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Encyclopedia > List of University of Oxford people
The Oxford skyline, with All Souls, the Radcliffe Camera, the University Church of St Mary the Virgin and Tom Tower visible.
The Oxford skyline, with All Souls, the Radcliffe Camera, the University Church of St Mary the Virgin and Tom Tower visible.

This page serves as a central navigational point for lists of more than 2,350 members of the University of Oxford, divided into relevant groupings for ease of use. The vast majority were students at the university, although they did not necessarily take a degree; others have held fellowships at one of the university’s colleges; many fall into both categories. This page does not include people whose only connection with the university consists in the award of an honorary degree or an honorary fellowship. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (999 × 749 pixel, file size: 152 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Oxford University Student... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (999 × 749 pixel, file size: 152 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Oxford University Student... College name All Souls College Collegium Omnium Animarum Named after Feast of All Souls Established 1438 Sister College Trinity Hall, Cambridge Warden Dr. John Davis JCR President None Undergraduates None MCR President None Graduates 8 (approx. ... The Radcliffe Camera in Oxford, England, was built by James Gibbs between 1737 and 1749 to house the Radcliffe Science Library. ... The University Church of St Mary the Virgin (St Marys or SMV for short) is the largest of Oxfords parish churches and the centre from which the University of Oxford grew. ... Tom Tower seen from the quad Tom Tower seen from St Aldates Tom Tower is a bell tower in Oxford, England. ... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... A degree is any of a wide range of status levels conferred by institutions of higher education, such as universities, normally as the result of successfully completing a program of study. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... The University of Oxford comprises 39 Colleges and 7 religious Permanent Private Halls (PPHs), which are autonomous self-governing corporations within the university. ... An honorary degree (Latin: honoris causa ad gradum, not to be confused with an honors degree) is an academic degree awarded to an individual as a decoration, rather than as the result of matriculating and studying for several years. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ...


The list has been divided into categories indicating the field of activity in which people have become well known. Many of the university’s alumni/ae, or old members, as they are more traditionally known, have attained a level of distinction in more than one field. These appear only in the category with which it is felt they are most often associated, or in which they have been more recently involved. Hence Jeffrey Archer (Brasenose), a novelist, is listed as a life peer; Imran Khan (Keble), a former captain of the Pakistani cricket team, is listed as a Pakistani politician. Some academic disciplines are more difficult to define than others. In particular, many theologians, lawyers, and sociologists work in areas that might be thought to be encompassed by philosophy. Not to be confused with Geoffrey Archer or Baron Archer of Sandwell. ... and of the Brasenose College College name The Kings Hall and College of Brasenose Latin name aula regia et collegium aenei nasi Named after Bronze door knocker Established 1509 Sister college Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge Principal Prof. ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... In the United Kingdom, Life Peers are appointed members of the Peerage whose titles may not be inherited (those whose titles are inheritable are known as hereditary peers). ... For the cricketer from the West Indies, see Imran Khan (Trinidad and Tobago cricketer). ... College name Keble College Collegium Keblense Named after John Keble Established 1870 Sister College Selwyn College Warden Professor Dame Averil Cameron DBE FBA JCR President Paul Dwyer Undergraduates 435 MCR President Tom Robinson Graduates 219 Homepage Boatclub Keble College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford... For the cricketer from the West Indies, see Imran Khan (Trinidad and Tobago cricketer). ... The Pakistani cricket team is a national cricket team representing Pakistan. ... In recent history, the Pakistani political processess have taken place in the framework of a federal republic, where the system of government has at times been parliamentary, presidential, or semi-presidential. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge [1]) is the systematic and scientific study of society, including patterns of social relationships, social action, and culture[2]. Areas studied in sociology can range from the analysis of brief contacts between anonymous... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ...


Oxonians (a term for members of the university derived from its Latin name, Academia Oxoniensis) have included two British kings and at least twelve monarchs of ten other sovereign states, twenty-five British prime ministers, and thirty-five presidents and prime ministers of nineteen other countries. There are currently nineteen Oxonians in Her Majesty's Government, including nine in the twenty-three-member Cabinet. Twelve members of the Shadow Cabinet were educated at Oxford. This article is about the monarchy of the United Kingdom, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. For information about other Commonwealth realm monarchies, as well as other relevant articles, see... For other uses, see Monarch (disambiguation). ... “Sovereign” redirects here. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... The head of government is the chief officer of the executive branch of a government, often presiding over a cabinet. ... A logo of Her Majestys Government. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Official Loyal Opposition Shadow Cabinet (normally referred to simply as The Shadow Cabinet) is, in British parliamentary practice, a group of members from Her Majestys Loyal Opposition whose job it is to scrutinise their opposite numbers in government and come up with alternative policies. ...


The university lays claim to twelve saints, ten blesseds, an antipope, eighteen cardinals, and eighty-seven archbishops (including thirty-two of Canterbury and twenty-two of York), as well as forty-seven Nobel prize-winners and three Fields medallists. Saints redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For the book by Robert Rankin, see The Antipope. ... For other uses, see Cardinal (disambiguation). ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Arms of the Archbishop of York The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan bishop of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... Winners of the Nobel Prize are scientists, writers and peacemakers who have been awarded in their field of endeavour, and who are known collectively as either Nobel laureates or Nobel Prize winners. ... The obverse of the Fields Medal The Fields Medal is a prize awarded to two, three, or four mathematicians not over 40 years of age at each International Congress of the International Mathematical Union, a meeting that takes place every four years. ...


This list also includes twenty-four princes and princesses (among them the heirs apparent of Belgium, Brunei, and Japan), thirty-two dukes, nineteen marquesses, eighty-three earls and countesses, forty-six viscounts and viscountesses, and 188 barons and baronesses; 157 bishops (Anglican and Catholic); 291 Members of Parliament (excluding MPs who were subsequently peers), eleven Members of the European Parliament (excluding MEPs also serving at Westminster), twelve Lord Chancellors, nine Lord Chief Justices and twenty-two law lords; ten US Senators, ten US Representatives (including a Speaker of the House), three state governors, and four associate justices of the US Supreme Court; as well as six puisne justices of the Supreme Court of Canada and a chief justice of the now defunct Federal Court of Canada. The term prince, from the Latin root princeps, is used for a member of the highest ranks of the aristocracy or the nobility. ... Contrasting with heir presumptive, an heir apparent is one who cannot be prevented from inheriting by the birth of any other person. ... This page lists all dukedoms, extant, extinct, dormant, abeyant, or forfeit, in the peerages of England, Scotland, Great Britain, Ireland and the United Kingdom. ... This page lists all marquessates, extant, extinct, dormant, abeyant, or forfeit, in the peerages of England, Scotland, Great Britain, Ireland and the United Kingdom. ... This page lists all Earldoms, extant, extinct, dormant, abeyant, or forfeit, in the peerages of England, Scotland, Great Britain, Ireland and the United Kingdom. ... This page lists all viscounties, extant, extinct, dormant, abeyant, or forfeit, in the peerages of England, Scotland, Great Britain, Ireland and the United Kingdom. ... This page links to lists of Baronies and Lordships of Parliament, which rank with them. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... This box:      Anglicanism most commonly refers to the beliefs and practices of the Anglican Communion, a world-wide affiliation of Christian Churches, most of which have historical connections with the Church of England. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... A Member of the European Parliament (English abbreviation MEP)[1] is a member of the European Unions directly-elected legislative body, the European Parliament. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and prior to the Union the Chancellor of England and the Lord Chancellor of Scotland, is a senior and important functionary in the government of the United Kingdom, and its predecessor states. ... The Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales was, historically, the second-highest judge of the Courts of England and Wales, after the Lord Chancellor. ... Lords of Appeal in Ordinary are Life peers entrusted since the Appellate Jurisdiction Act 1876 with carrying out the judicial functions of the House of Lords. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer—or speaker—of the United States House of Representatives. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... The Justices of the United States Supreme Court, other than the Chief Justice, are termed Associate Justices. ... The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ... A Puisne Justice or Puisne Judge (pronounced puny) is the title for a regular member of a Court. ... The Supreme Court of Canada (French: Cour suprême du Canada) is the highest court of Canada and is the final court of appeal in the Canadian justice system. ... The Federal Court of Canada, more properly known as the Federal Court and the Federal Court of Appeal, is the court system set up by the Canadian national government to resolve disputes that arise under the national governments jurisdiction. ...

Revisions and sourced additions are welcome.

Contents

Government

Monarchs

British

This is a list of University of Oxford people in British public life. ...

Foreign

Main article: List of University of Oxford people in public life overseas

This is a list of people from the University of Oxford in public life overseas. ...

Royal persons

British

This is a list of University of Oxford people in British public life. ...

Foreign

Main article: List of University of Oxford people in public life overseas

This is a list of people from the University of Oxford in public life overseas. ...

Heads of State and Heads of Government

British Prime Ministers

This is a list of University of Oxford people in British public life. ...

Other countries

Main article: List of University of Oxford people in public life overseas

This is a list of people from the University of Oxford in public life overseas. ...

Her Majesty's Government

This is a list of University of Oxford people in British public life. ...

Shadow Cabinet

This is a list of University of Oxford people in British public life. ...

House of Lords and House of Commons

This is a list of University of Oxford people in British public life. ...

Members of the European Parliament

This is a list of University of Oxford people in British public life. ...

British local politicians

This is a list of University of Oxford people in British public life. ...

British civil servants

This is a list of University of Oxford people in British public life. ...

British diplomats

This is a list of University of Oxford people in British public life. ...

Members of the British Royal Household

This is a list of University of Oxford people in British public life. ...

British military, security, and police personnel

This is a list of University of Oxford people in British public life. ...

Foreign politicians, civil servants, diplomats, and military personnel

Main article: List of University of Oxford people in public life overseas

This is a list of people from the University of Oxford in public life overseas. ...

Non-government people in British public life

This is a list of University of Oxford people in British public life. ...

Non-government people in public life overseas

Main article: List of University of Oxford people in public life overseas

This is a list of people from the University of Oxford in public life overseas. ...

The Law

Lord Chancellors and Lord Chief Justices

Main article: List of University of Oxford people in the Law

This is a list of University of Oxford people in the Law. ...

Lords of Appeal in Ordinary (Law Lords)

Main article: List of University of Oxford people in the Law

This is a list of University of Oxford people in the Law. ...

Other judges and lawyers: United Kingdom

Main article: List of University of Oxford people in the Law

This is a list of University of Oxford people in the Law. ...

Judges and lawyers: other countries

Main article: List of University of Oxford people in the Law

This is a list of University of Oxford people in the Law. ...

Legal academics

This is a list of people from the University of Oxford in academic disciplines. ...

Religions

Christianity

Saints

Main article: List of University of Oxford people in religion

Blessed This is a list of University of Oxford people in religion. ...

Main article: List of University of Oxford people in religion

Pope This is a list of University of Oxford people in religion. ...

Main article: List of University of Oxford people in religion

Cardinals This is a list of University of Oxford people in religion. ...

Main article: List of University of Oxford people in religion

Archbishops of Canterbury This is a list of University of Oxford people in religion. ...

Main article: List of University of Oxford people in religion

Archbishops of York This is a list of University of Oxford people in religion. ...

Main article: List of University of Oxford people in religion

Other Archbishops, Presiding Bishops, and Metropolitans This is a list of University of Oxford people in religion. ...

Main article: List of University of Oxford people in religion

Other Bishops This is a list of University of Oxford people in religion. ...

Main article: List of University of Oxford people in religion

Clergy and other ministers This is a list of University of Oxford people in religion. ...

Main article: List of University of Oxford people in religion

Theologians This is a list of University of Oxford people in religion. ...

This is a list of people from the University of Oxford in academic disciplines. ...

Islam

Main article: List of University of Oxford people in religion

This is a list of University of Oxford people in religion. ...

Judaism

Main article: List of University of Oxford people in religion

This is a list of University of Oxford people in religion. ...

Bahá'í

Main article: List of University of Oxford people in religion

This is a list of University of Oxford people in religion. ...

Buddhism

Main article: List of University of Oxford people in religion

This is a list of University of Oxford people in religion. ...

Study of Religions

This is a list of people from the University of Oxford in academic disciplines. ...

Literature

Poets

Poets Laureate

Samuel Daniel (1562 – October 14, 1619) was an English poet and historian. ... William Davenant Sir William Davenant (February 28, 1606 - April 7, 1668), also spelled DAvenant, was an English poet and playwright. ... Thomas Warton, the Younger Thomas Warton (January 9, 1728 – May 21, 1790) was an English literary historian and critic, as well as a poet. ... Henry James Pye Henry James Pye (February 20, 1745 – August 11, 1813) was an English poet. ... Robert Southey, English poet Robert Southey (August 12, 1774 – March 21, 1843) was an English poet of the Romantic school, one of the so-called Lake Poets, and Poet Laureate. ... Bridges on the cover of Time in 1929 Robert Seymour Bridges, OM, (October 23, 1844 – April 21, 1930) was an English poet, holder of the honour of poet laureate from 1913. ... Cecil Day-Lewis (or Day Lewis) (27th April 1904-22nd May 1972) was a British poet. ... A collection of Betjemans poetry, published by John Murray in January 2006 Sir John Betjeman CBE (28 August 1906 – 19 May 1984) was an English poet, writer and broadcaster who described himself in Whos Who as a poet and hack. He was born to a middle-class family... Andrew Motion, FRSL, (born October 26, 1952) is an English poet, novelist and biographer who is the current Poet Laureate. ... This page is about William Morris, the writer, designer and socialist. ... Philip Arthur Larkin, CH, CBE, FRSL, (9 August 1922 – 2 December 1985) was an English poet, novelist and jazz critic. ... John Abbot (1587/8–c. ... Drummond Allison (1921- 2 December 1943) was an English war poet of World War II. He was born in Caterham, Surrey, and educated at Bishops Stortford College and at Queens College, Oxford. ... Sir Edwin Arnold (1832-1904), English poet and journalist, was born on June 10, 1832 at Gravesend, the son of a Sussex magistrate, and was educated at Kings school, Rochester; Kings College, London; and University College, Oxford. ... Matthew Arnold Caricature from Punch, 1881: Admit that Homer sometimes nods, That poets do write trash, Our Bard has written Balder Dead, And also Balder-dash Family tree Matthew Arnold (24 December 1822 – 15 April 1888) was an English poet and cultural critic, who worked as an inspector of schools. ... Wystan Hugh Auden (21 February 1907 – 29 September 1973) IPA: ;[1], who signed his works W. H. Auden, was an Anglo-American poet, regarded by many as one of the greatest writers of the 20th century. ... Owen Barfield (November 9, 1898–December 14, 1997) was a British philosopher, author, poet, and critic. ... Thomas Lovell Beddoes (June 30, 1803 - January 26, 1849) was an English poet and dramatist. ... Henry Charles Beeching (15 May 1859 - 1919) was an English clergyman, author and poet. ... Photograph of Belloc Joseph Hilaire Pierre René Belloc (27 July 1870 – 16 July 1953) was one of the most prolific writers in England during the early twentieth century. ... Robert Laurence Binyon (August 10, 1869 at Lancaster – March 10, 1943 at Reading, Berkshire) was an English poet, dramatist and art scholar. ... John Francis Bloxam (1873-1928) was an English Uranian author and churchman. ... Edmund Charles Blunden (November 1, 1896 - January 20, 1974), although not one of the top trio of English World War I writers, was an important and influential poet, author and critic. ... (Rev. ... Thomas Edward Brown OKW (May 5, 1830 - October 29, 1897), British poet, scholar and divine, was born at Douglas, Isle of Man and educated at King Williams College. ... Alan Charles Brownjohn (born 28 July 1931) is a British poet and novelist. ... Charles Stuart Calverley (December 22, 1831 _ February 17, 1884) was an English poet and wit. ... Vahni Capildeo (born 1973) is a Trinidadian writer who has lived in the United Kingdom since 1991. ... Thomas Carew (pronounced like Carey) (1595 – March 22, 1640) was an English poet. ... Sydney Bertram Carter (6 May 1915–13 March 2004) was an English poet, songwriter, folk musician and Christian/Quaker, born in Camden Town, London. ... Arthur Hugh Clough (January 1, 1819 – November 13, 1861) was an English poet, and the brother of Anne Jemima Clough. ... Robert Peter Tristram Coffin (March 18, 1892 – January 20, 1955) was a writer, poet and professor at Wells College (1921-1934) and Bowdoin College (1934-1955). ... Wendy Cope (born July 21, 1945) is a contemporary English poet. ... The Reverend Samuel Elsworth Cottam, M.A. was an English poet and priest. ... Kevin Crossley-Holland (born 1941) is an English childrens author and poet Born in Mursley, North Buckinghamshire, Holland grew up in Whiteleaf, a small village in the Chilterns. ... Sir John Davies (April 1569 – December 8, 1626) was an English poet and lawyer, who became attorney general in Ireland and formulated many of the legal principles that underpinned the British Empire. ... Vinicius de Moraes (October 19, 1913 - July 9, 1980), born Marcus Vinícius da Cruz de Melo Morais in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, was a seminal figure in contemporary Brazilian music. ... For the Welsh courtier and diplomat, see Sir John Donne. ... Lord Alfred Bruce Douglas (born October 22, 1870; died March 20, 1945) was the third son of John Sholto Douglas, 9th Marquess of Queensberry, and the former Sibyl Montgomery. ... Ernest Christopher Dowson (2 August 1867-23 February 1900), an English poet who was associated with the Decadent Movement, was born at Lee, south-east of London. ... Sir Edward Dyer (died May, 1607), was an English courtier and poet. ... For other persons named Thomas Eliot, see Thomas Eliot (disambiguation). ... UA Fanthorpe. ... For other people named John Fuller, see Fuller (disambiguation). ... Sydney Goodsir Smith (26 October 1915 - 15 January 1975) was a New Zealand-Scottish poet, artist, dramatist and novelist. ... Richard Graves (1715 - 1804) was an English poet and novelist. ... Robert von Ranke Graves (24 July 1895 – 7 December 1985) was an English poet, scholar, and novelist. ... Julian Grenfell (1888-1915) was a British poet of World War I. He was the son and heir of Lord Desborough, and was educated at Eton College and Balliol College, Oxford. ... Jane Griffiths (born 1970) is a British poet. ... Stephen Hawes (fl. ... Robert Stephen Hawker (3 December 1803 - 15 August 1875), was an English poet, antiquarian of Cornwall, Anglican clergyman and reputed eccentric. ... Seamus Justin Heaney (IPA: ) (born 13 April 1939) is an Irish poet, writer and lecturer who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1995. ... John Francis Alexander Heath-Stubbs (born 9 July 1918) is a British poet and translator, known for his verse influenced by classical myths, and the long Arthurian poem Artorius (1972). ... for the British aeronautical engineer and professor, see Geoffrey T. R. Hill Geoffrey Hill (born June 18, 1932) is an English poet, professor of English Literature and religion, and co-director of the Editorial Institute at Boston University, Massachusetts, USA. // Geoffrey Hill was born in Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, England, in 1932. ... The Best ideal is the true/ And other truth is none. ... Alfred Edward Housman (IPA: ; March 26, 1859 – April 30, 1936), usually known as A.E. Housman, was an English poet and classical scholar, now best known for his cycle of poems A Shropshire Lad. ... Elizabeth Jennings (July 18, 1926 – October 26, 2001) was an English poet, noted for her clarity of style and simplicity of literary approach. ... Jenny Joseph (born 7 May 1932) is an English poet. ... Sidney Keyes (1922-1943) was an English poet of World War II. Like his contemporary, Keith Douglas, he was born in Kent, and had his Oxford career curtailed by the outbreak of war. ... Nicole Krauss is an American writer who lives in the Park Slope neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, with her husband, novelist Jonathan Safran Foer, and their dog, George. ... Walter Savage Landor (January 30, 1775 - September 17, 1864), English writer, eldest son of Walter Landor and his wife Elizabeth Savage, was born at Warwick. ... Eugene Lee-Hamilton was a late Victorian English poet (1845 - 1907). ... Richard Lovelace (1618 - 1657) was an English poet and nobleman, born in Woolwich, today part of south-east London. ... George Mann MacBeth (January 19, 1932-February 16, 1992) was a Scottish poet and novelist. ... Frederick Louis MacNeice (September 12, 1907 – September 3, 1963) was a British and Irish poet and playwright. ... John Marston (October 7, 1576 - June 25, 1634) was an English poet, playwright and satirist during the Elizabethan and Jacobean periods. ... Glyn Maxwell (born in 1962) is a British poet. ... Dominic Francis Moraes (July 19, 1938 - June 2, 2004), popularly known as Dom Moraes was an Indian writer, poet and columnist. ... Arthur Nortje (1942 - 1970) was a South African poet. ... Thomas Neilson Paulin (born January 25, 1949 in Leeds, England) is a Northern Irish poet and critic well-known for his strong political views. ... Frank Templeton Prince (September 13, 1912 – August 7, 2003) was a British poet and academic, known generally for the 1942 poem Soldiers Bathing which has been frequently included in anthologies. ... Craig Raine (3 December 1944 - ) is an English poet and critic born in Bishop Auckland, County Durham. ... John Crowe Ransom (April 30, 1888, Pulaski, Tennessee- July 3, 1974, Gambier, Ohio) was an American poet, essayist, social and political theorist, man of letters, and academic. ... Alan John Ross, (May 6, 1922 – February 14, 2001), was a British poet and editor. ... Francis Reginald Scott (Frank Scott, F.R. Scott) (August 1, 1899 - January 30, 1985) was a Canadian poet, intellectual and constitutional expert. ... Edith Joy Scovell (1907-1999) was a British poet. ... Patrick Shaw-Stewart was a brilliant Eton College and Oxford scholar of the Edwardian era who died on active service in the First World War. ... Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 – July 8, 1822; pronounced ) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets of the English language. ... Philip Sidney. ... Charles Hamilton Sorley (May 19, 1895 - October 13, 1915) was a British poet of World War I. Born in Aberdeen, Scotland, he was educated, like Siegfried Sassoon, at Marlborough College (1908-1913). ... Charles Bernard Spencer (1909 – 1963) was an English poet. ... Sir Stephen Harold Spender CBE, (February 28, 1909, London – July 16, 1995) was an English poet, novelist and essayist who concentrated on themes of social injustice and the class struggle in his work. ... Pauline Stainer is an acclaimed English poet. ... Jon (Howie) Stallworthy (born January 18, 1935 in London) FBA FRSL is Professor Emeritus of English at the University of Oxford. ... Count Stanislaus Eric Stenbock (1858-1895) was a Swedish poet and writer of macabre fantastic fiction. ... Algernon Swinburne, Portrait by Rossetti Algernon Charles Swinburne (April 5, 1837 – April 10, 1909) was a Victorian era English poet. ... Michael Symmons Roberts was born in Preston, Lancashire, in 1963. ... John Addington Symonds was the name of a father and son, both English writers. ... Edward Thomas (March 3, 1878 - April 9, 1917) was one of the best-known English poets of World War I. Thomas was of Welsh extraction but was born in London as Philip Edward Thomas. ... Michael Rayner Thwaites, AO (30 May 1915 - 1 November 2005) was an Australian academic, poet, intelligence officer, and activist for Moral Rearmament. ... Thomas Traherne (1636 or 1637 - October 10, 1674) was an English poet and religious writer. ... Julian Turner (born 1955) is a British poet and mental health worker. ... John Wain (born John Barrington Wain, March 14, 1925 - May 24, 1994) was an English poet, novelist, and critic, associated with the literary group The Movement. ... Robert Penn Warren Robert Penn Warren (April 24, 1905 – September 15, 1989) was an American poet, novelist, and literary critic, and was one of the founders of The New Criticism. ... Samuel Wesley (1662 - 1735) is now known as the father of a great religious leader, John Wesley; in his own time he was known to many as a poet and a writer of controversial prose. ... Henry Willobie (or Willoughby) (1575? - 1596?) is the supposed author of a poem called Willobie his Avisa, which derives interest from its possible connection with Shakespeares personal history. ... For other people of this name, see John Rochester. ... Fabian Strachan Woodley (19 July 1888–8 August 1957) was a British poet of the Uranian school. ... David John Murray Wright (1920-1994) was an author and an acclaimed South African-born poet[1] // [edit] Biography Wright was born in Johannesburg, South Africa 23 February 1920 of normal hearing. ... Kit Wright Kit Wright is one of the most acclaimed and adored of poets for children. ... Thomas Yalden (1670—July 16, 1736) was an English poet. ... For Her Majesty the Queens private secretary see Edward Young (Royal Household). ...

Novelists and story writers

Born in London in 1968, Diran is the author of Some Kind of Black a novel that won the 1996 Saga Prize. ... Naomi Alderman is a British author and novelist. ... Monica Ali (born October 20, 1967) is the author of Brick Lane, her debut novel, which was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize for Fiction in 2003. ... Sir Kingsley William Amis (April 16, 1922 – October 22, 1995) was an English novelist, poet, critic, and teacher. ... Photo of Martin Amis by Robert Birnbaum Martin Amis (born August 25, 1949) is an English novelist. ... Louise Bagshawe is an author of fiction. ... British author, who was born in Maidstone in 1969 and studied Modern Languages at St Johns College, Oxford. ... William Boyd, CBE (born 7 March 1952 in Accra, Ghana) is a contemporary Scottish novelist and screenwriter. ... John Buchan, 1st Baron Tweedsmuir, GCMG, GCVO, CH, PC (26 August 1875 – 11 February 1940), was a Scottish novelist and Unionist politician who served as Governor General of Canada. ... Mike Carey is the writer of the Eisner Award nominated Lucifer and Hellblazer, comic book titles published by the Vertigo imprint of DC Comics. ... Amit Chaudhuri (b. ... Susanna [Mary] Clarke (born November 1, 1959) is a British author best known for her debut novel Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell (2004), a Hugo Award-winning alternate history fantasy. ... Edmund Crispin was the pseudonym of Robert Bruce Montgomery (sometimes credited as Bruce Montgomery) (October 2, 1921—September 15, 1978) an English crime writer and composer. ... The cover of Apples and Pears by Guy Davenport Guy Mattison Davenport (November 23, 1927 – January 4, 2005) was an American writer, translator, painter, illustrator, intellectual, and teacher. ... William Robertson Davies, CC, FRSC, FRSL (born August 28, 1913, at Thamesville, Ontario, and died December 2, 1995 at Orangeville, Ontario) was a Canadian novelist, playwright, critic, journalist, and professor. ... Lindsey Davis, historical novelist, was born in Birmingham, England in 1949. ... Helen DeWitt (born 1957 in Takoma Park, Maryland, a suburb of Washington, D.C.) is a novelist. ... Siobhan Dowd (b. ... John Meade Falkner (8 May 1858 - 22 July 1932) was an English novelist, best known for his 1898 swashbuckler, Moonfleet. ... Helen Fielding (born February 19, 1958 in Morley, West Yorkshire) is a British author, best known as the author of the novel Bridget Joness Diary and its sequel Bridget Jones: The Edge Of Reason The Bridget Jones books had their origins in a column published in The Independent and... Penelope Fitzgerald (17 December 1916 - 28 April 2000) was an English poet, novelist and biographer. ... Richard Flanagan (born 1961) is an author, historian and film director from Tasmania, Australia. ... Margaret Forster (born 1938) is a British author. ... John Galsworthy OM (14 August 1867 – 31 January 1933) was an English novelist and playwright. ... For the banker, see Amitav Ghosh (banker). ... Sir William Gerald Golding (19 September 1911 – 19 June 1993) was a British novelist, poet and Nobel Prize for Literature laureate best known for his novel Lord of the Flies. ... This article is about the writer. ... Mark Haddon is a novelist and poet, best known for The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time. ... Catherine Heath (1924–1991) was a British novelist. ... Joseph Heller (May 1, 1923 – December 12, 1999) was an American satirical novelist and playwright. ... Zoë Heller (born 1965) is a British journalist and novelist. ... Robert David Quixano Henriques (December 11, 1905 - January 22, 1967) was a British writer, broadcaster and farmer. ... Peter Hobbs is the author of The Short Day Dying, a novel, and I Could Ride All Day in my Cool Blue Train, a book of short stories. ... Alan Hollinghurst is a British novelist. ... Image:Holtby. ... A statue of Thomas Hughes at Rugby School Thomas Hughes (October 20, 1822 – March 22, 1896) was an English lawyer and author. ... Aldous Leonard Huxley (July 26, 1894 – November 22, 1963) was an English writer and one of the most prominent members of the famous Huxley family. ... Hari Mohan Nath Kunzru (born 1969) is the British author of The Impressionist, Transmission and My Revolutions. ... Perceval Landon was an English writer and journalist, now best remembered for his classic and much reprinted ghost story Thurnley Abbey. ... John le Carré is the pseudonym of David John Moore Cornwell (born October 19, 1931 in Poole, Dorset, England), an English writer of espionage novels. ... Nelle Harper Lee (born April 28, 1926) is an American novelist known for her Pulitzer Prize – winning 1960 novel To Kill a Mockingbird, her only major work to date. ... Peter Levi (1931 – 2000) was a British poet, scholar and writer. ... Matthew Gregory Lewis (July 9, 1775 - May 14, 1818) was an English novelist and dramatist, often referred to as Monk Lewis, because of the success of his Gothic novel, The Monk. ... Toby Litt is an English writer, born in Bedford in 1968. ... Emilie Rose Macaulay, DBE (1 August 1881 - 30 October 1958), affectionately known as Emilie (her actual first name), was an English novelist. ... Val McDermid (born June 4, 1955) is a Scottish crime writer. ... Charlotte Mendelson (born 1972) is a British novelist and editor. ... Naomi Margaret Mitchison, CBE (nee Haldane; 1 November 1897 Edinburgh – 11 January 1999 at Carradale) was a Scottish novelist and poet. ... Dame Jean Iris Murdoch DBE (July 15, 1919 – February 8, 1999) was an Irish-born British writer and philosopher, best known for her novels, which combine rich characterization and compelling plotlines, usually involving ethical or sexual themes. ... Gregory Norminton is a novelist, dramatist, actor, and political and environmental activist born at Ascot, Berkshire, in 1976. ... Sir Vidiadhar Surajprasad Naipaul, KB, TC (b. ... Iain Pears (born in 1955) is an English mystery writer. ... Philip Pullman CBE (born October 19, 1946) is a British writer. ... Barbara Mary Crampton Pym (June 2, 1913 - January 11, 1980) was an English novelist. ... Mary Renault (pronounced Ren-olt[1]) (4 September 1905 – 13 December 1983) born Mary Challans, was an English writer best known for her historical novels set in Ancient Greece. ... Abu Rushd Matinuddin(Bengali: ), born December 25, 1919 in Kolkata, is a renowned modern Bangladeshi author, using the literary name of Abu Rushd. ... Edward St Aubyn (born 1960 in Cornwall) is a British author and journalist. ... Dorothy Leigh Sayers (Oxford, 13 June 1893 – Witham, 17 December 1957) was a renowned British author, translator, student of classical and modern languages, and Christian humanist. ... Will Self William Self (born September 26, 1961) is an English novelist, reviewer and columnist. ... Vikram Seth (pronounced ), born June 20, 1952 is an Indian poet, novelist, travel writer, librettist, childrens writer, biographer and memoirist. ... John Innes Mackintosh Stewart (September 30, 1906 Edinburgh–November 12, 1994 Coulsdon) was a Scottish novelist and academic. ... Anna Stothard, born in 1983, is a novelist and the daughter of Sir Peter Stothard, former editor of The Times. ... Victoria Plum Sykes is a British-born fashion-writer, novelist and New York socialite. ... Rachel Trickett (December 20, 1923 — June 24, 1999) was an English novelist, non‑fiction writer, literary scholar, and a prominent British academic; she served as Principal of St Hugh’s College, Oxford for nearly twenty years, between 1973 and 1991. ... Joanna Trollope OBE (born December 9, 1943, in her grandfathers rectory in Minchinhampton, Gloucestershire), is an English novelist. ... Philip William Turner (born December 3, 1925) is an English author best known for his childrens books about the fictional town of Darnley Mills and (as Stephen Chance) about the Reverend Septimus Treloar. ... Jill Paton Walsh (born 1937) is an English novelist and childrens writer. ... Rex Warner (March 9, 1905 - June 24, 1986) was an English classicist, writer and translator. ... Auberon Alexander Waugh (November 17, 1939 – January 16, 2001) was a British author and journalist. ... Evelyn Waugh, as photographed in 1940 by Carl Van Vechten Arthur Evelyn St. ... Angus Frank Johnstone Wilson (August 11, 1913-1991) was a British novelist and short story writer. ... Jeanette Winterson OBE (born August 27, 1959) is a British novelist. ...

Dramatists

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Sketch of Francis Beaumont Francis Beaumont (1584 – March 6, 1616) was a dramatist in the English Renaissance theatre, most famous for his collaborations with John Fletcher. ... Published by Faber/Profile Books in 2005 Alan Bennett (born May 9, 1934) is an English author and actor noted for his work, his boyish appearance and his sonorous Yorkshire accent. ... Thomas Chaundler (1418-1490) is a playwright and illustrator. ... Caryl Churchill (born September 3, 1938) is an English writer of stage plays known for her use of non-realistic techniques and feminist themes. ... Richard Curtis in London, 1999 Richard Curtis CBE, (born 8 November 1956), is a New Zealand-born British screenwriter, best known for the TV programmes Blackadder and The Vicar of Dibley as well as movies such as Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill, and Love Actually. ... Russell T Davies, interviewed for the documentary series Doctor Who Confidential in 2005. ... The Honourable William Douglas-Home (June 3, 1912- September 28, 1992) was a British writer and dramatist. ... For other people named Samuel Foote, see Samuel Foote (disambiguation) Samuel Foote (January 27, 1720 – October 21, 1777), a Cornish dramatist and actor, was baptized at Truro on January 27, 1720. ... John Ford (baptized April 17, 1586 - c. ... Christopher Hampton (born January 26, 1946) is a British playwright, screen writer and film director. ... Richard Arthur Warren Hughes (19 April 1900-28 April 1976) was a British professional writer of poems, short stories, novels and plays. ... Girish Karnad (Kannada:ಗಿರೀಶ್ ಕಾರ್ನಾಡ್) (born [[1938 May 19, 1938]]), is a contemporary writer, playwright, actor and movie director in Kannada language. ... Thomas Lodge (c. ... Patrick Marber (born 19 September 1964) is an English playwright, director, actor and Academy Award nominated screenwriter. ... Herman Charles Merivale ((1839 – 1906) was an English dramatist and poet, son of Herman Merivale. ... Thomas Middleton (1580 – 1627) was an English Jacobean playwright and poet. ... This article is about the writer. ... Thomas Nabbes (1605- date of death unknown) was an English dramatist. ... Thomas Otway (March 3, 1652 - April, 1685) was an English dramatist of the Restoration period. ... George Peele (1558 - c. ... Liber Amoris Dennis Christopher George Potter (17 May 1935—7 June 1994) was a controversial British dramatist who is best known for several widely acclaimed television dramas which mixed fantasy and reality, the personal and the social. ... Terence Rattigan — British Playwright Sir Terence Mervyn Rattigan (June 10, 1911 – November 30, 1977) was one of Englands most important 20th century dramatists. ... William Scoular, playwright, director, and teacher. ... Sir Charles Sedley (c. ... Robert Cedric Sherriff (6 June 1896 – 13 November 1975) was an English writer. ... James Shirley (or Sherley) (September 1596 - October 29, 1666), was an English dramatist. ... Asheem Singh (Born 28th November 1982) is a screenwriter for film and television. ... James Townley (1714-1778), English dramatist, second son of Charles Townley, merchant, was born in London on the 6th of May 1714. ... Nicholas Udall (1504 - December 23, 1556), was an English playwright and schoolmaster, the author of Ralph Roister Doister, regarded by many as the first comedy written in the English language. ... Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and author of short stories. ... Peter Wildeblood (19 May 1923 - 14 November 1999) was a British-Canadian journalist, novelist, playwright, and gay rights campaigner. ... George Emlyn Williams CBE (26 November 1905–25 September 1987), known as Emlyn Williams, was a Welsh dramatist and actor. ... William Wycherley in 1675. ...

Children's writers

For other persons named Richard Adams, see Richard Adams (disambiguation). ... Giles Andreae is Britains best-selling contemporary poet, through his personas Purple Ronnie and Edward Monkton. A graduate of Oxford University, Andreae completed his degree under difficult circumstances as he developed Hodgkins lymphoma, a cancer of the lymph glands, and began an intensive course of chemotherapy and radiotherapy... Wilbert Vere Awdry, OBE, (June 15, 1911 – March 21, 1997), better known as the Reverend W. Awdry, was a clergyman, railway enthusiast and childrens author. ... Thomas Archibald (T.A.) Barron (born March 26, 1952, in Boston, Massachusetts) is an American writer of young adult and fantasy literature. ... Nina Bawden (born January 19, 1925, London) is a popular British novelist and childrens writer. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (IPA: ) (27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll (), was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican clergyman and photographer. ... Thomas Day (22 June 1748 - 28 September 1789), was a British author. ... Ruby Ferguson, nee Ashby, (born Reeth, West Yorkshire, UK 1899-1966), was a British writer of childrens pony stories in the same vein as the Pullein-Thompson sisters. ... Theodor Seuss Geisel (March 2, 1904 – September 24, 1991) was an American writer and cartoonist, better known by his pen name, Dr. Seuss. ... Roger (Gilbert) Lancelyn Green (2 November 1918 – 8 October 1987) was a British biographer and childrens writer. ... Penelope Lively (born March 17, 1933) is a prolific, popular and critically acclaimed author of fiction for both children and adults. ... Lady Flora Mary McDonnell (born 7 November 1963), now called Lady Flora Pennybacker, is an Anglo-Irish aristocrat, the eldest child of Alexander Randal Mark McDonnell, 9th Earl of Antrim and Sarah Elizabeth Anne Harmsworth. ... Michelle Paver is a novelist. ... For other persons named Michael Rosen, see Michael Rosen (disambiguation). ... Anglo-American writer Francesca Simon (b. ... Frederick Edward Weatherly (1848-1929) was an English lawyer, author, songwriter and radio entertainer. ... Diana Wynne Jones (born London August 16, 1934) is a British writer, principally of fantasy novels for children and adults, as well as a small amount of non-fiction. ...

Scholars, critics, diarists, publishers, librarians

Joseph Addison, the Kit-cat portrait, circa 1703–1712, by Godfrey Kneller. ... Jean Aitchison is a Rupert Murdoch Professor of Language and Communication in the Faculty of English Language and Literature at the University of Oxford. ... Peter Bayley was an English fellow at University College, Oxford. ... John Bayley (CBE 1999) was born in 1925 in Lahore, Pakistan (then known as Lahore, British India. ... Max Beerbohm by William Rothenstein, 1893 Sir Henry Maximilian Beerbohm (August 24, 1872 - May 20, 1956) was an English parodist and caricaturist. ... Homi K. Bhabha (born 1949) is an Indian-American postcolonial theorist. ... James H. Billington James Hadley Billington (born June 1, 1929) is the current Librarian of Congress. ... Andrew Cecil Bradley (1851–1935) was an English literary scholar. ... Melvyn Bragg, Baron Bragg, FRSL, FRTS (born 6 October 1939, in Wigton, Cumberland) is a British author and broadcaster. ... Jay Taverner is the pseudonym for the writing partnership of Jacky Bratton and Jane Traies. ... Katharine Mary Briggs (November 8, 1898 – 1980) is the author of The Anatomy of Puck, the definitive 4-volume Dictionary of British Folk-Tales, and various other books on fairies and folklore. ... Vera Mary Brittain, Lady Catlin (1893 – March 29, 1970) was an English writer, feminist and pacifist, best remembered as the author of the best-selling memoir Testament of Youth, recounting her experiences during the First World War and the growth of her ideology of specifically Anglican Christian pacifism. ... Cleanth Brooks (October 16, 1906 - 1994) was an influential American literary critic and professor. ... Robert William Burchfield (January 27, 1923 - July 5, 2004) was a scholar, writer, and lexicographer. ... Alasdair Clayre was a British man of many talents: author, broadcaster, singer-songwriter, and academic. ... Peter Conrad (b. ... Janet Elizabeth Courtney (born Barton-on-Humber 27 November 1865; died London 24 September 1954) was a scholar, writer and feminist. ... Jonathan Culler (1944 - ) is an important figure of the structuralism movement. ... Thomas de Quincey from the frontispiece of Revolt of the Tartars, Thomas de Quincey (August 15, 1785 – December 8, 1859) was an English author and intellectual. ... Susie Dent is a British lexicographer born in Woking in the late 1960s. ... Terry Eagleton (born in Salford, Lancashire (now Greater Manchester), England, on February 22, 1943) is a British literary critic and philosopher. ... Richard Ellmann (March 15, 1918 – May 13, 1987) was a prominent American/British literary critic and biographer of Irish writers such as James Joyce, Oscar Wilde, and William Butler Yeats. ... Paul Engle (1908-1991) was a noted American poet, writer, editor, and novelist. ... Sir Geoffrey Cust Faber (1889-1961) was a British academic, publisher and poet. ... James Fenton (born April 25, 1949, Lincoln, England) has been, at various times, a journalist, poet, literary critic, and professor. ... Henry Watson Fowler (10 March 1858 – 26 December 1933) was an English schoolmaster, lexicographer and commentator on the usage of English. ... Canon Adam Fox (1883–1977) was the Dean of Divinity at C.S. Lewiss Magdalen College, Oxford. ... Leela Gandhi is a senior lecturer at La Trobe University in the English program. ... William Gifford (1756 - 1826), critic and poet, was born of humble parentage at Ashburton, Devonshire, and after being for a short time at sea, was apprenticed to a cobbler. ... Victor Gollancz (April 9, 1893–February 8, 1967) was a British publisher, socialist, and humanitarian. ... Professor John Haffenden was educated at Trinity College, Dublin (BA, MA) and Oxford University (D.Phil), Haffenden is an academic at the University of Sheffield, where his renowned research on William Empson developed. ... Robert Ian Hamilton (24 March 1938 - 27 December 2001) was a British literary critic, reviewer, biographer, poet, magazine editor and publisher. ... Richard Hakluyt (~1552 - November 23, 1616) was an English writer, famous for his Voyages which provided William Shakespeare and others with material. ... George Birkbeck Norman Hill (June 11, 1835 - February 27, 1904), English author, son of Arthur Hill, head master of Bruce Castle school, was born at Tottenham, Middlesex. ... Hugh Haughton, academic, author, editor and specialist in Irish literature and the literature of nonsense. ... Thomas James (c. ... For other persons named Samuel Johnson, see Samuel Johnson (disambiguation). ... For the former National Basketball Association player, see Andrew Lang (basketball). ... Gerard Langbaine (1656–1692), dramatic biographer and critic. ... Philip Arthur Larkin, CH, CBE, FRSL, (9 August 1922 – 2 December 1985) was an English poet, novelist and jazz critic. ... John Lahr is an American theater critic and the son of actor Bert Lahr. ... Andrew George Lehmann, M.A., D.Phil. ... Clive Staples Jack Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an Irish author and scholar. ... Alain LeRoy Locke (September 13, 1886 – June 9, 1954) was an African American writer, philosopher, educator, and patron of the arts. ... Edward Lucie-Smith, 2006 John Edward McKenzie Lucie-Smith (born 27 February 1933) is a British writer, poet, art critic, curator and author of exhibition catalogues. ... Fiona MacCarthy (born January 23, 1940) is a British biographer and cultural historian She was raised in Chelsea; her family then owned the Dorchester Hotel. ... Robert Macfarlane, (born 15 August 1976), is a travel writer, cultural historian, and literary critic. ... Norris Dewar McWhirter, CBE (August 12, 1925 – April 19, 2004) was a writer, political activist, co-founder of the Freedom Association, and a television presenter. ... Alan Ross McWhirter (12 August 1925 - 27 November 1975), known as Ross McWhirter, was, with his twin brother, Norris McWhirter, co-founder of the Guinness Book of Records. ... Christopher M. Maslanka (born 27 October 1954) is a British writer and broadcaster, specialising in puzzles and problem solving. ... Ved (Parkash) Mehta (Born March 21, 1934) is a writer who was born in Lahore, British India (now a Pakistani city) to a Hindu family. ... Time magazine, August 31, 1970 Kate Millett (born September 14, 1934) is an American feminist writer and activist. ... Toril Moi is James B. Duke Professor of Literature and Romance Studies at Duke University. ... Jan Morris CBE (born James Humphrey Morris on 2 October 1926, in Clevedon, Somerset, England, but by heritage and adoption Welsh) is a British historian and travel writer. ... Brian Robert Morris, Baron Morris of Castle Morris, (1930 - April 30, 2001), was a British poet, critic and professor of literature. ... Charles Raymond Mortimer Bell (April 25, 1895-January 9, 1980), who wrote under the name Raymond Mortimer, was a British writer, known mostly as a critic and literary editor. ... John Beverley Nichols (born September 9, 1898 in Bower Ashton, Bristol, died September 15, 1983 in Kingston, London), was an English writer, playwright, actor, novelist and composer. ... Sir Harold Nicolson (November 21, 1886 – May 1, 1968) was a British diplomat, author and politician. ... David Norbrook (born 1 June 1950) is Professor of Renaissance English Literature at Oxford University. ... Francis Turner Palgrave (September 28, 1824 - October 24, 1897) was a British critic and poet. ... Walter Horatio Pater (August 4, 1839 - July 30, 1894) was an English essayist and literary critic. ... William Paton Ker (August 30, 1855 - July 17, 1923) was a Scottish literary scholar and essayist. ... Reynolds Price Reynolds Price (born February 1, 1933, as Edward Reynolds Price) is a U.S. novelist, poet, dramatist, essayist and James B. Duke Professor of English at Duke University. ... Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch (November 21, 1863 - May 12, 1944) was a British writer, who published under the pen name of Q. Born in Cornwall, he was educated at Newton Abbot College, at Clifton College, and Trinity College, Oxford and later became a lecturer there. ... Sir Walter Alexander Raleigh was a scholar and author circa 1900. ... Christopher Ricks (born 1933) is a British literary critic and scholar. ... Neil Leon Rudenstine (born January 21, 1935) is an American educator, literary scholar, and administrator. ... John Campbell Shairp (July 30, 1819 - September 18, 1885) was a Scottish critic and man of letters. ... Image needed Susan Sontag (January 16, 1933 – December 28, 2004) was an American essayist, novelist, filmmaker, and activist. ... Sir Richard Steele (bap. ... Percy Reginald Stephensen, known as Inky Stephensen was a Rhodes Scholar who moved across the political spectrum from the Communist Party of Australia to the fascist Australia First Movement, whose magazine The Publicist he edited from 1941-1942. ... John Innes Mackintosh Stewart (September 30, 1906 Edinburgh–November 12, 1994 Coulsdon) was a Scottish novelist and academic. ... Jonathan Swift Jonathan Swift (November 30, 1667 – October 19, 1745) was an Irish cleric, satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for Whigs then for Tories), and poet, famous for works like Gullivers Travels, A Modest Proposal, A Journal to Stella, The Drapiers Letters, The Battle of the Books, and... Ann Thwaite (born 1932) is a British writer, best known as a biographer. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... Gudbrandr Vigfusson (born 1827 or 1828; died January 31, 1889) was the foremost Scandinavian scholar of the 19th century. ... Fredric John Warburg (November 27, 1898 - May 25, 1981) was a publisher best known for his association with the British author George Orwell. ... Marina Warner (born 21st November 1946) is a British writer, known as a novelist and short story writer, and also for many non-fiction books relating in various ways to feminism and myth. ... Joseph Warton (April, 1722 - February 23, 1800) was an English academic and literary critic. ... Raymond Henry Williams (31 August 1921 - 26 January 1988) was a Welsh academic, novelist and critic. ... Simon Winchester, OBE (born September 28, 1944), is a British author and journalist. ... George Woodcock (May 8, 1912 - January 28, 1995) was a Canadian writer. ...

Media

Many journalists work in both print and broadcast media. The following are listed under the medium for which they are best known. Those who are known solely as sports commentators will be found at List of University of Oxford people in sport, exploration, and adventuring . C. B. Fry This is a list of people from the University of Oxford involved in sport, exploration, and adventuring. ...


Print

Editors

Paul Anderson (born 1959) is a British journalist and academic. ... Perry Anderson (born 1938) is a Marxist intellectual and historian. ... Lionel Barber is a British journalist, educated at Dulwich College, who was appointed editor of the Financial Times in November 2005. ... Paul Barker (born 1935 in the West Riding of Yorkshire) is a British journalist and writer. ... Peter Beinart (born 1971) is a journalist and editor-at-large for The New Republic, having served as editor of TNR from November 1999 until March 2006. ... Tina Brown (born Christina Hambley Brown on November 21, 1953, in Maidenhead, England) is a British-born American magazine editor, columnist, and talk-show host. ... George Earl Buckle (June 10, 1854–March 13, 1935) was an English editor and biographer. ... Sir Alastair Burnet (born July 12, 1928) is a British journalist and broadcaster, known for his work in news and current affairs programming. ... William Percival Crozier (1 August 1879 – 16 April 1944) was a British journalist. ... Matthew dAncona (born 1968) is a British journalist. ... George Geoffrey Dawson (October 25, 1874, Skipton-in-Craven, Yorkshire - November 7, 1944, London) was editor of The Times from 1912 to 1919 and again from 1923 until 1941. ... John Thadeus Delane (October 11, 1817 - November 22, 1879), editor of The Times (London), was born in London. ... Bill Emmott, born August 6, 1956, is an English journalist. ... James Fallows is an American print and radio journalist who has been associated with The Atlantic Monthly for many years and has written eight books. ... Kim Fletcher is a British journalist and media consultant, born in 1956. ... Paul Foot, campaigning journalist Paul Mackintosh Foot (8 November 1937 in Palestine – 18 July 2004 at Stansted Airport) was a British investigative journalist, political campaigner, author, and long-time member of the Socialist Workers Party (SWP). ... John Lawrence Le Breton Hammond (1872-1949) was a British journalist and writer on social history and politics. ... Sir Max Hastings (born December 28, 1945) is a British journalist, editor, historian and author. ... Hector Alastair Hetherington (born 31 October 1919, died 3 October 1999) was a journalist, newspaper editor and academic. ... Ian Hislop (born 13 July 1960) is the editor of British satirical magazine Private Eye, a team captain on the popular satirical current affairs quiz Have I Got News for You and a comedy scriptwriter. ... Anthony Michell Howard (born February 12, 1934) is a prominent British journalist, broadcaster and writer. ... Brian Inglis (31 July 1916-11 February 1993) was a British journalist, historian and television presenter. ... Richard Ingrams (born August 19, 1937) was the second editor of British satirical magazine, Private Eye, taking over from Christopher Booker in 1963. ... Sir Simon Jenkins (born June 10, 1943) is a British newspaper columnist currently associated with The Guardian after fifteen years with News International titles. ... Paul Johnson (born Paul Bede Johnson on 2 November 1928 in Manchester, England) is a British Roman Catholic journalist, historian, speechwriter and author. ... Michael Kinsley (born March 9, 1951 in Detroit, Michigan) is a veteran American political journalist and commentator, currently serving as Editorial and Opinion Editor at the Los Angeles Times (since April 2004) (though he announced in July 2005 that he would assume a reduced, but as-yet-undefined, role). ... Andrew Stephen Bower Knight (born 1st November 1939 in England) is a journalist, editor, and media magnate. ... Richard Lambert was editor of the Financial Times until 2001. ... Dominic Ralph Campden Lawson (born December 17, 1956) is a British journalist. ... John Micklethwait, born in 1962, is editor-in-chief of The Economist magazine since March 23, 2006. ... Ferdinand Mount (born 1939) is a British writer, columnist for the Sunday Times and commentator on politics, and Conservative Party politician. ... Rowan Pelling (born 1968 in Kent) is a female British journalist and broadcaster, who first achieved note as the second editor (or editrice, to use her term) of a monthly literary/erotic magazine (now quarterly), entitled the Erotic Review. ... Peter Preston is a British journalist and author. ... William Rees-Mogg, Baron Rees-Mogg (born July 14, 1928) is a journalist and politician in the United Kingdom. ... Charles Prestwich Scott (26 October 1846 – 1 January 1932) was a British journalist, publisher and politician. ... Edward Taylor Ted Scott (1883 - April 22, 1932) was a British journalist, who was editor and briefly co-owner of the Manchester Guardian, and the younger son of its legendary editor-owner C. P. Scott. ... Paul Robert Spike is an author, editor and journalist who grew up in New Yorks Greenwich Village but has lived in Europe, primarily London, most of his life. ... Richard Rick Stengel is TIME’s 16th Managing Editor. ... Peter Stothard (born February 28, 1951) is a British newspaper editor, currently for the Times Literary Supplement, but of The Times itself from 1992 to 2002, and before that, from 1989 to 1992, of its United States section. ... Andrew Michael Sullivan (born August 10, 1963) is English, a self-described libertarian conservative author and political commentator, known for his often personal style of political analysis. ... Hilary Wainwright (born 1949) is a British socialist and feminist, best known for being editor of Red Pepper magazine. ... John Walter (February 23, 1776 - July 28, 1847), son of John Walter, the founder of The Times, really established the great newspaper of which his father had sown the seed. ... Norman E. Webster (born June 4, 1941, Summerside, Prince Edward Island) is a Canadian former editor-in-chief of The Globe and Mail and The Gazette. ... Jacob Weisberg (born 1964) is an American political journalist and commentator, currently serving as editor of Slate magazine. ... Andreas Whittam Smith CBE, (born 13 June 1937), British financial journalist, was one of the co-founders of The Independent newspaper in October 1986, and is a former president of the British Board of Film Classification. ... Sir Peregrine Gerard Worsthorne (born December 22, 1923) is a British Conservative journalist, writer and broadcaster. ... David Aaronovitch (born July 8, 1954) is a British journalist, broadcaster, and author. ... Tariq Ali Tariq Ali (Urdu: طارق علی) (born October 21, 1943) is a British-Pakistani writer and filmmaker [1]. He is a member of the editorial committee of the New Left Review, and regularly contributes to The Guardian, Counterpunch, and the London Review of Books, He is the author of Pirates Of... Yasmin Alibhai-Brown (born Yasmin Damji on 10 December 1949) is an Uganda-born journalist, based in London; she hyphenated her surname only after her second marriage in 1990. ... Lynn Barber is a British journalist, currently writing for The Observer. ... Catherine Bennett is a British journalist working for The Guardian, where she writes columns on politics and culture. ... Adrian Berry, 4th Viscount Camrose (born 15 June 1937) is a British journalist, writer, and nobleman. ... Anna Blundy is a British novelist and journalist. ... Emma Brockes (born 1975) is a British Jewish journalist for The Guardian newspaper, working principally as a profile writer. ... James Buchan, born in 1954, is a British novelist and journalist. ... David John Caute (born 16 December 1936) is a British author, journalist and historian. ... Hugh Chisholm, (1866-1924),journalist and editor of the 11th edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica, a son of Henry Williams Chisholm, Warden of the Standards at the Board of Trade. ... Alexander Claud Cockburn (pronounced , co-burn), born June 6, 1941, is a self-described radical Irish journalist who has lived and worked in the United States since 1973. ... Andrew Cockburn () is an Irish journalist who has lived in the United States for many years. ... Francis Claud Cockburn (pronounced ) (1904-1981) was a renowned radical British journalist, who was controversial for his communist and stalinist sympathies. ... Patrick Cockburn () is an Irish journalist who has been a Middle East correspondent since 1979 for the Financial Times and the Independent . ... Peter Conradi is an author and journalist who should not be confused with Peter J. Conradi, another author with a similar name. ... Journalist/writer. ... Nick Denton is the founder and proprietor of Gawker Media. ... Eugene J. E.J. Dionne, Jr. ... Image:Jonathanfreedland. ... Thomas Lauren Friedman, OBE (born July 20, 1953), is an American journalist. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Barton Gellman is a journalist writing for the Washington Post. ... Norman Alan Stanley Gibson (born May 28, 1923 at Sheffield, Yorkshire; died April 10, 1997[1] at Taunton, Somerset) was an English journalist, writer and radio broadcaster, best known for his work in connection with cricket, though he also sometimes covered football and rugby union. ... Richard Willoughby Gott (born 28 October 1938 Aston Tirrold, England) is a British journalist and historian, who has written extensively on Latin America. ... For other persons named John Harris, see John Harris (disambiguation). ... Julia Hartley-Brewer is political editor of the Sunday Express, although she previously worked for The Guardian (1999 - 2000). ... Christopher Eric Hitchens (born April 13, 1949) is a British-American author, journalist and literary critic. ... Anthony Holden (born 22 May 1947) is a British journalist, broadcaster and writer, particularly known as a biographer of the British Royal family and of artists including Shakespeare, Tchaikovsky, Lorenzo da Ponte and Laurence Olivier. ... Austen Ivereigh is a Catholic journalist and is currently co-ordinator of the Citizen Organising Foundations Strangers into Citizens campaign. ... Rachel Johnson (born 1965) is a British journalist and writer based in London. ... Tobias Jones is a British author and journalist. ... Oliver Kamm (born 1963) is a British newspaper columnist, author and blogger. ... John Keay (born 1941) is a British writer and historian. ... Robert Kee (born 1919) is a British journalist and writer, known for his historical works on World War II and on Ireland. ... Lucy Kellaway is the Management Columnist at the Financial Times. ... Sir Ludovic Kennedy shown on the cover of his book All In The Mind: A Farewell To God Sir Ludovic Henry Coverley Kennedy (born 3 November 1919) is a British journalist, broadcaster, and author. ... Martin Kettle is a British journalist and author focusing on British political issues. ... Miles Kington (born 1941) is a British journalist, jazz musician and broadcaster. ... Nicholas D. Kristof Nicholas Donabet Kristof (born April 27, 1959) is an American political scientist, author, and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist specializing in East Asia. ... Christina Lamb was named Foreign Correspondent of the Year in all the British media awards in 2002 (the British Press Awards, Foreign Press Association and What the Papers Say Awards) for her reporting on the war on terrorism. ... Example of a Lancaster Pocket Cartoon Sir Osbert Lancaster (1908 - 1986) was an author, diplomat and art critic. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Peter Millar is a British journalist and author, primarily known for his reporting of the fall of the Cold War and fall of the Berlin Wall for The Sunday Times of London. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Harry Mount is New York correspondent for the British newspaper the Daily Telegraph. ... Eustace Clare Grenville Murray (1824 – 20 December 1881), English journalist, was the illegitimate son of Richard Grenville, 2nd Duke of Buckingham. ... James Owen (born 1969) is a British author and journalist. ... Melanie Phillips (born June 4, 1951) is a British journalist and author, best known for her column about political and social issues which currently appears in the Daily Mail. ... W. Andrew Robinson (born 1957) is a British author and newspaper editor. ... Miranda Sawyer is an English journalist and broadcaster. ... George Lowther Steer (1909-1944) was a British journalist and war correspondent who reported on wars preceding World War II, especially the Spanish Civil War. ... William Shawcross (born 28 May 1946, Sussex) is a British writer, broadcaster and commentator. ... Jonny Steinberg (born 1970) is a South African journalist and a scriptwriter. ... Frances Stonor Saunders (born 1966) is a British journalist and historian. ... David Stubbs is a British journalist. ... Chris Taylor, who as of July 2005 is the San Francisco correspondent for TIME magazine, was born in Liverpool, England, and received his primary education in the small northeastern town of Chester-le-Street. ... Polly Toynbee (born Mary Louisa Toynbee on December 27, 1946) is a journalist and writer in the United Kingdom, and has been a columnist for The Guardian newspaper since 1998. ... Thomas Henry (Tom) Wintringham (1898-1949) was a British soldier, military historian, journalist, poet, Marxist, politician and author. ... John Woodcock OBE (born 7 August 1926) is an English cricket writer and journalist. ... Adrian Wooldridge is the Washington Bureau Chief and Lexington columnist for the Economist magazine. ... Hugo John Smelter Young (October 13, 1938 – September 22, 2003) was a British journalist and columnist and senior political commentator at The Guardian. ... Toby Young (born Toby Daniel Moorsom Young in 1963) is a homuncular high-flying British journalist, author of How to Lose Friends and Alienate People, the tale of his disastrous five-year attempt to make it in the U.S. as a contributing editor at Conde Nast Publications Vanity Fair...

Broadcast

Brett Allen (born 12th May 1979), in Hertfordshire, is a British television presenter and Comedian. ... Samira Ahmed (born 1968) is a television newsreader and reporter best known for her work with the BBC. She is currently a reporter and newspresenter on Channel 4 News [1]. She was born in London, Britain, and is married with two children. ... (Hon) Jackie Ashley (born September 10, 1954), is a British journalist and broadcaster. ... Zeinab Badawi Zeinab Badawi (born November 24, 1959) is a television and radio reporter and news presenter in the United Kingdom. ... Paul Barry reporting for Four Corners in 1993 Paul Barry (1952 - ) is a British-born, Australian-based journalist, who has won many awards for his investigative reporting. ... For other persons named Ben Brown , see Ben Brown (disambiguation). ... Fiona Bruce (born 25 April 1964 in Singapore) is a British journalist and television presenter in the United Kingdom. ... Michael Brunson is a well-known British political journalist. ... Brenda Buttner is the host of Bulls and Bears on Saturday mornings on the Fox News Channel. ... Reeta Chakrabarti (born 1964) is a political correspondent for the BBC Televisions Breakfast programme shown on BBC1 and BBC News 24 channels. ... Charles Collingwood (June 4, 1917 - October 3, 1985) was a CBS television newscaster. ... Alan Connor (born Alan Hamilton February 4, 1974) is a British writer, journalist and television presenter. ... Giles Coren (born 1969 in Paddington, London) is a British journalist and broadcaster. ... Victoria Vicky Coren (born 1972) is a British writer, presenter and poker player. ... Adam Curtis at the San Francisco International Film Festival in 2005 Adam Curtis (born 1955) is a British television documentary producer. ... For other persons of the same name, see Evan Davis. ... Sir Robin Day, OBE (24 October 1923 – 6 August 2000) was a British political broadcaster and commentator of note. ... David Dimbleby CBE (born October 28, 1938) is a long standing BBC TV commentator, a presenter of current affairs and political programmes, and more recently, art and architectural history series. ... Stephanie Flanders is the daugher of British actor and comic singer Michael Flanders. ... Matt Frei (born 26 November 1963 in Essen, Germany) is the BBCs Washington, D. C. correspondent. ... Delia Gallagher on CNN. Delia Buckley Gallagher (Born 11 March 1970) is CNN’s Faith and Values Correspondent. ... Paul Matthew Gambaccini (born April 2, 1949, New York) is a radio and television presenter in the United Kingdom. ... Krishnan Guru-Murthy (born April 5, 1970) is a British television newscaster and journalist currently fronting Channel 4 News (produced by ITN), which he joined in 1998. ... Guto Harri is the North American Business Correspondent for BBC News. ... Frederic Russell Harty (5 September 1934 – 8 June 1988) was an English television presenter with a distinctly camp turn of phrase; his name has been used as Cockney rhyming slang for party. ... Ronald Gordon Honeycombe (born 27 September 1936) is an author, playwright and stage actor, well known in the United Kingdom as a national television newscaster. ... Sally Jones was a British television news and sports presenter. ... Natasha presenting the BBC Six OClock News The image above is believed to be a replaceable fair use image. ... Martha Catherine Kearney (born October 8, 1957) is a British broadcaster and journalist. ... Bridget Kendall is a diplomatic correspondent for the BBC, a post that she has held since November 1998. ... Kenneth Kendall (born August 7, 1924) is a British broadcaster and journalist. ... Victoria Lautman is a Chicago broadcast journalist and writer with a specialty in arts, culture, and the humanities. ... (Tord) Alvar Quan Lidell (September 11, 1908–January 7, 1981) was a BBC radio announcer and newsreader. ... Rachel Maddow (born 1973) is the host of The Rachel Maddow Show on Air America Radio, which airs live on weekdays from 6pm to 8pm Eastern Time. ... Howard Percival Marshall (born August 22, 1900 in Surrey; died October 27, 1973) achieved distinction in several fields, but is best remembered as a pioneering commentator for live broadcasts of state occasions and sporting events - and in particular cricket Test matches - for BBC radio during the 1930s. ... Rex Murphy (born March, 1947, Carbonear, Newfoundland) is a noted Canadian commentator. ... Rageh Omaar (born 19 July 1967) is a British television news presenter and writer of Somali origin. ... Robert Orchard is a British radio journalist and presenter. ... Robert Peston is a British journalist, currently (as of 2006) the Business Editor of BBC News. ... Libby Purves (born February 2, 1950 in London, England) is a radio presenter, journalist and author. ... Esther Louise Rantzen CBE (born on 22 June 1940 ) (age 66)) is a British journalist and television presenter who is best known for her long stint in Thats Life! and her anti paedophile activism activities as founder of the charity ChildLine. ... James Robbins (born January 19, 1954) is the BBCs Diplomatic Correspondent, a post he has held since January 1998. ... Nick Robinson (right) interviewing Michael Portillo in July 2001. ... This article is about British radio presenter and television presenter. ... Tim Sebastian (born March 13, 1952, London, England) is a television journalist. ... John Sergeant (born 14 April 1944, Oxford) is a journalist and broadcaster. ... Peter Sissons presenting the last BBC Nine OClock News bulletin Peter George Sissons (born 17 July 1942 in Liverpool) is a nationally known television newscaster in the United Kingdom. ... Howard K. Smith Howard Kingsbury Smith (May 12, 1914 – February 15, 2002) was an American journalist, radio reporter, television anchorman and commentator, and one of the original Murrow boys. ... Francine Stock was born in 1958 and is best known as a TV presenter on Newsnight and The Money Programme on BBC2. ... Manisha Tank is one of the main presenters of World Business Report. ... Louis Theroux Louis Sebastian Theroux (born 20 May 1970) is a British broadcaster holding both British and US citizenship, best known for his television series Louis Therouxs Weird Weekends and When Louis Met… // Theroux was born in Singapore,[1] the younger son of the American travel writer and novelist... Alexander James Thomson (born December 22, 1960) is a UK television journalist and newscaster. ... Rajdeep Sardesai (born May 24,1965) in Ahmedabad, Gujarat in a Maharashtrian Gowd Saraswat Brahmin family is an Indian political commentator and TV personality. ...

Administration

Directors-General of the BBC

  • Jana Bennett Head of Science BBC 1994-2002, Director of Television 2002-06, Director of Vision 2006-
  • Seymour Berry, 2nd Viscount Camrose (Christ Church) MP 1941-45, Dep Chmn Telegraph 39-87, Vice Chmn Amalgamated Press 42-59
  • Michael Berry, Baron Hartwell (disclaimed 3rd Viscount Camrose) (Christ Church) Chmn & Ed-in-Chief Daily & Sunday Telegraph until 1986
  • Calvin Cheng (Hertford) founder Looque International (2004)
  • Arthur fforde (Trinity) Headmaster of Rugby 1948-57, Chairman of the BBC 1957-64
  • Maurice Gorham (Balliol) Controller BBC Television Service 1946-47, Director Radio Éireann 1953-59
  • George Howard, Baron Howard of Henderskelfe (Balliol) Chairman of the BBC 1980-83
  • Walter Isaacson (Pembroke) Chairman & CEO of CNN 2001-3, President & CEO of Aspen Institute 2003-
  • Roly Keating (Balliol) Controller of BBC Four 2002-04, Controller of BBC Two 2004-
  • Rupert Murdoch (Worcester) founder, Chairman, and CEO News Corporation since 1980
  • Cathy Rogers Creative Director RDF Media (Los Angeles) 2001-
  • Howard Stringer (Merton) Chairman and CEO Sony Corporation 2005-

Sir Frederick W. Ogilvie (died June 10, 1949) was Director-General of the BBC from July 19, 1938 (aged 45) to January 26, 1942, and was succeeded by joint Director-Generals Cecil Graves and Robert W. Foot. ... Sir Hugh Carleton Greene (1910-1987) was Director-General of the BBC from 1960 to 1969, and is generally credited with modernising an organisation that had fallen behind in the wake of the launch of ITV in 1955. ... Alasdair David Gordon Milne (born 1930) was Director-General of the BBC from July 1982 until a forced resignation, under intense pressure from the Conservative government and a Board of BBC Governors dominated by Conservatives, in January 1987. ... Sir Michael Checkland (born 1936) was Director-General of the BBC from 1987 to 1992, having been appointed after the forced resignation of Alasdair Milne. ... John Birt, Baron Birt (born 10 December 1944), served as the Director-General of the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) from 1992 to 2000, having previously been deputy director-general since 1987. ... Mark Thompson has been the BBC Director-General since May 2004. ... Jana Bennett joined the BBC as Director of Television in April 2002 having previously been Executive Vice President and General Manager at Discovery Communications in the USA. External link BBC Website Categories: Substubs | People stubs ... Sir John Seymour Berry, 2nd Viscount Camrose, 2nd Baronet Berry of Hackwood Park (12 July 1909-15 February 1995) was a British nobleman, politician, and newspaper proprietor. ... William Michael Berry, the 3rd Viscount Camrose and Baron Hartwell (28 May 1911-3 April 2001) was a newspaper proprietor and journalist. ... Calvin Ern-Lee Cheng (born in Singapore) is a figure in the fashion modelling industry in Asia. ... Sir Arthur Frederic Brownlow fforde (23 August 1900-1985) was a solicitor, civil servant, headmaster, writer and businessman. ... Maurice Gorham (born 1902; died August 9, 1975) was an Irish journalist and broadcasting executive. ... George Anthony Geoffrey Howard, Baron Howard of Henderskelfe, JP, (1920-1984) was a County Councillor and Justice of Peace. ... Walter Isaacson Walter Isaacson is the President and CEO of the Aspen Institute. ... Roly Keating is the current controller of British television channel BBC Two as of 2004. ... Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born United States citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ... Cathy Rogers (born May 28, 1968, Lancashire, UK) is a British television executive, producer and presenter, who has also had some success as a musician. ... Sir Howard Stringer Sir Howard Stringer (born 1942) is a British-American businessman and Chief Executive Officer of Sony Corporation, before that he was CEO of the Sony Corporation of America. ...

The Arts

Stage and television

Maria Aitken is a British actress and director, born 12 September 1945 in Dublin to Sir William Aitken (Conservative MP) and Penelope Aitken, daughter of John Maffey, 1st Baron Rugby. ... Ewan Bailey (born Ewan Thomson in Sussex, England, 1966) is an actor, writer and voice artist located in Central London, best known for writing and performing in The Sunday Format, BBC Radio 4s satire of British Sunday newspapers, Funland, BBC Threes darker than dark comedy set in the... Sir Kenneth Ralph Barnes (11 September 1878–16 October 1957) was director of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA) in London from 1909 until 1955. ... Kathryn Bailey Beckinsale[1] (born 26 July 1973) is an English actress, known for her roles in the films Pearl Harbor (2001), Underworld (2003) and Van Helsing (2004). ... Eve Best (born Emily Best, born July 1971), is a British actress best known for her stage work. ... Bunny Breckinridge in Plan 9 from Outer Space (illustrated by Drew Friedman). ... This article is about the 20th-century actor. ... Hugh Dancy (born 19 June 1975) is a British actor. ... Oliver Robert Ford Davies (born August 12, 1939) is a British actor and writer. ... John Michael Terence Wellesley Denison CBE (November 1, 1915 - July 22, 1998) was educated at Harrow School. ... George Alexander Cassady Devine CBE (November 20, 1910 - January 20, 1966) was an extremely influential theatrical manager, director, teacher and actor in London from the late 1940s until his death. ... Michael Henry Flanders (March 1, 1922 – April 14, 1975) was a British actor, broadcaster, and writer and performer of comic songs. ... Emilia Rose Elizabeth Fox (born July 31, 1974 in London, England) is a British actress possibly best known for her role as pathologist Nikki Alexander in television series Silent Witness, having joined the cast on the departure of Amanda Burton. ... Val Henry Gielgud (born April 28, 1900 in London, England, UK; died November 30, 1981 in London, England, UK) was a English actor, writer, director and broadcaster. ... Emily Hamilton is a British Actress. ... Cartoon in Punch magazine 25 August 1920, showing Charles Hawtrey accompanying Joan Barry. ... George Procter Hawtrey was an actor, playwright and Pageant Master. ... Francesca Hunt is an actress from the United Kingdom. ... Felicity Alice Jones [1] (born 19 January 1984, Birmingham) is a British actress best known to a television audiences for her role as the school bully Ethel Hallow in the series The Worst Witch and its spin-off Weirdsister College. ... Not to be confused with Harold Lloyd. ... Jodhi May (born 1st May 1975) is a British actress best known for her work on controversial costume dramas. ... Emily Mortimer (born 1 December 1971) is an English actress. ... Katherine Parkinson is a British actress. ... Rosamund Pike (born 27 January 1979) is an English actress, best known for her portrayals of Bond villainess Miranda Frost in Die Another Day and Jane Bennet in Pride and Prejudice. ... Hugh Antony Kobna Quarshie (born December 22, 1954) is a British actor. ... Diana Quick (born on 23 November 1947 in London, England) is an English actress, best known for her role as Julia in Brideshead Revisited. ... Wallace Shawn (born November 12, 1943), sometimes credited as Wally Shawn, is an American actor and playwright. ... Waen Shepherd ( b. ... Donald Ibrahím Swann (September 30, 1923–March 23, 1994) was a British composer, musician and entertainer. ... Kenneth Peacock Tynan (April 2, 1927 - July 26, 1980), was an influential and often controversial British theatre critic and writer. ... Honeysuckle Weeks (b. ... Samuel West, sometimes billed as Sam West, (born June 19, 1966) is a British actor, the son of Prunella Scales and Timothy West. ... Simon Woods is a British actor. ... Emily Woof (born 1967) is an English actress, known for her roles in such films as The Full Monty, The Woodlanders, Velvet Goldmine, Wondrous Oblivion, and The League of Gentlemens Apocalypse. ... For the American hockey player, see Mike York. ...

Comedy

Rowan Sebastian Atkinson (born 6 January 1955) is an English comedian, actor and writer, famous for his title roles in the British television comedies Blackadder and Mr. ... Gordon Angus Deayton (born January 6, 1956) is an English comic actor and television presenter. ... Richard Herring performing his show Someone Likes Yoghurt at the Pleasance Theatre, Edinburgh, during the 2005 Edinburgh Festival Fringe Richard Keith Herring (born July 12, 1967) is a British comedian and writer formerly best known as part of Lee and Herring, a double act with Stewart Lee. ... Armando Iannucci (born 1964, Glasgow, Scotland) is a Scottish comedian, satirist and radio producer. ... The actress Emma Kennedy Emma Kennedy (born May 28, 1967 in Corby, Northamptonshire) is an English television presenter, actress and writer. ... Terence Graham Parry Jones (born in Colwyn Bay, Wales, on February 1, 1942) is a British comedian, screenwriter and actor, film director, childrens author, popular historian, political commentator and TV documentary host. ... Stewart Graham Lee (born April 5, 1968 in Shropshire, raised in Solihull) is an English stand-up comedian, writer and director probably best known for being one half of the 1990s comedy duo Lee and Herring, and for co-writing and directing the critically-acclaimed and controversial stage show Jerry... Josie Long (born April 17, 1982) is a British comedian. ... Dudley Stuart John Moore, CBE (April 19, 1935 – March 27, 2002), was an Academy-Award nominated British comedian, actor and musician. ... Michael Edward Palin, CBE (born 5 May 1943) is an English comedian, actor, writer and television presenter best known for being one of the members of the comedy group Monty Python and for his travel documentaries. ... Sally Phillips (born 10 May 1970) is a British comic actress. ... Mel Smith Mel Smith is an English actor, film director, writer, producer born in London on December 3, 1952) He attended New College, Oxford. ... Laura Solon (born August 1979) is an English comedian, writer and winner of the 2005 Perrier Comedy Award, only the second woman to win as a solo performer (the first being Jenny Eclair in 1995). ...

Film

Lindsay Gordon Anderson (April 17, 1923 - August 30, 1994), was a Scottish film critic, and a film, theatre and documentary director. ... Frank Cottrell Boyce is a British screenwriter, novelist and occasional actor, best known for his collaborations with film director Michael Winterbottom. ... Donald Crisp (July 27, 1882 – May 25, 1974) was an Academy Award winning English film actor. ... Florian Maria Georg Christian Graf Henckel von Donnersmarck (b. ... David Giles is a British television film director. ... Hugh John Mungo Grant (born September 9, 1960) is a Golden Globe-winning British actor and film producer. ... Skylor Haagensen is a film producer with DreamScape Motion Pictures. ... Ken Loach Kenneth Loach (born June 17, 1936), known as Ken Loach, is an English television and film director, known for his naturalistic style and socialist themes. ... Terrence Terry Malick (born November 30, 1943, in Ottawa, Illinois) is an American film director. ... Laura Mulvey (born August 15, 1941) is a British feminist film theorist. ... Dilys Powell (1901 - June 3, 1995) was a film critic and scholar of Ancient Greek. ... John Richard Schlesinger CBE (February 16, 1926 – July 25, 2003) was an English film director. ... Michael Winterbottom (b. ...

Music

Composers

Librettist Richard Addinsell,(January 13, 1904 - November 14, 1977) was a British composer, best known for his Warsaw Concerto and film music. ... Thomas Ashwell (c. ... Richard Baker (b. ... Sir Edward Cuthbert Bairstow was born in Huddersfield on August 22, 1874 and died in York on May 1, 1946. ... Sir Lennox Berkeley (May 12, 1903 - December 26, 1989) was a British composer. ... George Sainton Kaye Butterworth (July 12, 1885 - August 5, 1916) was a British composer best known for his settings of A. E. Housmans poems. ... Barney Childs (February 13, 1926–January 11, 2000) taught and composed avant-garde music and literature at universities in the United States and United Kingdom. ... Reginald de Koven was born at Middletown, Connecticut, April 3, 1859. ... Paul Drayton is a British composer, conductor, pianist and teacher. ... John Farmer (August 16, 1835 - July 17, 1901), from Nottingham, composed oratorios, cantatas, and other church music, and chamber music. ... John Gardner, CBE (born 1917 in Manchester, England) is an English composer of classical music. ... Jane Glover is an eminent female conductor, and Music Director of the Chicagos Music of the Baroque. ... Sir William Henry Harris (March 28, 1883 - September 6, 1973) was an English organist and composer. ... Basil Harwood (11 April 1859–3 April 1949) was an English organist and composer. ... Joseph Horovitz (born May 26, 1926 in Vienna, Austria) is a British composer and conductor. ... Michael J. Hurd from Ocean View,DE or artist Michael Hurd from Roswell,NM[1] Michael (John) Hurd was a noted composer[1] and author[2], principally known for his choral music[3]. He was born in Gloucester on 19th December 1928[4] and educated at Pembroke College, Oxford. ... Stiltskin are a post-grunge/rock band who first achieved widespread popularity in the mid-1990s. ... Kenneth Leighton ( Wakefield, October 2, 1929 Edinburgh, August 24, 1988) was born in Wakefield, Yorkshire. ... Andrew Lloyd Webber, Baron Lloyd-Webber (born 22 March 1948) is a highly successful English composer of musical theatre, and also the elder brother of cellist Julian Lloyd Webber. ... Herbert Murrill (1909–1952) was an English musician, composer and organist. ... Tarik O’Regan (photo credit: Suzanne Jansen) Tarik Hamilton ORegan (b. ... Stephen Oliver (1950-1992) was an English composer, best known for his operas. ... Professor Ian Parrott (born 1916), who retired from the Gregynog Chair of Music at Aberystwyth in 1983, is a prolific Anglo-Welsh composer and writer on music. ... Sir Charles Hubert Hastings Parry (February 27, 1848 – October 7, 1918) was an English composer, probably best known for his setting of William Blakes poem, Jerusalem. ... Rachel Portman (born December 11, 1960 in Haslemere, England) is a British composer, best known for her film work. ... Daniel Purcell (1664 - November 26, 1717), was an English composer, the younger brother of Henry Purcell. ... Bernard William George Rose, DMus, (May 9, 1916, Herts. ... Erik Routley ( October 31, 1917– October 8, 1982) was an English Congregational minister, composer and musicologist. ... Robert Saxton (born 1953 in London) is a British composer. ... Tim Souster (born 29 January 1943 in Bletchley; died 1 March 1994) was a composer best known for his electronic music. ... Sir John Stainer (London, 6 June 1840 – Verona, 31 March 1901) was an English composer and organist. ... Robert Steadman (born April 1, 1965) is a British composer of classical music who mostly works in a post-minimalist style but also writes lighter music, including musicals, and compositions for educational purposes. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... John Taverner (around 1490 – October 18, 1545) is regarded as the most important English composer of his era. ... Sir William Turner Walton, OM (March 29, 1902–March 8, 1983) was a British composer whose style was influenced by the works of Stravinsky, Sibelius and jazz. ... Peter Warlock was a pseudonym of Philip Arnold Heseltine (October 30, 1894 - December 17, 1930), an Anglo-Welsh composer and music critic. ... Thomas Weelkes (baptised 25 October 1576 – buried 1 December 1623) was an English composer and organist. ... Philip Wilby (Pontefract, 1949) is a British composer. ... Sandy Wilson (born May 19, 1924) is a British composer and lyricist, best known for his musical, The Boyfriend (1954). ...

Conductors Myfanwy Piper (28 March 1911 – 18 January 1997) was an English art critic and opera librettist. ...

Organists To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Harry Bicket is a British conductor. ... Sir Adrian Cedric Boult CH (April 8, 1889 – February 22, 1983) was an English conductor. ... Harry Christophers is a British conductor, born on December 26, 1953 in Goudhurst, Kent. ... Nicholas Cleobury (b. ... Laurence Cummings, MA (Oxon), ARCM, FRCO, HonRAM is a harpsichordist, organist, and conductor. ... Howard Goodall Howard Goodall (born 1958 in Bromley, South London) is a British composer of musicals, choral music and music for television. ... Vernon Handley (November 11, 1930 –) is a Welsh conductor. ... David Lloyd-Jones has been a conductor for orchestral and choral concerts, BBC broadcasts and TV studio opera productions. ... Simon Rattle recording Porgy and Bess with the London Symphony Orchestra at Abbey Road in 1988, aged 33. ... Leopold Stokowski (born Antoni Stanisław Bolesławowicz April 18, 1882 in London, England, died September 13, 1977 in Nether Wallop, England) was the conductor of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the NBC Symphony Orchestra, Hollywood Bowl Orchestra and the Symphony of the Air. ... John Whitfield, British musician and conductor, born Darlington, UK 21 March 1957. ...

Pianists Sir Thomas Armstrong (b. ... John Clarke Whitfield (December 13, 1770 - February 22, 1836), English organist and composer, was born at Gloucester, and educated at Oxford under Dr Philip Hayes. ... Edgar Thomas Cook CBE DMus(Cantuar) FRCO FRCM was an English organist and composer (18 March 1880 — 5 March 1953). ... Clive Driskill-Smith (b. ... Sir George Job Elvey (1816-1893), English organist and composer, was born at Canterbury on the 27th of March 1816. ... Jeremy Filsell (born 1964) is an English pianist, organist, and composer. ... Christopher Herrick (born 23 May 1942) is an English organist. ... Born in West Yorkshire, England, Max Kenworthy has performed recitals throughout the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand and has undertaken recordings, broadcasts and tours in organ, piano, conducting and singing. ... Harpsichord Christopher John Monckton (born 23 March 1954 at Ipswich, England), is an orchestral and choral conductor, singer, and organ recitalist and accompanist of international repute. ... Sir Sydney Hugo Nicholson (February 9, 1875 – May 30, 1947) was an English choir director, organist and composer, now chiefly remembered as the founder of the Royal School of Church Music. ... Walter Parratt (February 10, 1841 - March 27, 1924) was an English organist and composer. ... Simon Preston (b. ...

  • Paul Crossley (Mansfield)
  • Ian Pace (The Queen's)
  • Jean Redcliffe-Maud (Somerville)
  • Peter Seivewright
  • Llŷr Williams (The Queen's)

Singers Paul Crossley (born May 17, 1944) is a British pianist. ... Ian Pace (born 1968 in Hartlepool) is a British pianist. ... LlÅ·r Williams (born Pentrebychan 1976) is a Welsh pianist. ...

Musicologists John Mark Ainsley is a British tenor. ... Robin Blaze is a countertenor. ... Ian Bostridge, CBE (born London, 25 December 1964) is an acclaimed tenor, well known for his performances as an opera singer and as a song recitalist. ... James Thomas Bowman (b. ... Susan Gritton (born 31 August 1965 at Reigate) is a soprano. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Robert Andrew Lloyd (born 2 March 1940 in Southend-on-Sea, Essex) is an English bass singer. ... Sir Peter Neville Luard Pears (June 22, 1910 – April 3, 1986) was an English tenor and life-long partner of the composer Benjamin Britten. ...

Administration Barry Cooper (born 1949) is an English musicologist, composer, organist and author, one of the most renowned Beethoven scholars, and is editor of the Beethoven Compendium. ... Edmund Horace H. Fellowes (1870–1951), became well known for his work in promoting the revival of sixteenth and seventeenth century English music. ... Paul Douglas Hillier (b. ... Nicola LeFanu (born 27th January 1947) is a British composer. ... Robert Sherlaw Johnson (born May 21, 1932, in Sunderland, UK, died November 3, 2000), was a composer, pianist, music scholar, teacher and liturgist. ... Alan Walker Tyson (born October 27, 1926, died November 10, 2000) was a British musicologist who specialized in studies of the music of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Ludwig van Beethoven. ...

  • Tony Hall (Keble) Chief Executive Royal Opera House 2001-
  • Nicholas Kenyon (Balliol) Contr Radio 3 1992-, Dir Proms 1996-2000, Contr Proms, Live Events & TV Classical Music 2000-
  • Anthony Russell-Roberts (New College) Administrative Director of the Royal Ballet 1983-

Didgeridoo Tony Hall CBE (born 3 March 1951 in Birkenhead, Cheshire) has been chief executive of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden since 2001. ... Nicholas Kenyon (born 1951, in Cheshire, UK) is a British music administrator, editor and writer on music. ... Anthony de Villeneuve Russell-Roberts, CBE, MA (Oxon), is the Administrative Director of the Royal Ballet and the executor and residual legatee of the will of the late Sir Frederick Ashton. ...

Jazz Graham Wiggins is an American musician. ...

Country William Michael Allingham Bill Ashton MBE BA DipEd FCLCM (born 1936) is a British saxophonist and composer, best known for co-founding the London Schools’ Orchestra, now the National Youth Jazz Orchestra (NYJO), of which he is Musical Director. ... Pat Fish read a humanities degree at Oxford University. ... Soweto Kinch Soweto Kinch is a British jazz alto saxophonist and rapper. ...

Folk Kristoffer Kris Kristofferson (born June 22, 1936) is an influential American country music songwriter, singer and actor. ...

Rock and pop June Tabor (born 1947) is an English folk singer. ...

Mira Aroyo (Bulgarian: ), born in Bulgaria, is a member of the electropop band Ladytron, and currently lives in Liverpool, England. ... For young horses less than a year old, see Foal Foals are a five-piece dance-punk band from Oxford who play a mix of indie with elements from techno and math rock. ... For other uses, see Mylo (disambiguation). ... For young horses less than a year old, see Foal Foals are a five-piece dance-punk band from Oxford who play a mix of indie with elements from techno and math rock. ... Michael R. (Mike) Ratledge (born Maidstone, april 1943) is a British musician. ...

Museum and Gallery Directors

  • Robert Anderson (St John's) Director British Museum 1992–2002
  • Kenneth Clark, Baron Clark of Saltwood (Trinity) Director National Gallery 1933–46, Surveyor King's Pictures 1934–44, Chairman Arts Council 1953–60
  • Henry Ellis (St John's) Principal Librarian British Museum 1827–56
  • T. D. Kendrick (Oriel) Director and Principal Librarian British Museum 1950-59
  • Frederic G. Kenyon (Magdalen) Director and Principal Librarian British Museum 1909-31
  • Michael Levey (Exeter) Director National Gallery 1973–86
  • Neil MacGregor (New College) Director National Gallery 1987–2002, Director British Museum 2002–, Chairman World Collections 2008-
  • Edward Maunde Thompson (University) Principal Librarian British Museum 1888-98, Director and Principal Librarian 1898-1909
  • Nicholas Penny (Balliol) Director National Gallery 2008-
  • John Pope-Hennessy (Balliol) Director Victoria and Albert Museum 1967–73, Director and Principal Librarian British Museum 1974–76, Director 1976-79
  • John Wolfenden, Baron Wolfenden (Magdalen) V-C Reading Univ 1950-63, Chmn Wolfenden Cttee 1954-57, Chmn Univ Grants Cttee 1963-68, Dir & Prin Lib Brit Mus 1969-74

Dr. Robert Geoffrey William Anderson was Director of the British Museum, London. ... Kenneth Clark presenting the BBC TV series Civilisation. ... Sir Henry Ellis (November 29, 1777 – June 15, 1869) was an English librarian. ... Sir Frederic G. Kenyon (1863–1952) was a British paleographer, biblical and classical scholar. ... Sir Michael Vincent Levey MVO (born 1927) is a British art historian and former director of the National Gallery, London. ... Robert Neil MacGregor (born 1946) is an art historian and museum director. ... Edward Maunde Thompson (1840–1929), Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath, was a British palaeographer, best remembered today for his study of William Shakespeares handwriting in the manuscript of the play Sir Thomas More. ... Nicholas Penny (born 1949) is a British art historian. ... John Wyndham, Sir Pope-Hennessy (1913 - 1994) was a British art historian. ... John Frederick Wolfenden, Baron Wolfenden, KB, CBE (1906 — 1985) was a British education figure probably most famous for chairing the Wolfenden report recommending the legalisation of homosexuality, which was published in 1957. ...

Art and History of Art

Peter Bales (1547-1610?), English calligraphist, one of the inventors of shorthand writing, was born in London in 1547, and is described by Anthony Wood as a most dexterous person in his profession, to the great wonder of scholars and others. We are also informed that he spent several years... Sister Wendy Beckett (born February 25, 1930) is a South African-born British nun who became an unlikely celebrity during the 1990s, presenting a series of acclaimed art history documentaries for the BBC. ... Love Among the Ruins, by Edward Burne-Jones. ... William Gershom Collingwood, (6 August 1854 - 1 October 1932), was an author, artist, and antiquary. ... Vincent Cronin (born May 24, 1924 in Tredegar, Wales) is a British historical, cultural, and biographical writer whose works have been widely translated into European languages. ... Andrew Graham-Dixon read English at Oxford University and graduated in 1981 is a well-known British art critic. ... Robert Hewison (born 1943) is a British academic and author. ... Bevis Hillier was born on 28 March 1940 in Redhill, Surrey. ... Kurt Jackson is a leading English painter whose large canvases reflect a concern with natural history, ecology and environmental issues. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Tom Phillips CBE (born May 24, 1937) is a British artist. ... George Rickey (1907–July 17, 2002) was an American kinetic sculptor. ... Upper: Steel-plate engraving of Ruskin as a young man, made circa 1845, scanned from print made circa 1895. ... Desmond Shawe-Taylor was appointed Surveyor of the Queens Pictures in 2005. ...

Architecture

Edward James. ... John Robinson in the procession to the annual service of the Order of the Garter Dr John Martin Robinson, FSA, (b. ... Sir Sacheverell Sitwell, 6th Baronet CH (November 15, 1897–October 1, 1988) was an English writer, best known as an art critic and writer on architecture, particularly the baroque. ... Sir Christopher Wren, (20 October 1632–25 February 1723) was a 17th century English designer, astronomer, geometrician, and the greatest English architect of his time. ...

Academic disciplines

This includes: This is a list of people from the University of Oxford in academic disciplines. ...

  • Law
  • Theology and the Study of Religions
  • Historians
  • Classicists, Byzantinists, Archaeologists
  • Modern Languages
  • Philosophers
  • Economists
  • Geography
  • Anthropology and ethnography
  • Sociology
  • Politics, political philosophy, and international relations
  • Asian studies
  • Mathematicians and statisticians
  • Scientists
    • Naturalists, botanists, and zoologists
    • Medicine
    • Psychologists, psychiatrists, and physiologists of the brain
    • Chemists
    • Physicists and astronomers
      • Astronomers Royal
      • Other physicists and astronomers
    • Computers, electronics, and robotics
    • Engineering and agriculture
    • Geology
    • Meteorology

Educationalists

Main article: List of University of Oxford people in education

This is a list of people from the University of Oxford involved in education. ...

Sports people, explorers and adventurers

Main article: List of University of Oxford people in sport, exploration, and adventuring

C. B. Fry This is a list of people from the University of Oxford involved in sport, exploration, and adventuring. ...

Business people

Main article: List of University of Oxford people in business

This is a list of people from the University of Oxford involved from the world of business. ...

Chefs and wine experts

Oz Clarke (1949 - )is a British wine writer and broadcaster. ... Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall (Born 14 January 1965) is a English celebrity chef and TV presenter, noted for his mildly eccentric antics and back-to-nature philosophy. ... Nigella Lucy Lawson (born January 6, 1960) is an English journalist, cookery writer and television presenter. ... Jancis Mary Robinson (born in Cumbria on April 22, 1950) is a British wine writer and journalist. ... Christopher Richard (Rick) Stein OBE (born January 4, 1947) is an English chef, restaurateur and television presenter. ...

Fictional Oxonians

Main article: List of fictional University of Oxford people

This is a list of fictional people associated with the University of Oxford. ...

See also

Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ... The following people have been Vice-Chancellors of the University of Oxford: 2004 – Dr John Hood 1997 – Sir Colin Lucas 1993 – Sir Peter North 1989 – Professor Sir Richard Southwood 1985 – Lord Neill of Bladen 1981 – Geoffrey Warnock 1977 – Sir Rex Richards 1973 – Sir John Habakkuk 1969 – Lord Bullock of Leafield... This is a list of all current Heads of Houses of Colleges and Permanent Private Halls of the University of Oxford. ...

External links

  • British Society for the History of Mathematics: Oxford individuals
  • Famous Oxford Alumni
  • Short Alumni List Published by Oxford

References


 
 

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