusyn 1 Albanian 2 Demonym Serbian Government Parliamentary Democracy  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica    -  First state 7th century   -  Serbian Kingdom3 1217   -  Serbian Empire 1345   -  Independence lost... Presidential Standard of Serbia The President of Serbia is the head of state of the Republic of Serbia. ... The President of Yugoslavia was Yugoslavias head of state from 1953 to 1991 in SFR Yugoslavia, and from 1992 to 2003 in FR Yugoslavia. ... The Right Honourable John Morley, 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, OM, PC (1838 - 1923) was a British Liberal statesman and writer. ... For other Orders see Order of Merit (disambiguation). ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... Statesman is a respectful term used to refer to politicians, and other notable figures of state. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... Marjorie Mo Mowlam (18 September 1949 – 19 August 2005) was a British politician, Secretary of State for Northern Ireland and Labour Member of Parliament. ... The Secretary of State for Northern Ireland is the British cabinet minister who has responsibility for the government of Northern Ireland. ... Baroness Elaine Murphy of Aldgate is a British politician and a member of the House of Lords. ... “Barack” redirects here. ... Culbert Levy Olson (November 7, 1876 – April 13, 1962) was an American politician and governor of California. ... Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger (left) and Governor Gray Davis (right) with President George W. Bush in 2003 The Governor of California is the highest executive authority in the state government, whose responsibilities include making yearly State of the State addresses to the California State Legislature, submitting the budget, and ensuring that... Marion Phillips (1881-1932) was a Labour politician and Member of Parliament in Britain. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Philip Piratin (15 May 1907 – 10 December 1995), known as Phil Piratin, was a member of the Communist Party of Great Britain and one of their few Members of Parliament. ... The Communist Party of Great Britain (CPGB) was the largest communist party in the United Kingdom, though it never became a mass party like the Communist parties of France and Italy. ... Drawing of Gilbert Romme Gilbert Romme (March 26, 1750-June 17, 1795) was a French politician. ... Manabendra Nath Roy (March 21, 1887 – January 25, 1954) was an Bengali Indian revolutionary, philosoper, political theorist and activist as well as the exponent of the philosophy of Radical Humanism. ... Brian Sedgemore (on right) with the Liberal Democrat leader Charles Kennedy, announcing his defection prior to the 2005 General Election. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Philip Andrew Sawford (born 26 June 1950) is an English politician and former member of Parliament for Kettering. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Kettering is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Hanna Sheehy (May 26, 1877 — April 20, 1946) was born in Kanturk, County Cork, Ireland, a daughter of David Sheehy, Irish Parliamentary Party Westminster MP, who was also the brother of Father Eugene Sheehy, a priest who educated Eamon de Valera in Limerick. ... Suffragette with banner, Washington DC, 1918 The title of suffragette was given to members of the womens suffrage movement in the United Kingdom and United States, particularly in the years prior to World War I. The name was the Womens Social and Political Union (founded in 1903). ... Dr. Owen Lancelot Sheehy-Skeffington (19th May 1909 – 7th June 1970) was an Irish university lecturer and Senator. ... Bhagat Singh (Punjabi: ਭਗਤ ਸਿੰਘ بھگت سنگھ, IPA: ) (September 27, 1907[1] –March 23, 1931) was an Indian freedom fighter, considered to be one of the most influential revolutionaries of the Indian independence movement. ... Josef Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili (Georgian: , Ioseb Besarionis Dze Jughashvili; Russian: , Iosif Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili) (December 18 [O.S. December 6] 1878[1] – March 5, 1953), better known by his adopted name, Joseph Stalin (alternatively transliterated Josef Stalin), was General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Unions Central Committee from... Stark delivers his response to President George W. Bushs 2005 State of the Union address. ... For information about the band, see Atheist (band). ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      Peter Gary Tatchell (born 25 January 1952) is an Australian-British human rights activist, who is best known internationally for his attempts to perform a citizens... William Thompson (1775 Cork City, - March 28, 1833 Rosscarbery, Co. ... During the Vietnam War, Xuan Thuy was a representative of the North Vietnamese government to the peace talks with the United States in Paris. ... Henry Alfred Kissinger (born Heinz Alfred Kissinger on May 27, 1923) is a German-born American politician, and 1973 Nobel Peace Prize laureate. ... // Born in Genoa to a middle class family, Togliatti began his political life in the Italian Socialist Party prior to the First World War. ... The Partito Comunista Italiano (PCI) or Italian Communist Party emerged as Partito Comunista dItalia or Communist Party of Italy from a secession by the Leninist comunisti puri tendency from the Italian Socialist Party (PSI) during that bodys congress on 21 January 1921 at Livorno. ... Leon Trotsky (Russian:  , Lev Davidovich Trotsky, also transliterated Leo, Lyev, Trotskii, Trotski, Trotskij, Trockij and Trotzky) (November 7 [O.S. October 26] 1879 – August 21, 1940), born Lev Davidovich Bronstein (), was a Ukrainian-born Bolshevik revolutionary and Marxist theorist. ... Bengt Westerberg (born August 23, 1943 in Södertälje, Stockholm County) is a Swedish politician, the leader of the Liberal Peoples Party from 1983 to 1995. ... The Liberal Party of Sweden (in Swedish: Folkpartiet liberalerna, abbreviated fp, meaning Peoples Party the Liberals) is a political party in Sweden. ... A vice president is an officer in government or business who is next in rank below a president. ... The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRCS) is an international humanitarian organisation, often better known as the Red Cross or the Red Crescent. ... For other uses, see Geneva (disambiguation). ... Phillip Whitehead , MA (May 30, 1937 – December 31, 2005) was a British Labour politician, television producer and writer. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Alan Wolfe is a political scientist and author. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... Sociology is the study of the social lives of humans, groups and societies. ... The Boisi Centers goal is to create opportunities for discussion of the intersection of religion and American public life. ... Mao redirects here. ... State atheism is the official promotion of atheism by a government, often accompanied by active suppression of religious belief and practice. ... Kim Jong-il (also written as Kim Jong Il) (born February 16, 1942) is the leader of North Korea. ...


Science and technology



Photo by his wife, Lalla Ward, taken from his website. ... Photo by his wife, Lalla Ward, taken from his website. ... Clinton Richard Dawkins, FRS (born March 26, 1941) is a British ethologist, evolutionary biologist and popular science writer who holds the Charles Simonyi Chair for the Public Understanding of Science at the University of Oxford. ... Image of Paul Dirac File links The following pages link to this file: Paul Dirac ... Image of Paul Dirac File links The following pages link to this file: Paul Dirac ... Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac, OM, FRS (IPA: [dɪræk]) (August 8, 1902 – October 20, 1984) was a British theoretical physicist and a founder of the field of quantum physics. ... John Maynard Smith. ... John Maynard Smith. ... Professor John Maynard Smith[1], F.R.S. (6 January 1920 – 19 April 2004) was a British evolutionary biologist and geneticist. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Linus Carl Pauling (February 28, 1901 – August 19, 1994) was an American scientist, peace activist, author and educator of German ancestry. ... Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 370 KB)Alan Turing memorial statue in Sackville Park, 18 Sep 2004 Photograph taken by Lmno 18 September 2004 with Canon IXUS File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 370 KB)Alan Turing memorial statue in Sackville Park, 18 Sep 2004 Photograph taken by Lmno 18 September 2004 with Canon IXUS File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Alan Mathison Turing, OBE, FRS (23 June 1912 – 7 June 1954) was an English mathematician, logician, and cryptographer. ... Image File history File linksMetadata James_Watson. ... Image File history File linksMetadata James_Watson. ... For other people named James Watson, see James Watson (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Steven-weinberg. ... Image File history File links Steven-weinberg. ... Steven Weinberg (born May 3, 1933) is an American physicist. ... Peter William Atkins (b. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: [1]) varies. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... and of the Lincoln College College name Lincoln College Named after Richard Fleming, Bishop of Lincoln Established 1427 Sister college Downing College, Cambridge Rector Prof. ... Julius Axelrod won a Nobel Prize in 1970 Julius Axelrod (May 30, 1912 – December 29, 2004) was an influential American biochemist. ... Emil Adolf von Behring was the first person to receive the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, for his work on the treatment of diphtheria. ... Wöhler observes the synthesis of urea. ... tyrosine is the precursor of catecholamines epinephrine norepinephrine dopamine Synthesis Catecholamines are chemical compounds derived from the amino acid tyrosine containing catechol and amine groups. ... Chemical structure of D-aspartic acid, a common amino acid neurotransmitter. ... The pineal gland (also called the pineal body or epiphysis) is a small endocrine gland in the brain. ... The Fellowship of the Royal Society was founded in 1660. ... The Geologist by Carl Spitzweg A geologist is a contributor to the science of geology, studying the physical structure and processes of the Earth and planets of the solar system (see planetary geology). ... The Right Honourable Patrick Maynard Stuart Blackett, Baron Blackett, OM, CH, FRS (18 November 1897–13 July 1974) was a British experimental physicist known for his work on cloud chambers, cosmic rays, and paleomagnetism. ... For other Orders see Order of Merit (disambiguation). ... The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order. ... The Fellowship of the Royal Society was founded in 1660. ... Hannes Alfvén (1908–1995) accepting the Nobel Prize for his work on magnetohydrodynamics [1]. List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... Experimental physics is the part of physics that deals with experiments and observations pertaining to natural/physical phenomena, as opposed to theoretical physics. ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... Discovery of the positron in 1932 by Carl D. Anderson in a cloud chamber The cloud chamber, also known as the Wilson chamber, is used for detecting particles of ionizing radiation. ... Cosmic rays can loosely be defined as energetic particles originating outside of the Earth. ... Paleomagnetism refers to the study of the record of the Earths magnetic field preserved in various magnetic minerals through time. ... Susan Jane Blackmore (born July 29, 1951) is a British freelance writer, lecturer, and broadcaster, perhaps best known for her book The Meme Machine. ... A psychologist is an expert in psychology, the systematic investigation of the human body, including behavior, cognition, and affect. ... Memetics is an approach to evolutionary models of information transfer based on the concept of the meme. ... The Meme Machine (1999) is a popular science book by psychologist Susan Blackmore on the subject of memes. ... Professor Sir Hermann Bondi, KCB , FRS (1 November 1919–10 September 2005) was a British (formerly Austrian) mathematician and cosmologist. ... This article is about the physics subject. ... For alternative meanings see steady state (disambiguation). ... For a generally accessible and less technical introduction to the topic, see Introduction to general relativity. ... Paul Delos Boyer (born July 31, 1918) is an American biochemist. ... A biochemist is a scientist trained and dedicated to producing results in the discipline of biochemistry. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Sean M. Carroll (b. ... Cosmology is the study of the large-scale structure and history of the universe. ... For a generally accessible and less technical introduction to the topic, see Introduction to general relativity. ... Chandrasekhar redirects here. ... For an article on American Indians see Native Americans. ... An astrophysicist is a person whose profession is astrophysics. ... Hannes Alfvén (1908–1995) accepting the Nobel Prize for his work on magnetohydrodynamics [1]. List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... William Kingdon Clifford William Kingdon Clifford, FRS (May 4, 1845 - March 3, 1879) was an English mathematician who also wrote a fair bit on philosophy. ... The Fellowship of the Royal Society was founded in 1660. ... A geometric algebra is a multilinear algebra with a geometric interpretation. ... Gravity redirects here. ... Frank Close OBE is currently Professor of Physics at the University of Oxford. ... Obe can mean: Obe, in Afghanistan Ebenezer Obe, a Nigerian musician. ... Francis Harry Compton Crick OM FRS (8 June 1916 – 28 July 2004), (Ph. ... The structure of part of a DNA double helix Deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, is a nucleic acid molecule that contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... Sir Howard Dalton FRS is a British microbiologist. ... The Fellowship of the Royal Society was founded in 1660. ... A Microbiologist is a biologist that studies the field of microbiology. ... The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) is the United Kingdom government department responsible for environmental protection, food production and standards, agriculture, fisheries and rural communities in England. ... Clinton Richard Dawkins, FRS (born March 26, 1941) is a British ethologist, evolutionary biologist and popular science writer who holds the Charles Simonyi Chair for the Public Understanding of Science at the University of Oxford. ... Zoology (Greek zoon = animal and logos = word) is the biological discipline which involves the study of animals. ... A biologist is a scientist devoted to and producing results in biology through the study of organisms. ... The Selfish Gene is a controversial book by Richard Dawkins published in 1976. ... For other uses, see Meme (disambiguation). ... The God Delusion is a book by British biologist Richard Dawkins, Professor for the Public Understanding of Science at the University of Oxford. ... Arnaud Denjoy (5 January 1884 – 21 January 1974) was a French mathematician. ... Harmonic analysis is the branch of mathematics that studies the representation of functions or signals as the superposition of basic waves. ... In mathematics, a differential equation is an equation in which the derivatives of a function appear as variables. ... Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac, OM, FRS (IPA: [dɪræk]) (August 8, 1902 – October 20, 1984) was a British theoretical physicist and a founder of the field of quantum physics. ... Theoretical physics attempts to understand the world by making a model of reality, used for rationalizing, explaining, predicting physical phenomena through a physical theory. There are three types of theories in physics; mainstream theories, proposed theories and fringe theories. ... For a generally accessible and less technical introduction to the topic, see Introduction to quantum mechanics. ... For other senses of this term, see antimatter (disambiguation). ... Hannes Alfvén (1908–1995) accepting the Nobel Prize for his work on magnetohydrodynamics [1]. List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Leon Festinger Leon Festinger (May 8, 1919 – February 11, 1989) was a social psychologist from New York City who became famous for his Theory of Cognitive Dissonance (Festinger, 1957). ... The scope of social psychological research. ... Cognitive dissonance is a psychological state that describes the uncomfortable feeling between what one holds to be true and what one knows to be true. ... This article is about the physicist. ... Theoretical physics attempts to understand the world by making a model of reality, used for rationalizing, explaining, predicting physical phenomena through a physical theory. There are three types of theories in physics; mainstream theories, proposed theories and fringe theories. ... Quantum electrodynamics (QED) is a relativistic quantum field theory of electrodynamics. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Hannes Alfvén (1908–1995) accepting the Nobel Prize for his work on magnetohydrodynamics [1]. List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... Sigmund Freud (IPA: ), born Sigismund Schlomo Freud (May 6, 1856 – September 23, 1939), was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist who founded the psychoanalytic school of psychology. ... Erich Fromm Erich Pinchas Fromm (March 23, 1900 – March 18, 1980) was an internationally renowned Jewish-German-American social psychologist, psychoanalyst, and humanistic philosopher. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... A stereotypical German The Germans (German: die Deutschen), or the German people, are a nation in the meaning an ethnos (in German: Volk), defined more by a sense of sharing a common German culture and having a German mother tongue, than by citizenship or by being subjects to any particular... Hyphenated Americans are Americans who are referred to with a first word indicating an origin or ancestry in a foreign country and a second term (separated from the first with a hyphen) being American (e. ... The scope of social psychological research. ... For the specific belief system, see Humanism (life stance). ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... For related articles, see Critical theory and Critical theory (Frankfurt School) Max Horkheimer (front left), Theodor Adorno (front right), and Jürgen Habermas in the background, right, in 1965 at Heidelberg The Frankfurt School is a school of neo-Marxist critical theory, social research, and philosophy. ... In the humanities and social sciences, critical theory has two quite different meanings with different origins and histories, one originating in social theory and the other in literary criticism. ... Arne Christer Fuglesang (born March 18, 1957) is the first and only Swedish astronaut. ... For other uses, see Astronaut (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... Vitaly Lazarevich Ginzburg (Russian: ; born October 4, 1916 in Moscow) is a Russian (formerly Soviet) theoretical physicist and astrophysicist, a member of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and the successor to Igor Tamm as head of the Department of Theoretical Physics of Academys physics institute (FIAN). ... Theoretical physics employs mathematical models and abstractions of physics in an attempt to explain experimental data taken of the natural world. ... Spiral Galaxy ESO 269-57 Astrophysics is the branch of astronomy that deals with the physics of the universe, including the physical properties (luminosity, density, temperature, and chemical composition) of celestial objects such as stars, galaxies, and the interstellar medium, as well as their interactions. ... Hannes Alfvén (1908–1995) accepting the Nobel Prize for his work on magnetohydrodynamics [1]. List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... Past winners of the Wolf Prize in Physics: 1978 Chien-Shiung Wu 1979 George Eugene Uhlenbeck, Giuseppe Occhialini 1980 Michael E. Fisher, Leo P. Kadanoff, Kenneth G. Wilson 1981 Freeman J. Dyson, Gerard t Hooft, Victor F. Weisskopf 1982 Leon M. Lederman, Martin M. Perl 1983/4 Erwin L. Hahn... Jonathan Haidt is associate professor of psychology at the University of Virginia. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... Edward Thomas Hall (10 May 1924 - 11 August 2001, also known as Professor Teddy Hall) was a scientist. ... The portrait painted by John Cooke in 1915. ... The first photo of the Shroud of Turin, taken in 1898, had the surprising feature that the image on the negative was clearer than the positive image. ... The Royal Society of Edinburghs Building on the corner of George St. ... The Scottish Enlightenment was a period of intellectual ferment in Scotland, running from approximately 1740 to 1800. ... Godfrey Harold Hardy FRS (February 7, 1877 Cranleigh, Surrey, England [1] – December 1, 1947 Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England [2]) was a prominent English mathematician, known for his achievements in number theory and mathematical analysis. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Leonhard Euler, considered one of the greatest mathematicians of all time A mathematician is a person whose primary area of study and research is the field of mathematics. ... Number theory is the branch of pure mathematics concerned with the properties of numbers in general, and integers in particular, as well as the wider classes of problems that arise from their study. ... Analysis has its beginnings in the rigorous formulation of calculus. ... Peter Ware Higgs (born May 29, 1929), FRSE, FRS, until recently held a personal chair in theoretical physics at the University of Edinburgh and is now an emeritus professor. ... The Dirac Medal is a rather prestigious award for physics, named after Thomas Bradley didnt you know Paul Dirac. ... The Higgs boson, also known as the God particle, is a hypothetical massive scalar elementary particle predicted to exist by the Standard Model of particle physics. ... Professor Nicholas Keynes Humphrey (b. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Sir Julian Sorell Huxley, FRS (June 22, 1887 – February 14, 1975) was a English biologist, author, Humanist and internationalist, known for his popularisations of science in books and lectures. ... The Fellowship of the Royal Society was founded in 1660. ... The modern evolutionary synthesis (often referred to simply as the new synthesis, the modern synthesis, the evolutionary synthesis, neo-Darwinian synthesis or neo-Darwinism), generally denotes the integration of Charles Darwins theory of the evolution of species by natural selection, Gregor Mendels theory of genetics as the basis... The Zoological Society of London (sometimes known by the abbreviation ZSL) is a learned society founded in April 1826 by Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles, Lord Auckland, Sir Humphry Davy, Joseph Sabine, Nicholas Aylward Vigors and other eminent naturalists. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... Note: After losing a court case in 2002 on the use of the initials WWF, the organization previously known as the World Wrestling Federation has rebranded itself as World Wrestling Entertainment, or WWE. WWF - The Conservation Organization was formerly known as World Wildlife Fund and Worldwide Fund for Nature. ... Frédéric Joliot-Curie Jean Frédéric Joliot-Curie né Joliot (March 19, 1900 – August 14, 1958) was a French physicist and Nobel laureate. ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Harold Kroto Sir Harold Walter Kroto, FRS (born 7 October 1939) is an English chemist and one of the winners of the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Alfred Charles Kinsey (June 23, 1894 – August 25, 1956), was an American biologist and professor of entomology and zoology who in 1947 founded the Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction at Indiana University, now called the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction. ... Richard Erskine Frere Leakey (born 19 December 1944 in Nairobi, Kenya), is a Kenyan paleontologist and conservationist. ... Sir John Leslie (April 10, 1766 - November 3, 1832) was a Scottish mathematician and physicist best remembered for his research into heat Born in Largo, Fife, Leslie gave the first modern account of capillary action in 1802 and froze water using an air-pump in 1810, the first artificial production... For other uses, see Heat (disambiguation) In physics, heat, symbolized by Q, is energy transferred from one body or system to another due to a difference in temperature. ... Capillary Flow Experiment to investigate capillary flows and phenomena onboard the International Space Station Capillary action, capillarity, capillary motion, or wicking is the ability of a substance to draw another substance into it. ... Christopher Longuet-Higgins, (April 11, 1923 - March 27, 2004) was not a scientist in two distinct areas - theoretical chemistry and cognitive science - and also an amateur musician, keen to advance the scientific understanding of the art. ... The Fellowship of the Royal Society was founded in 1660. ... Theoretical chemistry involves the use of physics to explain or predict chemical phenomena. ... Cognitive science is usually defined as the scientific study either of mind or of intelligence (e. ... Professor John Maynard Smith[1], F.R.S. (6 January 1920 – 19 April 2004) was a British evolutionary biologist and geneticist. ... A geneticist is a scientist who studies genetics, the science of heredity and variation of organisms. ... For other uses, see Game theory (disambiguation) and Game (disambiguation). ... The evolution of sex is a major puzzle in modern evolutionary biology. ... Within evolutionary biology, signalling theory refers to the scientific theory around how organisms signal their condition to others. ... Ernst Mayr Ernst Walter Mayr (July 5, 1904, Kempten, Germany – February 3, 2005, Bedford, Massachusetts U.S.), was one of the 20th centurys leading evolutionary biologists. ... Ornithology (from the Greek ornitha = chicken and logos = word/science) is the branch of biology concerned with the scientific study of birds. ... A biologist is a scientist devoted to and producing results in biology through the study of organisms. ... Sir Peter Brian Medawar (February 28, 1915 – October 2, 1987) was a Brazilian-born English scientist best known for his work on how the immune system rejects or accepts organ transplants. ... Emil Adolf von Behring was the first person to receive the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, for his work on the treatment of diphtheria. ... A scanning electron microscope image of a single neutrophil (yellow), engulfing anthrax bacteria (orange). ... This article is about the British physician, theatre and opera director, and television presenter; for other people named Jonathan Miller, see Jonathan Miller (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Doctor. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... A theatre director is a principal in the theatre field who oversees and orchestrates the mounting of a play by unifying various endeavors and aspects of production. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... The title of music director is used by many symphony orchestras to designate the primary conductor and artistic leader of the orchestra. ... A television presenter is a British term for a person who introduces or hosts television programmes. ... Peter Dennis Mitchell (September 29, 1920–April 10, 1992)[1] was a British biochemist who was awarded the 1978 Nobel Prize for Chemistry for his discovery of the chemiosmotic mechanism of ATP synthesis. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... See also Jacques-Louis Monod, French-born composer and cousin of Jacques Monod. ... A biologist is a scientist devoted to and producing results in biology through the study of organisms. ... Emil Adolf von Behring was the first person to receive the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, for his work on the treatment of diphtheria. ... Dr Desmond Morris (born 24 January 1928 in the village of Purton, UK) is most famous for his work as a zoologist and ethologist. ... Zoology (Greek zoon = animal and logos = word) is the biological discipline which involves the study of animals. ... Ethology is the scientific study of animal behaviour (particularly of social animals such as primates and canids), and is a branch of zoology. ... Desmond Morris (born January 24th, 1928) is most famous for his work as a zoologist and ethologist. ... The Human Zoo is a book written by the British zoologist Desmond Morris, published in 1969. ... Johann Friedrich Theodor Müller PhD (March 31, 1821–May 21, 1897), always known as Fritz, was a German biologist who emigrated to Brazil, where he studied the natural history of the Amazon rainforest and was an early advocate of evolutionary theory. ... This article is about evolution in biology. ... Hermann Joseph H. J. Muller (December 21, 1890 – April 5, 1967) was a Nobel Prize-winning American geneticist and educator, best known for his work on the physiological and genetic effects of radiation (X-ray mutagenesis) as well as his outspoken political beliefs. ... A geneticist is a scientist who studies genetics, the science of heredity and variation of organisms. ... For other uses, see Radiation (disambiguation). ... Emil Adolf von Behring was the first person to receive the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, for his work on the treatment of diphtheria. ... Paul Zachary PZ Myers (born March 9, 1957) is an American biology professor at the University of Minnesota, Morris and a science blogger via his blog, Pharyngula. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Pharyngula is a weblog run by PZ Myers, listed by the science journal Nature as the top-ranked blog written by a scientist. ... Sir Paul M. Nurse, FRS, (b. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... Linus Carl Pauling (February 28, 1901 – August 19, 1994) was an American scientist, peace activist, author and educator of German ancestry. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Gari Melchers, Mural of Peace, 1896. ... John Allen Paulos is a professor of mathematics at Temple University in Philadelphia who has gained fame as a writer and speaker, usually on the topic of public ignorance about mathematics. ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... For the private Christian university in Tennessee, see Tennessee Temple University. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... For other uses, see Pavlov (disambiguation). ... Emil Adolf von Behring was the first person to receive the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, for his work on the treatment of diphtheria. ... Classical Conditioning (also Pavlovian or Respondent Conditioning) is a form of associative learning that was first demonstrated by Ivan Pavlov. ... Dr. Massimo Pigliucci received his doctorate in genetics at the University of Ferrara, Italy, and PhD in botany from the University of Connecticut. ... State University of New York at Stony Brook, commonly known as Stony Brook University, is a public research university located in Stony Brook, New York, United States (on the north side of Long Island, about 55 miles (89 km) east of Manhattan, New York). ... Steven Pinker Steven Arthur Pinker (born September 18, 1954) is a prominent Canadian-born American experimental psychologist, cognitive scientist, and popular science writer known for his spirited and wide-ranging advocacy of evolutionary psychology and the computational theory of mind. ... Norman Wingate Pirie FRS (1 July 1907 - 29 March 1997)-was a British biochemist and virologist who, along with Frederick Bawden, discovered that a virus can be crystallized by isolating tobacco mosaic virus in 1936. ... The Fellowship of the Royal Society was founded in 1660. ... A biochemist is a scientist trained and dedicated to producing results in the discipline of biochemistry. ... Virology is the study of viruses and their properties. ... The structure of part of a DNA double helix Deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, is a nucleic acid molecule that contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms. ... For other uses, see RNA (disambiguation). ... Frank Plumpton Ramsey (February 22, 1903 – January 19, 1930) was a British mathematician who, in addition to mathematics, made significant contributions in philosophy and economics. ... Leonhard Euler, considered one of the greatest mathematicians of all time A mathematician is a person whose primary area of study and research is the field of mathematics. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... Richard J. Roberts (b. ... A biochemist is a scientist trained and dedicated to producing results in the discipline of biochemistry. ... Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. ... Emil Adolf von Behring was the first person to receive the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, for his work on the treatment of diphtheria. ... Diagram of the location of introns and exons within a gene. ... Kingdoms Animalia - Animals Fungi Plantae - Plants Chromalveolata Protista Alternative phylogeny Unikonta Opisthokonta Metazoa Choanozoa Eumycota Amoebozoa Bikonta Apusozoa Cabozoa Rhizaria Excavata Corticata Archaeplastida Chromalveolata Animals, plants, fungi, and protists are eukaryotes (IPA: ), organisms whose cells are organized into complex structures by internal membranes and a cytoskeleton. ... The structure of part of a DNA double helix Deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, is a nucleic acid molecule that contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms. ... Steven P. Rose (born July 4, 1938 in London, United Kingdom) is a Professor of Biology and Neurobiology at the Open University and University of London. ... Affiliations Alliance of Non-Aligned Universities, Association of Commonwealth Universities, European Association of Distance Teaching Universities, Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools Website http://www. ... Website http://www. ... Oliver Sacks in 2005. ... This article is about a 1990 film. ... Insert non-formatted text here Carl Edward Sagan (November 9, 1934 – December 20, 1996) was an American astronomer and astrobiologist and a highly successful popularizer of astronomy, astrophysics, and other natural sciences. ... The DNA structure might not be the only nucleic acid in the universe capable of supporting life[1] Astrobiology (from Greek: ἀστρο, astro, constellation; βίος, bios, life; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the interdisciplinary study of life in space, combining aspects of astronomy, biology and geology. ... This article is about the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence. ... Robert Maurice Sapolsky (b. ... Stanford redirects here. ... Amartya Sen Amartya Kumar Sen (अमर्त्‍य कुमार सेन) (born November 3, 1933) is a Bengali economist best known for his work on famine, Human development theory, welfare economics, and the underlying mechanisms of poverty. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... Claude Shannon Claude Elwood Shannon (April 30, 1916 – February 24, 2001), an American electrical engineer and mathematician, has been called the father of information theory, and was the founder of practical digital circuit design theory. ... Michael Smith, CC, OBC (April 26, 1932 – October 4, 2000) was a British-born Canadian biochemist who was the 1993 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry. ... A biochemist is a scientist trained and dedicated to producing results in the discipline of biochemistry. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Richard Matthew Stallman (born March 16, 1953), often abbreviated rms,[2] is an American software freedom activist, hacker,[3] and software developer. ... This article is about free software as defined by the Free Software Foundation. ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action to bring about social or political change. ... This article is about computer hacking. ... For other uses, see Software developer (disambiguation). ... Victor J. Stenger (born January 29, 1935) is emeritus professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Hawaii and adjunct professor of philosophy at the University of Colorado. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ... This article is about the University of Hawaii system. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... The University of Colorado at Boulder (CU-Boulder, UCB officially[3]; Colorado and CU colloquially) is the flagship university of the University of Colorado System in Boulder, Colorado. ... Leonard Susskind (born 1940[1]) is the Felix Bloch professor of theoretical physics at Stanford University in the field of string theory and quantum field theory. ... Theoretical physics attempts to understand the world by making a model of reality, used for rationalizing, explaining, predicting physical phenomena through a physical theory. There are three types of theories in physics; mainstream theories, proposed theories and fringe theories. ... Superstring theory is an attempt to explain all of the particles and fundamental forces of nature in one theory by modeling them as vibrations of tiny supersymmetric strings. ... Theoretical physics employs mathematical models and abstractions of physics in an attempt to explain experimental data taken of the natural world. ... Stanford redirects here. ... Raymond Tallis is a Professor of Geriatric Medicine at the University of Manchester. ... Gerontology is the study of the elderly, and of the aging process itself. ... Linus Benedict Torvalds   (born December 28, 1969 in Helsinki, Finland) is a Finnish software engineer best known for initiating the development of the Linux kernel. ... Software engineering (SE) is the profession concerned with specifying, designing, developing and maintaining software applications by applying technologies and practices from computer science, project management, and other fields. ... The Linux kernel is a Unix-like operating system kernel. ... Alan Mathison Turing, OBE, FRS (23 June 1912 – 7 June 1954) was an English mathematician, logician, and cryptographer. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Leonhard Euler, considered one of the greatest mathematicians of all time A mathematician is a person whose primary area of study and research is the field of mathematics. ... A logician is a philosopher, mathematician, or other whose topic of scholarly study is logic. ... Pre-19th century Leone Battista Alberti, polymath/universal genius, inventor of polyalphabetic substitution (see frequency analysis for the significance of this -- missed by most for a long time and dumbed down in the Vigenère cipher), and what may have been the first mechanical encryption aid. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... The A.M. Turing Award is given annually by the Association for Computing Machinery to a person selected for contributions of a technical nature made to the computing community. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... Matthew Turner (d. ... W. Grey Walter (February 19, 1910 - May 6, 1977) was a neurophysiologist and robotician. ... Neurophysiology is a part of physiology as a science, which is concerned with the study of the nervous system. ... Electroencephalography is the neurophysiologic exploration of the electrical activity of the brain by the application of electrodes to the scalp. ... ASIMO, a humanoid robot manufactured by Honda. ... For other people named James Watson, see James Watson (disambiguation). ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... The structure of part of a DNA double helix Deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, is a nucleic acid molecule that contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms. ... Steven Weinberg (born May 3, 1933) is an American physicist. ... Theoretical physics attempts to understand the world by making a model of reality, used for rationalizing, explaining, predicting physical phenomena through a physical theory. There are three types of theories in physics; mainstream theories, proposed theories and fringe theories. ... Hannes Alfvén (1908–1995) accepting the Nobel Prize for his work on magnetohydrodynamics [1]. List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... This box:      Electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field: a field which exerts a force on particles that possess the property of electric charge, and is in turn affected by the presence and motion of those particles. ... The weak nuclear force or weak interaction is one of the four fundamental forces of nature. ... In physics, the electroweak theory presents a unified description of two of the four fundamental forces of nature: electromagnetism and the weak nuclear force. ... David Sloan Wilson (1949- ) is an American evolutionary biologist. ... Evolutionary biology is a subfield of biology concerned with the origin and descent of species, as well as their change over time, i. ... Sloan Wilson (8 May 1920 - 25 May 2003) was an American author. ... In evolutionary biology, group selection refers to the idea that alleles can become fixed or spread in a population because of the benefits they bestow on groups, regardless of the fitness of individuals within that group. ... Lewis Wolpert Lewis Wolpert CBE FRS FRSL (born October 19, 1929) is a developmental biologist, author, and broadcaster. ... Coimbatore   (Tamil: ), also known as Kovai (Tamil: ), is a major industrial city in India. ... The Fellowship of the Royal Society was founded in 1660. ... The Royal Society of Literature is the senior literary organisation in Britain. ... Views of a Foetus in the Womb, Leonardo da Vinci, ca. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... Note: broadcasting is also the old term for hand sowing. ... Stephen Gary Woz Wozniak (born August 11, 1950 in San José, California) is an American computer engineer and the co-founder of Apple Computer (now Apple Inc. ... Apple Inc. ... Elizur Wright (1804-1885) is sometimes called the father of life insurance, In 1829, he became Professor of Mathematics at Western Reserve College in Ohio. ... Leonhard Euler, considered one of the greatest mathematicians of all time A mathematician is a person whose primary area of study and research is the field of mathematics. ... This article is about the abolition of slavery. ... 2003 US mortality table, Table 1, Page 1 In actuarial science, a life table (also called a mortality table or actuarial table) is a table which shows, for a person at each age, what the probability is that they die before their next birthday. ... External links National Academy of Sciences biography Categories: People stubs | 1908 births | 2002 deaths | Manhattan Project | Physicists ... Theoretical physics attempts to understand the world by making a model of reality, used for rationalizing, explaining, predicting physical phenomena through a physical theory. There are three types of theories in physics; mainstream theories, proposed theories and fringe theories. ... The Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) is an advocacy organization based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States. ...


Social Sciences

  • Scott Atran (1952–): American anthropologist.[620]
  • Herbert de Souza (1935–1997): Brazilian sociologist and activist against economic injustice and government corruption in Brazil, and founder of the Brazilian Institute of Social Analysis and Economics (IBASE).[621]
  • Émile Durkheim (1858–1917): French sociologist whose contributions were instrumental in the formation of sociology and anthropology.[622]
  • Norman Finkelstein (1953–): American political scientist and author, specialising in Jewish-related issues, especially the Holocaust and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.[623]
  • Thor Heyerdahl (1914–2002): Norwegian ethnographer and adventurer, famous for his Kon-Tiki expedition.[624]
  • Mayer Hillman (1931–): British political scientist, architect and town planner, a Senior Fellow Emeritus at the Policy Studies Institute.[625]
  • Baruch Kimmerling (1939–2007): Romanian-born professor of sociology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.[626]
  • Kemal Kirişci (19??–): Turkish political scientist, professor at the Department of Political Science and International Relations at Boğaziçi University, Istanbul.[627]
  • Peter Lawrence (1921–1987): British-born Australian anthropologist, pioneer in the study of Melanesian religions noted for his work on cargo cults.[628]
  • Sir Edmund Leach (1910–1989): British social anthropologist, a Fellow of the British Academy.[629]
  • James H. Leuba (1868–1946): American psychologist, one of the leading figures of the early phase of the American psychology of religion movement.[630]
  • Alfred Radcliffe-Brown (1881–1955): English social anthropologist who developed the theory of Structural functionalism.[631]
  • Robert Spitzer (19??–): American psychiatrist, Professor of Psychiatry at Columbia University, a major architect of the modern classification of mental disorders.[632]


Scott Atran was born in New York City in 1952 and received his PhD in anthropology from Columbia University. ... See Anthropology. ... Herbert Betinho de Souza was a sociologist and activist against economic injustice and government corruption in Brazil and founder of the Brazilian Institute of Social Analysis and Economics (IBASE). ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Émile Durkheim Émile Durkheim (IPA: ; April 15, 1858 – November 15, 1917) was a French sociologist whose contributions were instrumental in the formation of sociology and anthropology. ... For other uses, see Norman Finkelstein (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ... Israel, with the West Bank, Gaza Strip and Golan Heights The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is an ongoing dispute between the State of Israel and Arab Palestinians. ... Hi Every Body For the cruiseferry, see: M/S Thor Heyerdahl Thor Heyerdahl Thor Heyerdahl (October 6, 1914 Larvik, Norway – April 18, 2002 Colla Micheri, Italy) was a Norwegian ethnographer and adventurer with a scientific background in zoology and geography. ... Ethnography (from the Greek ethnos = nation and graphe = writing) refers to the qualitative description of human social phenomena, based on months or years of fieldwork. ... The Kon-Tiki raft is shown on the cover of the DVD of the documentary. ... Mayer Hillman (born London, 1931) is a Senior Fellow Emeritus since 1992 at the Policy Studies Institute. ... Baruch Kimmerling (born 1939) is a Professor of Sociology at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem. ... The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (‎, Arabic: ) is one of Israels oldest, largest, and most important institutes of higher learning and research. ... Melanesia (from Greek black islands) is a region extending from the west Pacific to the Arafura Sea, north and north-east of Australia. ... The article is about cargo cults as a religious phenomenon. ... Sir Edmund Ronald Leach (November 7, 1910 – January 6, 1989) was a British anthropologist. ... James Henry Leuba (1867-1946) was an American psychologist, best known for his contributions to the Psychology of Religion. ... Psychology of religion is psychologys theory of religious experiences and beliefs. ... Alfred Reginald Radcliffe-Brown (January 17, 1881–October 24, 1955) was a British social anthropologist who developed the theory of Structural Functionalism, a framework that describes basic concepts relating to the social structure of primitive civilizations. ... Social anthropology is the branch of anthropology that studies how currently living human beings behave in social groups. ... The article is about functionalism in sociology; for other uses, see functionalism. ... Dr. Robert L. Spitzer is a Professor of Psychiatry at Columbia University. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ...


Sports


Image File history File links Cyclist Lance Armstrong visiting the NIH. File links The following pages link to this file: Lance Armstrong ... Image File history File links Cyclist Lance Armstrong visiting the NIH. File links The following pages link to this file: Lance Armstrong ... Lance Armstrong (born Lance Edward Gunderson on September 18, 1971) is a retired American professional road racing cyclist. ... Lance Armstrong (born Lance Edward Gunderson on September 18, 1971) is a retired American professional road racing cyclist. ... A cyclist is a person who engages in cycling whether as a sport or rides a bicycle for recreation or transportation. ... Major (Thomas) Robin Valerian Dixon, 3rd Baron Glentoran CBE (b. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Historic bobteam from Davos around 1910 Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from an article revision dated 2006-02-04, and may not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... Major is a military rank the use of which varies according to country. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... Jonathan David Edwards CBE (born May 10, 1966 in London, England) is a former British triple jumper and widely regarded as the finest triple jumper of all time. ... The triple jump is an athletics (track and field) event, previously also known as hop, step and jump, whose various names describe the actions a competitor takes. ... David Feherty (born August 13, 1958 in Bangor, Northern Ireland) is a former European and PGA Tour golfer. ... Olga and Vova Galchenko Olga and Vova Galchenko During the 2004 World Juggling Federation (WJF) Championships, Emcee Penn Jillette was heard to say (on air) that Olga and Vova Golchenko were the best team jugglers in the competition. ... For other persons named Robert Smith, see Robert Smith (disambiguation). ... League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1961–present) Western Conference (1961-1969) Central Division (1967-1969) National Football Conference (1970-present) NFC Central (1970-2001) NFC North (2002-present) Current uniform Team colors Purple, Gold, White Fight song Skol, Vikings Mascot Viktor the Viking, Ragnar Personnel Owner Zygi Wilf General... P.J. Daniels was a star running back for Georgia Tech from 2002-2005. ... NFL Network is an American specialty channel owned and operated by the National Football League (NFL) and is also shown in Canada and Mexico. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Ksawery Tartakower (generally known as Saviely or Savielly in English, from Polish Sawielly meaning little Saul, less often Xavier Tartacover or Xavier Tartakover; 1887–1956) was a leading Polish and French chess Grandmaster. ... This article is about the Western board game. ... The title Grandmaster is awarded to world-class chess masters by the world chess organization FIDE. Apart from World Champion, Grandmaster is the highest title a chess player can attain. ...


Theologians

  • Klaas Hendrikse (1947–): Dutch liberal preacher within the Protestant church in the Netherlands, who calls himself an "atheist pastor".[640]



Visual arts


Image File history File links Hatemail225_me. ... Image File history File links Hatemail225_me. ... Normal Bob Smith Normal Bob Smith (born June 24, 1969, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin) is the pseudonym used by an American freelance graphic artist, writer, and satirist of Christianity. ... Abu Abraham (June 11, 1924 - December 1, 2002) was an Indian cartoonist, journalist, and author. ... Obe can mean: Obe, in Afghanistan Ebenezer Obe, a Nigerian musician. ... The Whitechapel Gallery, founded 1901, was one of the first publicly-funded galleries for temporary exhibitions in London. ... Guy Berkeley Berke Breathed (born June 21, 1957) is an American cartoonist, childrens book author/illustrator, director, and screenwriter, best known for Bloom County, a 1980s cartoon-comic strip which dealt with socio-political issues as seen through the eyes of highly exaggerated characters (e. ... Joan Brossa i Cuervo (Barcelona, 1919 - 1998). ... Mitch Clem (b. ... Cartoonist Jack Elrod at work. ... Webcomics, also known as online comics and internet comics, are comics that are available to read on the Internet. ... Sam Fullbrook (1922-2004), Australian artist born in Sydney, who won the Archibald Prize in 1974 with the painting Jockey Norman Stephens. ... Sir Alfred Gilbert (August 12, 1854 – November 4, 1934) was an English sculptor and goldsmith who enthusiastically experimented with metallurgical innovations. ... Sculptor redirects here. ... A goldsmith creating a new ring A goldsmith is a metalworker who specializes in working with precious metals, usually to make jewelry. ... The New Sculpture refers to a movement in late-nineteenth century British sculpture. ... Sir Ernst Hans Josef Gombrich, OM, CBE (30 March 1909 – 3 November 2001) was an Austrian-born art historian, who spent most of his working life in the United Kingdom. ... For other Orders see Order of Merit (disambiguation). ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... Art history usually refers to the history of the visual arts. ... George Grosz (July 26, 1893 – July 6, 1959) was a prominent member of the Berlin Dada and New Objectivity group, known especially for his savagely caricatural drawings of Berlin life in the 1920s. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... DaDa is a concept album by Alice Cooper, released in 1983. ... The New Objectivity, or neue Sachlichkeit (new matter-of-factness), was an art movement which arose in Germany during the 1920s as an outgrowth of, and in opposition to, expressionism. ... Hrdlicka, 2005 Statue of kneeling Jew, located at the base of the Monument against War and Fascism, Albertinaplatz. ... Sculptor redirects here. ... This is about drafting, the art and science of technical drawing. ... Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ... The definition of an artist is wide-ranging and covers a broad spectrum of activities to do with creating art, practicing the arts and/or demonstrating an art. ... Alternate meaning: See Apostle (Mormonism) The Christian Apostles were Jewish men chosen from among the disciples, who were sent forth (as indicated by the Greek word απόστολος apostolos= messenger), by Jesus to preach the Gospel to both Jews and Gentiles, across the world. ... Mark William Hofmann (born 7 December 1954), a disaffected member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, was a prolific counterfeiter who murdered two people in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Sebastian Horsley (born 1962) is a London writer and artist best known for having undergone a voluntary crucifixion. ... Giulio Mancini (1558 - 1630) was a noted physician, art collector and writer on a range of subjects. ... Alexander McQueen CBE (born Lee Alexander McQueen, 17 March 1969) is an English fashion designer. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... Brief introduction on the history of fashion design and designers Fashion design is the art dedicated to the creation of wearing apparel and lifestyle. ... Alan Yentob and Grayson Perry at private view of Gilbert & George retrospective, Tate Modern Grayson Perry (born 24 March 1960), is an award-winning English artist, best known for his ceramics and cross-dressing. ... Tate Britain: the venue for the Turner Prize. ... Obe can mean: Obe, in Afghanistan Ebenezer Obe, a Nigerian musician. ... Martin Rowson (born 15 February 1959) is a British cartoonist. ... Cartoonist Jack Elrod at work. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... List of satirists below - writers, cartoonists and others known for their involvement in satire - humourous social criticism. ... Normal Bob Smith Normal Bob Smith (born June 24, 1969, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin) is the pseudonym used by an American freelance graphic artist, writer, and satirist of Christianity. ... Jesus Dress Up refrigerator-magnet set - Normal Bob Smith Jesus Dress Up was created by artist Normal Bob Smith in 1991 as a black-and-white colorform, which he photocopied and distributed to friends. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Cartoonist Jack Elrod at work. ... The Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy began after twelve editorial cartoons, most of which depicted the Islamic prophet Muhammad, were published in the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten on 30 September 2005. ...


Notes and references

  1. ^ Rowe, William L. (1998). "Atheism". Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Ed. Edward Craig. “Atheism is the position that affirms the nonexistence of God. It proposes positive disbelief rather than mere suspension of belief.” 
  2. ^ Nielsen, Kai "Atheism". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved on 2007-04-28.  "...a more adequate characterization of atheism consists in the more complex claim that to be an atheist is to be someone who rejects belief in God for [reasons that depend] on how God is being conceived."
  3. ^ Eller, David (2004). Natural Atheism, p. 12. 
  4. ^ religioustolerance.org's short article on Definitions of the term "Atheism" suggests that there is no consensus on the definition of the term. Simon Blackburn summarizes the situation in The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy: "Atheism. Either the lack of belief in a god, or the belief that there is none." Most dictionaries (see the OneLook query for "atheism") first list one of the more narrow definitions.
  5. ^ Vizetelly, Ernest Alfred (1911), Barcelona Outrages - The Empress Elizabeth and Luccheni, The Anarchists: Their Faith and Their Record, Turnbull and Spears Printers, Edinburgh. Retrieved March 19, 2007.
  6. ^ John Carlin. "Zackie's story: The man who took on Mbeki - and won", The Independent, 2005-08-05. Retrieved on 2007-08-27. "A homosexual, an atheist, and a militant anti-apartheid campaigner whose political ideas were forged on an intense reading of Marx, Lenin, and Trotsky..." 
  7. ^ "In college, after reading material from American Atheists, he became, in his words, 'a pretty hard core atheist.'" Clark Adams: 1969-2007, American Humanist Association News Flash, May 24, 2007 (Accessed 14 April 2008)
  8. ^ Ian Buruma. "Sacred freedom", Financial Times, 2005-08-05. Retrieved on 2006-12-22. "Too much reason can reform a faith away, which would be fine with Hirsi Ali, who regards herself as an atheist." 
  9. ^ "Atheist though he was..." Obituary: Baba Amte, The Economist 1 March 2008: 93. (Retrieved 21 March 2008)
  10. ^ My God Problem[1]
  11. ^ Minister Turned Atheist[2]
  12. ^ "He was an old-fashioned rationalist and radical. He detested modern politics and despised Blairite froth, spin-doctoring and cloned MPs and betrayal of principles. I share Peter's doubts about the milk-and-water term "humanism." He and I called ourselves atheists." Karl Heath, 'Obituary Letter: Peter Brearey', The Guardian, 30 May 1998, Pg. 21.
  13. ^ "He's a proud atheist..." The nexus, by Orit Arfa, The Jerusalem Post, 12 July 2007 (Accessed 16 April 2008)
  14. ^ "An ecclesiastical court [...] sitting at Cleveland, Ohio, yesterday, found Dr. William Montgomery Brown, retired Bishop of Arkansas, a self-styled "Christian Atheist", guilty of heresy." 'U.S. Heresy Trial. A "Christian Atheist."' The Times, Monday, June 02, 1924; p. 13; Issue 43667; col C.
  15. ^ Biography of Richard Carrier[3]
  16. ^ "Cohen was a witty, courteous, and effective public speaker and debater, and a prolific writer with over fifty titles to his credit. Typical of his writings are A Grammar of Freethought (1921), Theism or Atheism (1921), Materialism Restated (1927), and four series of Essays in Freethinking (1923–38), culled from occasional pieces in the Freethinker. His achievement was to transform Victorian freethought from an emphasis on anti-biblical argument to the positive advocacy of materialism [...]". Edward Royle, 'Cohen, Chapman (1868–1954)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  17. ^ National and International Contacts, Atheist Alliance International website, 2008 (Accessed 14 April 2008)
  18. ^ Edamaruku dead: A staunch campaigner of rationalism, The Hindu, 2006 (Accessed 31 March 2008)
  19. ^ Honorary Associates of Rationalist International: Joseph Edamaruku (India), profile at the website of Rationalist International (Accessed 31 March 2008)
  20. ^ On 3 March 2008, Edamaruku challenged a tantrik on TV to kill him using only magic. After two hours of failure, "[t]he tantrik, unwilling to admit defeat, tried the excuse that a very strong god whom Sanal might be worshipping obviously protected him. "No, I am an atheist", said Sanal Edamaruku." The Great Tantra Challenge, Rationalist International article (Accessed 31 March 2008)
  21. ^ "Mr. Finley is a lifetime educational activist, humanist and atheist. He dedicates over 80 hrs a week producing his programs that challenge himself and those that listen." The Infidel Guy Show FAQ (accessed 14 April 2008).
  22. ^ Friedman wrote "I'm also an atheist" in his blog article titled Atheism and Religion. This blog is linked from his personal web site,[4] which is in turn linked from his Santa Clara Law site.[5]
  23. ^ "Air America... last Saturday aired its first Freethought show, hosted by [Dan] Barker and his wife, Annie Laurie Gaylor, who co-chair an atheist activist group called the Freedom of[sic] Religion Foundation." Atheist Radio Show Goes National on Air America, With Ron Reagan as Guest, by Catherine Donaldson-Evans, foxnews.com, October 12, 2007 (Accessed 14 April 2008)
  24. ^ Emma Goldman (1916 February). The Philosophy of Atheism. positiveatheism.org. Retrieved on 2006-12-13.
  25. ^ The Atheist Centre (official website).
  26. ^ The Atheist Centre (official website).
  27. ^ "Inspector Elphick said the defendant [John William Gott] was considered to be a Socialist and Atheist of the worst type, and had been convicted many times." 'Blasphemer Sent To Prison', The Times, 10 Dec 1921; p. 7; Issue 42900; col B.
  28. ^ In The Meaning Of Atheism, Haldeman-Julius wrote: "We advocate the atheistic philosophy because it is the only clear, consistent position which seems possible to us. As atheists, we simply deny the assumptions of theism; we declare that the God idea, in all its features, is unreasonable and unprovable; we add, more vitally, that the God idea is an interference with the interests of human happiness and progress." (Accessed 23 April 2008.)
  29. ^ Erkki Hartikainen's profile, hosted at the website of the Atheist Association of Finland (Accessed 15 April 2008)
  30. ^ "From the mid-1850s he was a convinced atheist and published over a dozen tracts and lectures, including Thoughts on Atheism, or, Can Man by Searching Find out God? (1870) and a neo-Malthusean pamphlet, Large or Small Families? On which Side Lies the Balance of Comfort? (1870). He edited with Charles Watts The Secularist's Manual of Songs and Ceremonies (1871), to which he contributed secular marriage and burial services. Edward Royle, 'Holyoake, Austin (1826–1874)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (accessed 1 May 2008).
  31. ^ Meek, James. "Free fall", Religion in the UK: special report, The Guardian, 2000-02-02. Retrieved on 2007-04-20. 
  32. ^ Feldman, Noah (2005). Divided by God. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, pg. 113
  33. ^ Ellen Johnson (2006). Welcome from the president of American Atheists. American Atheists. Retrieved on 2006-12-13.
  34. ^ American Atheists: Kentucky (Accessed 30 April 2008)
  35. ^ "Though an atheist, she was buried in a Jewish cemetery - a strange end for a rebel within a revolution." Denis Herbstein, 'Obituary: Norma Kitson: On the streets of London, and in the townships of South Africa, they fought and won the struggle against apartheid', The Guardian, 12 July 2002, Pg. 20.
  36. ^ American Atheists: California (Accessed 15 April 2008)
  37. ^ "[T]he noblest man, the one really greatest of them all was Prince Peter Kropotkin, a self-professed atheist and a great man of science."—Ely, Robert Erskine (October 10, 1941), New York World-Telegram.
  38. ^ "It's not that these atheists [Julia Sweeney, Richard Dawkins, Sam Harris, Paul Boyer, Paul Kurtz] expect to rid America of religion." The New Atheists, Betty Rollin (reporting), Bob Abernethy (anchor), Religion and Ethics Newsweekly (pbs.org), January 5, 2007 Episode no. 1019, (Accessed 14 April 2008)
  39. ^ Lewis wrote extensively on atheism, including Atheism (1930), An Atheist Manifesto (1954) and The Philosophy of Atheism (1960). From Atheism: "I came to accept Atheism as the result of independent thought and self-study."
  40. ^ "Emma's strident atheism was particularly provocative—so much so that even some of her fellow socialists objected. In 1842, angered by this lack of support from the movement, she and her fellow atheist George Jacob Holyoake set up the Anti-Persecution Union to defend freethinkers charged with blasphemy. Emma herself ended up in court on several occasions, and was forced to hide from the police on others; but unlike many militant atheists, she avoided imprisonment." Barbara Taylor, 'Martin , Emma (1811/12–1851)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (accessed 6 May 2008).
  41. ^ 'I Sold My Soul on eBay': Interview with Atheist Hemant Mehta
  42. ^ FriendlyAtheist.com blog
  43. ^ "I was born in a Muslim family, but I became an atheist." For freedom of expression, Taslima Nasreen, November 12, 1999 - Taslima Nasreen took the floor during Commission V of UNESCO's General Conference, as a delegate of the NGO International Humanist and Ethical Union (Accessed 23 December 2006).
  44. ^ Tom Curry. "Atheist pleads with justices to stop recitation of pledge", MSNBC, 2004-03-24. Retrieved on 2006-12-13. 
  45. ^ Conrad F. Goeringer (2000 June). The Murray O’Hair Family. American Atheists. Retrieved on 2006-12-13.
  46. ^ "I have been an atheist all my life and I have been the executive director of the National Secular Society for six years." Minutes of Evidence, House of Lords Select Committee on Religious Offences in England and Wales, 18 July 2002 (accessed 18 April 2002).
  47. ^ Randi wrote: "...I am a concerned, forthright, declared, atheist." Our Stance on Atheism, Swift: Online Newsletter of the JREF, August 5, 2005. (Accessed 1 June 2007)
  48. ^ "Although greatly influenced by his father's political and racial attitudes, Randolph resisted pressure to enter the ministry and later became an atheist." Paula F. Pfeffer: "Randolph, Asa Philip", American National Biography Online Feb. 2000 (accessed 28 April 2008) [6].
  49. ^ "I'm an atheist so... I can't be elected to anything, because polls all say that people won't elect an atheist." Ron Reagan Jr. during an interview on Larry King Live, 26 June 2004. See clip.
  50. ^ "In that year he came under the influence of the radical freethinker Charles Bradlaugh and, after being active in the Edinburgh Secular Society, accepted Bradlaugh's invitation to join him in London as assistant editor of the National Reformer. When Bradlaugh died, Robertson became editor until the publication failed in 1893, when he founded the Free Review, which he edited until 1895. [...] During the late 1880s and the 1890s Robertson extended his interests beyond atheism, free thought, and neo-Malthusianism and became increasingly involved with radical and ethical causes [...]." Michael Freeden, 'Robertson, John Mackinnon (1856–1933)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, May 2006 (accessed 6 May 2008).
  51. ^ "Many members of the NSS are, of course, also atheists. Some, including myself, have come to the conclusion that belief in the supernatural is fallacious, and they don't hesitate to say so. The fact that adherents to the supernatural explanation of life apparently cannot bear to hear any opposition, and rush to label atheists as "fundamentalist", is a measure of where we are." Terry Sanderson, 'All at sea over faith and secularism', The Guardian, 28 February 2007, Reply Letters and emails, Pg. 35.
  52. ^ a b c Haught, James A. (1996). 2,000 Years of Disbelief: Famous People with the Courage to Doubt. Prometheus Books, pp. 261-262. ISBN 1-57392-067-3. 
  53. ^ "The Rediff Interview: Bipan Chandra", Rediff India Abroad, 2003-03-03. Retrieved on 2006-12-13. "Savarkar was an atheist. When he was the Hindu Mahasabha president he used to give lectures on why there is no god." 
  54. ^ Lawmaker Apologizes For Comments Against Atheist Website of WBBM Newsradio 780, 10 April 2008 (Accessed 17 April 2008)
  55. ^ Singh, Bhagat (2002-06-18). Why I Am An Atheist. Boloji Media Inc. Retrieved on 2007-04-11. “I had become a pronounced atheist.”
  56. ^ "Closer to home, in Arkansas, atheist activist Charles Lee Smith was twice arrested in 1928, first for selling atheist literature and then for blasphemy. Moreover, since he couldn't as an atheist swear an oath to God on the Bible, he wasn't permitted to testify in his own defense!" American Humanist Association Executive (AHA) Director Roy Speckhardt, as quoted in an AHA press release: Did Politician Really Apologize for Anti-Atheist Rant? 11 April 2008 (Accessed 15 April 2008)
  57. ^ Smoker, Barbara (2002). Freethoughts: Atheism, Humanism, Secularism. Foote (G.W.) & Co Ltd. ISBN 0-9508243-5-6. 
  58. ^ "Together with William Chilton and John Field, Southwell began the Oracle of Reason, a penny weekly advocating atheism. Aggressively confrontational, the Oracle featured a pro-evolutionary series (begun by Southwell, continued by Chilton) using science to prove the bestial origins of the human race." J. A. Secord, 'Southwell, Charles (1814–1860)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (accessed 6 May 2008).
  59. ^ "To learn at Les Ruches came Anna (Bamie) Roosevelt, the favourite sister and later adviser of Theodore Roosevelt [...] and Richard Potter—though Beatrice Potter (later Webb), then antipathetic to the Frenchwoman's energetic atheism, declined to follow her sister Rosy. [...] In London, Souvestre became intimate, as well as with the Harrisons and Stracheys, with Leslie Stephen, the Morleys, the Chamberlains, Mrs J. R. Green, and a wider circle of radicals and freethinkers, including the young Beatrice Webb. A convinced humanist, candidly pro-Boer, anti-imperialist, and anti-clerical—though she also frequented and liked the Mandell Creightons—she impressed with her intellect and charmed with her personality." D. A. Steel, 'Souvestre, Marie Claire (1835–1905)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (accessed 6 May 2008).
  60. ^ Nancy Schiefer (2006-04-28). REVIEW:Suzuki laments conscience role. The London Free Press. Archived from the original on 2006-09-03. Retrieved on 2007-10-29. “As an atheist, Suzuki declares, he has no illusions about life and death, adding that the individual is insignificant in cosmic terms.” Review of book "David Suzuki: The Autobiography", by David Suzuki (Greystone Books, 2006)
  61. ^ Polly Toynbee. "This is a clash of civilisations - between reason and superstition", The Guardian, 2006-04-14. Retrieved on 2006-12-13. "Even an old atheist like me sees no good in this ignorance of basic Christian myths." 
  62. ^ "Like most of the Godless (or Godfree), I have no desire to proselytise for atheism or to persuade people out of religions that may offer them comfort and companionship." Wicked untruths from the Church, David Aaronovitch, Times Online, 25 March 2008 (Accessed 26 March 2008)
  63. ^ "What makes me think I "can reduce the function of religion to the provision of 'comfort and companionship'" instead of seeing it as a "public truth"? Being an atheist, I suppose. I see religion as a cultural and psychological construct, which fulfils certain almost universal needs and which, as a consequence, I am disinclined to condemn." Who wants to kill the elderly?, David Aaronovitch, Times Online, 31 March 2008 (Accessed 31 March 2008)
  64. ^ "I am a radical Atheist..." Adams in an interview by American Atheists[7].
  65. ^ "It is well known that I am not a religious person, I grew up and remain an atheist [...]". Tariq Ali, Interview: Tariq Ali, Socialist Review November 2006 (accessed 22 April 2008).
  66. ^ Amado is described as an "ateu convicto", or "convinced atheist". Cynara Menezes (8 August 2001). Velório de Jorge Amado foi discreto (Portuguese). Folha de S. Paulo. Retrieved on 2007-11-24.
  67. ^ "Once, filming in Italy with the American director John Huston and a US army crew, Ambler and his colleagues were shelled so fiercely that his unconscious 'played a nasty trick on him' (Ambler, Here Lies, 208). A confirmed atheist, he heard himself saying, 'Into thy hands I commend my spirit.' " Michael Barber: 'Ambler, Eric Clifford (1909–1998)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edition, January 2007 [8] (accessed 29 April 2008).
  68. ^ "I am an atheist, out and out. It took me a long time to say it... I don't have the evidence to prove that God doesn't exist, but I so strongly suspect he doesn't that I don't want to waste my time." Isaac Asimov in "Free Inquiry", Spring 1982, vol.2 no.2, p. 9 (See Wikiquote.)
  69. ^ "Last week, looking through a book about 15th-century painting in Italy, I began to wonder why I loved these paintings so much. Almost all of them are illustrations of religious subjects, and I have been an atheist almost since the day I was confirmed in the Christian faith by the Bishop of Norwich in 1931. To describe the atheism first: it originated in a certainty that I was going to start breaking the rules as laid down by the god I'd been taught about, followed by a suspicion that if his rules were so easy to break he couldn't be all that he was cracked up to be. Then came its firmer base: the observation that many of the most hideous things done to each other by human beings have been done in his name. It can be argued that this is our fault, not God's. But the god we Europeans are supposed to believe in a) created us as well as everything else that is; b) is omnipotent; c) is Love. In which case, one must assume from the evidence rammed down our throats for century after century that he is liable to fits of serious derangement during which he is Not Himself." Diana Athill, 'I'm a believer - but only in a good story', The Guardian, 21 January 2004, Features Pages, Pg. 5.
  70. ^ "I'm an evangelical atheist so I'm not into supernatural effects - I hated The Exorcist - but John Carpenter's remake of The Thing is different." 'I was a brain-eating zombie... As the scary season descends [...] famous horror experts choose their most terrifying screen experiences', Daily Telegraph, 30 October 2004, Arts Pg. 04.
  71. ^ "Berton's book, The Comfortable Pew, in which as a lifelong atheist he attacked status quo religiosity, outraged churchgoers. But the wider public came to expect to be challenged by Berton's views." Cathryn Atkinson, 'Obituary: Pierre Berton', The Guardian, 7 December 2004, Pg. 27.
  72. ^ "Wilfred Scawen Blunt was notorious as an atheist, a libertine, an adventurer and a poet. Somehow he also found time to be a diplomat - one of the earliest in this country to make a real attempt to understand Islam - and an anti-imperialist, becoming the first British-born person to go to jail for Irish independence." Phil Daoust, The Guardian, 11 March 2008, G2: Radio: Pick of the day, Pg. 32.
  73. ^ " "What song would you like played at your funeral?" "We'll Meet Again. I'd like the congregation to join in. As a devout atheist, I should make it clear there are no religious connotations." " Rosanna Greenstreet, 'Q&A: William Boyd', The Guardian, 3 February 2007, Weekend Pages, Pg. 8.
  74. ^ "Braibanti is a fiercely intellectual left-wing atheist and so, apart from his sexual preferences, would be regarded by sections of Italian opinion as a dangerous character." 'Plagiarist's appeal', The Times, 15 November 1969; pg. 6; Issue 57718; col D.
  75. ^ Reviewing a production of The Romans in Britain, Charles Spencer wrote: "It strikes me as an exceptionally powerful study of the human need for belief in a higher power, notwithstanding the fact that Brenton himself is an atheist. And the dramatist examines the nature of Paul's faith with both sympathy and insight." 'A powerful and thrilling act of heresy', Daily Telegraph, 10 November 2005, Reviews, Pg. 30.
  76. ^ "It [her non-fiction book Black Ship to Hell (1962)] endeavoured to formulate a morality based on reason rather than religion—Brophy described herself as 'a natural, logical and happy atheist' (King of a Rainy Country, afterword, 276)." Peter Parker: 'Brophy, Brigid Antonia [married name Brigid Antonia Levey, Lady Levey] (1929–1995)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edition, May 2006 [9] (accessed 29 April 2008).
  77. ^ Reviewing Brownjohn's Collected Poems, Anthony Thwaite wrote: "Brownjohn is 75 at the moment of publication. He has been on the literary scene - publishing, reviewing, judging, chairing, tutoring, giving readings - since the 1950s. He has also been a London borough councillor, a Labour parliamentary candidate (Richmond, Surrey, 1964), very much what I think of as decent, persistent, dogged "Old Labour" - sensitive but solid, inclining towards the puritan (though a self-confessed atheist in matters of religion) - and a strenuous campaigner for serious radio and television, anti-muzak, anti-destruction of libraries, for the proper traditional cultural concerns of the British Council, et al." 'Poetry: The vodka in the verse', The Guardian, 7 October 2006, Review Pages, Pg. 18
  78. ^ "The very practical nature of Islam, a religion that enjoins the faithful to act in the world to change it, is also a boon to activists, good and bad, as does its emphasis on public demonstration of faith. The sight of rows of believers facing Mecca to answer the call to prayer often moves me, an atheist, deeply. Yet the Arabic word for martyr - and currently suicide bomber - comes from the same linguistic stem as the word for bearing witness." Jason Burke, 'Ideology's violent face', The Guardian, 22 July 2005, Weekly Pages, Pg. 6.
  79. ^ Bush describes himself as "an atheist who has nevertheless worked intimately in Jewish religious institutions as a writer and editor for much of my adult life." The rabbi and the atheist, New Jersey Jewish News, 20 September 2007 (accessed 21 april 2008).
  80. ^ "By this time she had become an atheist and socialist." Nathalie Blondel: 'Butts , Mary Franeis (1890–1937)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 [10] (accessed 30 April 2008).
  81. ^ "Though an atheist, Cabral had a deep, atavistic fear of the devil. When his wife died in 1986, he placed an emblem of Our Lady of Carmen around her neck, saying, in his mocking way, that this would make sure that she went directly to heaven, without being stopped at customs." 'Joao Cabral: His poetry voiced the sufferings of Brazil's poor', The Guardian, 18 October 1999, Leader Pages; Pg. 18.
  82. ^ "All the mythic versions of women, from the myth of the redeeming purity of the virgin to that of the healing, reconciling mother, are consolatory nonsenses; and consolatory nonsense seems to me a fair definition of myth, anyway. Mother goddesses are just as silly a notion as father gods. If a revival of the myths of these cults gives women emotional satisfaction, it does so at the price of obscuring the real conditions of life. This is why they were invented in the first place." Angela Carter, The Sadeian Woman and the Ideology of Pornography (1978) p. 5
  83. ^ "Italian judge Gaetano Mautone has, with that special blend of flamboyance and arrogance you really only see in the continental judiciary, ordered a priest to appear in court to prove that Jesus exists. Or at least existed. Luigi Cascioli, a militant atheist and author of The Fable of Christ, has brought a case against Father Enrico Righi after the priest lambasted the writer for questioning Christ's historical origins." Lucy Mangan, 'Proving Christ existed, and other resolution', The Guardian, 4 January 2006, Pg. 36.
  84. ^ "…Stanley [Kubrick] is a Jew and I'm an atheist". Clarke quoted in Jeromy Agel (Ed.) (1970). The Making of Kubrick's 2001: p.306
  85. ^ "We can only guess what Clodd would have thought of having an evangelical preacher owning his old house: he was a noted atheist, who rejected his parents' ambition for him to become a Baptist minister in favour of becoming chairman of the Rationalist Press Association. His contribution to literature was in popularising the work of Charles Darwin and other evolutionary scientists in the face of opposition from the church. "The story of creation," wrote Clodd, " is the story of gas into genius"." Rose Gibbs, 'A religious conversion', Sunday Telegraph, 14 August 2005, Section: House & Home, Pg. 004.
  86. ^ "For one whose life had been so full of ironies, it was fitting that five priests celebrated a requiem mass for him in Youghal, although he had been a committed atheist." Richard Ingrams: 'Cockburn, (Francis) Claud (1904–1981), rev. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edition, May 2006 [11] (accessed 30 April 2008).
  87. ^ "Or you can ask: was that you in The Rotters' Club, the schoolboy so crazed with fear of being seen naked that you prayed to God for deliverance and He was moved to fling a wet pair of bathers into your orbit. Yes and no. There was no such epiphanous moment, he says, and besides, he's an atheist." Sally Vincent interviewing Coe, 'A Bit of a Rotter', The Guardian, 24 February 2001, Pg. 36.
  88. ^ "An unlikely friendship developed between Reckitt and G. D. H. Cole. Although an unapproachable cold atheist, and at root an anarchist, Cole joined forces with Reckitt, the clubbable, romantic medievalist, archetypal bourgeois, and unswerving Anglican with a dogmatic faith, to found the National Guilds League in 1915." J. S. Peart-Binns, 'Reckitt, Maurice Benington (1888–1980)', rev., Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  89. ^ "Like Margaret Jourdain, and most of her characters who are not fools or knaves, Ivy Compton-Burnett was a firm atheist, dismissing religion because ‘No good can come of it’ (Spurling, Ivy when Young, 77)." Patrick Lyons: 'Burnett, Dame Ivy Compton- (1884–1969)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 [12] (accessed 30 April 2008).
  90. ^ "I'm an atheist. God is an abstract noun, he's not a Father Christmas up there in Heaven, he's an abstract bloody noun who has been exploited by men in order to exploit other men, through the centuries." Edmund Cooper, We must love one another or die: an interview with Edmund Cooper (pdf), c.1973.
  91. ^ 'Cooper' was the pen name of Harry Hoff. "As a militant atheist he was especially on his guard in churches, and at the wedding of a much younger friend had to be restrained from heckling the bride's clerical uncle, who was delivering an address." D. J. Taylor, 'Hoff, Harry Summerfield (1910–2002)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, online edn, Oxford University Press, Jan 2006 (accessed 1 May 2008).
  92. ^ "The impulse of this book came when I was writing Quarantine. At the end of writing that book, I was no less of an atheist than I was before, yet it did make me think about my atheism. Thinking about the bleakness of my own atheism, and the inadequacy of the old fashioned kind of atheism when the big events of life-- especially death--came along, made me want to see whether I could come up with a narrative of comfort, a false narrative of comfort, but one that could match the narratives of comfort religions come up with to get you through death and bereavement." Jim Crace, Beatrice Interview: Jim Crace, c. 1999 (accessed 28 April 2008).
  93. ^ Criticising the 'New Atheists' (Harris, Hitchens, Dawkins, Onfray, Grayling and co.), Dalrymple wrote: "Yet with the possible exception of Dennett's [book Breaking the Spell], they advance no argument that I, the village atheist, could not have made by the age of 14 (Saint Anselm's ontological argument for God's existence gave me the greatest difficulty, but I had taken Hume to heart on the weakness of the argument from design)." What the New Atheists Don't See, City Journal, Autumn 2007 (accessed 24 April 2008).
  94. ^ "As a boy he attended a nonconformist chapel, and later an Anglican church, but in later life was to declare himself an atheist." Meic Stephens: 'Davies, Rhys (1901–1978)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 [13] (accessed 30 April 2008).
  95. ^ "He rejected his father's ambition to make him a rabbi. Instead he became an atheist and, following in the footsteps of Marx, Trotsky, and his countrywoman Rosa Luxemburg, a lifelong 'non-Jewish Jew' (Non-Jewish Jew, ed. Deutscher)." John McIlroy: 'Deutscher, Isaac (1907–1967)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 [14] (accessed 30 April 2008).
  96. ^ "In recent years, he had begun to write an always witty column for the Jewish Chronicle and, after his diagnosis, had even joined a synagogue - though this, he told friends, was not because he had discovered God. He remained an atheist to the end, but, he said, he wanted his children, Cosima and Bruno, to know something of the Judaism into which they had been born." Jay Rayner and Roy Greenslade, 'Obituary: John Diamond', The Guardian, 3 March 2001, Pg. 22.
  97. ^ "Tariq likes permanent revolution, whereas I am a libertarian conservative. True, we are both atheists, but Tariq is evangelical while I am benign about religion and think the Throne should be occupied by a member of the Church of England." Ruth Dudley-Edwards, 'Will half of Ireland really back Cameroon? How will a win affect public sentiment? Or a defeat?', Daily Telegraph, 1 June 2002, Pg. 24.
  98. ^ "But the 21st century has done nothing to prevent two others from the Manchester area from reshaping and modernising the Christmas story -the poet Carol Ann Duffy and the composer Sasha Johnson Manning, who have written 16 new carols. Duffy, brought up a Catholic, pronounces herself an atheist; Johnson Manning is a committed Christian." Geoff Brown, 'O great big town of Manchester', The Times, 7 December 2007, Times2; Pg. 15.
  99. ^ "Turan Dursun, a former imam and an atheist writer..." A dark shadow over Turkey, Turkish Daily News, January 20, 2007 (Accessed 15 April 2008)
  100. ^ "I was raised as a Christian, and I still retain a lot of the values of Christianity. The trouble with basing values on religions, though, is that the premises of most of them are pure wishful thinking; you either have to refuse to scrutinise those premises - take them on faith, declare that they "transcend logic" - or reject them. As Paul Davies has said, most Christian theologians have retreated from all the things that their religion supposedly asserts; they take a much more "modern" view than the average believer. But by the time you've "modernised" something like Christianity - starting off with "Genesis was all just poetry" and ending up with "Well, of course there's no such thing as a personal God" - there's not much point pretending that there's anything religious left. You might as well come clean and admit that you're an atheist with certain values, which are historical, cultural, biological, and personal in origin, and have nothing to do with anything called God." Greg Egan, An Interview With Greg Egan, Eidolon 11, pp. 18-30, January 1993 (accessed 28 April 2008)
  101. ^ "When I discussed my own atheism and Peter his own belief, he wrote that he needed God as a "friend of loneliness, who does not speak, does not laugh, does not cry"." Greg Egan, Letters from the forgotten, The Age (Australia), 17 February 2005 (accessed 28 April 2008)
  102. ^ "Saturday, my last night at the [Motel] 6, and I refuse to spend it crushed in my room. But what is a person of limited means and no taste for "carousing" to do? Several times during the week, I have driven past the "Deliverance" church downtown, and the name alone exerts a scary attraction... The marquee in front of the church is advertising a Saturday night "tent revival," which sounds like the perfect entertainment for an atheist out on her own." Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America, Barbara Ehrenreich, Henry Holt and Company, 2001, (p. 66-67) ISBN 0-8050-6389-7
  103. ^ Reprinted in Hitchens, Christopher (2007). The Portable Atheist. ISBN 978-0-306-81608-6. 
  104. ^ "Look, I'm an atheist. People say to me, do you believe in God? No, I don't believe in God." Harlan Ellison in clue book for the computer version of I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream([15].)
  105. ^ "He died of prostate cancer in Trinity Hospice, in Clapham, south London, on 23 October 1995. He was a declared atheist and a member of the Humanist Society and he was cremated on 30 October at Putney Vale crematorium, south London." Paul Vaughan: 'Ewart, Gavin Buchanan (1916–1995)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, May 2006 [16] (accessed 30 April 2008).
  106. ^ "I am an atheist, and if an atheist and a pope think the same things, there must be something true. It's that simple! There must be some human truth here that is beyond religion." Prophet of Decline: An interview with Oriana Fallaci, Wall Street Journal, 23 June 2005 (accessed 10 April 2008).
  107. ^ American Atheists article on Fisher [17].
  108. ^ Criticising Desert Island Discs presenter Kirsty Young, Gillian Reynolds wrote: "Fisk is an atheist. Why didn't she pick up his constant conversational invocations of God, press him on his choice of Psalm 23 as disc six?" 'It's time to come off the fence on Kirsty's island', Daily Telegraph, 17 October 2006, Features: Arts, Pg. 28.
  109. ^ "I've been doing media appearances as a secular humanist activist for fifteen years now. I perennially underwent this exchange: REPORTER/HOST: Are you an atheist? ME: I call myself a secular humanist. Secular humanists disbelieve in the supernatural and prefer to use reason, compassion, and the methods of science to build the good life in this life. REPORTER/HOST: But you're an atheist, aren't you? I couldn't sidestep the "A" word. When I tried, it was all I'd get to talk about. Today, I handle this question differently: REPORTER/HOST: Are you an atheist? ME: Yes, but that's only the beginning." Tom Flynn, Why The "A" Word Won't Go Away, Council for Secular Humanism op-ed article (accessed 30 April 2008).
  110. ^ "Follett, who is 58, was born in Cardiff, the son of a tax inspector. His family belonged to the puritanical Plymouth Brethren, so he was barred from watching films and television and even visiting other churches. Sounds like a strict upbringing. Perhaps too strict, given that he is now an atheist. 'Yeah, as soon as I reached the age of reason - about 16 - I stopped going to church. But I also have a sybaritic streak and could never have been happy in any puritanical religion. Self-denial is not my thing." Nigel Farndale, 'Damn Right I Got The Talent', Sunday Telegraph, 7 October 2007, Section 7 (Books), Pg.22.
  111. ^ "Describing his old friend as a "devout atheist", Ingrams said Paul Foot had been much upset to discover, after he suffered a near-fatal aneurysm five years ago, that some of his religious friends had been praying for him - and even more indignant to hear that some of them thought that their prayers had been answered when he survived to go on campaigning and writing." Duncan Campbell, 'Funeral of Paul Foot', The Guardian, 28 July 2004, Pg. 5.
  112. ^ "Some time in his middle teens, he had announced that he had become an atheist, and this had led to a violent flurry in the family, various clerical friends being called in, in vain, to shepherd him back to orthodoxy. [...] Despite his churchy friends, Forster was very ready to be parted from his faith, which did not go very deep. [...] Within a short time, under Meredith's ministrations, he had lost his faith completely." Extract from P. N. Furbank's E. M. Forster: A Life, the Growth of the Novelist 1879-1914, "which E. M. Forster invited P. N. Furbank to write", 'Saturday Review: Forster at Kings', The Times, 23 July 1977; pg. 7; Issue 60063; col A.
  113. ^ "In 1989 a stroke slightly impaired his memory. But the death of Elizabeth, who had been in all his novels, was an incomparably worse blow. "As an atheist, it made me very angry with someone - He, She or It - who doesn't exist," he said. It was the paradox his books had been written to solve." John Ezard, 'Obituary: John Fowles', The Guardian, 8 November 2005, Pg. 36.
  114. ^ "Frederick Furnivall was a man of diverse causes, all based on passionately held beliefs: vegetarianism, sculling, spelling reform, atheism (in his later years), socialism, egalitarianism, teetotalism, and above all the supreme importance of editing historic and literary texts that could shed light on the cultural and social life of England's past." William S. Peterson, 'Furnivall, Frederick James (1825–1910)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edition, May 2007 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  115. ^ In his introduction to the Sunshine screenplay (Faber and Faber 2007), Garland writes: "Aside from being a love letter to its antecedents, I wrote Sunshine as a film about atheism. A crew is en route to a God-like entity: the Sun. The Sun is larger and more powerful than we can imagine. The Sun gave us life, and can take it away. It is nurturing, in that it provides the means of our survival, but also terrifying and hostile [...] Ultimately, even the most rational crew member is overwhelmed by his sense of wonder and, as he falls into the star, he believes he is touching the face of God. But he isn't. The Sun is God-like, but not God. Not a conscious being. Not a divine architect. And the crew member is only doing what man has always done: making an awestruck category error when confronted with our small place within the vast and neutral scheme of things. The director, Danny Boyle, who is not atheistic in the way that I am, felt differently. He believed that the crew actually were meeting God. I didn't see this as a major problem, because the difference in our approach wasn't in conflict with the way in which the story would be told."
  116. ^ "Constance became a lifelong sceptic and atheist." Patrick Waddington: 'Garnett, Constance Clara (1861–1946)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edition, May 2007 [18] (accessed 1 May 2008).
  117. ^ "I have no religion - I'm an atheist, and I don't believe in any afterlife..." looks towards end", BBC News, 2003-06-06. Retrieved on 2007-07-07.
  118. ^ "I am an atheist. I wouldn't even call myself an agnostic." The Art of Fiction No. 77: Nadine Gordimer, Interview by the Paris Review Foundation, 2005. Retrieved on 2007-07-24.
  119. ^ "What's stopping me is that I don't believe in God. Not in an agnostic sense but in the spirit of pure atheism which asserts that man invented divinities to account for the temporarily inexplicable. [...] Jews were just as welcoming, as long as you're Jewish by birth or conversion. Would I, as an avowed atheist, be turned away, I asked Rabbi Pini [...]." Linda Grant, 'Almighty gamble', The Guardian, 25 June 1999, Art Pages, Pg. 2.
  120. ^ "In addition, between 1919 and 1924 Nancy gave birth to four children in under five years; while Graves (now an atheist like his wife) suffered from recurring bouts of shell-shock." Richard Perceval Graves, 'Graves, Robert von Ranke (1895–1985)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edition, Oct 2006 [19] (accessed 1 May 2008).
  121. ^ "Though Greene later objected to being called a 'Catholic novelist', he became celebrated for employing religious themes in his works, praised by Catholic critics during his lifetime for the powerful way in which his novels explore the subjects of sin, damnation, evil, and divine forgiveness. But Greene's relationship with the church was never easy, and he was often critical of the religion. In his last years he began referring to himself as a 'Catholic atheist' (Shelden, 6)." Michael Shelden: 'Greene, (Henry) Graham (1904–1991)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, September 2004; online edition, January 2006 [20] (accessed 1 May 2008).
  122. ^ "I don't like conventional religious piety. I'm more at ease with the Catholicism of Catholic countries. I've always found it difficult to believe in God. I suppose I'd now call myself a Catholic atheist." Graham Greene, interviewed by VS Pritchett, 'Saturday Review: Graham Greene into the light', The Times, 18 March 1978; pg. 6; Issue 60260; col A.
  123. ^ "I am still a Catholic, I just don't believe in God. I am an atheist Catholic - there are a lot of them around. One thing lapsed Catholics do not do is go in for an "inferior" religion with less in the way of tradition and intellectual content."—Greer, Germaine (27 November 2003), The habit of a lifetime, The Guardian. Accessed February 12, 2008.
  124. ^ (Swedish) Translation: "I am [an] atheist, but Ann-Marie and I light a candle anyway. I have dedicated "Madame Terror" to her. Since she has helped me much with [my] books, not least with this one, the latest. Much talk on and forth, I've had a lot yellings." "Det ska mycket till för att reta upp mig". Expressen (2006-12-03). Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  125. ^ "Handler says he's 'pretty much' an atheist..." Autumn of a book-lover’s contentment, Marvin Olasky, World Magazine, October 07, 2006 (Accessed 5 April 2008)
  126. ^ "Mr. Handler... describes himself as a 'secular humanist.'", Lemony Snicket reaches 'The End', By Todd Leopold, CNN.com, October 5, 2006 (Accessed 5 April 2008)
  127. ^ Interviewer: "Are the Baudelaires Jewish?" Handler: "I think that if you had that many terrible things happen to you, you'd probably become an atheist." A Very Frustrating Dialogue, by Marc Silver, U.S. News & World Report web exclusive, 5/20/02 (Accessed 5 April 2008)
  128. ^ Author of An Atheist Manifesto
  129. ^ "Harry Harrison is a self-confessed atheist" per official website HarryHarrison.com
  130. ^ "Although his parents never saw the poems he wrote about them, they are still included in his audience. "I'm a total atheist but I do write things for them." " The Guardian Profile: Tony Harrison, 1 April 2000 (accessed 15 April 2008)
  131. ^ "In a hideous act of precocity, I saw as a child that, having tried as hard as I could, I could not believe in God. I greatly regret this, but, despite extensive reflection, I can see no reason after all these years to revise my view." However, "... I rejoice wholeheartedly as an atheist that I live in a Christian culture". Stop apologising for being Christian, Simon Heffer, Telegraph, 21 December 2005 (Accessed 31 March 2008)
  132. ^ "I am not a believer. In fact, on religious matters, I am inclined to take the Christopher Hitchens line - not only am I atheist, I am anti-theist. (If God did exist, I would be against him on any number of grounds, not least of which is that He is always behaving in such an unreasonable, autocratic manner.)" Zoë Heller, 'God doesn't have the best tunes New York', Daily Telegraph, 27 March 2004, Features, Comment Pg. 22.
  133. ^ Ernest Hemingway is a noted atheist by several atheist and independent websites. [21] Also noted for saying "All thinking men are atheist".
  134. ^ "She was educated at home, by correspondence and at Perth College. This was run by Anglican nuns who, she said, informed her she would never enter the kingdom of heaven. Since she was already an atheist - which she remained all her life - she greeted this news with a certain nonchalance. She was amused when, in later life, she was designated as a patron saint of Australian writers." Philip Jones, 'Obituary: Dorothy Hewett', The Guardian, 5 September 2002, Pg. 26.
  135. ^ "Hind became a socialist and an atheist, and at 14 left Riverside high school, Carntyne, and became a process clerk at Britain's largest engineering firm, Beardmore." Jackie Kemp, 'Obituary: Archie Hind: Author of a novel of Glasgow working-class life which won the Guardian award', The Guardian, 29 February 2008, Pg. 41.
  136. ^ "Secularism is not just a smug attitude. It is a possible way of democratic and pluralistic life that only became thinkable after several wars and revolutions had ruthlessly smashed the hold of the clergy on the state. ... I have spent all my life on the atheist side of this argument..." Hitchens in Slate.com article, "Bush's Secularist Triumph".
  137. ^ "In March 1811 he was expelled along with Shelley for refusing to reveal who wrote The Necessity of Atheism. Though Shelley wrote the final version and arranged the printing and distribution, Hogg had garnered philosophical arguments for the essay and probably wrote an early draft. Consequently, his decision to share Shelley's expulsion was partly a matter of loyalty and partly of pride—he could not allow his friend to accept full credit (or blame) for their joint production." Carol L. Thoma, 'Hogg, Thomas Jefferson (1792–1862)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  138. ^ "Grimly atheist, he appreciated Nietzsche's attempt to establish a philosophy that was simultaneously nihilist and life-affirming. He understood Nietzsche's keen wit, and was very funny in his own fashion, cracking many a joke, often at his own expense. ("A drink? Oh alright, just a large one!")" Carol Diethe, 'Obituary: RJ Hollingdale', The Guardian, 10 October 2001, Pg. 24.
  139. ^ Masson, Sophie (June 2003). "The Strange Case of Michel Houellebecq". Quadrant XLVII (6). Retrieved on 2007-04-20. 
  140. ^ The article is subtitled "At Easter I, a longstanding atheist, find myself feeling affinity with religious folk", and begins "As a godless, atheistic Marxist, I have never been less worried about religion. What does worry me is the rise of a New Atheism that, never mind God, appears to have lost faith in humanity." It looks like Man crucified, Mick Hume, Times Online, 21 March 2008 (Accessed 31 March 2008)
  141. ^ Jim Page, the chairman of the Housman Society, said: [...] "He writes about church bells in his poems and his ashes are buried at the church in Ludlow. He was an atheist but retained an affection for churches and the sound of the bells." Richard Savill, 'Housman's bells ring again at Bredon', Daily Telegraph, 28 June 2004, Pg. 08.
  142. ^ "Hyman blatantly proclaimed his biases: for example, he vigorously opposed any critical approach that took organized religion seriously (he often described himself as a "militant atheist"), and his dismissal of Eliot and Winters was based in part on their religious sympathies." Ann T. Keene: "Hyman, Stanley Edgar", American National Biography Online, Feb. 2000 (accessed 28 April 2008) [22].
  143. ^ "In response to the popular atheist books of Susan Jacoby, Sam Harris, Daniel Dennett, Richard Dawkins, and Christopher Hitchens..." Review by Fred Edwords of What's So Great about Christianity (by Dinesh D'Souza), expanded online version of that originally published in The Humanist, March/April 2008 (Accessed 14 April 2008)
  144. ^ Reviewing Jenkins's The Missionaries, Paul Binding wrote: "In addition to registering as a pacifist Jenkins became a member of the Independent Labour Party and was a declared atheist." Paul Binding, 'Saints and sinners', The Guardian, 5 November 2005, Review Pages, Pg. 17.
  145. ^ Jenkins wrote "I'm an atheist but still I resent this joker in Rome slighting my community. Sorry, Pope, but this 'proper church' declaration is surreal nonsense by Simon Jenkins, The Guardian, 13 July 2007 (Accessed 31 March 2008).
  146. ^ Joshi's book: God's Defenders: What They Believe and Why They Are Wrong at amazon.com.
  147. ^ Kennedy's book: All in the Mind: A Farewell to God at amazon.com.
  148. ^ Krassner contributed a piece entitled 'Confessions of an Atheist' to the anthology Everything You Know About God Is Wrong: The Disinformation Guide to Religion (The Disinformation Company 2007, ISBN 1932857591). Excerpt: "I had developed that habit of communicating with my imaginary friend when I was a kid who actually believed in an all-knowing, all-powerful Being. [...] My faith disappeared when I was thirteen. [...] On the day after the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, I would read that headline over and over and over and over again. That afternoon, I told God I couldn't believe in him any more because he had allowed such devastation to happen. "Allowed? Why do you think I gave humans free will?" "Okay, well, I'm exercising my free will to believe that you don't exist." "All right, it's your loss!" So at least we would remain on speaking terms."
  149. ^ "...Lagerkvist... wrote of himself that he was 'a believer without a belief, a religious atheist.'" The Religious Atheist, Time Magazine review of Lagerkvist's book The Death of Ahasuerus, February 23, 1962. Retrieved 24 July 2007.
  150. ^ "Larkin, a typical moody 20th-century atheist, thought religion was "that vast moth-eaten musical brocade / Created to pretend we never die". A.N. Wilson, 'Give me that old-time religion', Daily Telegraph, 17 April 2006, News section, End column, Pg. 19.
  151. ^ "It is a curious fact, but if I want a poet who will get me in an Easter frame of mind, I turn not to these orthodox followers of the Creed, but to that out-and-out atheist and self-confessed nihilist Philip Larkin." A.N. Wilson, 'This is the time when Larkin comes into his own', Daily Telegraph, 21 April 2003, World of Books section, Pg. 21.
  152. ^ "In view of the enduring influence of Moses Gaster it is a mark of Marghanita Laski's true independence of mind that, while remaining proud of her Jewishness, she renounced her faith even before she went up to Oxford and declared herself to be an atheist." R. W. Burchfield, 'Laski, Marghanita (1915–1988)', rev. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, May 2007 (accessed 1 May 2008).
  153. ^ Laskier wrote "The little faith I used to have has been completely shattered. If God existed, He would have certainly not permitted that human beings be thrown alive into furnaces, and the heads of little toddlers be smashed with gun butts or shoved into sacks and gassed to death." New Pages of Past Horror: Writings depict the innocence of a Jewish teen coming of age--and Nazi brutality, Aron Heller, Associated Press, 6 June 2006.
  154. ^ An Interview with Stanislaw Lem by Peter Engel. The Missouri Review, Volume 7, Number 2, 1984.
  155. ^ In his posthumously published Zibaldone, Leopardi writes, among other such arguments: "In sum, the foundation of everything, and of God himself, is nothing. Since nothing is absolutely necessary, there is no absolute reason why something could not be, or not be in a certain way...And everything is possible, that is there is no absolute reason why some arbitrary thing can not exist, or exist in a certain manner....And there is no absolute distinction between all these possibilities, nor absolute difference between all the possible perfections and so on....It is certain that since the Platonic forms that preexist all things have been destroyed, God is destroyed." (Zib. 1341-42, 18 July 1821) —trans. Francesco Franco
  156. ^ Levi quoted as saying "There is Auschwitz, and so there cannot be God." Interview with Marlboro Press (1989)[23].
  157. ^ Waste Books E 252, 1765-1770
  158. ^ Repeatedly mentioned in Lesley Blanch's biography of him: Pierre Loti - Travels with the Legendary Romantic.
  159. ^ Joshi, The Scriptorium, "H. P. Lovecraft", section II.
  160. ^ "A convinced atheist, he had discussed the possibility of suicide with his friend Fruttero in the past, at one time contemplating driving his car into a canal with his companion, Simone Bennes Darses, at his side. On this occasion he rose early, leaving her sleeping undisturbed in bed." Philip Willan, 'Obituary: Franco Lucentini', The Guardian, 9 August 2002, Pg. 18.
  161. ^ "During the Second World War McCaig was a conscientious objector, though not on religious grounds for, as he asserted in an interview, 'I was born an atheist' (Murray, 88)." Hilda D. Spear, 'MacCaig , Norman Alexander (1910–1996)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, September 2004; online edition, May 2007 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  162. ^ "I'm an atheist. So is everyone I know, or maybe they're being Canadian and refraining from mentioning their religion. Don't poke atheists with a stick or we'll want our own morning manifesto." Religion in the public discourse? It's a can of worms (cbc.ca, 18 February 2008 (Accessed 25 Mars 2008).
  163. ^ "This distresses me on many levels. First because as a card-carrying atheist, I had transferred my faith to these secular deities and passionately believed in their perfect marriage." Lucy Mangan, 'The Beckhams - do we deserve any better?', The Guardian, 19 October 2005, Pg. 36.
  164. ^ "So why should Maugham, self-declared atheist, "continental" more than English, choose so inappropriate a burial place?" Shona Crawford Poole, 'Pilgrimage to the heart of England', The Times, 26 January 1985; pg. 12; Issue 62046; col D.
  165. ^ "In The Summing Up (1938) and A Writer's Notebook (1949) Maugham explains his philosophy of life as a resigned atheism and a certain skepticism about the extent of man's innate goodness and intelligence; it is this that gives his work its astringent cynicism." 'Maugham, W. Somerset', Encyclopedia Britannica, accessed 8 May 2008.
  166. ^ "The French right, to give it its due, has been astonishingly persistent throughout history. [...] In Action Francaise[sic] it found a congenial form of expression and a leader, Charles Maurras; the fact that Maurras was an atheist who believed that religion was a useful social cement [...] did not distress the Catholics on the French right as much as it should." Peter Hebblethwaite, 'Misguided catalogue of blame for the passing of the glory that was France', The Times, 4 January 1975; pg. 12; Issue 59285; col B.
  167. ^ Multiple quotes from McCabe substantiating his atheist view [24].
  168. ^ "Throughout her childhood, McCarthy took refuge in Catholicism, but, although she was schooled in convents and considered herself a devout Catholic, she tried to call attention to herself as a teenager by pretending to have lost her faith. Questioned about her claim, she found that she had in fact done so. She remained an atheist." Kathy D. Hadley: "McCarthy, Mary", American National Biography Online, Feb. 2000 (accessed 28 April 2008) [25].
  169. ^ "Yes, I am an atheist, and probably Briony is, too. Atheists have as much conscience, possibly more, than people with deep religious conviction, and they still have the same problem of how they reconcile themselves to a bad deed in the past. It’s a little easier if you’ve got a god to forgive you." Solomon, Deborah (December 2, 2007). A Sinner's Tale: Questions for Ian McEwan. New York Times. Retrieved on 2007-12-02.
  170. ^ "My distaste for Lewis and Tolkien as writers does not stem from the fact that, as an atheist, I disagree with their religious beliefs or think that religious concerns cannot make great literature." – Reinvigorating the Fantastic, Accessed February 12, 2007.
  171. ^ Interviewed in 2004 by Jonathan Miller for his television series Atheism: A Rough History of Disbelief, Arthur Miller said: "Well I tried to be a religious person when I was twelve, thirteen, fourteen, it lasted about two years. And then it simply vanished. I simply lay down one evening to go to sleep and woke up the next day and it wasn't there anymore. [...] Of course, I could no longer believe. I quickly, at some point in my late teens, began reading and surmising that the idea of religion was a creation of man's longing to be a permanent part of the universe. [...] But myself, personally, I don't have the talent to believe. [...] It just seems to me so patent that what man has done is to project himself into the heavens, where he can be all-powerful as he's not here, and moral, and decent, and vengeful, and all the things he's not allowed to do on the earth, and to don that white garment and the beard and be what he wished in his dreams he could be... and I just can't get past that." The Atheism Tapes: Arthur Miller, 3.25–6.14, BBC television, first broadcast October 2004.
  172. ^ Atheist Universe: The Thinking Person's Answer to Christian Fundamentalism.[26]
  173. ^ "I'm also obsessed by religion, being an atheist myself. There's something eternally fascinating about respectability gone wrong." Quoted in Sheridan Morley, 'Mortimer on Heaven and Hell', The Times, 27 May 1976; pg. 7; Issue 59714; col E.
  174. ^ " "Marty really rattled the paramilitaries because he had such good contacts," said John Keane, a friend and colleague of O'Hagan's. "He'd be able to tell you what they had for breakfast before they went out to kill. He had a cynical eye and he was very aware of the sub-structure of society, the unusual alliances, the way people weren't always what they seemed. He was an atheist and a Marxist, liable to start spouting Hegel if you gave him a chance. He used to say, my enemy's enemy is my friend. Very little that happened in Northern Ireland would have surprised Marty." " Susan McKay, 'Faith, Hate and Murder', The Guardian, 17 November 2001, Weekend Pages, Pg. 19.
  175. ^ "...I accept Buddhism... It’s an atheistic philosophy... I don’t expect them to be sympathetic to my atheism, my nihilism, or anything of the sort." An Interview with Atheist Poet Ananda Selah Osel, The Eloquent Atheist (Accessed 5 April 2008)
  176. ^ "Oswald, a vegetarian and atheist, used the pseudonyms Ignotus (in the Political Herald, 1785–7), Sylvester Otway (London newspapers 1788–9), and H. K." T. F. Henderson, 'Oswald, John (c.1760–1793)', rev. Ralph A. Manogue, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edition, May 2006 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  177. ^ "Frances Partidge was a pacifist long before she met Ralph. She says she cannot pinpoint the day with the same clarity with which she can remember discovering herself an atheist—at the age of 11 in an Isle of Wight boarding house—but hearing about the outbreak of World War I in the company of bellicose friends, and a feminist cousin who supported conscientious objectors, put her on the path." Caroline Moorehead, 'Love and laughter on the fringe of the Bloomsbury set', The Times, 12 August 1978; pg. 12; Issue 60378; col A.
  178. ^ Salon magazine 28 April 1999 [27]
  179. ^ "Tanya Byron: Former MP and newspaper columnist Matthew Parris is proud to call himself an atheist. Matthew Parris: I don't have a lot of doubt any more. I think it's a mistake, religion. I think that God doesn't exist. I am not absolutely hundred percent certain of that, any more than I am not absolutely a hundred percent certain that there isn't an elephant in the next room. There may be, but I think it's highly unlikely. Of course I know lots of very nice Christians, and their Christianity doesn't make me angry at all. But I get irritated with laziness of mind, with bad arguments and with a reaching for the comfort of something that, in some part of their brain, they must know is unprovable, and perhaps not true." Am I Normal? episode 'Spirituality', BBC TV, first broadcast BBC2, 28 April 2008 21:00.
  180. ^ "Not since 1964 had Pasolini created such a stir, and even then it was not the content of his The Gospel According to St. Matthew that stunned people. It was the discovery that a director who was both a communist and an atheist could bring such fervor and insight to a religious subject. [...] There are times when Pasolini sounds remarkably religious for a self-acknowledged atheist. "I suffer from the nostalgia of a peasant-type religion, and that is why I am on the side of the servant," he says. "But I do not believe in a metaphysical god. I am religious because I have a natural identification between reality and God. Reality is divine. That is why my films are never naturalistic. The motivation that unites all of my films is to give back to reality its original sacred significance." Guy Flatley, The Atheist who was Obsessed with God, 1969, located at Moviecrazed.com (accessed 25 April 2008).
  181. ^ "Pinter 'on road to recovery'", BBC News, 2002-08-26. Retrieved on 2007-04-20. 
  182. ^ "I'm an atheist, at least to the extent that I don't believe in the objective existence of any big beards in the sky."—The Line One Interview with Terry Pratchett, Gay, Anne, 1999. Accessed December 24, 2006.
  183. ^ "As an atheist I'm rather on difficult ground here, but presumably this is what a Christian believes." The Dark Materials debate: life, God, the universe... (interview of Pullman by Rowan Williams), Telegraph.co.uk, 17 March 2004 (Accessed 12 November 2007).
  184. ^ Reviewing Raine's collection In Defence of T. S. Eliot, Charles Osborne and Sally Cousins wrote: "Raine, a fine poet, is also an entertaining and thought-provoking critic, and his subjects range widely from the Bible, which as an atheist he appreciates for its short stories, "some of the greatest ever written", to Bruce Chatwin, whom he sensibly does not take too seriously." Sunday Telegraph, 14 October 2001, Paperbacks, Pg. 14.
  185. ^ "I am an intransigent atheist, but not a militant one." Rand quoted in Michael S. Berliner (1995). Letters of Ayn Rand: March 20, 1965 [28]
  186. ^ Derek Raymond was the pen name of Robert Cook. "Cook was an atheist, but he described his probes into abjection and despair with almost religious intensity." Phil Baker: 'Cook, Robert William Arthur (1931–1994)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 [29] (accessed 30 April 2008).
  187. ^ "I tell you something, in case anyone wonders, not a single out-of-body experience, no long corridors of light, I was an atheist when it started and I've remained one. People used to say to me, 'You wait until something really bad happens, you'll start praying', but I didn't and I can't. I don't put this down to any superior being, I put it down to the superb training and skill of the people looking after me. I remain the humanist I always was." Claire Rayner, interviewed by Libby Brooks, The Guardian, 12 September 2003, Features Pages, Pg. 6.
  188. ^ When asked by Larry King if he would ever run for office, Reagan Jr. responded by saying, "I'm an atheist so... I can't be elected to anything, because polls all say that people won't elect an atheist." Interview on Larry King Live, 26 June 2004. See clip.
  189. ^ Reviewing Anne Rice's Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt, Matt Thorne noted: "In a long author's note, Rice explains how she experienced an old-fashioned, strict Roman Catholic childhood in the 1940s and 1950s, before leaving the Church at 18 due to sexual pressure and her desire to read authors she considered forbidden to her, such as Kierkegaard, Sartre, and Camus. Two years later she married a passionate atheist, the poet and artist Stan Rice, and in 1974, began a literary career that she now retrospectively views as representing her 'quest for meaning in a world without God'." Sunday Telegraph, 18 December 2005, Section 7, Pg. 43.
  190. ^ Interview with Rushdie by Gigi Marzullo; Sottovoce, RAIUNO, March 31, 2006.
  191. ^ CNN reports that: "Among these works are mythical stories through which Saramago, a communist and atheist, weaves his own brand of social and political commentary." In praise of Portuguese (Accessed 30 May 2007)
  192. ^ "If Osama bin Laden were in charge, he would slit my throat; my God, I'm an atheist, a hedonist, and a faggot." Skipping Towards Gomorrah: The Seven Deadly Sins and the Pursuit of Happiness in America, Dan Savage, Plume, 2002, p. 258.
  193. ^ Savage declared in his syndicated sex advice column: "I'm Catholic—in a cultural sense, not an eat-the-wafer, say-the-rosary, burn-down-the-women's-health-center sense. I attended Quigley Preparatory Seminary North, a Catholic high school in Chicago for boys thinking of becoming priests. I got to meet the Pope in 1979..." Savage Love (column), The Village Voice, April 12, 2005.
  194. ^ Listing of Shelley's The Necessity of Atheism at Amazon.com [30].
  195. ^ "I am an atheist. There, I said it. Are you happy, all you atheists out there who have remonstrated with me for adopting the agnostic moniker? If "atheist" means someone who does not believe in God, then an atheist is what I am. But I detest all such labels. Call me what you like — humanist, secular humanist, agnostic, nonbeliever, nontheist, freethinker, heretic, or even bright. I prefer skeptic." Why I Am An Atheist, Michael Shermer, June 2005 (accessed 31 March 2008).
  196. ^ "Like most atheists, I don't mind in the least being insulted for my beliefs, as long as I am not prevented from expressing them." Joan Smith, 'None of us has the right not to be offended', Independent on Sunday, 21 October 2001, Comment, Pg. 30.
  197. ^ Listing of Smith as a founder of Freethinkers New York.
  198. ^ Reviewing Steele's book, Victor J Stenger called it "A clear, concise, complete, and convincing presentation of the case for atheism."
  199. ^ "By early 1890 Steevens had broken with his family's Brethrenism, and he described himself as 'a discontented atheist' (Steevens to Browning; Oscar Browning MSS)." Sidney Lee, 'Steevens, George Warrington (1869–1900)', rev. Roger T. Stearn, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edition, October 2007 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  200. ^ "A decadent dandy who envied the manly Victorian achievements of his family, a professed atheist haunted by religious terrors, a generous and loving man who fell out with many of his friends - the Robert Louis Stevenson of Claire Harman's biography is all of these and, of course, a bed-ridden invalid who wrote some of the finest adventure stories in the language. [...] Worse still, he affected a Bohemian style, haunted the seedier parts of the Old Town, read Charles Darwin and Herbert Spencer, and declared himself an atheist. This caused a painful rift with his father, who damned him as a "careless infidel". Theo Tait, review of Robert Louis Stevenson: a Biography by Claire Harman, Daily Telegraph, 29 January 2005, Books Pg.3
  201. ^ Matt Taibbi, interveiwed by 'Friendly Atheist' Hemant Mehta: "HM: What role should religion play in the political arena? MT: Well, I’m an atheist/agnostic, so I would say none. People should stick to solving the problems they have the tools to solve." 'Interview with Rolling Stone's Matt Taibbi', friendlyatheist.com, 29 April 2008 (accessed 10 May 2008).
  202. ^ In Allen Tate: Orphan of the South, biographer Thomas A. Underwood quotes Tate as saying: "I am an atheist, but a religious one—which means there is no organization for my religion."
  203. ^ Commenting on Tendryakov's obituary in the Times, Professor Geoffrey A. Hosking wrote: "Perhaps because of his concern for the human personality, Tendryakov was the first writer in the post-Stalin period to raise religious questions seriously in fiction. Though an atheist himself, he understood the intrinsic importance of religion, and did not treat it merely satirically or condescendingly." 'Vladimir Tendryakov', The Times, 17 August 1984; pg. 10; Issue 61912; col G.
  204. ^ "Characterizing himself as an atheist, an anarchist, and a skeptic, he enjoyed his image of impudent prurience, though he revealed little to the public of his personal life." Dennis Wepman: "Thayer, Tiffany", American National Biography Online, Feb. 2000 (accessed 28 April 2008) [31].
  205. ^ "Facebook knows I'm an atheist, and if Facebook knows it then the CIA probably knows it too, which could be a problem if I tried to stand for election in South Carolina, Mississippi or any of the other seven US States which require candidates to believe in a supreme being." Facebook knows I'm an atheist, New Humanist (web exclusive article), January 2008 (accessed 17 April 2008).
  206. ^ "His beliefs moved from pantheism to an atheism which causes less of a frisson now than it did in his own day, and his apocalyptic vision of the megalopolis in 'The City of Dreadful Night' continues to have resonance." Ann Margaret Ridler, 'Thomson , James (1834–1882)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (accessed 6 May 2008).
  207. ^ "B.B.C. 2 (Ch. 33) [...] 10.20 Doubts and Certainties: a Dean talks to an atheist, with Harry Williams, Nicholas Tomalin." 'Television and radio', The Times, 17 September 1968; pg. 18; Issue 57358; col A.
  208. ^ "Her parents were radicals in their outlook and they educated their daughter in a rationalist and humanist mode. As an atheist she saw religion only as the shield of tyranny, intolerance, and cruelty." D. A. Farnie, 'Utley, Winifred (1899–1978)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  209. ^ "She returned to England an atheist and radical, eager to view nihilism in Russia." Patrick Waddington, 'Voynich , Ethel Lilian (1864–1960)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edition, October 2007 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  210. ^ "[...] I'm an admirer of what you might call 'Enlightenment values' (though they go way beyond the Enlightenment). Things like scientific empiricism, the separation of church and state, the waning of absolutism and tyranny, yes, I cling to those. [...] It [his childhood home] was quite a religious household. I wouldn't be surprised, frankly, if I'm the first Wheen to be an atheist. And so, of course, there was a lot of church-going and all the rest of it, and gradually, through my childhood, I found myself rejecting more and more of it, until finally all I was left with was the Litany and the hymns. I know the Book of Common Prayer and Hymns Ancient and Modern and the King James Bible practically backwards, and I'm very fond of them all." Interview with Francis Wheen by Simon Jones for Third Way magazine, reprinted in Wheen's 2004 book How Mumbo-Jumbo Conquered the World, Harper Collins paperback 'P.S.' section, p.2, ISBN 0-00-714097-5.
  211. ^ "He was brought up in Reform Judaism, became an atheist in his teens, and remained sceptical about the religious temperament." S. P. Rosenbaum, 'Woolf, Leonard Sidney (1880–1969)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  212. ^ Nobel Lecture by Gao Xingjian
  213. ^ Baskerville left directions that his body be buried "in a Conical Building in my own premises Hearetofore used as a mill which I have lately Raised Higher and painted and in a vault which I have prepared for It. This Doubtless to many may appear a Whim perhaps It is so—But it is a whim for many years Resolve'd upon, as I have a Hearty Contempt for all Superstition the Farce of a Consecrated Ground the Irish Barbarism of Sure and Certain Hopes &c I also consider Revelation as it is call'd Exclusive of the Scraps of Morality casually Intermixt with It to be the most Impudent Abuse of Common Sense which Ever was Invented to Befool Mankind." He also wrote the test for his epitaph: "Stranger—Beneath this Cone in Uncons[e]crated Ground / A Friend to the Liberties of mankind Directed his Body to be Inhum'd / May the Example Contribute to Emancipate thy mind / From the Idle Fears of Superstition / And the wicked arts of priesthood." Both quoted in James Mosley, 'Baskerville, John (1706–1775)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (accessed 7 May 2008).
  214. ^ "Baskerville, designer of the type that bears his name and one of Birmingham's best known citizens, was an atheist and anticleric whose will contained a vitriolic attack on the Church." 'Printer's Reburial Demanded', The Times 9 March 1963; pg. 6; Issue 55645; col A.
  215. ^ Flynt writes "I have left my religious conversion behind and settled into a comfortable state of atheism" in the epilogue of his autobiography An Unseemly Man: My Life As A Pornographer, Pundit And Social Outcast by Larry Flynt and Kenneth Ross (1996) ISBN 0-7871-1143-0
  216. ^ Gray, Carole (Spring 1999). "The Atheist Who Saved The United States (...and the thanks he got for it)". The American Atheist 37 (2): 34-44. “One of his longtime employees, whose father had also worked for Stephen, said of him, "on the subject of religion, his opinions were atheistical. Let not the reader start, to find himself in company with one, who utterly disbelieved in all modes of a future existence, and who rejected with inward contempt every formulary of religion, as idle, vain, and unmeaning. Yet such were the convictions of Girard, held to his dying hour, and perpetuated in his last testament as a legacy to future generations .... He was known to be totally irreligious; and to attempt to conceal what is notorious, would be to suppress one of the most extraordinary features of his character."” 
  217. ^ "Although christened by a Baptist minister in the Gorbals (25 August 1819), he had a churchless upbringing and was a lifelong atheist." Richard Davenport-Hines, 'Pinkerton, Allan (1819–1884)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  218. ^ "I'm an atheist..." Lane interviews Graeme Samuel, BigIdeas, ABC Radio National, 28 May 2006 (Accessed 2 July 2007)
  219. ^ (Swedish) Translation: I am also an atheist. I find that just about everybody are atheists. The religions of the world has created many gods. Hinduism has millions. Most of the people I meet that call themselves Christians are atheists when it comes to all gods, except for one. Jag är en sökare!
  220. ^ "Mr Wyatt, an atheist, said that he had no axe to grind, and was struck by how much more different - "and accurate" - the BBC's description of Christianity was, where the birth of Jesus was mentioned as being "believed by Christians" and that Jesus "claimed" that he spoke with the authority of God." Hugh Davies, 'BBC site guilty of 'cringeing' ', Daily Telegraph, 8 February 2006, Pg. 7.
  221. ^ Mark Zuckerberg on Facebook
  222. ^ Zuckerberg "considers himself an atheist." Just How Much Do We Want to Share On Social Networks?, by Vauhini Vara, The Wall Street Journal, 28 November 2007 (Accessed 30 March 2008).
  223. ^ "Allen had little time for those who unquestioningly accept the tenets of any creed or system of thought. He applied this stricture equally to himself, and used humour to undermine even his own scepticism ("I'm an atheist, thank God"). [...] "His baffled humanity," wrote Charles Spencer, the theatre critic of The Daily Telegraph, in 1993, "his perplexity in the face of life's mysteries and irritations, are the qualities that make him such a fine and sometimes moving comedian. He's a blaspheming atheist on the side of the angels." " Obituary of Dave Allen, Daily Telegraph, 12 March 2005, Pg. 029.
  224. ^ "One of the many reasons Allen made the documentary was to explore his own atheism. Unlike most non-believers, he claims, in all seriousness, to have once seen God. It was at Glastonbury during the 1980s, and (as is the case with most of the splendid anecdotes that litter his conversation), it involved enough mind-altering substances to stun a baby elephant. [...] Like any considered atheist, particularly one who will burn in Hell, he lives according to a moral code that refuses to romanticise things like love, or devotion." Guy Adams, Serious documentary maker? Is Keith Allen having a laugh?, The Independent 21 June 2007 (accessed 25 April 2008).
  225. ^ 'Of course, Anderson has never avoided controversy, but this show promises to be his most contentious yet. As an out-and-proud atheist, he's asking, "If the world truly does have an intelligent design, why is everything so f---ed?"'—Lallo, Michael (April 5, 2007), Wil to Succeed, The Age, Fairfax Media. Retrieved November 15, 2007.
  226. ^ "...my mother was a Christian from Harrison, Ark., and somehow I'm an atheist now living in L.A."[32]
  227. ^ "Don't expect Jerry Springer-style controversy, however. Bowman, an atheist, has found that "most Christians are so disgusted by Guantanamo that I don't get many people saying it's offensive". And playing Jesus has even infiltrated his own personality: "I feel myself being more humble and trying to understand people with compassion rather than getting angry." " Emma John, 'A funny thing happened on the way to redemption', The Guardian, 14 August 2006, G2, Pg. 22.
  228. ^ During an episode of The Late Edition filmed in October 2007, Brigstocke was presented with an Out Campaign t-shirt by his guest and out-spoken Atheist Richard Dawkins to which Brigstocke replied: "Look at that. Outed, outed as an Atheist and proud to be so" [33]
  229. ^ Quotes from "There Is No God," You Are All Diseased. Carlin says on the same track that "there is no God. None, not one, no God, never was."
  230. ^ When asked by Penn Jillette if he was an atheist, Carolla replied "Yes." Interview on Penn Radio, 09-Mar-2006. Audio hosted at Penn Fans website. Accessed 29 October 2007.
  231. ^ "There's no God - grow up!". Jimmy Carr. Jimmy Carr Comedian [DVD]. Channel 4 DVD.
  232. ^ Pat Condell: interview - Features - Comedy - Time Out London
  233. ^ Appearance on ABC's "Politically Incorrect" (March 9, 1998) "I was born Jewish, but I am an atheist. I don't believe in God."[34]
  234. ^ "The comedian [...] said Britons should be taught the essentials of Christianity, if only for cultural reasons. But he also said that "lack of faith" should be taught in schools. "I think the concept that faith in itself is a good thing should be questioned from day one, which it isn't," he said. "There's a presumption that if you're a religious leader you are in some way already halfway up to the moral high ground and your opinion has more relevance than anyone else's." BBC 'too scared to allow jokes about Islam', 2 April 2008. (Accessed 3 April 2008)
  235. ^ "Elton described himself as an atheist but said he was in favour of God defined as "the mystery of the universe". His children attend a Church of England school and he said he attended church occasionally." BBC 'scared' of Islam jokes, says Elton, Guardian, 2 April 2008 (accessed 3 April 2008)
  236. ^ "Garofalo said "I am a proud atheist." Freethought Radio interview with Janeane Garofalo, 26 May 2007 (quote starts at 19:32). (Accessed 9 June 2007)
  237. ^ Gervais states he is an atheist in his Animals live DVD. Also, in a PBS "Fresh Air" interview, December 18, 2006 he said "I'm an atheist," and that Homer Simpson was the closest thing for him to God.
  238. ^ In an interview with Daily Mirror, Gervais said: "I'm basically a 'do unto others' type person. I don't have any religious feelings because I'm an atheist, but I live my life like there's a God. And if there was he'd probably love me." See Official homepage (Accessed 21 December 2007).
  239. ^ Speaking to Sacramento’s Outword Magazine, Griffin said: "...I think I’m getting more atheist because of the way the country is getting more into bible-thumping." See Quotelines, by Rex Wockner at Windy City Times (Accessed 29 August 2006).
  240. ^ Robin Ince Tour Dates. Retrieved on 2007-11-10.
  241. ^ Ince, Robin. Myspace.com - Robin Ince. Retrieved on 2007-11-10.
  242. ^ On the introduction by his children of a swearbox to his household, Joly wrote: "Our biggest area of contention at home is blasphemy. Jackson follows me round the house waiting for me to say "oh Jesus" or "for God's sake", two of my favourite expressions. I tried to get a ruling excluding these from punishment, on the grounds that I'm an atheist and don't consider them to be swear words." Dom Joly: It's 50p a swear word... and the pot stands at £75, The Independent, 20 April 2008 (accessed 21 April 2008).
  243. ^ "Craggy Island would soak up the irony. From beyond the grave, Dermot Morgan, a staunch atheist who savaged the Catholic Church, is delivering a final kick to the priests who gave him a hero's send-off." Rory Carroll, 'Catholic critic Father Ted still causing controversy', The Guardian, 23 April 1998, Pg. 4.
  244. ^ "[Oswalt is] an atheist..." MySpace must be doing something right, Chicago Sun-Times, Oct 5, 2006 by Andy Ihnatko (Accessed 20 December 2006)
  245. ^ "But it was secondary school, Bexleyheath Comprehensive, that really put me off God. I suddenly thought in assembly that this was all rubbish, all these stupid old gits like the headmaster and the deputy headmaster reading out this piffle and all these sulky kids moving their mouths to these hymns. I do remember enquiring whether or not you could be removed from assembly on the grounds of being an atheist, but I was told that it didn't count. You could only be excluded if you were Jewish, Catholic or Muslim. But not believing in God was not a valid reason." Linda Smith, Anarchist with attitude: Laurie Taylor interviews Linda Smith, New Humanist Volume 119 Issue 5 September/October 2004 (accessed 22 April 2008)
  246. ^ "An atheist from childhood, Linda Smith was appointed president of the British Humanist Society in 2004, declaring her intention to wake up a society which she felt had become stuck in the past." Daily Telegraph obituary: Linda Smith, 1 March 2006 (accessed 22 April 2008).
  247. ^ Interview with Sweeney discussing her atheism[35].
  248. ^ "I've been an atheist since the age of eight. A visiting pastor at church performed a magic trick that ended with him tapping a chalice and it filling with coins. I asked him how he did it and he said, 'All you need is faith,' When I got home I rushed down to the cellar and found an old Half Corona tin and a stick from my dad's wood box (he was a self-employed builder). I sat there for an hour and left an atheist." The world of Mark Thomas, comedian, Daily Telegraph, 1 December 2007 (accessed 10 April 2008).
  249. ^ "I found that Archie thing completely creepy. Is that because I am an atheist?" [36], The Washington Post, August 7, 2007. (Accessed 15 August 2007)
  250. ^ "She was a socialist, a romantic communist, and could charm with her charisma, spontaneity, and quick informed intelligence. She was a fervent atheist and advocate of humanism and common sense, accepting her stance without subjecting it to analysis." Sally Adams: 'Adams , Mary Grace Agnes (1898–1984)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 [37] (accessed 29 April 2008).
  251. ^ In a letter by Adams dated 10 August 1993: "I've spent a life-time attacking religious beliefs and have not wavered from a view of the universe that many would regard as bleak. Namely, that it is a meaningless place devoid of deity[sic] "[38].
  252. ^ "Still, it's worth noting that by the age of 20 this whistle-blower had resisted two of the most powerful institutions - church and army, both. He is an atheist, "And I have been against all of these wars ever since." " Suzie Mackenzie interviewing Altman, 'Still up to mischief', The Guardian, 1 May 2004, Pg. 30.
  253. ^ Every religion has a mythology. Sidmennt, the Icelandic Ethical Humanist Association (16 August 2006). Retrieved on 2006-12-19.
  254. ^ "Does the prospect of his own inevitable death frighten him? 'I don't think it does. I don't fret about it. I think it was partly to do with seeing my father go. It didn't frighten him. Upset him a bit but not ... I think if you are an atheist, what's there to be frightened of? ... But I don't want to die yet.' " Nigel Farndale, 'The Heartbreak Kid: Jim Broadbent', Sunday Telegraph, 23 September 2007, Section 7, Pg.8.
  255. ^ " Nor does organised religion emerge with honour, and Brock says he has been an atheist for many years. "My father was an intelligent and articulate advocate for old-fashioned notions of kindness and liberalism, but in the end I just did not feel that loving him was a justification for believing in a whole theocratic system. Religion in certain circles has become increasingly exclusive and aggressive. Fundamentalist attitudes pervade, and that, in its most extreme form, means you can kill anybody you want to because they're an unbeliever." " A very British charmer, Daily Telegraph 18 August 2006 (accessed 22 April 2008).
  256. ^ "Father Julian... and I often talk about faith and the existence of God, but... he's forever coming up against the stone wall of my atheism..." Luis Bunuel (1982, 1985). My Last Breath: p.254.
  257. ^ Richard Carleton 1943-2006 - The death of a legendary journalist - The Bulletin, 16 May 2006.
  258. ^ The Adam Carolla Show Blog, February 10, 2006
  259. ^ His blog
  260. ^ "So me, the completely unsuperstitious atheist, goes and posts on a message board that 'no, I don't believe in bad luck on Friday the 13th'." Asia Carrera's official website, bulletin for 13 July 2006 (archived 29 August 2007)
  261. ^ Reviewing The Letters of Noel Coward edited by Barry Day, Simon Callow noted: "His unashamed patriotism galvanised the nation. One wonders whether these admirers would have laughed so heartily or wept so freely if they had thought that they were being entertained and moved by a homosexual atheist of the most militant kind. A letter to his mother on the early death of his brother out-Dawkinses Dawkins: "I'm saying several acid prayers to a fat contented God the Father in a dirty night gown who hates you and me and every living creature in the world." " The Guardian, 15 December 2007, Review pages, Pg. 7.
  262. ^ "As writer and executive producer of Doctor Who, Davies often plays with religious imagery (from a cross-shaped space station to robot angels with halos), but he's a fervent believer in [Richard] Dawkins. "He has brought atheism proudly out of the closet!" " Russell T Davies: Return of the (tea) Time Lord, The Independent, 6 April 2008 (accessed 7 April 2008)
  263. ^ Interviewed by American Atheist "AA: You're a second generation Atheist. While in college, did you have a skeptical attitude toward the paranormal? Was it something you thought about at the time? DAVIS: I was always skeptical of ghosts, or aliens, or whatever it might be." American Atheist Interview with William B. Davis (accessed 14 April 2008)
  264. ^ Stephen M. Silverman, Dancing on the Ceiling: Stanley Donen and His Movies, Alfred A. Knopf: New York (1996), page 312.
  265. ^ Speaking about her role in the film The Lair of the White Worm, Donohoe said: "I'm an atheist, so it was actually a joy. Spitting on Christ was a great deal of fun. I can't embrace a male god who has persecuted female sexuality throughout the ages. And that persecution still goes on today all over the world." Biography of Amanda Donohoe, Internet Movie Database (accessed 24 April 2008).
  266. ^ "Earlier this year David Edgar wrote an unforgettable account of the death of his wife, Eve Cook, for a BBC radio talk during Easter week. An avowed atheist, Edgar said that he was trying to express 'that most human need to tell the dead what we would want to say - but know we couldn't say - if they were still alive'." Sean French, 'Dust to dustjacket', The Guardian, 30 April 1999, Pg. 18.
  267. ^ Interviewer: "At what point did you realize you were an atheist?" Flemming: "I kind of realized it gradually. At first it was like, OK, clearly fundamentalist Christianity is wrong, but Christianity is probably right. Then the more I actually thought about it, the more I deduced my way to atheism." Finding My Religion, SF Gate (San Francisco Chronicle), 13 February 2006 (accessed 14 April 2008).
  268. ^ "The more significant was Granada's Adam Smith the following year, with Keir as a bereaved Church of Scotland minister seeking the meaning of life. Though written by Trevor Griffiths under a nom-de-plume, it owed much of its character to Sir Denis Forman, by this time Granada's chairman and himself a son of the manse - Adam was his father's first name. Sir Denis is also a convinced atheist, and the series, which at first went out on Sunday evenings as a religious offering, became so doubting that it had to be switched to an ordinary outlet." Philip Purser, 'Obituary: Andrew Keir', The Guardian, 7 October 1997, Pg. 14.
  269. ^ "Jodie Foster: Unbreakable", Entertainment Weekly, 2007-09-07. Retrieved on 2007-12-29. "EW: Are you religious? JF: No, I'm an atheist. But I absolutely love religions and the rituals. Even though I don't believe in God." 
  270. ^ ""I never saw Russell lose it on set..."", TotalFilm.com, 2006-02-08. Retrieved on 2007-03-03. "I’m an atheist..." 
  271. ^ "My films show that I am a true atheist, although I always had the highest marks in Religious Education" [39] retrieved January 15, 2008
  272. ^ Reviewing Hare's collection Obedience, Struggle and Revolt, Nicholas Blincoe noted: "Hare's willingness to engage openly with traditions and institutions he respects can be heard in his speeches about Osborne and Williams, and in a speech to the Anglican Church, delivered at Westminster Abbey [...] the address to the Church is openly atheist." 'Turning his back on revolution', Daily Telegraph, 6 August 2005, Books section, Pg. 004.
  273. ^ Hepburn stated "I'm an atheist, and that's it. I believe there's nothing we can know except that we should be kind to each other and do what we can for people" in the October 1991 issue of Ladies' Home Journal[40]
  274. ^ a b Interview with Penn Jillette in which he mentions his and Teller's atheism.
  275. ^ "Sarah became an atheist, her writing fired by the cruelties carried out in the name of God. "God, the bastard," was one of her favourite Beckett quotes. "I think she looked at the world around her, and thought it was unsustainable to think there is an all-powerful, all-caring God who made the world as it is," says Simon [Kane, her brother]." Simon Hattenstone, 'A Sad Hurrah', The Guardian, 1 July 2000, Pg. 26.
  276. ^ "28.Do you have a religion and if so what is it? I am an Atheist. I know the film's really Christian and everything but it doesn’t really affect me. Oh and you know I’m related to Charles Darwin." [41]
  277. ^ "Although Hitchens’s title refers to God, his real energy is in the subtitle: “religion poisons everything.” Disproving the existence of God (at least to his own satisfaction and, frankly, to mine) is just the beginning for Hitchens..."—Kinsley, Michael (May 13, 2007). In God, Distrust. New York Times. Retrieved on 2007-05-17.
  278. ^ "Kawalerowicz, a professed atheist, had no interest in demonology per se, only as a symbol of repressed sexuality and of the power of authority, be it the Roman Catholic Church or - though it is never spelt out - Communism." 'Obituary of Jerzy Kawalerowicz, Polish director of 'Mother Joan of the Angels' who fell out with his fellow film-makers over the Solidarity movement', Daily Telegraph, 1 January 2008, Pg. 23.
  279. ^ "I was brought up an atheist and have always remained so. But at no time was I led to believe that morality was unimportant or that good and bad did not exist. I believe passionately in the need to distinguish between right and wrong and am somewhat confounded by being told I need God, Jesus or a clergyman to help me to do so. More: I'm offended. And one is constantly being told how offensive is a lack of faith to believers." Nigella Lawson, 'We atheists know right from wrong', The Times, 26 June 1996, Features section.
  280. ^ The Seattle Times article confirming that Leykis hosts a radio segment called Ask the Atheist [42].
  281. ^ "An atheist himself, Macdonald describes Touching the Void as a religious film in a post-religious age. 'It is about realising there is nothing but the void. Uncaring nature. Emptiness.' " Nigel Farndale interviewing Kevin Macdonald, Sunday Telegraph, 7 January 2007, Section 7, Pg. 18.
  282. ^ "I do not believe in God. I'm an atheist. I consider myself a critical thinker, and it fascinates me that in the 21st century most people still believe in, as George Carlin puts it, 'the invisible man living in the sky' " - Seth MacFarlane to [[Steppin' Out (magazine)|]] magazine. October 18, 2007 [43]
  283. ^ Voss, Brandon. "Big Gay Following: Seth MacFarlane", The Advocate, Planet Out, Incorporated, 2008-02-28. Retrieved on 2008-02-03. "...I'm an atheist..." 
  284. ^ Farber, Stephen. "A Night in Hollywood, a Day in Ukraine", The New York Times, 2006-12-31. Retrieved on 2006-12-31. "I’ve always felt very Jewish but very ambivalent about being Jewish. I’m an atheist." 
  285. ^ "I was brought up a Christian, low church, and I like the community of churchgoing. That's rather been replaced for me by the community of people I work with. I like a sense of family, of people working together. But I'm an atheist. So God, if She exists, isn't really a part of my life." - from a January 19, 1996 profile by Tim Appelo found in Mr. Showbiz.
  286. ^ "No, I don't believe in God" "Series 1, Episode 2". The Ricky Gervais Show. 2005-12-12.
  287. ^ "I've been reading Richard Dawkins' The God Delusion. It's his polemic against religion and even for an avowed atheist like myself, it's quite strong." "Office Boy", Q, May 2007 
  288. ^ "As I was saying before, it was so hard for me to be a Catholic. It wound my spring almost to the breaking point. The spring is still uncoiling from those early years. I'm a thoroughly virulent atheist."September 2004 Interview in The Believer
  289. ^ " No kosher food, but he [Warren Mitchell] feels Jewish. "I can't define it, I just am." It is not spiritual. "I am an atheist, thank God," he quips. " The pride of prejudice, Scotland on Sunday, 10 October 2004 (accessed 22 April 2008).
  290. ^ Interviewer: "You said that your experiences on Sunshine, and particularly the time you spent with the scientists turned you from an agnostic to an atheist – what changed your perception?" Murphy: "I did a lot of reading, I spoke to those guys a lot, and I was always an agnostic, which I think is a very safe place to be in terms of your faith or lack of... It just seems to me to be irrational that there’s an omnipotent, omnipresent being who was there at the beginning, and will be there forever, it’s not logical, it doesn’t help me as a person..." April 2007 interview in Total Film (Accessed 20 November 2007)
  291. ^ "Newly tolerant Parry is a "post-Deist" - "basically I'm an atheist but reluctant to admit it." Cassandra Jardine interviewing Bruce Parry, Daily Telegraph, 19 September 2007, Features, Pg. 25.
  292. ^ "Islam as we are experiencing it in the west at the moment is having difficulties examining areas of criticism. All religions should face criticism. As an atheist, I believe it is a healthy society that does criticise religions. What happened to Salman Rushdie was absolutely shameful. It takes us back to the middle ages." Julia Pascal, interviewed for the article 'Sikh theatre row: Can censorship ever be justified?', The Guardian, 22 December 2004, Pg. 7.
  293. ^ "Both her parents came from Russian Jewish backgrounds, but Julia was brought up as an atheist and an avid reader in Brooklyn, before the family moved, first to Great Neck, Long Island, and then to Milwaukee." Obituary of Julia Phillips, Daily Telegraph, 4 January 2002, Pg. 25.
  294. ^ "When asked what directors she admires, Polley talks about Ingmar Bergman and Terrence Malick (she says his Thin Red Line "single-handedly brought me out of a deep depression. It shifted something in me. I'm an atheist, but it was the first time that it gave me faith in other people's faith")." Woman on the Verge by Mark Pupo, Toronto Life Magazine, October 2006.
  295. ^ "An atheist, despite his upbringing, he described himself as a humanist radical." Anne Pimlott Baker, [http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/49502 'Robertson, Fyfe (1902–1987)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  296. ^ "[...] Semi-Detached [...] also shows Jones to be an emotional hoarder; a pragmatic atheist, who thinks little of the passage of time and scorns himself out of unhappiness, but who is still ashamed for misleading a girl 30 years earlier." Will Cohu, reviewing Semi-Detached by Griff Rhys Jones, Daily Telegraph, 18 November 2006, Books, Pg. 30.
  297. ^ "I read the whole of the Chronicles of Narnia when I was little and I grew up an atheist. My problem, I realise, was that I just didn't believe in Aslan." Griff Rhys Jones, 'Darling how thoughtful: a voucher for buttock reshaping', Sunday Telegraph, 11 December 2005, Features section, Pg.19.
  298. ^ "Serkis has been an atheist since his teens but feels spiritual when he's up a mountain (he once climbed the Matterhorn solo) and is much drawn to the karmic possibilities of energy transference. 'Not in a woo-ey way,' he smiles, 'but the idea that your energy lives on after you I find very relieving.'" Catherine Shoard, "Beastie Boy: You can take Andy Serkis out of the animal gear, but you can't take the animal out of Andy Serkis," The Sunday Telegraph 16 March 2008, Section 7, pg.22.
  299. ^ "His first chance came in 1944, when after a long period of feuding with Warner, Warner offered him a short. Siegel himself is a Jewish-born atheist. "I wondered what I could do which would most annoy Warner as a Jew; and decided on a present-day retelling of the story of the nativity. To my surprise he liked the idea, and it was a big success. So then I wondered what else I could do which would irritate him and tried something quite different, which was Hitler Lives." David Robinson, 'Don Siegel's stories', The Times, 1 May 1975; pg. 11; Issue 59384; col E.
  300. ^ Soderbergh siad "I’m a hardcore atheist." State of Independence, by Scotland on Sunday, 23 January 2005, (Accessed 8 June 2007).
  301. ^ "Like a lot of atheists, Starkey can seem a little obsessed with religion. [...] 'Personally, I find the inclusiveness and uncertainty of the Church of England as horrible as the brittle, iron-edged certainties of Islam and I would much rather the chairman of the National Secular Society held up the Coronation sword. But I can't see that happening. Although I am an atheist, unlike a Richard Dawkins, I understand the importance of religious motive and, broadly, I am sympathetic to it - except when it is fused with the political, which is what Henry does, and which modern Islam wants to do, and also what Tony Blair and George Bush flirt with.' " Nigel Farndale interviewing David Starkey, Sunday Telegraph, 5 November 2006, Secion 7, Pg. 18.
  302. ^ When asked what book he would choose to memorize, Straczynski said "Despite being an atheist, I would probably choose the Book of Job." Online chat with Straczynski, hosted by SciFi.com (Accessed 8 June 2007)
  303. ^ " "A lifelong atheist, he needed a belief, a philosophy, a cause," noted his first wife." Charles Spencer, 'Starstruck critic with a sting in his tail', Daily Telegraph, 29 September 2001, Pg. 07.
  304. ^ "If Jaya Bachchan is in the film, I will go to hell. But then I am an atheist, and do not believe in god." Jaya Bachchan in Sarkar Raaj?, India Times, 18 April 2008 (accessed 21 April 2008)
  305. ^ Mr Vaughan-Thomas says he is the only Welshman brought up as a trained atheist: "I am totally irreligious, but I can understand why religious people are concerned about the disintegration of Christian ethics. [...] I am a sympathetic atheist and I go to services from time to time and enjoy the great sense of history." Trevor Fishlock, 'Regional notebook: A feeling for history in one man's abiding devotion to a landscape', The Times, 8 January 1973; pg. 3; Issue 58675; col C.
  306. ^ "But then, this auteur has no hauteur; nor, more importantly, is he Jewish. Rather, he is an atheist who had a bout of Pentacostalist fervour in his mid-20s that still inflects his work and thinking: he still reads widely about Christian history; he considers RoboCop to be a Christ-like story of resurrection." Stuart Jeffries interviewing Verhoeven, 'Of course there are nude scenes... I'm Dutch!', The Guardian, 12 January 2007, Film and Music Pages, Pg. 6.
  307. ^ Asked if there was a God, Whedon answered, "No." Is There a God?, by Stephen Thompson, 9 October 2002, A.V. Club (Accessed 22 October 2006.)
  308. ^ "Well, I'm a Jewish-Buddhist-Atheist, I guess." Pogrebin, Abigail (2005). Stars of David: Prominent Jews Talk About Being Jewish. New York: Broadway, 91-99. ISBN 978-0-7679-1612-7. 
  309. ^ In his 2006 book Unintelligent Design: Why God isn't as smart as she thinks she is, Williams states: "Atheists like me don't think about God at all—unless provoked. We think about everything else that life's rich burden thrusts upon us. But God doesn't arise." (p.14; Allen & Unwin, Australia, ISBN 978-1-74114-923-4)
  310. ^ "LORD WILLIS (Lab.) said that although an atheist or humanist, he was not opposed to the teaching of religion in schools. What he objected to was the way in which it was presented. Except in rare instances, children were not taught about religion but about one religion and in a one-sided untruthful, dogmatic and prejudiced way." 'The Lords: contemporary approach to teaching religion in schools', The Times, 16 November 1967; pg. 5; Issue 57100; col A.
  311. ^ "A devoted only child, he acquired a profound knowledge of the Bible at his mother's knee; it may be supposed that he acquired there too his strong feelings about religion (in later life he often described himself as a 'politely militant' atheist), and a certain earnestness and missionary zeal that always marked him." R. C. T. Parker, 'Ste Croix, Geoffrey Ernest Maurice de (1910–2000)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edition, May 2007 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  312. ^ "Then in 1933 he was sent to Wellington College in England; this experience, he later insisted, turned him into an "atheist Marxist"." Mr Constantine Fitzgibbon: Novelist, biographer and historian, Obituaries, The Times, 25 March 1983; pg. 16; Issue 61490; col F.
  313. ^ "He became a utilitarian in philosophy, an associationist in psychology, an advocate of democratic reform in his politics, and a confirmed atheist." Joseph Hamburger: 'Grote, George (1794–1871)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edition, May 2006 (accessed 1 May 2008).
  314. ^ In the preface to his book The Unauthorized Version: Truth and Fiction in the Bible (1991), Lane Fox states: "I write as an atheist, but there are Christian and Jewish scholars whose versions [of the history of the Bible] would be far more radical than mine." (Penguin paperback edition 2006, p.7; ISBN 978-0-14-102296-3)
  315. ^ "The oral historian Tony Parker, who has died aged 73, was an atheist. "If it turns out I'm wrong and I find myself in front of God, I shan't half have a lot to say on the subject." One reason Tony will have so much to say in heaven is because he spent so much of his time on earth being totally silent." Roger Graef, 'Obituary: Tony Parker: Courage and Convictions', The Guardian, 5 October 1996, Pg. 18.
  316. ^ "It's easy to scoff at supernatural tales of seances and Ouija boards, but Compton Miller found that some remarkable people who believe them." "Humble pie from the hereafter LADY DOUGLAS OF KIRTLESIDE: Aged 62, an ex-Molyneax model and widow of the World War II RAF hero. Sholto Douglas was an atheist who always maintained that death was as final as "treading on a beetle". Soon after he died in 1969 his distraught widow met Dr Mervyn Stockwood, then Bishop of Southwark." Compton Miller, 'Lords and ladies in high spirits', The Times, 5 October 1984; pg. 15; Issue 61954; col A.
  317. ^ "I think of myself as a militant atheist and I never knew quite where Tony [Benn] was coming from on the religion side." The Writing on the Wall: An Interview with Roy Bailey (accessed 14 April 2008).
  318. ^ From the March 2001 issue of Kerrang magazine: ""Being an atheist means you have to realise that when you die, that really is it. You've got to make the most of what you've got here and spread as much influence as you can. I believe that you only live through the influence that you spread, whether that means having a kid or making music."
  319. ^ "If I get into trouble, there's no God or Allah to sort me out. I have to do it myself." [44]
  320. ^ When asked "Do you still consider yourself an atheist?" Brock replies "Pretty much, but there are things that make me think...I'm 100 percent on the whole Christianity thing being a crock of shit..." [45]
  321. ^ "Geoffrey Burgon [...] has declined a generous Hollywood offer to write the music for award-winning John Carpenter's remake of The Thing, a 1950s horror film. An atheist with a remarkable feel for "church" music, Burgon tells me that time prevents his crossing the Atlantic; he is busy writing two operas [...]" Peter Watson, 'The Times Diary', The Times, 12 January 1982; pg. 8; Issue 61129; col C.
  322. ^ "A religious and political freethinker, convinced of the truth of Darwinism and not inclined to conceal his beliefs, Burstow encountered some prejudice—indeed his views deterred some from contributing to the funds set up to relieve his poverty. However, he seems to have become something of a local celebrity: articles on Burstow appeared in newspapers and magazines, focusing on his singing, bell-ringing, prodigious memory, fascination with figures, and even his atheism."
  323. ^ "Burstow was a fascinating man. A shoemaker by trade, he shared the radical and non-conformist attitudes of many who followed the gentle craft. His reading included Darwin and Lyle and he was a convinced atheist, this in spite of the fact that he was a well known church bell-ringer." Vic Gammon, Chairman of the Oral History Society, 'The Grand Conversation: Napoleon and British Popular Balladry', 26 March 1999 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  324. ^ "Aside from his undisputed powers as composer, pianist and man of letters, Busoni was an enterprising (if sometimes erratic) conductor, a passionate bibliophile, a talented draughtsman and a bon vivant. Baptized into the Catholic church, he was at heart an atheist; a lucid commentator on world affairs, he remained politically uncommitted." Beaumont, Anthony: 'Busoni, Ferruccio (Dante Michelangelo Benvenuto)', Grove Music Online ed. L. Macy (accessed 28 April 2008), [46].
  325. ^ "I am the minority of the minority, an African-American atheist..." Official Greydon Square Website 11 June 2007 (Accessed 15 April 2008)
  326. ^ "Coyne is a comically rationalist atheist ("I wish I did believe in God. It would be a great relief to think, 'God'll take care of it. God'll put gas in the car tomorrow'") who makes music that, for all its quirkiness and frivolity, is in its essence spiritually transcendental. [...] For an atheist, he has a touching faith in the power of song to ease our shared burden. "There's some comfort in saying, I'm joining this long line of humanity," he says. "We're all going to get in line and our parents will die and our friends will die but I'm in the line with you and you're in it with me and, for some reason, if we're in it together, it's better than doing it alone. That's why music is always going to save us." Neil McCormick interviewing Wayne Coyne, Daily Telegraph, 23 March 2006, Features section: Music On Thursday, Pg. 23.
  327. ^ "Currie isn't praying for salvation, either. Echoing recent bestsellers by Richard Dawkins and Christopher Hitchens, he finds organized religion "fascinating, intellectually, but completely redundant. So I'm an extreme atheist who also believes in human rights." " Justin Currie on a roll, The Examiner, 15 April 2008 (accessed 21 April 2008).
  328. ^ "In the Mass of Life (1904–05) Delius testified to his atheism. With Cassirer's assistance, he selected the words from Nietzsche's prose-poem Also sprach Zarathustra [...] In music that touches extreme poles of physical energy and rapt contemplation, Delius celebrates the human 'Will' and the 'Individual', and the 'Eternal Recurrence of Nature'." Diana McVeagh, 'Delius, Frederick Theodor Albert (1862–1934)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  329. ^ "I'm an atheist, for Chrissake!" Question: Do DiFranco and Brown have all the answers?, 2000 interview with DiFranco by Jim Walsh, Pioneer Planet (Archived 25 August 2001)
  330. ^ "The ecumenical echoes are no accident. Eno describes himself as an "evangelical atheist, and has spoken of his intent to create a space in which one could have "secular spiritual experiences"." James Flint, 'This 'art for airports' is merely screen deep', Daily Telegraph, 2 February 2007, Features: Film on Friday, Pg. 32.
  331. ^ "For meg har aldri opprøret vært greia. Det har heller handlet om en slags ateistisk vind-i-håret-frihet og kritikk av organisert religion."[47] retrieved January 15, 2008
  332. ^ Atheist Musicians F to M
  333. ^ The hard-living Oasis star Noel Gallagher has revealed to the New Musical Express that he has read Richard Dawkins’ book The God Delusion and loved it “Anything that disproves God, bring it on” [48]
  334. ^ "Mr Geldof said that as an atheist he was not going along with this "if you like fundamental Christian agenda". " [49]
  335. ^ From Newsday, published March 30, 2006: "I'm an atheist, and I don't have any belief in an afterlife..."
  336. ^ "There was more to Godin than a love of music, however. A militant atheist, a conscientious objector who argued his way out of national service, a vegetarian from the age of 14, a campaigner against cruelty to animals and cinema censorship, he abhorred violence and believed in fairness in all areas of human conduct." Richard Williams, 'Obituary: Dave Godin', The Guardian, 20 October 2004, Pg. 27.
  337. ^ 'Graffin is a smart, proud atheist...'—Kinsella, Warren (January 2007), The punk and the professor and what they say about God, Anglican Journal. Retrieved August 9, 2007.
  338. ^ '[Graffin] describes himself as a naturalist, which to him means someone who holds that the natural world is all there is. "If you can believe in God, then you can believe in anything," he says. "It's a gang mentality."'—Olson, Steve (November 2006), Faces of the New Atheism: The Punk Rocker, Wired News, Condé Nast Publishing. Retrieved November 15, 2007.
  339. ^ SFBG Arts and Entertainment: September 9, 1998: Woman vs. rock
  340. ^ "In recognition of his achievements he was invited by George Grove to join the staff of the newly founded Royal College of Music as a professor of violin in 1883. However, within a few years of his appointment at the college, Grove became uncomfortably aware of his 'radical unbelieving views' and of his inclination to lecture his students on atheism and socialism." Jeremy Dibble, 'Holmes, Henry (1839–1905)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  341. ^ Reviewing a recording of the Glagolitic Mass, John Allison wrote: "Sacred music may have lost some of its importance over the last century or so, but more cynical times have not discouraged composers completely. Even atheist composers, among whom Janácek is a good example, have taken to the genre, though his celebrated Glagolitic Mass is more of a national than religious statement." Sunday Telegraph, 2 April 2006, Section 7, Classical, Pg. 29.
  342. ^ "'Atheist or believer?' 'Atheist.'" [50], The Mind's Construction Quarterly, (accessed 4 May 2008)
  343. ^ "as an atheist, 'I [Johnson] couldn't reconcile myself to the idea that Haile Selassie was God.'" 'I did my own thing', Guardian Books, 8 March 2008 (accessed 31 March 2008)
  344. ^ "I'm an atheist and an anarchist"—Eddy, Chuck (1997). Damage Case: Lemmy and Motörhead. Motörhead Forever.
  345. ^ Stated that he is an Atheist.[51]
  346. ^ "The closest word I’ve found to describe [my] belief system is Pantheism, but I could also call myself an agnostic (because I don’t claim to know if my own conception of divinity is ultimately true) or an atheist (because I believe that religions based around personified deities are definitely not true)."—The Universe According to Lynx (June 30, 2007), Soundtrack for Insurrection, circlealpha.com. Retrieved October 21, 2007.
  347. ^ Interviewing Maxwell Davies, Ivan Hewett wrote: "An avant-gardist who uses ancient Christian chants, an atheist who's written pieces entitled Antichrist and Revelation and Fall - clearly there are tensions beneath that carefully controlled surface." 'A Life on the Edge', Daily Telegraph, 7 April 2005, Features Pg. 015.
  348. ^ Interviewed by Nigel Farndale, Melly said: "I don't understand people panicking about death. It's inevitable. I'm an atheist; you'd think it would make it worse, but it doesn't. I've done quite a lot in the world, not necessarily of great significance, but I have done it." Daily Telegraph, 24 October 2005, Features section, Pg. 023.
  349. ^ Mark "Barney" Greenway writes regarding the album Smear Campaign: "People are also very supportive about the new album theme of atheism/free thought in a world being driven by aggressive religious mythology." [52] [53]
  350. ^ The Guardian describes as "a devout atheist - Stravinsky later described him rather disapprovingly as having a mind 'closed to any religious or metaphysical idea'" [54]
  351. ^ Rodgers' biographer William G Hyland states: "That Richard Rodgers would recall, at the very beginning of his memoirs, his great-grandmother's death and its religious significance for his family suggests his need to justify his own religious alienation. Richard became an atheist, and as a parent he resisted religious instruction for his children. According to his wife, Dorothy, he felt that religion was based on "fear" and contributed to "feelings of guilt." " Richard Rodgers, Yale University Press 1998, ISBN 0300071159. Chapter 1 at New York Times Books (accessed 30 April 2008).
  352. ^ quoted as saying "I'm an atheist" in interview for American Music Box[55]
  353. ^ "To these he brought the disciplines that had stood him in such good stead in music, most particularly the rejection of traditional beliefs unsupported by hard evidence. This also lay behind his own atheism." Andrew Lamb, 'Sams, Eric Sydney Charles (1926–2004)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, online edition, Oxford University Press, January 2008 (accessed 6 May 2008).
  354. ^ quoted saying that he is an atheist in an interview with concertlivewire.com[56]
  355. ^ "Both composers celebrate the potential of music to contain the irrational in human experience, although in stance they are antithetical. Strauss, the atheist, examines the vagaries of desire and the human psyche. Mahler, the visionary, goes on a solitary quest to find his God." Tim Ashley, 'Review: Classical: LPO/Elder: Royal Festival Hall, London 5/5', The Guardian, 6 December 2002, Pg. 22.
  356. ^ "I've always been an atheist. We grew up in a village and I was like 'I'm not joining the Christian Youth Club'. Believing something that's unprovable is not how my mind works." Tracey Thorn, 'G2: Pieces of me: Tracey Thorn, Singer', The Guardian, 23 July 2007, Features pages, Pg. 14.
  357. ^ "He then went as a boarder to Stamford grammar school, Lincolnshire, where he was much happier, though still a notorious character largely on account of his now fully developed atheism. [...] He was cremated on 15 January at Hanworth crematorium, at an explicitly non-religious service." Geraint Lewis, 'Tippett, Sir Michael Kemp (1905–1998)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (accessed 6 May 2008).
  358. ^ "This degree of radicalism Sydney could endure. But what of a man who had signed up as a communist immediately on his arrival, who was unashamedly an atheist, a realist where philosophers were expected to be idealists, who freely mixed with students when he was expected to meet them only in classes or, very occasionally, in their studies? Trouble was bound to loom ahead." John Passmore: 'Anderson, John (1893–1962)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 [57] (accessed 29 April 2008).
  359. ^ From a Freethought Radio podcast: Avalos: "I was a child evangelist and preacher, and I used to go around a lot of churches in Arizona specifically [...] it was coming along sort of in stages [...] slowly through high school, and so by the first year of college, I pretty much had realised that I am an atheist." [...] Annie Laurie Gaylor: "What made you an atheist?" Avalos: "Well I always say, reading the Bible did. The more I read the Bible and I tried to use the Bible to convert other people to Christianity, I realised, well I have to learn the arguments of the other religions I'm trying to convert. And the more I tried to learn the arguments and compare them to mine, the more I realised, I could make the arguments for their side just as well. Then it went into, you know, how do I know that anything I believe is true? And eventually I realised I have no evidence for any religion being true, and at that point, I was an atheist." FFRF podcast Fighting Words: The Origins of Religious Violence (mp3), 2 June 2007 (accessed 25 April 2008).
  360. ^ "Conversely, an absolute denial of God's existence is equally meaningless, since verification is impossible. However, despite this assertion, Ayer may be considered a practical atheist: one who sees no reason to worship an invisible deity." 2000 Years of Disbelief: Famous People with the Courage to Doubt, by James A. Haught, Prometheus Books, 1996, p. 276.
  361. ^ "I was thoroughly irritated when Freddie Ayer, the philosopher who was at Christ Church with me, presented me with a book inscribed: 'To my fellow atheist'." Lord Dacre, 'I liked the elegant, frivolous life...', Daily Telegraph, 28 January 2003, Pg. 17.
  362. ^ "The reverend Dr Tom Ambrose was sacked yesterday by his bishop for being "arrogant, aggressive, rude, bullying, high-handed, disorganised and at times petty", as a Church of England tribunal put it. Twice, he even spat at parishioners. You might expect that, as an atheist, I might rub my hands over this clerical outrage." Julian Baggini, Thought for the day - BBC Radio Bristol, blog entry, 11 April 2008 (accessed 22 April 2008).
  363. ^ Multiple quotes from Bakunin substantiating his atheist views[58].
  364. ^ "[Beauvoir] remained an atheist until her death." Simone de Beauvoir (1908-1986), The Internet Encyclopedia or Philosophy (Accessed 21 April 2008)
  365. ^ "Some years ago, without realizing what it might mean, I accepted a dinner invitation from a Jewish colleague for dinner on Friday night. I should say that my colleague had never appeared particularly orthodox, and he would have known that I am an atheist." Simon Blackburn, Religion and Respect (pdf) on his website, August 2004 (accessed 23 April 2008.)
  366. ^ David Simpson writes that Camus affirmed "a defiantly atheistic creed." Albert Camus (1913–1960), The Internet Encyclopedia or Philosophy, 2006, (Accessed 14 June 2007).
  367. ^ Martin Gardner said "Carnap was an atheist..." A Mind at Play: An Interview with Martin Gardner, by Kendrick Frazier, Skeptical Inquirer, March/April 1998 (Accessed 2 July 2007).
  368. ^ "Carnap had a modest but deeply religious family background, which might explain why, although he later became an atheist, he maintained a respectful and tolerant attitude in matters of faith throughout his life." Buldt, Bernd: "Carnap, Paul Rudolf", Complete Dictionary of Scientific Biography Vol. 20 p.43. Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2008.
  369. ^ "If I had to sum up my own atheism, I think I would have to say that it amounts to this: I have no interest in the supernatural. I also have no interest in what others believe about the supernatural as long as their belief does not involve intolerance of those who disagree with them." Robert Todd Carroll, Skeptic's Dictionary entry: atheism (accessed 28 April 2008).
  370. ^ "Like everyone participating I'm what's called here a "secular atheist," except that I can't even call myself an "atheist" because it is not at all clear what I'm being asked to deny." Noam Chomsky, Edge Discussion of Beyond Belief: Science, Religion, Reason and Survival, November 2006 (accessed 21 April 2008).
  371. ^ "Despite his atheism, Comte was concerned with moral regeneration and the establishment of a spiritual power." Mary Pickering, 'Auguste Comte and the Saint-Simonians', French Historical Studies Vol. 18, No. 1 (Spring 1993), pp. 211-236.
  372. ^ "But tragically, Comte's "remarkable clearness and extent of vision as to natural things" was coupled with a "total blindness in regard to all that pertains to man's spiritual nature and relations." His "astonishing philosophic power" served only to increase the "plausibility" of a dangerous infidelity. Comte was, once unmasked, a "blank, avowed, unblushing Atheist." [...] Some of the Reformed writers were careful enough to note that technically Comte was not an atheist since he never denied the existence of God, merely his comprehensibility. Practically, however, this made little difference. It only pointed to the skepticism and nescience at the core of his positivism. The epistemological issues dominated the criticism of Comte. Quickly, his atheism was traced to his sensual psychology (or "sensualistic psychology", as Robert Dabney preferred to say)." Charles D. Cashdollar, 'Auguste Comte and the American Reformed Theologians', Journal of the History of Ideas Vol. 39, No. 1 (January&ndashMarch 1978), pp. 61-79.
  373. ^ "This is why I am an atheist, while remaining faithful – as best as I can – to the spirit of Christ, who represents justice and charity." André Comte-Sponville, An Atheist Chooses Jesus Over Santa, Washington Post, 22 December 2007 (accessed 21 April 2008).
  374. ^ "An atheist, he rejected the burden of original sin, and preached the fundamental 'moral goodness of man.'" Condorcet's Reconsideration of America as a Model for Europe, Max M. Mintz, Journal of the Early Republic, Vol. 11, No. 4 (Winter, 1991), pp. 493-506 (p. 505), published by University of Pennsylvania Press on behalf of the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic
  375. ^ Stated in Will Durant's Outlines of Philosophy
  376. ^ Stated in Mary Bryden's Deleuze and Religion Page 157
  377. ^ Dennett, Daniel C. (2006), Breaking the Spell, Viking (Penguin), ISBN 0-670-03472-X
  378. ^ A History of Freethought, Ancient and Modern, to the Period of the French Revolution, J.M. Robertson, Fourth Edition, Revised and Expanded, In Two Volumes, Vol. I, Watts, 1936. p173 - 174
  379. ^ a b Will and Ariel Durant, Rousseau and Revolution, p. 183
  380. ^ "This book... presents the strongest case yet for atheism... Drange carefully analyzes and assesses two major arguments for the nonexistence of God: the argument from Evil and the Argument from Nonbelief." [quoted from the dustjacket description] Nonbelief & Evil: Two arguments for the nonexistence of God Theodore M. Drange, Prometheus Books, 1998, ISBN 1-57392-228-5
  381. ^ "'There is no God, there is no life after death, Jesus was a man, and, perhaps most important, the influence of religion is by and large bad,' he wrote in the current issue of Free Inquiry, a magazine about secular humanism, a school of thought that emphasizes values based on experience rather than religion." Paul Edwards, Professor and Editor of Philosophy, Dies at 81, by Jennifer Bayot, The New York Times, 16 December 2004 (Accessed 21 April 2008)
  382. ^ positiveatheism.org
  383. ^ "I would certainly describe myself as a robust or uncompromising atheist..." House Philosopher: An Interview with AC Grayling, conducted and hosted by Amazon.co.uk (Accessed 1 April 2008)
  384. ^ "Prof Harris, 54, an atheist who has advocated that corpses should become public property to make up for the shortage in transplant organs [...]." 'Is ANDi a miracle or a monster? Seven philosophers consider the ethical issues raised by the first GM monkey,' Daniel Johnson and Thomas Harding, Daily Telegraph, 22 January 2001, Pg. 04.
  385. ^ Will and Ariel Durant, The Age of Voltaire: a History of Civilization in Western Europe from 1715 to 1756, with Special Emphasis on the Conflict between Religion and Philosophy, New York, Simon and Schuster, 1965, pp. 695-714
  386. ^ "I am an atheist." [David Lewis, "Evil for Freedom's Sake," in Papers in Ethics and Social Philosophy, 101-127 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000). p. 102]
  387. ^ "A self-confessed "religious atheist", Lipton was fully engaged with his religious culture, taking his family to synagogue on Saturdays and teaching children at the Sabbath school. He did not think it was necessary to believe in God to recognise the value of religion in providing the individual with a moral compass." 'Obituary of Professor Peter Lipton, Inspiring head of Cambridge's department of History and Philosophy whose atheism did not impede his religious observance', Daily Telegraph, 17 December 2007, Pg. 23.
  388. ^ Kazimierz Lyszczynski's Web List of Atheists and Agnostics
  389. ^ J. L. Mackie, The Miracle of Theism, 1982.
  390. ^ "Are there really no atheists? No good reason has yet been given for NA and, until one is, we professed atheists have every reason to suppose that we really are atheists." Michael Martin, Are There Really No Atheists?, 1996 (accessed 21 April 2008).
  391. ^ "She became increasingly skeptical of religious beliefs, including her own liberal Unitarianism, and her avowal of atheism in the Letters on the Laws of Man's Nature and Development (1851, with H.G. Atkinson) caused widespread shock." Martineau, Harriet Encyclopædia Britannica Online, 2008 (Accessed 15 April 2008)
  392. ^ Contribution to the Critique of Hegel's Philosophy of Right, 1843
  393. ^ a b On the filming of The Atheism Tapes with Jonathan Miller: "We had been friends for a number of years, and had discussed a great many topics, but we had never, except glancingly, ever spoken about religion. We knew about our shared atheism, but the subject didn’t seem to warrant much attention; in the Miller-McGinn world it was a non-existent topic. [...] It is often forgotten that atheism of the kind shared by Jonathan and me (and Dawkins and Hitchens et al) has an ethical motive." Atheism Tapes, Colin McGinn, on his blog. (Accessed 1 April 2008)
  394. ^ Extracts from Moi Testament published as Superstition in All Ages
  395. ^ Will and Ariel Durant, The Age of Voltaire, 1965, pp. 611-17
  396. ^ Will and Ariel Durant, The Age of Voltaire, 1965, pp. 617-22
  397. ^ Autobiography, Chapter 2
  398. ^ "Since my mid-undergraduate days, I have been an atheist. By now I suppose there are some who would call me a professional atheist troikaing me with Antony Flew and Michael Scriven." Kai Nielsen, God and the Grounding of Morality, p.155 [59]
  399. ^ Die fröhliche Wissenschaft, aphorisms 108 and 125 [60])
  400. ^ Piergiorgio Odifreddi. Che fine ha fatto Dio? (Italian). Retrieved on 2006-10-09.
  401. ^ The Sydney Morning Herald. Facts and friction of Easter (English). Retrieved on 2008-03-23.
  402. ^ Amazon listing for Atheist Manifesto: The Case Against Christianity, Judaism, and Islam, by Michel Onfray. (Accessed 23 March 2008)
  403. ^ In 'Is God Good By Definition?' (1992), Oppy presented a logical argument for God's nonexistence based upon an alleged fact of metaethics: the falsity of moral realism. If moral realism is false, then that is a fact that is incompatible with God's existence.
  404. ^ "...as an Objectivist I am an atheist." Religion vs. America, by Leonard Peikoff, delivered at the Ford Hall Forum on April 20, 1986, and published in The Objectivist Forum, June 1986 (Accessed 15 April 2008)
  405. ^ "Herman Philipse is a Dutch professor of Philosophy who gained national notoriety in the Netherlands with his 'Atheist Manifesto.'" Divided House: Dutch Debate Nature of Europe’s Culture War, by Paul Belien, The Brussels Journal, 2006-03-02 (Accessed 15 April 2008)
  406. ^ In God and Moral Autonomy (1997), Rachels argued for the nonexistence of God based on the impossibility of a being worthy of worship.
  407. ^ Russell said: "As a philosopher, if I were speaking to a purely philosophic audience I should say that I ought to describe myself as an Agnostic, because I do not think that there is a conclusive argument by which one prove that there is not a God. On the other hand, if I am to convey the right impression to the ordinary man in the street I think I ought to say that I am an Atheist... None of us would seriously consider the possibility that all the gods of Homer really exist, and yet if you were to set to work to give a logical demonstration that Zeus, Hera, Poseidon, and the rest of them did not exist you would find it an awful job. You could not get such proof. Therefore, in regard to the Olympic gods, speaking to a purely philosophical audience, I would say that I am an Agnostic. But speaking popularly, I think that all of us would say in regard to those gods that we were Atheists. In regard to the Christian God, I should, I think, take exactly the same line." Am I an Agnostic or an Atheist?, from Last Philosophical Testament 1943–1968, (1997) Routledge ISBN 0-415-09409-7.
  408. ^ "Santayana playfully called himself 'a Catholic atheist,' but in spite of the fact that he deliberately immersed himself in the stream of Catholic religious life, he never took the sacraments. He neither literally regarded himself as a Catholic nor did Catholics regard him as a Catholic." Empiricism, Theoretical Constructs, and God, by Kai Nielsen, The Journal of Religion, Vol. 54, No. 3 (Jul., 1974), pp. 199-217 (p. 205), publishd by The University of Chicago Press
  409. ^ "He was so thoroughly an atheist that he rarely mentioned it, considering the topic of God to be beneath dicussion. In his autobiography, The Words, Sartre recalled deciding at about age twelve that God does not exist, and hardly thinking about it thereafter." 2000 Years of Disbelief: Famous People with the Courage to Doubt, James A. Haught, Prometheus Books, 1996.
  410. ^ Kimball, Roger (2000). The World According to Sartre. The New Criterion. Retrieved on 2006-11-12.
  411. ^ Kemerling, Garth (October 27, 2001). Sartre: Existential Life. Philosophy Pages. Britannica Internet Guide Selection. Retrieved on 2006-11-12.
  412. ^ MIZ title in German: Materialien und Informationen zur Zeit (MIZ) (Untertitel: Politisches Magazin für Konfessionslose und AtheistInnen)
  413. ^ "Like many other so-called "Atheists" I am also not a pure atheist, but actually an agnostic..." Life without God: A decision for the people (Automatic Google translation of the original, hosted at Schmidt-Salomon's website), by Michael Schmidt-Salomon 19 November 1996, first published in: Education and Criticism: Journal of Humanistic Philosophy and Free Thinking January 1997 (Accessed 1 April 2008)
  414. ^ "Within Schopenhauer's vision of the world as Will, there is no God to be comprehended, and the world is conceived of as being meaningless." [61]
  415. ^ Reviewing an episode of the Channel 4 series Voices: "On the one hand, Sir John Eccles, a quiet-spoken theist with the most devastating way of answering questions with a single "yes", on the other, Professor Searle, a flamboyant atheist using words I've never heard of or likely to again "now we know that renal secretions synthesize a substance called angiotensin and that angiotensin gets into the hypothalamus and causes a series of neuron firings". " Peter Dear, 'Today's television and radio programmes', The Times, 22 February 1984; pg. 31; Issue 61764; col A.
  416. ^ Price, Joyce Howard. "Princeton bioethicist argues Christianity hurts animals", The Washington Times, 4 July 2002. "I am an atheist." 
  417. ^ "This book is a presentation and defense of atheism." Atheism: The Case Against God, by George H. Smith, Prometheus Books, 1989, ISBN 0-87975-124-X
  418. ^ Smith has written numerous papers arguing for the nonexistence of God.
  419. ^ "Theodorus, the atheistic philosopher of Cyrene, appears in Athens during the Phalerean regime." Athenian Impiety Trials in the Late Fourth Century B. C., L. L. O'Sullivan, The Classical Quarterly, New Series, Vol. 47, No. 1 (1997), pp. 136-152 (p. 142), published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Classical Association
  420. ^ "It was during this time that White, by now a keen atheist, married, on 12 August 1948, Eileen Anne Jarvis (b. 1927), of Hull, a clerk; they had two daughters and a son." Paul Gilbert, 'White, Alan Richard (1922–1992)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  421. ^ "While Shirley was (and is) a devout Catholic and so took the marriage as a commitment for eternity, Bernard, an atheist, had not done so when he made the wedding vows. Shirley says: "The Church and Bernard had a wonderful time debating all this. The theologians were so thrilled to be discussing it with a leading philosopher." " Stuart Jeffries, 'Profile: Bernard Williams', The Guardian, 30 November 2002, Saturday Review, Pg. 20.
  422. ^ Wine said "I am an atheist." Time Magazine January 29, 1965
  423. ^ Atheism is a legacy worth fighting for (as reprinted in the International Herald Tribune), an editorial by Slavoj Zizek, The New York Times, Tuesday, March 14, 2006 (Accessed 2 July 2007).
  424. ^ "The defendant, in the witness-box, declared that the meeting was quite orderly, and there were cries of "Shame" when he was arrested. He denied the charges. Aldred said he was an Atheist and a Socialist." 'Hyde Park Speech Prosecution. Evidence For The Defence', The Times, Wednesday, Mar 04, 1925; pg. 5; Issue 43901; col G.
  425. ^ "There are religions that have very rigid rules and there are others that don't. Religion is something that I, as a person, am not interested in. I have always been an atheist. My parents were atheists. It doesn't bother me if somebody is religious. My problem is when religion is used to institutionalise other things." The Rediff Interview/ Subhasini Ali, 8 August 2001 (accessed 21 April 2008).
  426. ^ Edward Leigh, Gainsborough MP: "That point was made in the excellent speech by the hon. Member for Nottingham, North (Mr. Allen), who is a convinced atheist—perhaps a member of the National Secular Society; I do not know." House of Commons Hansard, 21 June 2005: Column 728 (accessed 24 April 2008).
  427. ^ The inauguration was, however, followed by an ecumenical service in the cathedral, since, as the new President, an atheist and freemason, has already explained, many of those who voted for his "Popular Unity" programme are sincere Roman Catholics." Richard Wigg, '75 states witness Allende pledge to democracy', The Times, 4 November 1970; pg. 9; Issue 58014; col E.
  428. ^ "His mother was an intelligent and widely read woman of strong, radical, Presbyterian views who encouraged William to read extensively and passed on a love of literature which stayed with him long after he was converted to free-thinking atheism." Joseph Melling, 'Anderson, William Crawford (1877–1919), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, Jan 2008 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  429. ^ "Señor Julio Anguita, the mayor, who is a self-confessed atheist indifferent to both religions, has invoked Spain's 1978 constitution which separates church and state [...]". Richard Wigg, 'Córdoba mayor upsets the bishop', The Times, 9 January 1981; pg. 4; Issue 60821; col E.
  430. ^ "[...] then in 1896 at the age of thirteen went on, like all the boys in the family, to Haileybury College. Here he confirmed an unobtrusive atheism—he became disenchanted with church attendance and religious observance—and played rugby and cricket with the handicap of his small stature and lack of any real skill, but enjoyed the rifle corps." R. C. Whiting, 'Attlee, Clement Richard, first Earl Attlee (1883–1967)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edition, January 2008 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  431. ^ Part Four of Away With All Gods! contains a section called "God Does Not Exist — And There Is No Good Reason to Believe In God". Table of Contents from the publisher, Insight Books.
  432. ^ "His failed marriage aside, he was on a climbing path of conventional success and acclaim, which he left in 1879 when he abandoned his application for the chair of comparative anatomy because the post required its holder to profess Christianity. In July 1879 he made a public pronouncement that he had been an atheist for two or three years. In June 1881 he lost his lectureship, largely because of his atheism." C. A. Creffield: 'Aveling, Edward Bibbens (1849–1898)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 [62] (accessed 29 April 2008).
  433. ^ "Well, I myself am a 100% atheist. And I am increasingly worried that the Israeli-Palestinian struggle, which dominates our entire life, is assuming a more and more religious character." Uri Avnery, A War of Religions? God Forbid!, Ramallah Online 19 February 2007(?) (accessed 28 April 2008).
  434. ^ "The pupil said he had read Richard Dawkins's book The God Delusion and it had helped turn him into an atheist. Mr Blair looked put out and eventually spluttered something about his new Tony Blair Faith Foundation also being about understanding people who had no god. His father Leo was a "militant atheist, he added." Tim Walker, 'Pupil rattles Blair', Daily Telegraph 5 April 2008.
  435. ^ "Mrs. Braddock, whose husband died in 1963, was an atheist, and her funeral service, next Tuesday at Liverpool crematorium, will be non-sectarian." Christopher Warman, ' 'Merseyside legend' Mrs Braddock dies at 71', The Times, 14 November 1970; pg. 1; Issue 58023; col G.
  436. ^ Bradlaugh professes and defends atheism in his essay A Plea For Atheism.
  437. ^ "You are an atheist. Tony Blair is a devout Christian. Did that make you feel uncomfortable?" Campbell answering questions in The Independent newspaper [63].
  438. ^ "Mr Campbell, who is an atheist, has been keen to stop Mr Blair discussing his faith since 1996, when the Labour leader gave an extensive interview on the subject in The Telegraph which proved highly controversial." [64] The Daily Telegraph.
  439. ^ Godless Americans Political Action Committee national advisory board[65]
  440. ^ Michigan Godless Americans Political Action Committee[66]
  441. ^ "Queer-boy, soap-star, luvvie, Blairite, Michael is also, for the final flourish, something of a Buddhist. 'It seems to me a wonderfully selfless religion - and of course the only one which has had no war fought on its behalf.' He was brought up a Catholic, 'but not any more. People who think you have to do things now for reward later might feel faced with a comeuppance that, as an atheist, I don't have to deal with. If it turns out that there is a God, and I meet her, I think she'll say: 'Well... you were pretty fearless, and you did what you thought was right. I've got a place for you.' " Victoria Coren, 'The Monday interview: Michael Cashman: Straight talker', The Guardian, 24 August 1998, Pg. 14.
  442. ^ "Opposition Members said that many Labour Members hate religion. Perhaps they think that those who support the new clause are atheists. Will my hon. Friend accept my assurance that it is possible to be an atheist and to admire religion? It is even possible to be an atheist and to study it, as I chose to do when I went to university." Colin Challen, House of Commons Hansard, 6 Feb 2002: Column 952 (accessed 24 April 2008).
  443. ^ Asked directly in the interview on BBC Radio 5 Live, "Do you believe in God?", Mr Clegg replied simply: "No." I don't believe in God, says new Lib Dem chief, The Scotsman, 20 December 2007 (accessed 1 April 2008)
  444. ^ Q: You had the courage publicly to declare that you are an atheist. How does your secular outlook affect your political views? - Simon Maynard. A: I have tremendous respect for people with faith, it's just not something I have myself. But I think it's absolutely vital to keep politics and faith separate. Government shouldn't make moral judgements about what people do or do not believe: faith is a private, personal decision that politicians should not interfere with. Clegg responds - Part II, Spectator Coffee House, 4 April 2008 (accessed 15 April 2008).
  445. ^ "For instance, Chrysostomos might argue that certain self-declared atheists should not be allowed to vote. It's worth recalling that a couple of years ago, the leader of the communist party AKEL Demetris Christofias said he was an atheist." Elias Hazou, 'Church elections: how it works', Cyprus Mail archive article, 17 September 2006 (accessed 15 May 2008).
  446. ^ "M. Clemenceau does not belong to the Socialist party, but is nevertheless a convinced atheist. He opposes zealously the idea of God, and preaches revolt against Him." Eugne Tavernier, 'The Religious Question In France. I. A French Catholic's View', The Times, 6 November 1909; p. 5; Issue 39110; col F.
  447. ^ Labour Party at prayer salutes Cook the atheist, by Magnus Linklater, The Times, 13 August 2005.
  448. ^ "When he left, after numerous rows with American socialists—De Leon ultimately dubbed the atheist Connolly a Jesuit agent; Connolly alleged De Leon was 'purposely doing the work of the capitalist class' (Connolly to Matheson, 8 Nov 1900, Dudley Edwards, 63)—though the class struggle was still his main concern he had developed a new sympathy with cultural and political nationalism." Ruth Dudley Edwards: 'Connolly, James (1868–1916)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 [67] (accessed 30 April 2008).
  449. ^ "The philosophical and political differences among the conspirators were expressed at the trial. This was particularly obvious between the two Cubrilović brothers. [...] Veljko was a deeply religious man, who spent the whole night before the execution reading St. John's Gospel; Vaso was an atheist, scandalising judges with his statements; [...]." 'Back to Sarajevo After 50 Years By Professor Vladimir Dedijer of Harvard', The Times, 26 June 1964; pg. 13; Issue 56048; col F.
  450. ^ "Lord Desai: Like my noble friend Lord Dormand I am an atheist and therefore should not speak too much about religion, but I am glad that the C[hurch] of E[ngland], having lost money in real estate, is now interested in sex and making money. That is always welcome." Lords Hansard, 4 Jun 1998: Column 481 (accessed 24 April 2008).
  451. ^ In a House of Commons debate on historic churches, Sir Patrick Cormack said: "The chairman of the historic churches and chapels group, the right hon. Member for Holborn and St. Pancras (Frank Dobson) [...] is a self-proclaimed atheist but shares the affection [for historic churches] that I believe that the Minister has [...]" House of Commons Hansard, 14 Dec 2006: Column 1132 (accessed 24 April 2008).
  452. ^ "As the most insistent of atheists in the House of Lords, after he arrived there in 1987, Dormand demanded equal rights for the non-religious fifth of the population. As a former teacher and education officer, he wanted religions and humanism described neutrally in schools, not propagated. [...] But "after some years of very considerable thought", he became an atheist, though "I certainly attempt, although I fail regularly, to live by the Christian ethic." He became more overtly atheist in the Lords than he had been in the Commons, where he had to worry about his religious constituents. [...] He started teaching at 21, telling his headmaster that, as an atheist, he was not really qualified to take religious education." Andrew Roth, 'Obituary: Lord Dormand of Easington: Genial chairman during Labour's hard times', The Guardian, 20 December 2003, Pg. 21.
  453. ^ "Fisher may have underestimated the offence the book would cause because he was himself an agnostic in religious matters; in private letters he described himself as an atheist, and said firmly to his friends that religion 'rots the mind' (J. Hart, Ask me No More, 1998, 204)." A. Ryan, 'Fisher, Herbert Albert Laurens (1865–1940)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edition, January 2008 [68] (accessed 1 May 2008).
  454. ^ "Mr Findlay, who describes himself as an atheist, also claimed that under European human rights law he had the right to free speech." joke not intended as offensive, says QC', The Journal Online, 19 June 2007 (accessed 13 May 2008).
  455. ^ "I am an atheist and yet I am accepted by Hindus because as far as I can I follow the principles of the Gita, which I consider the most important Hindu book. In my small way I try to live by that. I do not believe in God but I believe that we have to live a good life on this Earth." Baroness Flather, Lords Hansard, 19 Apr 2007: Column 341 (accessed 24 April 2008).
  456. ^ "Why are politicians such awful people, I asked Michael Foot. 'They're not,' he answered. 'Only the ones who don't do anything else.' His father's son, obviously. And also his own man. He became fatally estranged from his father's Methodist insistencies as a student, when he came upon Bertrand Russell's humanism. He kept quiet about it at the time. 'No point saying I'm an atheist. It wouldn't have been kind.' " Sally Vincent, The Guardian, 2 January 1999, Weekend Page, Pg. 16.
  457. ^ In his Life of Garibaldi (1881) Bent reproduces a letter he wrote two years before he died. "Dear Friends-Man created God, not God man-yours ever, Garibaldi."
  458. ^ "Goldie's opinions, as much as his actions, defied convention. He was a convinced atheist, an admirer of Huxley, Darwin, and Winwoode Reade." Scarbrough: 'Goldie, Sir George Dashwood Taubman (1846–1925)', rev. John Flint, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2008 [69] (accessed 1 May 2008).
  459. ^ "Above all, however, Mr. Gomulka is an atheist, and he is now strong enough to say so in a country which is not." 'Mr. Gomulka Bolder Against Church', The Times, Wednesday, Feb 08, 1961; pg. 11; Issue 55000; col D.
  460. ^ "I am an atheist. But I... respect the feelings and the religious beliefs of each citizen." Gorbachev interview with Peter Jennings, ABC News, Sept. 6, 1991, reported in The New York Times, Sept. 7, 1991.
  461. ^ Atheism: An Affirmative View (1980) by Emmett F. Fields
  462. ^ hyperhistory.net
  463. ^ "I was the visiting atheist on the BBC's weekly religious show a couple of Sundays ago." Roy Hattersley, 'Blighted by a moral code', The Guardian, 11 December 2006, Comment and Debate, Pg. 25.
  464. ^ In 1996 Hayden was recognised as the Australian Humanist of the Year with the statement that "The award is made because he has shown that an avowed atheist who describes himself as a secular humanist can occupy the position of Governor-General with mounting approval." Australian Humanist, No. 41 February 1996
  465. ^ "Being an atheist--as I am--is not a necessary pre-condition for being a humanist." in his acceptance speech for Australian Humanist of the Year, reported in Australian Humanist, No 42, May 1996
  466. ^ "He [Chaim Maccoby] spoke out ever more vehemently against Herzl, the self-confessed atheist, and his followers, refusing to preach at one federation synagogue because it dared to host a branch of the Zionist Federation." Geoffrey Alderman, 'Maccoby, Chaim Zundel (1858–1916)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  467. ^ "Baroness Blatch: My Lords, if noble Lords, like me, believe in the life hereafter, then it is possible to believe that the doughty animal-lover, the late Lord Houghton of Sowerby, will be looking down on our proceedings today. Lord McIntosh of Haringey: My Lords-- Baroness Blatch: I know that the noble Lord is not a believer in these matters. I speak personally; I did make that point. [...] Lord McIntosh of Haringey: Before the Minister leaves Lord Houghton of Sowerby, it is not my beliefs that matter; Lord Houghton was to his dying day a devoted atheist." Lords Hansard, 20 March 1997: Column 1142-1143
  468. ^ Sang M. Lee writes that Albania was "[o]fficially an atheist state under Hoxha..." Restructuring Albanian Business Education Infrastructure August 2000 (Accessed 6 June 2007)
  469. ^ Kamm, Henry (1993, June 10). 'Hallelujah' is heard in the arch-atheist's temple. The New York Times (Late Edition (East Coast)), p. A4. Retrieved August 27, 2007, from National Newspaper Abstracts
  470. ^ "Do we accept the fact that in a wholly elected Chamber there would be no Cross-Benchers and no representatives of the Church of England or any other faith? Fortunately there will still be room for atheists like me, although I would go as well under a wholly elected system." Lord Hughes of Woodside, Lords Hansard, 21 Jan 2003: Column 632 (accessed 25 April 2008).
  471. ^ "A diligent pupil, she won a scholarship to Milan's prestigious Catholic university - which left no traces of religiosity. An untormented atheist, she died without a priest at her side." Donald Sassoon, 'Nilde Iotti: Italy's leading post-war woman politician and a founding mother of the republic', The Guardian, 9 December 1999, Leader Pages, Pg. 24.
  472. ^ " Dale Jackaman doesn't believe in God. Those who do worry him, especially fundamentalists. "I'm an atheist," declares Jackaman, a former Army reservist who has served in the Middle East and now runs a computer security firm. [...] "Atheists tend not to bother anybody unless they're riled up," Jackaman said. "We're riled up now." [...] Jackaman gives the lie to the old saw that there are no atheists in foxholes. He did three tours of duty in the Middle East -- two in the Golan Heights and one in Cyprus -- with the Army signal corps. Far from igniting any spark of spirituality, his experience in the war-torn Middle East confirmed his belief that religious differences fan the flames of war. "It solidified my atheism," Jackaman said. " No god before me, Richmond News 23 October 2007 (accessed 22 April 2008).
  473. ^ "When Jackson in his teens converted 'in a night' to socialism and atheism, he was 'literally ill for days afterwards', and it was another two years before he felt able to reveal his new beliefs to his parents (memoirs, People's History Museum, Manchester)." Kevin Morgan, 'Jackson, Thomas Alfred (1879–1955)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (accessed 6 May 2008).
  474. ^ "I come to this debate with some hesitation because, although I am an atheist, I have always respected the Church of England for the courageous conduct of some of its clergy in South Africa during the apartheid regime, for its social and community work in the UK and for its stand on many human rights issues, and, of course, my admiration and respect for the most reverend Primate the Archbishop of York is unbounded." Lord Joffe, Lords Hansard, 19 Apr 2007: Column 357 (accessed 24 April 2008).
  475. ^ "Fiercely anti-Christian, he also found time to publish, under the pseudonym Lin Shao Yang, an attack on protestant missions in China, A Chinese Appeal to Christendom Concerning Christian Missions (1911). [...] Johnston's atheism was humourless, and privately coarse. His anger with Christianity was a reaction against the high-church Anglicanism of his early upbringing; his was a quarrel with God, as much as with the mission enterprise—although he claimed the latter was as morally indefensible as the opium trade." Robert Bickers, 'Johnston, Sir Reginald Fleming (1874–1938)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edition, January 2008 (accessed 6 May 2008).
  476. ^ "Since Karunanidhi is an atheist he seems to believe in Janatha Janardhan rather than the Janardhan (God)....."[70]
  477. ^ .....M. Karunanidhi, is a sworn atheist, it is a tussle between personal beliefs and the party's ideological moorings.[71]
  478. ^ "I am not a religious believer, and the Bible is not an authority for me. I never did recognize it as an authority even before I joined the party. I always was an atheist." Memoirs of Nikita Khrushchev: Volume 3: Statesman, 1953-1964, p.9. Edited by MR Sergei Khrushchev. 2007, Penn State Press, ISBN 0271023325.
  479. ^ "Khrushchev was a convinced atheist who displayed little tolerance for the traditions and symbols of pre-revolutionary Russia." Intellectuals and Apparatchiks: Russian Nationalism and the Gorbachev Revolution, p.61. Kevin O'Connor. 2006, Lexington Books, ISBN 0739107712.
  480. ^ King calls herself "a misguided 'cultural' Jew without any culture, and a born-again atheist." My week: Oona King, by Oona King, The Observer, Sunday March 5 2006 (hosted at guardian.co.uk, accessed 29 March 2008)
  481. ^ "Mr Blair's private faith is well-documented and almost certainly stronger than any prime minister in recent memory. Mr Hague is more typical in being an occasional church-goer. Neil Kinnock was unique in declaring himself an atheist." Michael White, Political editor, 'Blair to address Christian groups conference', The Guardian, 26 June 2000, Pg. 4.
  482. ^ "I am an atheist and everybody knows it..." Atheist premier attacks lack of Christianity in EU constitution, by Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, The Telegraph, 4 June 2003.
  483. ^ "[Pod Znamenem Marksizma] must be a militant atheist organ... a journal which sets out to propagandise militant materialism must carry on untiring atheist propaganda and an untiring atheist fight." On the Significance of Militant Materialism, V. I. Lenin, Pod Znamenem Marksizma No. 3, 12 March 1922, as published in Lenin’s Collected Works, Progress Publishers, Moscow, Volume 33, 1972, pp. 227-236 (Translated by David Skvirsky and George Hanna), hosted at Marxists Internet Archive (Accessed 14 November 2007)
  484. ^ "I assume you're an atheist? I am too. Isn't life easier?" Ken Livingstone: The Interview. attitude. Retrieved on 2008-04-25.
  485. ^ PERSECUTION WATCH: Belarus. vineyardfederalway.org. Retrieved on 2006-09-01.
  486. ^ [72].
  487. ^ "I speak as someone who was brought up as an atheist, although my free-thinking parents insisted that I spent a great deal of my childhood at Bible class, the Boys' Brigade and Church of Scotland lectures, none of which I regret, but I came back to an atheistic view of the world and have maintained that." Gus Macdonald, Lords Hansard, 27 March 2006: Column GC257 (accessed 24 April 2008).
  488. ^ "As I have said in the House, I am an atheist and anti-clerical and I do not believe that religion should play the large part that it does in the House or elsewhere." John Maxton, House of Commons Hansard, 23 Jun 1999: Column 1253 (accessed 24 April 2008).
  489. ^ "I am not religious: my children have never been christened. I openly and proudly announce that I am an atheist." John Maxton, House of Commons Hansard, 29 Oct 1996: Column 518 (accessed 28 April 2008).
  490. ^ "They spent much of their early married life with the Salisburys at Hatfield House; this she found enthralling but oppressive—the incessant talk about the Anglican church dividing her, an atheist, from the religious Cecils." Hugh Cecil, 'Milner , Violet Georgina, Viscountess Milner (1872–1958)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edition, October 2006 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  491. ^ "Milosevic buried in quiet ceremony in his hometown", CBC News, 2006-03-18. Retrieved on 2008-04-02. "There were no clergy at the ceremony because Milosevic was an avowed atheist." 
  492. ^ "[...] Morley was an odd choice for biographer, since he was a "freethinking atheist, and he agreed to the Gladstone family's stipulation that he should refrain from treating Gladstone's religion in any depth." Christopher Howse, 'Why Gladstone had God up his sleeve', Daily Telegraph, 24 November 2007, Pg. 29.
  493. ^ "She had always proclaimed herself an atheist..." Times obituary: Dr Marjorie Mowlam, 19 August 2005 (Accessed 6 June 2007)
  494. ^ In a heated debate in the House of Lords in which the Archbishop of Canterbury, Lord Carey, claimed "in my opinion, atheists are not renowned throughout the world for their commitment to the very poor, the starving and the needy", Baroness Murphy replied: "I speak as a rationalist, agnostic — I shall not say atheist in the light of the comments of the noble and right reverend Lord, Lord Carey. It is not a particularly comfortable matter, but one reason to contribute to this debate is to stand up and be counted. I was going to remain rather calm throughout this, but I was rather offended by the comments of the noble and right reverend Lord, Lord Carey, about the role that people without faith have played in doing good in the world. He is entirely and wholly wrong. We feel just as passionately as those who have faith about ensuring that society is just." Lords Hansard, 19 Apr 2007: Column 350–351 (accessed 24 April 2008).
  495. ^ "My father was almost entirely absent from my childhood, having been divorced from my mother when I was 2 years old; in any event, although my father had been raised a Muslim, by the time he met my mother he was a confirmed atheist, thinking religion to be so much superstition." Barack Obama Jr, 'My Spiritual Journey', Time, 16 October 2006 (accessed 7 May 2008).
  496. ^ The Hon. Atheist Governor: Culbert L. Olson[73]
  497. ^ "She died an atheist, from stomach cancer, on 23 January 1932 [...]." Brian Harrison, 'Phillips, Marion (1881–1932)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edition, January 2008 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  498. ^ "Mr. Piratin declined to take the oath, saying that he was an atheist, and elected to affirm." 'Former Communist M.P.'S Application Suspended Discharge From Bankruptcy', The Times, Saturday, Jul 12, 1952; pg. 3; Issue 52362; col C.
  499. ^ "Although an atheist, Romme did not support deChristianization, nor did he regret the fall of Maximilien Robespierre." Historical Dictionary of the French Revolution, by Paul R. Hanson, Scarecrow Press, 2004, p. 281 (Accessed 15 April 2008)
  500. ^ "But Roy was an atheist and fierce priest hater..." Portrait of a Bengal Revolutionary, by Leonard A. Gordon, The Journal of Asian Studies, Vol. 27, No. 2 (Feb., 1968), pp. 197-216, published by Association for Asian Studies
  501. ^ "Moreover, unless I am much mistaken, as that person is a Church Commissioner he must be a member of the Church of England, an organisation of which I was a member before I became an atheist." Brian Sedgemore, House of Commons Hansard, 13 Feb 2002: Column 247 (accessed 24 April 2008).
  502. ^ "I, too, am a republican atheist, by the way—that should be put in the record—and agree with points made by other hon. Members." Phil Sawford, House of Commons Standing Committee on Delegated Legislation (pt 3), 29 October 2001 (accessed 24 April 2008).
  503. ^ "She had been a militant nationalist among the pacifist internationalist feminists, a republican among the free staters, a feminist among the nationalists, and an atheist in holy Ireland." Sybil Oldfield, 'Skeffington, Johanna Mary Sheehy- (1877–1946)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  504. ^ "His parents combined Irish nationalism, atheism, feminism, pacifism, and socialism. Sheehy-Skeffington learned to think for himself, coming to share their politics, minus his mother's later abstentionist republicanism." D. R. O'Connor Lysaght, 'Skeffington, Owen Lancelot Sheehy- (1909–1970)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (accessed 6 May 2008).
  505. ^ Why I am an Atheist, Bhagat Singh, October 1930.
  506. ^ Stalin is quoted as saying "You know, they are fooling us, there is no God...all this talk about God is sheer nonsense" in E. Yaroslavsky, Landmarks in the Life of Stalin, Foreign Languages Publishing House, Moscow 1940
  507. ^ Stark called himself "a Unitarian who does not believe in a supreme being" and has been identified as an atheist. Rep. Stark applauded for atheist outlook: Believed to be first congressman to declare nontheism, Associated Press, 13 March 2007 (Accessed 15 June 2007)
  508. ^ "It is long overdue for Atheistic arguments to be given a seat at the table of the marketplace of ideas in today's world. I have established this website in the hope of providing a platform for the dissemination of these arguments." Website of Eddie Tabash (Accessed 14 April 2008)
  509. ^ Peter Tatchell: Islamists Betray Palestine and Human Rights "They happily work with me, despite my atheism and gayness. This is the kind, gentle face of Islam that never seems to be newsworthy."
  510. ^ "Such actions established among the Catholic population of the area a long-lived reputation for kindness and fair dealing which persisted despite his professed atheism." Noel Thompson, 'Thompson, William (1775–1833)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (accessed 6 May 2008).
  511. ^ "It has just been revealed that Thuy used to earn a living as a sorcerer [...] he travelled around the country selling magical charms, spells and cures, and spreading Communist propaganda at the same time. This information was volunteered by a Vietcong colonel who recently came over to the South Vietnam Government side. He said they Thuy, being an atheist, clearly did not believe in his own magical powers, but had used sorcery purely as a cover for his political work." 'Party Tricks', 'The Times Diary', The Times, 7 June 1968; pg. 8; Issue 57271; col F.
  512. ^ "Churches along the route were closed. It was said at the Vatican that this could be seen as a silent protest against an atheist's funeral on such a scale in the heart of Christian Rome." 'Communist Show Of Strength At Signor Togliatti's Funeral', The Times, 26 August 1964; pg. 7; Issue 56100; col C.
  513. ^ Trotsky's Testament. Retrieved on 2007-12-09. “I shall die a proletarian revolutionist, a Marxist, a dialectical materialist, and, consequently, an irreconcilable atheist.”
  514. ^ (Swedish) "Bengt Westerberg: Humanistisk ledning av Röda Korset". Humanisten. Retrieved on 2007-08-18. Translation: Interviewer: I would like to ask you about your relation to religion and atheistic humanism. When did you "come out" as [an] atheist and how did it happen?
    Westerberg: If you mean in public, then I revealed it in connection to my candidacy as party leader for the People's Party. I got the question if I believed in God from Thomas Hempel in Radioekot (radioprogram) and answered no. That's when it became known, though I've never made any secret about it.
  515. ^ "It was entirely right that Phillip Whitehead, who loved the village and had lived there since he was three, should have left it in the way that Rowsley men and women have left it for 200 years and more. It was an English funeral in an English village according to the rites of the Church of England. But it is at least a paradox that a man who was an uncompromising atheist - and so described by one of his sons during the service - should be laid to rest with the promise of resurrection and eternal life." Roy Hattersley, 'A decent send-off: Even a hardline atheist can see that the church is better than anyone at staging the last farewell', The Guardian 16 January 2006, Pg. 31.
  516. ^ "Wolfe, a self-proclaimed atheist, said he recognizes the importance of being open to religious ideas." Sara Esquilin, Celebrated atheists debate the ethics of non-believers, The Daily Free Press, 29 April 2008 (accessed 30 April 2008).
  517. ^ "With revolution came a new, atheist regime - one that frowned on all religious belief." China's Catholics: Far from Rome, by Holly Williams, BBC News, 24 December 2003, (Accessed 14 April 2008)
  518. ^ "...Mao was an atheist..." Death Ritual as Political Trickster in the People's Republic of China, by A. P. Cheater, Source: The Australian Journal of Chinese Affairs, No. 26 (Jul., 1991), pp. 67-97 (p. 92), published by Contemporary China Center, Australian National University
  519. ^ "Mao is not only a historical figure, of course, but is part of the (tattered) web of legitimacy on which the People's Republic rests. He is part of the founding mythology of the Chinese government, the Romulus and Remus of "People's China," and that's why his portrait hangs in Tiananmen Square. Even among ordinary Chinese, Mao retains a hold on the popular imagination, and some peasants in different parts of China have started traditional religious shrines honoring him. That's the ultimate honor for an atheist - he has become a god." 'Mao': The Real Mao, Nicholas D. Kristof, The New York Times, 23 October 2005 (Accessed 25 April 2008)
  520. ^ "...Kim Jong Il is not a religious person. In contrast with his father, who was raised in a Protestant family and with age grew increasingly interested in the Bible and its disciples, conversations about God do not attract Kim Jong Il's attention. He is an atheist and, like an orthodox Marxist, still considers religion to be "opium for the masses..." [74], by Alexandre Y. Mansourov, Associate Professor, Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies, (Accessed 22 April 2008)
  521. ^ When asked by Rod Liddle in the documentary The Trouble with Atheism "Give me your views on the existence, or otherwise, of God", Peter Atkins replied "Well it's fairly straightforward: there isn't one. And there's no evidence for one, no reason to believe that there is one, and so I don't believe that there is one. And I think that it is rather foolish that people do think that there is one."The Trouble with Atheism, UK Channel 4 TV. 2006-12-18.
  522. ^ "Although he became an atheist early in life and resented the strict upbringing of his parents’ religion, he identified with Jewish culture and joined several international fights against anti-Semitism." Craver, Carl F: "Axelrod, Julius", Complete Dictionary of Scientific Biography Vol. 19 p. 122. Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2008.
  523. ^ "In religious matters he was an atheist." A.G. MacGregor: "Bailey, Edward Battersby", Complete Dictionary of Scientific Biography Vol. 1 p. 393. Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2008.
  524. ^ "The grandson of a vicar on his father’s side, Blackett respected religious observances that were established social customs, but described himself as agnostic or atheist." Mary Jo Nye: "Blackett, Patrick Maynard Stuart." Complete Dictionary of Scientific Biography, Vol. 19 p. 293. Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2008.
  525. ^ In a Point of Inquiry podcast interview, Blackmore described religion as a collection of "really pernicious memes", "I think religious memeplexes are really amongst the nastiest viruses we have on the planet". Blackmore also practices Zen Buddhist meditation; later, when she was asked: "And you find this practice of Zen, the meditative practice, completely compatible with your lack of theism, your atheism...?" She replied: "Oh yes, I mean, there is no god in Buddhism...". Susan Blackmore - In Search of the Light, Point of Inquiry, 15 December 2006 (accessed 1 April 2008).
  526. ^ "Since his childhood in Vienna Bondi had been an atheist, developing from an early age a view on religion that associated it with repression and intolerance. This view, which he shared with Hoyle, never left him. On several occasions he spoke out on behalf of freethinking, so-called, and became early on active in British atheist or "humanist" circles. From 1982 to 1999, he was president of the British Humanist Association, and he also served as president of the Rationalist Press Association of United Kingdom." Helge Kragh: "Bondi, Hermann", Complete Dictionary of Scientific Biography Vol. 19 p. 343. Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2008. Accessed via Gale Virtual Reference Library 29 April 2008.
  527. ^ In a letter to the Guardian, Jane Wynne Willson, Vice-President of the British Humanist Association, added to his obituary: "Also president of the Rationalist Press Association from 1982 until his death, and with a particular interest in Indian rationalism, Hermann was a strong supporter of the Atheist Centre in Andra Pradesh. He and his wife Christine visited the centre a number of times, and the hall in the science museum there bears his name. When presented with a prestigious international award, he divided a large sum of money between the Atheist Centre and women's health projects in Mumbai." Obituary letter: Hermann Bondi, Guardian, 23 September 2005 (accessed 29 April 2008).
  528. ^ Boyer, Paul. "A Path to Atheism". Freedom From Religion Foundation. Retrieved February 3, 2007.
  529. ^ Why (Almost All) Cosmologists are Atheists
  530. ^ "In his later years, Chandra had openly admitted to being an atheist which also meant that he subscribed to no religion in the customary sense of the word." Vishveshwara, S. 2000. Leaves from an unwritten diary: S. Chandrasekhar, Reminiscences and Reflections, Current Science, 78(8):1025-1033.
  531. ^ "I once wrote a book about the Victorian crisis of faith and entitled it, borrowing from a poem of Hardy's, God's Funeral. I included Carlyle, [...] as well as the out-and-out atheists such as W K Clifford [...]." A N Wilson, 'Browning's faith kept the snake wriggling underfoot', Daily Telegraph, 20 August 2001, Pg. 19.
  532. ^ When describing a total solar eclipse, Close wrote: "It was simultaneously ghastly, beautiful, supernatural. Even for a 21st century atheist, the vision was such that I thought, "If there is a heaven, this is what its entrance is like." The heavenly vision demanded music by Mozart; instead we had the crickets." Frank Close, 'Dark side of the moon', The Guardian, 9 August 2001, Guardian Online Pages, Pg. 8.
  533. ^ Francis Crick, What Mad Pursuit: a Personal View of Scientific Discovery, Basic Books reprint edition, 1990, ISBN 0-465-09138-5, p. 145.
  534. ^ "How I Got Inclined Towards Atheism"[75]
  535. ^ Mark Steyn identify Crick as an atheist. See:The Twentieth-Century Darwin by Mark Steyn, published in The Atlantic Monthly, October 2004.
  536. ^ "Francis Crick was an evangelical atheist."Francis Crick's Legacy for Neuroscience: Between the α and the Ω
  537. ^ "Instead, it is interlaced with descriptions of Crick’s vacations, parties and assertions of atheism — occasionally colorful stuff that drains the intellectual drama from the codebreaking."Genome Human
  538. ^ "There is Crick the mentor, Crick the atheist, Crick the free-thinker, and Crick the playful."Entertaining Dr Crick
  539. ^ Crick, 86, said: "The god hypothesis is rather discredited." Do our genes reveal the hand of God?
  540. ^ "She advised him that he risked being called up, and suggested an unusual way to avoid the draft - by becoming a priest, one of the categories exempt from military service. Dalton discovered a little-known religious group called the Universal Life Church of California which for $25 would "ordain" anyone. He duly sent off a cheque and within days was delighted to learn that he was now a bona fide Minister of Religion. It became a running joke and his friends frequently addressed letters to the Reverend Howard Dalton; as a life-long atheist, he particularly relished the irony of his new title." 'Obituary of Professor Sir Howard Dalton, Microbiologist who became Defra's Chief Scientific Adviser just after the foot-and-mouth outbreak', Daily Telegraph 15 January 2008, Pg. 25.
  541. ^ Dawkins identifies himself as an atheist in his article "A Challenge to Atheists: Come Out of the Closet," Free Inquiry, Summer 2002. Excerpt reprinted at Positiveatheism.org
  542. ^ "Denjoy was an atheist, but tolerant of others' religious views; he was very interested in philosophical, psychological, and social issues." "Denjoy, Arnaud", Complete Dictionary of Scientific Biography Vol. 17, p.219. Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2008.
  543. ^ Werner Heisenberg recollects a friendly conversation among young participants at the 1927 Solvay Conference about Einstein's and Planck's views on religion. Wolfgang Pauli, Heisenberg and Dirac took part in it. Among other things, Dirac said: "I cannot understand why we idle discussing religion. If we are honest — and as scientists honesty is our precise duty — we cannot help but admit that any religion is a pack of false statements, deprived of any real foundation. The very idea of God is a product of human imagination.[...] I do not recognize any religious myth, at least because they contradict one another.[...]" Pauli jokingly said: "Well, I'd say that also our friend Dirac has got a religion and the first commandment of this religion is: God does not exist and Paul Dirac is his prophet." Physics and Beyond: Encounters and Conversations. New York: Harper & Row. ISBN 0061316229. 
  544. ^ a b "... I [Pauling] am not, however, militant in my atheism. The great English theoretical physicist Paul Dirac is a militant atheist. I suppose he is interested in arguing about the existence of God. I am not. It was once quipped that there is no God and Dirac is his prophet." Linus Pauling & Daisaku Ikeda (1992). A Lifeling Quest for Peace: A Dialogue. Jones & Bartlett, page 22. ISBN 0867202777. 
  545. ^ Nielsen, Stevan Lars & Ellis, Albert. (1994). "A discussion with Albert Ellis: Reason, emotion and religion", Journal of Psychology and Christianity, 13(4), Win 1994. pp. 327-341
  546. ^ "Festinger, a professed atheist, was an original thinker and a restless, highly motivated individual with (in his words) "little tolerance for boredom". " Franz Samelson: "Festinger, Leon", American National Biography Online, Feb. 2000 (accessed 28 April 2008) [76].
  547. ^ Feynman was of Jewish birth, but described himself as "an avowed atheist" by his early youth in Freethought of the Day, Freedom From Religion Foundation, May 11, 2006.
  548. ^ "[Freud and Jung] were close for several years, but Jung's ambition, and his growing commitment to religion and mysticism — most unwelcome to Freud, an aggressive atheist — finally drove them apart." Sigmund Freud, by Peter Gay, The TIME 100: The Most Important People of the Century.
  549. ^ "About the same time he stopped observing Jewish religious rituals and rejected a cause he had once embraced, Zionism. He "just didn't want to participate in any division of the human race, whether religious or political," he explained decades later (Wershba, p. 12), by which time he was a confirmed atheist." Keay Davidson: "Fromm, Erich Pinchas", American National Biography Online, Feb. 2000 (accessed 28 April 2008) [77].
  550. ^ Atlantseglaren från Bromma vill tänja gränsen mot rymden, Dagens Nyheter, December 10, 2006.
  551. ^ "I am an atheist, that is, I think nothing exists except and beyond nature."Ginzburg's autobiography at Nobelprize.org
  552. ^ "Religions are technologies that are evolved over millennia to do this and many religions are very effective in doing this. I'm an atheist, I don't believe that gods actually exist, but I part company with the New Atheists because I believe that religion is an adaptation that generally works quite well to suppress selfishness, to create moral communities, to help people work together, trust each other and collaborate towards common ends." Jonathan Haidt, Interview with Jonathan Haidt, Vox Popoli 19 November 2007 (accessed 14 April 2008).
  553. ^ "The three laboratories unanimously agreed that the cloth dated from between 1260 and 1390, a date consistent with its known history—but which demolished the notion of its being the burial shroud of Christ. Hall, who made no secret of his atheism, had no hesitation in enjoying the public attention that this definitive result attracted." Robert Hedges, 'Hall, Edward Thomas [Teddy (1924–2001)'], Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, online edition, Oxford University Press, January 2005 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  554. ^ " 'Unequalled stability and sweetness of disposition' are said to have been among his domestic virtues, while in politics and religion he was 'a declared democrat and avowed atheist' (The Times)." Jean Jones: 'Hall, Sir James, of Dunglass, fourth baronet (1761–1832)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, September 2004; online edition, October 2006 (accessed 1 May 2008).
  555. ^ "Hardy... was a stringent atheist..." Hit Play on Ramanujan, by Lisa Drostova, East Bay Express, April 30 2003. Retrieved 7 October 2007.
  556. ^ "The first Bombe to be delivered was named Agnus by Turing: a joke that atheist Hardy might have made..." Alan Turing — a Cambridge Scientific Mind, by Andrew Hodges, Cambridge Scientific Minds (Cambridge University Press, 2002) Retrieved 2 July 2007.
  557. ^ "Officially, the particle is called the Higgs boson, but its elusive nature and fundamental role in the creation of the universe led a prominent scientist to rename it the God particle. The name has stuck, but makes Higgs wince and raises the hackles of other theorists. "I wish he hadn't done it," he says. "I have to explain to people it was a joke. I'm an atheist, but I have an uneasy feeling that playing around with names like that could be unnecessarily offensive to people who are religious." Ian Sample, 'The God of Small Things', The Guardian, 17 November 2007, Weekend pages, Pg. 44.
  558. ^ "He has worked with monkeys in laboratories and in the wild. He has been a media don, a campaigner against nuclear weapons and the holder of a chair in parapsychological research who was dedicated to debunking even the possibility of telepathy or survival after death. He is an atheist, and the man who suggested to Richard Dawkins the analogy of viruses of the mind for religions; yet nowadays he talks as if spirituality were the thing that makes us human." Andrew Brown interviewing Humphrey, 'A life in science: The human factor', The Guardian, 29 July 2006, Review Pages, Pg. 13.
  559. ^ "Despite his atheism Huxley could appreciate Teilhard de Chardin's vision of evolution, and like his grandfather T. H. Huxley he believed progress could be described in biological terms." Robert Olby, 'Huxley, Sir Julian Sorell (1887–1975)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edition, May 2007 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  560. ^ makingthemodernworld.org.uk
  561. ^ "Raised in a completely nonreligious family, Joliot never attended any church and was a thoroughgoing atheist all his life." Perrin, Francis: "Joliot, Frédéric", Complete Dictionary of Scientific Biography Vol. 7 p. 151. Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2008.
  562. ^ Harold Kroto claims to have four "religions": humanism, atheism, amnesty-internationalism and humourism.[78]
  563. ^ "Kinsey was also shown to be an atheist who loathed religion and its constraints on sex." 'Kinsey' critics ready, Cheryl Wetzstein, The Washington Times. Retrieved 2 February 2007.
  564. ^ Leakey, Richard [September 2001]. Wildlife Wars: My Fight to Save Africa's Natural Treasures, design by Kathryn Parise, p. 257. ISBN 0-312-20626-7. 
  565. ^ "Although an atheist, Le Dantec was always open to religious discussion. [...] Among his philosophical works are L'athéisme (Paris, 1907); " 'Le Dantec, Félix', Complete Dictionary of Scientific Biography. Vol. 8. Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2008, p. 124.
  566. ^ "In these years Leslie was an unsuccessful candidate for the chairs of natural philosophy at the universities of St Andrews and Glasgow respectively. He failed at the former because he was then an extreme whig and an atheist who deplored the Erastianism of many of the Scottish clergy." Jack Morrell, 'Leslie, Sir John (1766–1832)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  567. ^ "By that time Longuet-Higgins had become a convinced atheist, although he still respected many of the features of the Church of England." John Murrell, 'Higgins, (Hugh) Christopher Longuet- (1923–2004)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, online edition, Oxford University Press, January 2008 (accessed 1 May 2008).
  568. ^ From a Humanist News interview in Autumn 2001: Interviewer: What is your attitude to religion now? JMS: Ever since reading (J. B. S. Haldane's book) Possible Worlds I have been an atheist, and a semi-conscious atheist before that. I think there are two views you can have about religion. You can be tolerant of it and say, I don't believe in this but I don't mind if other people do, or you can say, I not only don't believe in it but I think it is dangerous and damaging for other people to believe in it and they should be persuaded that they are mistaken. I fluctuate between the two. I am tolerant because religious institutions facilitate some very important work that would not get done otherwise, but then I look around and see what an incredible amount of damage religion is doing. [79]
  569. ^ An appreciation of biologist Ernst Mayr (1904-2005)
  570. ^ "... I believe that a reasonable case can be made for saying, not that we believe in God because He exists but rather that He exists because we believe in Him. [...] Considered as an element of the world, God has the same degree and kind of objective reality as do other products of mind. [...] I regret my disbelief in God and religious answers generally, for I believe it would give satisfaction and comfort to many in need of it if it possible to discover and propound good scientific and philosophic reasons to believe in God. [...] To abdicate from the rule of reason and substitute for it an authentication of belief by the intentness and degree of conviction with which we hold it can be perilous and destructive. [...] I am a rationalist—something of a period piece nowadays, I admit [...]" Peter Medawar, 'The Question of the Existence of God' in his book The Limits of Science (Harper and Row 1984).
  571. ^ A Rough History of Disbelief Official BBC site describing the series
  572. ^ Nobel Biography[80].
  573. ^ "In his final chapter de Duve turns to the meaning of life, and considers the ideas of two contrasting Frenchmen: a priest, Teilhard de Chardin, and an existentialist and atheist, Jacques Monod." Peaks, Dust, & Dappled Spots, by Richard Lubbock, Books in Canada: The Canadian Review of Books. Retrieved 2 July 2007.
  574. ^ "[Religion] is not an easy subject to deal with, but as zoologists we must do our best to observe what actually happens rather than listen to what is supposed to be happening. If we do this, we are forced to the conclusion that, in a behavioural sense, religious activities consist of the coming together of large groups of people to perform repeated and prolonged submissive displays to appease a dominant individual. The dominant individual takes many forms in different cultures, but always has the common factor of immense power. [...] If these submissive actions are successful, the dominant individual is appeased. [...] The dominant individual is usually, but not always, referred to as a god. Since none of these gods exist in a tangible form, why have they been invented? To find the answer to this we have to go right back to our ancestral origins." Desmond Morris, The Naked Ape, p.178-179, Jonathan Cape, 1967.
  575. ^ "Man's evolution as a neotenous ape has put him in a similar position to the dog's. He becomes sexually mature and yet he still needs a parent — a super-parent, one as impressive to him as a man must be to a dog. The answer was to invent a god — either a female super-parent in the shape of a Mother Goddess, or a male god in the shape of God the Father, or perhaps even a whole family of gods. Like real parents they would both protect, punish and be obeyed. [...] These — the houses of the gods — the temples, the churches and the cathedrals — are buildings apparently made for giants, and a space visitor would be surprised to find on closer examination that these giants are never at home. Their followers repeatedly visit them and bow down before them, but they themselves are invisible. Only their bell-like cries can be heard across the land. Man is indeed an imaginative species." Desmond Morris, The Pocket Guide to Manwatching, p.234-236 Triad Paperbacks, 1982.
  576. ^ "[Müller] was an atheist..." Review of Müller's biography, by James Mallet, Quarterly Review of Biology 79:196 (2004). Retrieved 2 July 2007.
  577. ^ "Muller, who through Unitarianism had become an enthusiastic pantheist, was converted both to atheism and to socialism." Hermann Joseph Muller. 1890–1967, G. Pontecorvo, Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society, Vol. 14, Nov., 1968 (Nov., 1968), pp. 348-389 (Quote from p. 353) Retrieved 14 July 2007.
  578. ^ "I was brought up a Lutheran, but I became an atheist"—PZ Myers (February 14, 2007), It's the arrogance, stupid, Pharyngula. Retrieved February 22, 2007.
  579. ^ "I gradually slipped away from religion over several years and became an atheist or to be more philosophically correct, a sceptical agnostic." Nurse's autobiography at Nobelprize.org
  580. ^ Amazon listing of Irreligion: A Mathematician Explains Why the Arguments for God Just Don't Add Up.
  581. ^ Asked by his follower E. M. Kreps whether or not he was religious, Kreps wrote that Pavlov smiled and replied: "Listen, good fellow, in regard to [claims of] my religiosity, my belief in God, my church attendance, there is no truth in it; it is sheer fantasy. I was a seminarian, and like the majority of seminarians, I became an unbeliever, an atheist in my school years." Quoted in George Windholz, 'Pavlov's Religious Orientation', Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion Vol. 25 No. 3 (Sep., 1986), pp. 320-327.
  582. ^ "...I'm an atheist..." Enough blasting Dennett and Dawkins, all right?, from Rationally Speaking, the blog of Massimo Pigliucci, October 30, 2006 (Accessed 15 April 2008)
  583. ^ "I never outgrew my conversion to atheism at 13, but at various times was a serious cultural Jew." The Guardian Profile. "Steven Pinker: the mind reader", Guardian News and Media Limited, November 6, 1999. Retrieved on 2006-12-10. 
  584. ^ "During sixty years from 1937 he also wrote over forty articles on the origins, distribution, and nature of life, taking the stance of a 'dogmatic atheist'." David F. Smith, 'Pirie, Norman Wingate [Bill (1907–1997)'], Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edition, October 2005 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  585. ^ "His tolerance and good humour enabled him to disagree strongly without giving or taking offence, for example with his brother Michael Ramsey whose ordination (he went on to become archbishop of Canterbury) Ramsey, as a militant atheist, naturally regretted." D. H. Mellor, 'Ramsey, Frank Plumpton (1903–1930)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edition, October 2005 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  586. ^ "The Nobel Laureate Dr Richard Roberts will give a public lecture entitled A Bright Journey from Science to Atheism..." A bright journey to atheism, or a road that ignores all the signs?, The Irish Times, April 20, 2006. Retrieved 24 July 2007.
  587. ^ "...Rich Roberts... delivered a public lecture on his Bright journey from Science to Atheism in April 2006." Events listing on the website of Humani, The Humanist Association of Northern Ireland, Retrieved 24 July 2007.
  588. ^ Roberts versus God: No Contest, review of Roberts' talk A Bright Journey from Science to Atheism, written by Les Reid, and published on the Belfast Humanist Group website. Retrieved 24 July 2007.
  589. ^ "Have you ever broken one of the ten commandments? As an atheist from an early age, I can't readily remember them. But I expect I have." Lifeline: Steven Rose, Lancet Vol. 355 Issue 9213 p. 1472, 22 April 2000.
  590. ^ "All of which makes the Wingate Prize a matter of bemusement. "Yes, tell me," he says, frowning. "What is it, and why are they giving it to an old Jewish atheist who has unkind things to say about Zionism?" " Oliver Burkeman interviewing Sacks, 'Inside Story: Sacks appeal', The Guardian, 10 May 2002, Features Pages, Pg. 4.
  591. ^ "A sworn enemy of "pseudoscientists" - believers in UFOs and paranormal phenomena - he was a confirmed atheist. "I would lose my integrity if I accepted a belief system that did not stand up to sceptical scrutiny," he said recently." Ian Katz, 'Sagan, Man Who Brought Cosmos to Earth, Dies', The Guardian, 21 December 1996, Pg. 3.
  592. ^ Dan Barker: "When we invited Robert Sapolsky to speak at one of out national conventions to receive our 'Emperor Has No Clothes Award', Robert wrote to me, 'Sure! Get the local Holiday Inn to put up a sign that says Welcome, Hell-bound Atheists!' [...] So, welcome you hell-bound atheist to Freethought Radio, Robert." Sapolsky: "Well, delighted to be among my kindred souls." [...] Annie Laurie Gaylor: So how long have you been a kindred non-soul, what made you an atheist Robert?" Sapolsky: "Oh, I was about fourteen or so... I was brought up very very religiously, orthodox Jewish background and major-league rituals and that sort of thing [...] and something happened when I was fourteen, and no doubt what it was really about was my gonads or who knows what, but over the course of a couple of weeks there was some sort of introspective whatever, where I suddenly decided this was all gibberish. And, among other things, also deciding there's no free will, but not in a remotely religious context, and deciding all of this was nonsense, and within a two week period all of that belief stuff simply evaporated." Freethought Radio podcast (mp3), 3 February 2007 (accessed 22 April 2008).
  593. ^ Reported lecture [81]
  594. ^ Self-proclaimed [82]
  595. ^ World Bank [83]
  596. ^ Press meeting [84]
  597. ^ "Shannon described himself as an atheist and was outwardly apolitical." William Poundstone, Fortune's Formula, Hill and Wang: New York (2005), page 18.
  598. ^ Smith, Michael. Michael Smith: Autobiography. Nobel Prize.org. Retrieved February 3, 2007.
  599. ^ Stallman's former personal ad
  600. ^ God: The Failed Hypothesis. How Science Shows That God Does Not Exist.[85][86]
  601. ^ "I read a few sentences. It was written in beautiful Biblical Hebrew. The language was like that of the Psalms.' One of these was the Isaiah scroll, which I saw recently in the Rockefeller Museum in East Jerusalem: sections of goat-skin parchment, sewn together, 27 feet long. I felt in the presence of something numinous, although I have been a convinced atheist since boyhood. But this document is a testament to the inexplicable persistence of the human mind, in the face of all the evidence, in believing that we are on earth for a divine purpose." Eleazar Sukenik, quoted in Justin Cartwright, 'The indestructible power of belief', The Guardian, 27 May 2000, Saturday Pages, Pg. 3.
  602. ^ In a review of Susskind's book The Cosmic Landscape: String Theory and the Illusion of Intelligent Design, Michael Duff writes that Susskind is "a card-carrying atheist." Life in a landscape of possibilities, December 2005. Retrieved 30 May 2007.
  603. ^ "He is a passionate atheist who hates materialistic interpretations of our minds." Interview: Raymond Tallis, The ardent atheist, Guardian Review, 29 April 2006 (accessed 14 April 2008).
  604. ^ "[I am] completely a-religious—atheist. I find that people seem to think religion brings morals and appreciation of nature. I actually think it detracts from both." Interview: Linus Torvalds in Linux Journal 1 November 1999. Retrieved 18 January 2007.
  605. ^ "This loss shattered Turing's religious faith and led him into atheism..." Time 100 profile of Alan Turing, p. 2
  606. ^ "He was an atheist..." Alan Turing: Father of the computer, BBC News, 28 April 1999. Retrieved 11 June 2007.
  607. ^ "In religion he was raised as a theist, but in 1782, in an Answer to Dr. Priestley, on the Existence of God, a response to Priestley's Letters to a Philosophical Unbeliever, he described himself as a freethinker (p. 5). This work, first published under the pseudonym William Hammon, was subsequently republished by Richard Carlile in 1826. In the pamphlet Turner declared that he was an atheist, though he did admit that the 'vis naturae', gravity, and matter's elasticity and repulsive powers demonstrated that the universe was permeated by 'a principle of intelligence and design' (ibid., 17). Despite the 'perpetual industry' of nature, he denied that this intelligence entailed that philosophers needed to posit the existence of a deity extraneous to the material world." E. I. Carlyle, 'Turner, Matthew (d. 1789?)', rev. Kevin C. Knox, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  608. ^ Text of Answer to Dr. Priestley's Letters to a Philosophical Unbeliever at Project Guttenberg.
  609. ^ "A firm atheist, he was interested in, though unconvinced by, the paranormal, and also did research on hypnosis." Ray Cooper, 'Walter, (William) Grey (1910–1977)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edition, May 2007 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  610. ^ Watson is identified as an atheist by his acquaintance, Rabbi Marc Gellman. Trying to Understand Angry Atheists: Why do nonbelievers seem to be threatened by the idea of God?, by Rabbi Marc Gellman, Newsweek, 28 April 2006. Retrieved 11 November 2006.
  611. ^ When asked by a student if he believed in God, Watson replied "Oh, no. Absolutely not... The biggest advantage to believing in God is you don't have to understand anything, no physics, no biology. I wanted to understand." JoAnne Viviano. "Nobel Prize-winning scientist wows some, worries others", The Vindicator, 19 October 2007. Retrieved on 2007-10-19. 
  612. ^ Azpurua: "Would it be accurate to say that you are an atheist?" Weinberg: "Yes. I don't believe in God, but I don't make a religion out of not believing in God. I don't organize my life around that." In Search of the God Particle, by Ana Elena Azpurua, Newsweek Web Exclusive, 24 March 2008, p. 3 (Accessed 25 March 2008)
  613. ^ In a review of Susskind's book The Cosmic Landscape: String Theory and the Illusion of Intelligent Design, string theorist Michael Duff identifies Steven Weinberg as an "arch-atheist".[87]
  614. ^ In the book The God Delusion, Richard Dawkins identifies Steven Weinberg as an atheist.richarddawkins.net.
  615. ^ Angier, Natalie. "The Origin of Religions, From a Distinctly Darwinian View", New York Times, 2002-12-24, p. F5. Retrieved on 2007-06-11. "...I don't believe in God. I tell people I'm an atheist, but a nice atheist." 
  616. ^ "I grew up in a Jewish family but I gave it all up at 16 when I prayed to God for something I really wanted and it didn't happen. I have been an atheist ever since. I believe in proof and I know of no evidence for the existence of God, but I am in no way hostile to religion provided it does not interfere in the lives of others or come into conflict with science." Easter special: I believe..., Independent on Sunday, 16 April 2006 (accessed 18 April 2008).
  617. ^ Wozniak, Steven. Letters – General Questions Answered. woz.org. Retrieved on 2007-09-26. “... I am also atheist or agnostic (I don't even know the difference). I've never been to church and prefer to think for myself. I do believe that religions stand for good things, and that if you make irrational sacrifices for a religion, then everyone can tell that your religion is important to you and can trust that your most important inner faiths are strong.”
  618. ^ In Abolitionist, Actuary, Atheist: Elizur Wright and the Reform Impulse, Wright's biographer Lawrence B. Goodheart describes him as "an evangelical atheist, an impassioned actuary, a liberal who advocated state regulation, an individualist who championed social cooperation, and a very private public crusader" (op. cit., page x)
  619. ^ "...Victor Weisskopf, who describes himself as an atheist Viennese Jew...." Quoting from page 14 of The Prism of Science, by Edna Ullmann-Margalit, Springer, 1986.
  620. ^ In an Edge discussion following the Beyond Belief conference in 2006, Atran criticised other speakers, saying: "I find it fascinating that among the brilliant scientists and philosophers at the conference, there was no convincing evidence presented that they know how to deal with the basic irrationality of human life and society other than to insist against all reason and evidence that things ought to be rational and evidence based. It makes me embarrassed to be a scientist and atheist."
  621. ^ "Two years ago, Betinho developed Aids. He died, weighing just over six stone, of complications of hepatitis C, which he had also caught from contaminated blood. Although he was an atheist, the theologian Leonardo Boff has suggested that the Pope should canonise Betinho during his visit to Brazil in October. He said that "it would be a prophetic act if he were declared the saint of the poor, the patron saint of citizenship"." Sue Branford and Jan Rocha, 'Obituary: Herbert De Souza: Saintly Champion of the Poor', The Guardian, 19 August 1997, Pg. 15.
  622. ^ "Commonly regarded as the most important feature of Durkheim's thought about religion—doubtless because of the apologetic anxieties it stirs—this "reduction" takes the form of claiming that all talk of God can be reduced to talk about society. As a formula, this is to assert that society and God are identical. There is indeed ample warrant for the view that the Durkheimians believed that all talk of God was really about and derived from social experience. The religious experience of "spirit" is explainable in terms of the dynamics of crowd-induced enthusiasms in rituals. As atheists, the Durkheimians did not believe an experience of God or spirit was possible because gods or spirits either did not exist or were beyond the cognitive abilities of humans to experience. Ritual, on the other hand, was religion in tangible form." Strenski, Ivan: "Durkheim, Émile", Encyclopedia of Religion, ed. Lindsay Jones, Vol. 4 p.2527, 2nd ed. Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA, 2005.
  623. ^ "Finkelstein, who describes himself as a Jewish atheist and Left-wing anti-Zionist who supports the Palestinian cause, has been ostracised by the American Jewish community for his views." Tony Paterson, 'German outrage at Holocaust book', Sunday Telegraph, 18 February 2001, Pg. 31.
  624. ^ "He remained, however, an admirer of primitive societies. He was also an atheist." Obituary of Thor Heyerdahl, Daily Telegraph, 19 April 2002, Pg. 29.
  625. ^ "Oppressively authoritarian, he [Hillman's father] required his children to do his bidding and brooked no dissent. As a consequence, all three came to challenge authority and Mayer counts himself a "militant atheist", though feels very Jewish and is proud of his origins." Anne Karpf interviewing Hillman, 'A Chain Reaction', The Guardian, 2 November 2002, Weekend Pages, Pg. 32.
  626. ^ "A devoted atheist, he lamented Jews' and Arabs' failure to "separate religion from nationality"." Lawrence Joffe, 'Obituary: Baruch Kimmerling', The Guardian, 26 June 2007, Pg. 39.
  627. ^ "I don't vote for him, but I praise him [...] I'm a leftist atheist, he's a rightwing Islamist. Yet I still say he's the best prime minister for the country." Kemal Kirişci, quoted in Ian Traynor, 'EU membership', The Guardian, 12 June 2006, Pg. 17.
  628. ^ "Raised Anglican, Lawrence professed to be an atheist, although, as he once wryly remarked, "an atheist with doubts." " MacDonald, Mary N. "Lawrence, Peter." Encyclopedia of Religion. Ed. Lindsay Jones. Vol. 8. 2nd ed. Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA, 2005. 5379-5380.
  629. ^ "A declared atheist Leach's upbringing was 'hard-boiled Christian', his mother, to whom he was close as a child, being a devout Anglican (Firth, 10). His rejection of Christianity while an undergraduate was bound up with his growing independence from her, but as he later remarked, 'mud sticks if you throw enough' (ibid.)." James Laidlaw, [http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/39978 'Leach, Sir Edmund Ronald (1910–1989)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (accessed 1 May 2008).
  630. ^ "After he began his scientific studies he became an atheist. He remained, throughout the rest of his life, a critic of religion, much in the same vein as Freud, and a critic of religious hypocrites." Beit-Hallahmi, Benjamin: "Leuba, James H." Encyclopedia of Religion. Ed. Lindsay Jones. Vol. 8. 2nd ed. Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA, 2005, p.5418.
  631. ^ "An atheist from at least his student years, he became an honorary associate of the Rationalist Press Association in 1952. An Oxford student remembered him as 'somewhat assertive in his arguments against religion' (C. Fuller, 'An interview with M. N. Srinivas', Anthropology Today, 15/5, 1999, 5), but the nearest he came to showing it in print was the suggestion that religion is a source of 'fears and anxieties from which [men] would otherwise be free—the fear of black magic or of spirits, fear of God, of the Devil, of Hell' (Radcliffe-Brown, Structure, 149). [...] His restraint may have sprung from an austere conception of science or from the functionalist fear that destroying a people's beliefs will undermine their social system." Kenneth Maddock: Brown, Alfred Reginald Radcliffe- (1881–1955)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 [88] (accessed 30 April 2008).
  632. ^ "Dr Spitzer has said repeatedly that as an "atheist Jew" his only interest in the issue is scientific truth, adding that an orthodoxy which forbids acknowledgement of the possibility of change is as flawed as that which labels homosexuality an act of will and morally wrong." Charles Laurence, 'Going straight', Sunday Telegraph, 12 October 2003, Pg. 19.
  633. ^ "There has been legislation in Northern Ireland concerning fair employment, which related to those matters, for many years. It was strictly adhered to and policed. In fact, all recruits to my company and most others had to declare at the time, in a totally confidential envelope, whether they were perceived to be Roman Catholics or perceived to be Protestants. I say that because one has to be a Protestant or Roman Catholic Jew or, in my case, a Roman Catholic or Protestant atheist." Lord Glentoran, Lords Hansard, 11 Mar 2004: Column 1372 (accessed 24 April 2008).
  634. ^ "Having left his sport as a dyed-in-the-wool evangelical, Edwards is now, to all intents and purposes, an atheist." [89]
  635. ^ "Hugh Falkus set about refining his techniques for Spey casting with carbon-fibre rods and aerodynamic lines, and, more importantly, sharing his skills on his legendary famous fishing courses. When, in 1995, old age prevented him from continuing, he asked his protege to take up the reins. "Take the school south, that is where all the money is, but keep my name alive," is how Daunt, as he is known by his friends, recalls the offer, adding, "although Hugh was an atheist, he was quite determined to become immortal"." Adrian Dangar, 'A simple matter of perfect casting', Daily Telegraph, 25 May 2002, Pg. 19.
  636. ^ "The only thing missing from this tidy story - this is America, remember - is a testimonial from the athlete thanking God for his rescue. That is the way it's done over here. Feherty's not buying it, though. "I am a diehard atheist," he volunteers, joining Einstein, Darwin and, hmm, Annika Sorenstam, but clearly crossing into uncharted waters for an American TV personality." Bruce Selcraig, 'Golf: US Open Countdown', Daily Telegraph, 12 June 2007, Sports, Pg.12.
  637. ^ "Thou Shalt not Confuse Religion with Morality" by Olga Galchenko "Coming from a somewhat religious family, I naturally embraced Christianity and tried hard to keep my faith until about the age of 12, when I decided to finally stop trying, and gradually became an atheist."
  638. ^ "Former Minnesota Vikings running back Robert Smith, an atheist, says he has no objection to making religious counseling and services available to interested players." Going long for Jesus, by Tom Krattenmaker at Salon.com (Accessed 29 August 2006).
  639. ^ "Practically all chess-players are born optimists [...] Those who believe in God count on divine help; the agnostics know that somehow or other it will turn out all right; whilst the atheists, who are of course the most superstitious, believe in luck. If this last statement seems a trifle high pitched then let me submit as evidence the case of Dr. Tartakower. An atheist if ever there was one, he fervently believed in luck, touched wood at appropriate moments and never, never walked under ladders." Harry Golombek, 'Chess: The eternal spring of hope', The Times, 24 July 1971; pg. 7; Issue 58233; col E.
  640. ^ "A self-described "atheist pastor" is a bestselling author in the Netherlands. The Rev Klaas Hendrikse's book, Believing in a God Who Does Not Exist: Manifesto of an Atheist Pastor, published in November, is being reprinted for the third time. "The non-existence of God is for me not an obstacle but a precondition to believing in God," he says." Bess Twiston Davies, 'Believing in a God Who Does Not Exist: Manifesto of an Atheist Pastor', The Times, 15 December 2007, Features, Pg. 79.
  641. ^ "His strongest theme, as India sank faster into factional and religious politics, had remained adherence to the original vision of Mahatma Gandhi and Nehru for a wholly secular state: Abu was a rationalist and atheist." Michael McNay, 'Obituary: Abu Abraham', The Guardian, 7 December 2002, Pg. 26.
  642. ^ "Around their dinner table could be found all shades of political and religious affiliation. Hugh was a devout Christian and apolitical, while Jemima's atheism was coupled with a stout defence of Disraeli's brand of toryism." A. J. Crilly, 'Blackburn, Hugh (1823–1909)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (accessed 2 May 2008).
  643. ^ "The hidden jewel of the year was an impromptu performance by 40 singers from a South African township under the dome of St Paul's Cathedral, which made me - a devout atheist - feel spiritually moved." Iwona Blazwick, 'The Best of 2002', Daily Telegraph, 21 December 2002, Section, Pg. 01.
  644. ^ "...I'm an atheist..." Berkeley Breathed Pokes Fun, interview with Breathed by William Whitney, Psychology Today Magazine, Jan/Feb 2004 (Accessed 24 April 2008)
  645. ^ "Brossa was born in Barcelona, and resisted his family's ambitions for him to become a banker. He was tenacious, his sense of purpose often taken for arrogance. He became a Marxist, and an atheist who believed that if a good God existed, he should be tried at Nuremburg." Adrian Searle, 'The conjuror of Catalonia: Obituary: Joan Brossa', The Guardian, 12 January 1999, Pg. 16.
  646. ^ "The thing is that, as an athiest[sic] , I don't BELIEVE in Satan."—Clem, Mitch (February 13, 2006). Tour V. San Antonio Rock City. Retrieved on 2006-01-03.
  647. ^ "De Maré was unhappy at his preparatory boarding school, and became an atheist and opponent of puritanism in reaction against its ethos. [...] In A Matter of Life or Debt (1984), de Maré foresaw how the digital age offered even greater potential for his dream of the future, which was prevented from happening by "the Judaeo-Christian tradition of rewards and punishments in general and the Puritan ethic in particular"." Obituary of Eric de Maré, Daily Telegraph, 6 February 2002, Pg. 27.
  648. ^ "The painter and sculptor Barry Driscoll, who has died of cancer aged 79, was one of Britain's finest wild life artists and he was also a humanist, humourist, atheist, anarchist, hedonist, raconteur and bon viveur." Adrian Bailey, 'Obituaries: Barry Driscoll', The Guardian, 15 May 2006, Pg. 36.
  649. ^ "His aim as a painter, he said bluntly, was to rubbish Australian-born Europhiles, and paint good pictures that children would love. He hoped to combine in his work "tenderness, sweetness, charm, clarity, succinctness, love, passion and religion" - this from a declared atheist who would go to church "because I get a lot out of it"." Obituary of Sam Fullbrook, Daily Telegraph, 13 February 2004, Pg. 29.
  650. ^ "Although an atheist who disliked all organized religion, his memorial service was held on 13 November in St Paul's Cathedral, where a memorial tablet to him was erected in the crypt." Richard Dorment: 'Gilbert, Sir Alfred (1854–1934)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 [90] (accessed 1 May 2008).
  651. ^ " Although "an imperfect guide to world history ... its central message is still valid," concluded Raymond Carr in the Spectator. Gombrich "was an atheist with a strong streak of anticlericalism where the great monotheistic religions, Islam, Judaism and Christianity, were concerned ... To his dying day Voltaire was his hero. When today bashing the Enlightenment is a popular sport, his humanism is a lesson for us all." " 'Critical eye: One for the history books', The Guardian, 1 October 2005, Review Pages, Pg. 2.
  652. ^ "As a Communist, atheist, and satirist Grosz was a natural target for the National Socialists but left for America in 1932." David Rodgers: "Grosz, George", Grove Art Online, Oxford University Press, (accessed 28 April 2008) [91].
  653. ^ "Hrdlicka says overall he is pleased with the display and has praised the director for being "strong". A communist and atheist, Hrdlicka once said the Bible was the most thrilling book he had ever read and that religious imagery forms a central core to his work." Erotic Jesus sparks art debate in Austria, ABC News (Australia), 8 April 2008 (accessed 15 April 2005).
  654. ^ "He admitted later that he actually was trying to change church [Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints] history, because he said that he had become an atheist when he was a teenager." The Anthon Forgeries, from the documentary series "Masterminds." Originally aired in 2004 (Season 1, Episode 1).
  655. ^ "Hofmann, an atheist who kept up all appearances of being a good member of the LDS Church, was known for his historical "discoveries," many of which were intended to cast doubt on the official history of the church." Notorious incidents over the years, Jerry D. Spangler and Bob Bernick Jr., Deseret Morning News, March 15, 2003 (Accessed 17 December 2007).
  656. ^ "Horsley said later: "I have been punished by a god I don't believe in and he has thrown me off the cross for impersonating his son, for being an atheist, and for being a disaster. I have made a complete fool of myself. I am going to be a laughing stock. The film will end up on Jeremy Beadle." " Fiachra Gibbons, 'Cross to bear: Crucified artist up for Alternative Turner', The Guardian, 30 November 2002, Pg. 11.
  657. ^ "An ebullient personality, he was an atheist and adulterer, and made clever use of his official position to further his activities as art dealer." Langdon, Helen: "Mancini, Giulio", Grove Art Online, Oxford University Press, [accessed 28 April 2008], [92].
  658. ^ "As an apprentice tailor in Savile Row, McQueen enthusiastically made suits for the Prince of Wales and he has since designed several outfits for the Duchess of York. He says, however, "I am an anarchist, full-stop. I have always had the same political ideology. I'm an atheist. I am anti-monarchist. I don't believe in hierarchies." " Tim Walker, 'Fashion victim', Sunday Telegraph, 21 December 2003, Pg. 26.
  659. ^ "Perry rages at the dead, he even has contempt for them. He has hung a collection of Victorian samplers - religious texts and domestic images embroidered by middle-class women - among which is his own, atheist, sampler. Anger is generous, and in raging against these dead peoples' beliefs he treats them as if they mattered." Jonathan Jones, 'Perry's rural magic casts the right spell', The Guardian, 10 July 2006, Review Pages, Pg. 32.
  660. ^ "We read mythology and had periods for religious knowledge with separate classes for Jews and Catholics as there would be now for Muslims. Myths, after all, are the vaudeville of religion; how can you become a convincing atheist without prior knowledge of what you're rejecting?" Bryan Robertson, in a reprint of a 1995 article following his death, The Guardian, 23 November 2002, Pg. 19.
  661. ^ Rowson refers to himself as an atheist throughout his 2008 book The Dog Allusion: Gods, Pets and How to be Human (Vintage Books, London, ISBN 9780099521334). (The title is a play on that of Richard Dawkins's The God Delusion.)
  662. ^ Smith's explanation of his atheism to a hate mailer on his website [93]
  663. ^ Interviewed by the New York Times on 20 March 2008, Westergaard said: "I have always been an atheist, and I dare say these events have only intensified my atheism." Outrage at Cartoons Still Tests the Danes (accessed 10 April 2008).

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Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2 June is the 153rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (154th in leap years), with 212 days remaining. ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Tantrik is a man who is usually associated with black magic and practices of the occult. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see SIC. Sic is a Latin word, originally sicut [1] meaning thus, so, or just as that. In writing, it is placed within square brackets and usually italicized — [sic] — to indicate that an incorrect or unusual spelling, phrase, punctuation, and/or other preceding quoted material has been... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... James Meek is a British writer and journalist. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... George Jacob Holyoake (April 13, 1817 - January 22, 1906), English secularist and co-operator, was born in Birmingham, England. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Founded in Amsterdam in 1952, International Humanist and Ethical Union (IHEU) is the sole world umbrella organisation [1] embracing Humanist, atheist, rationalist, secular, skeptic, Ethical Culture, freethought and similar organisations world-wide. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Bhagat Singh (Punjabi: ਭਗਤ ਸਿੰਘ بھگت سنگھ, IPA: ) (September 27, 1907[1] –March 23, 1931) was an Indian freedom fighter, considered to be one of the most influential revolutionaries of the Indian independence movement. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The newspaper Folha de São Paulo represents the development of the communication media in Brazil. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Desert Island Discs is a long-running BBC Radio 4 programme. ... Kirsty Jackson Young (born 23 November 1968 in East Kilbride) is a Scottish television journalist, presenter, actress and radio presenter. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Expressen is a Swedish right leaning newspaper founded in 1944. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Sophie Masson is a French-Australian author. ... Quadrant is an Australian literary and cultural journal founded in 1956 by Richard Krygier, a Polish-Jewish refugee who had been active in social-democrat politics in Europe, James McAuley, a Catholic poet. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Peter Engel (born 1959) is a science writer, graphic designer, and architect, perhaps best known as one of the foremost American origami artists and theorists. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Lesley Blanch (London, June 6, 1904 – May 7, 2007[1]) was an English writer, fashion editor and writer of history. ... For other uses, see SIC. Sic is a Latin word, originally sicut [1] meaning thus, so, or just as that. In writing, it is placed within square brackets and usually italicized — [sic] — to indicate that an incorrect or unusual spelling, phrase, punctuation, and/or other preceding quoted material has been... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Deborah Solomon (born August 9, 1957) is a journalist and cultural critic with a weekly Q&A column in The New York Times Magazine. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the television show host. ... Larry King Live is an American talk show hosted by Larry King on CNN. The show debuted in 1985, and is CNNs most watched program, with over one million viewers nightly. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Archbishop Quigley Preparatory Seminary was a United States high school administered by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Chicago for young men considering the priesthood. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Pope (disambiguation). ... This article is about a New York newspaper. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... It has been suggested that John Fairfax Holdings be merged into this article or section. ... You Are All Diseased is the title for the 1999 HBO stand-up special with comedian George Carlin and was also converted into an album. ... Penn Fraser Jillette (born March 5, 1955 in Greenfield, Massachusetts) is an American comedian, illusionist, juggler and writer known for his work with fellow illusionist Teller in the team known as Penn & Teller. ... Penn Radio was an hour-long talk radio show, debuting January 3, 2006, hosted by Penn Jillette and Michael Goudeau and produced by Happy Jack Landreth and Patrick DiFazio. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Homer Simpson is also a character in the book and film The Day of the Locust. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see SIC. Sic is a Latin word, originally sicut [1] meaning thus, so, or just as that. In writing, it is placed within square brackets and usually italicized — [sic] — to indicate that an incorrect or unusual spelling, phrase, punctuation, and/or other preceding quoted material has been... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Lair of the White Worm is a 1988 film written, produced and directed by Ken Russell which starred Hugh Grant and Amanda Donohoe. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A cover of Ladies Home Journal from 1906 Ladies Home Journal was first published February 16, 1883 as a womens supplement to the Tribune and Farmer. ... Michael Kinsley (born March 9, 1951 in Detroit, Michigan) is a veteran American political journalist and commentator, currently serving as Editorial and Opinion Editor at the Los Angeles Times (since April 2004) (though he announced in July 2005 that he would assume a reduced, but as-yet-undefined, role). ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Seattle Times is the leading daily newspaper in Seattle, Washington, United States. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Q is a music magazine published monthly in the United Kingdom, with a circulation of 140,282 and a readership of 731,000. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wired News, online at Wired. ... Condé Nast Publications Inc is a worldwide magazine publishing company, credited with creating the marketing strategy which emphasized magazines focused on a particular class or interest. ... Mark Barney Greenway, born July 13, 1969 in Kettering, is a British death metal vocalist, who has been a member of Napalm Death, Extreme Noise Terror and Benediction. ... Smear Campaign is an album by the band Napalm Death released in 2006. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Igor Stravinsky. ... Will Durant William James Durant (November 5, 1885–November 7, 1981) was an American philosopher, historian, and writer. ... Will Durant William James Durant (November 5, 1885–November 7, 1981) was an American philosopher, historian, and writer. ... Will Durant William James Durant (November 5, 1885–November 7, 1981) was an American philosopher, historian, and writer. ... For other people named John Mackie, see John Mackie. ... The Atheism Tapes is a BBC TV documentary series by Jonathan Miller. ... This article is about the British physician, theatre and opera director, and television presenter; for other people named Jonathan Miller, see Jonathan Miller (disambiguation). ... Will Durant William James Durant (November 5, 1885–November 7, 1981) was an American philosopher, historian, and writer. ... Will Durant William James Durant (November 5, 1885–November 7, 1981) was an American philosopher, historian, and writer. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... This article concerns the British newspaper. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Patrick Thomas Cormack (born May 18, 1939, Grimsby) is an British politician. ... ABC News logo ABC News Special Report ident, circa 2006 ABC News is a division of American television and radio network ABC, owned by The Walt Disney Company. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Look up Humanist in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... attitude is an award winning British gay lifestyle magazine distributed worldwide. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... CBC redirects here, as this is the most common use of the abbreviation. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Humanisterna (the Humanists) is the largest humanist/rationalist organisation in Sweden with over 3,000 members. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Rod Liddle (born 1960) is a controversial British journalist best known for his term as editor of BBC Radio 4s Today programme. ... The Trouble with Atheism is an hour-long documentary on atheism, presented by Rod Liddle, who advocates agnosticism. ... The Trouble with Atheism is an hour-long documentary on atheism, presented by Rod Liddle, who advocates agnosticism. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Point of Inquiry is a podcast produced by the Center for Inquiry (CFI). ... The Freedom From Religion Foundation is an American Freethought organization based in Madison, Wisconsin. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Mark Steyn (born 1959) is a Canadian journalist, columnist, and film and music critic. ... The Atlantic redirects here; for the ocean, see Atlantic Ocean. ... Werner Karl Heisenberg (December 5, 1901 – February 1, 1976) was a celebrated German physicist and Nobel laureate, one of the founders of quantum mechanics and acknowledged to be one of the most important physicists of the twentieth century. ... The portrait of participants to the first Solvay Conference in 1911. ... Planck redirects here. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... For information about the band, see Atheist (band). ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... â–¶(?) (DN) (Swedish: lit. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Richard Erskine Frere Leakey (born 19 December 1944 in Nairobi, Kenya), is a Kenyan paleontologist and conservationist. ... John Burdon Sanderson Haldane (November 5, 1892 – December 1, 1964), who normally used J.B.S. as a first name, was a British geneticist and evolutionary biologist. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Pharyngula is a weblog run by PZ Myers, listed by the science journal Nature as the top-ranked blog written by a scientist. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Michael Duff, the bon vivant and society figure, was the son of Sir Robin Duff, 2nd Bt, of Vaynol, and his wife Lady Juliet Lowther, only child of the 4th Earl of Lonsdale and his wife Lady Gwladys Herbert (later Marchioness of Ripon). ... The God Delusion is a book by British biologist Richard Dawkins, Professor for the Public Understanding of Science at the University of Oxford. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see SIC. Sic is a Latin word, originally sicut [1] meaning thus, so, or just as that. In writing, it is placed within square brackets and usually italicized — [sic] — to indicate that an incorrect or unusual spelling, phrase, punctuation, and/or other preceding quoted material has been... Mitch Clem (b. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Mitch Clem. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Clinton Richard Dawkins, FRS (born March 26, 1941) is a British ethologist, evolutionary biologist and popular science writer who holds the Charles Simonyi Chair for the Public Understanding of Science at the University of Oxford. ... The God Delusion is a book by British biologist Richard Dawkins, Professor for the Public Understanding of Science at the University of Oxford. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

These are articles that list people of a particular religious or political belief. ... Thomas Huxley, coiner of the term agnostic. ... This is a partial list of famous humanists, including both secular and religious humanists. ... // A nontheist is any person who does not believe in the existence of a deity. ... This section does not cite its references or sources. ... Atheist redirects here. ... It is difficult to quantify the number of atheists in the world. ... Although the term atheism originated in the 16th century, based on Ancient Greek ἄθεος godless, denying the gods, ungodly[1] and open admission to positive atheism in modern times was not made earlier than in the late 18th century, atheistic ideas and beliefs, as well as their political influence, have a... State atheism is the official promotion of atheism by a government, often accompanied by active suppression of religious belief and practice. ... Criticism of atheism is made chiefly by theistic sources, though some forms of atheism also receive criticism from nontheistic sources. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial quota... Many atheists have experienced persecution, mainly from Christians and Muslims. ... Strong atheism is a term generally used to describe atheists who accept as true the proposition, gods do not exist. Weak atheism refers to any type of non-theism which falls short of this standard. ... Agnostic atheism is a philosophical doctrine that encompasses both atheism and agnosticism. ... Implicit atheism and explicit atheism are subcategories of atheism coined by George H. Smith (1979, p. ... Antitheism (sometimes anti-theism) is active opposition to theism. ... Antireligion is opposition to some or all religions in some or all contexts. ... Atheist Alliance International (AAI) is an alliance of atheist organisations around the world. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (504x656, 106 KB) Ludwig Feuerbach is a german philosopher. ... This article refers to the philosopher. ... Agnosticism (Greek: α- a-, without + γνώσις gnōsis, knowledge; after Gnosticism) is the philosophical view that the truth value of certain claims — particularly metaphysical claims regarding theology, afterlife or the existence of God, gods, deities, or even ultimate reality — is unknown or, depending on the form of agnosticism, inherently unknowable due to... Thomas Huxley, coiner of the term agnostic. ... Agnostic Theism is the philosophical view that encompasses both theism and agnosticism. ... Agnostic atheism is a philosophical doctrine that encompasses both atheism and agnosticism. ... Weak agnosticism, or empirical agnosticism (also negative agnosticism), is the belief that the existence or nonexistence of deities is currently unknown, but is not necessarily unknowable, therefore one will withhold judgment until more evidence is available. ... Strong agnosticism or positive agnosticism is the belief that it is impossible for humans to know whether or not any God or gods exist. ... Ignosticism is a word coined by Rabbi Sherwin Wine to indicate one of two related views about the existence of God. ... Apatheism (a portmanteau of apathy and theism/atheism), also known as pragmatic or critically as practical atheism, is acting with apathy, disregard, or lack of interest towards belief, or lack of belief in a deity. ... Nontheism is a term that covers a range of both religious and nonreligious attitudes characterized by the absence of—or the rejection of—theism or any belief in a personal god or gods. ... Secular humanism is a humanist philosophy that upholds reason, ethics, and justice, and specifically rejects the supernatural and the spiritual as warrants of moral reflection and decision-making. ... Freethought is a philosophical viewpoint that holds that beliefs should be formed on the basis of science and logical principles and not be compromised by authority, tradition, or any other dogma. ... This article is about secularism. ... This article concerns secularity, that is, being secular, in various senses. ... The criticism of religion includes criticism of the concept of religion, the validity of religion, the practice of religion, and the consequences of religion for humanity. ... The Freedom From Religion Foundation is an American Freethought organization based in Madison, Wisconsin. ... Bobby Henderson redirects here. ... A depiction of the Invisible Pink Unicorn, in the style of a heraldic animal rampant, though the nearest heraldic color to pink is purpure (purple). ... Russells teapot, sometimes called the Celestial Teapot, was an analogy first coined by the philosopher Bertrand Russell, intended to refute the idea that the burden of proof lies upon the sceptic to disprove unfalsifiable claims of religions. ... Below are words that designate a set or subset of beliefs. ... Acosmism, in contrast to pantheism, denies the reality of the universe, seeing it as ultimately illusory, (the prefix a- in Greek meaning negation; like un- in English), and only the infinite unmanifest Absolute as real. ... Agnosticism (Greek: α- a-, without + γνώσις gnōsis, knowledge; after Gnosticism) is the philosophical view that the truth value of certain claims — particularly metaphysical claims regarding theology, afterlife or the existence of God, gods, deities, or even ultimate reality — is unknown or, depending on the form of agnosticism, inherently unknowable due to... The term Animism is derived from the Latin anima, meaning soul.[1][2] In its most general sense, animism is simply the belief in souls. ... Antireligion is opposition to some or all religions in some or all contexts. ... Atheist redirects here. ... For other uses, see Ceremonial Deism. ... This article is about the general notion of determinism in philosophy. ... For other uses, see Dualism (disambiguation). ... Look up Esotericism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Gnosticism (Greek: gnōsis, knowledge) refers to a diverse, syncretistic religious movement consisting of various belief systems generally united in the teaching that humans are divine souls trapped in a material world created by an imperfect spirit, the demiurge, who is frequently identified with the Abrahamic God. ... This article discusses Humanism as a non-theistic life stance. ... In philosophical debates about free will and determinism, libertarianism is generally held to be the combination of the following beliefs: that free will is incompatible with determinism that human beings do possess free will, and that determinism is false All libertarians subscribe to the philosophy of incompatibilism which states that... For other uses, see Monist (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... New Age describes a broad movement characterized by alternative approaches to traditional Western culture. ... The New Thought Movement or New Thought is comprised of a loosely allied group of denominations, organizations, authors, philosophers, and individuals who share a set of metaphysical beliefs concerning healing, life force, visualization, and personal power. ... The term nondual is a literal translation of the Sanskrit term advaita, (meaning not two). ... Pandeism (Greek πάν, pan = all and Latin deus = God, in the sense of deism), is a term used at various times to describe religious beliefs. ... Pantheism (Greek: πάν ( pan ) = all and θεός ( theos ) = God) literally means God is All and All is God. It is the view that everything is of an all-encompassing immanent abstract God; or that the universe, or nature, and God are equivalent. ... Theism is the belief in the existence of one or more divinities or deities. ... Thelema is the English transliteration of the Ancient Greek noun : will, from the verb θέλω: to will, wish, purpose. ... Theosophy is a word and a concept known anciently, commonly understood in the modern era to describe the studies of religious philosophy and metaphysics originating with Helena Petrovna Blavatsky from the 1870s. ... In religion, transcendence is a condition or state of being that surpasses, and is independent of, physical existence. ... Below are words that designate a set or subset of beliefs. ... Image File history File links Portal. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Atheism (909 words)
Atheists, both forms of agnostics, and positivists (who believe that "God"-talk is nonsense) are generally lumped together as nonbelievers by theists.
According to it the "catholic" brand of atheist merely denies the existence of God while the self-proclaimed "orthodox atheist" agrees with Mikhail Bakunin's assertion that "if God existed he would have to be abolished".
Many atheists are generally misunderstood in many societies, and if they openly express their non-theistic points of view they may be mistreated, ostracized, or subject to discrimination.
atheism: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (4806 words)
Atheists such as Ludwig Feuerbach held that God was a projection of human ideals and that recognizing this fiction made self-realization possible.
Although some atheists tend toward skepticism and secular philosophies such as humanism, naturalism and materialism, there is no system of philosophy which all atheists share, nor does atheism have institutionalized rituals or behaviors.
Atheists assert various reasons for their position, including a lack of empirical evidence for deities, or the conviction that the non-existence of deities (in general or particular) is better supported rationally.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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