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Encyclopedia > List of United States Supreme Court cases

This is a chronological list of notable cases decided by the Supreme Court of the United States. Seal of the Supreme Court The Supreme Court of the United States, the highest court in the United States of America, is the head of the Judicial Branch of the Federal Government. ...

Contents


1790–1819

{| cellpadding=2 cellspacing=0 border=1 align=right style=margin-left: 0. ... Sovereign immunity or crown immunity is a type of immunity that, in common law jurisdictions traces its origins from early English law. ... Holding A tax on the possession of goods is not a direct tax, which must be apportioned under Article I of the Constitution. ... Holding Section 13 of the Judiciary Act of 1789 is unconstitutional to the extent it purports to enlarge the original jurisdiction of the Supreme Court beyond that permitted by the Constitution. ... A congress is a gathering of people, especially a gathering for a political purpose. ... Stuart v. ... Holding The Supreme Court had the power to order that a writ of habeas corpus be issued to release the petitioners from prison, because the Constitution grants that power to federal courts unless Congress suspends it. ... Fletcher v. ... Martin v. ... Loyalists (often capitalized L) were British North American colonists who remained loyal subjects of the British crown during the American Revolutionary War. ... Holding Although the Constitution does not specifically give Congress the power to establish a bank, it does delegate the ability to control national economic policy, which a bank can be considered part of. ... Trustees of Dartmouth College vs. ...

1820–1839

Cohens v. ... In the United States, the state supreme court (known by other names in some states) is usually the highest court in the state court system. ... In the case of Gibbons v. ... Bankruptcy is a legally declared inability or impairment of ability of an individual or organization to pay their creditors. ... Cherokee Nation v. ... Worcester v. ... Barron v. ... Wheaton v. ... Common law copyright is the legal doctrine that contends that copyright is a natural right and creators have the same inherent right to it as they would tangible property. ...

1840–1859

La Amistad (Spanish: friendship) was a Spanish merchant ship on which a rebellion by the slaves it was carrying broke out in 1839 when the schooner was travelling along the coast of Cuba. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... La Amistad (Spanish: friendship) was a Spanish merchant ship on which a rebellion by the slaves it was carrying broke out in 1839 when the schooner was travelling along the coast of Cuba. ... Prigg v. ... Cooley v. ... Holding Blacks, whether slaves or free, could not become United States citizens and the plaintiff therefore lacked the capacity to file a lawsuit. ...

1860–1879

Holding ... Court membership Case opinions Laws applied ... Ex Parte Milligan, 71 U.S. 2 (1866) was an important United States Supreme Court case involving civilians and military tribunals. ... Ex Parte Garland, 71 U.S. 333 (1866) was an important United States Supreme Court case involving the disbarment of former Confederate officials. ... Ex Parte McCardle, 74 U.S. 506 (1868) is a United States Supreme Court decision that examines the extent of the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court to review decisions of lower courts under federal statutory law. ... In law, jurisdiction refers to the aspect of a any unique legal authority as being localized within boundaries. ... Texas v. ... United States v. ... The Slaughter-House Cases, 83 U.S. 36 (1873) represented a block appeal to the United States Supreme Court testing the relatively new Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution. ... Bradwell v. ... Minor v. ... Amendment XIV (the Fourteenth Amendment) of the United States Constitution is one of the post-Civil War amendments and includes the due process and equal protection clauses (Section 1). ... United States v. ... The first ten Amendments to the U.S. Constitution make up the Bill of Rights. ... Amendment II (the Second Amendment) of the United States Constitution, which is part of the Bill of Rights, protects the right of the people to keep and bear arms. ... Munn v. ... Holding No personal jurisdiction over defendants who are physically absent from the state or have not consented to the courts jurisdiction Court membership Case opinions Laws applied U.S. Const. ... Holding Religious duty was not a suitable defense to a criminal indictment Court membership Case opinions Laws applied Sect. ... Baker v. ...

1880–1899

Strauder v. ... The Civil Rights Cases, 109 U.S. 3 (1883) was an important United States Supreme Court decision that held that Congress lacked the constitutional authority under the enforcement provisions of the Fourteenth Amendment to outlaw racial discrimination by private individuals and organizations, rather than state and local governments. ... Holding It is within the constitutional power of Congress to extend copyright protection to photographs that are a representation of an authors original intellectual conceptions. ... Santa Clara County v. ... Wabash, St. ... Dent v. ... Holding That a tomato is legally a vegetable, not a fruit. ... Binomial name Solanum lycopersicum L. The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is a plant in the Solanaceae or nightshade family, native to Peru and Mexico. ... United States v. ... is an appelate case before the U.S. Supreme Court which established the presumption of innocence of persons accused of crimes. ... Presumption of innocence is an essential right that the accused enjoys in criminal trials in all countries respecting human rights. ... Pollock v. ... Plessy v. ... United States v. ... Supreme court upholds law limiting miners work hours, citing dangers from fatigue due to nature of work. ... Wong Kim Ark was born in the United States, but denied entry after leaving to visit China. ... A literacy test, in a strict sense, is a test designed to determine ones ability to read and write a given language. ... Cumming v. ...

1900–1909

Insular Cases are several U. S. Supreme Court cases decided early in the 20th century. ... The Insular Cases are several U. S. Supreme Court cases decided early in the 20th century. ... The Insular Cases are several U. S. Supreme Court cases decided early in the 20th century. ... The Insular Cases are several U. S. Supreme Court cases decided early in the 20th century. ... Downes v. ... The Insular Cases are several U. S. Supreme Court cases decided early in the 20th century. ... The Insular Cases are several U. S. Supreme Court cases decided early in the 20th century. ... The Insular Cases are several U. S. Supreme Court cases decided early in the 20th century. ... Holding --- Court membership Case opinions Laws applied --- Champion v. ... Article I, Section 8, Clause 3 of the United States Constitution, known as the Commerce Clause, empowers the United States Congress To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes. ... The Insular Cases are several U. S. Supreme Court cases decided early in the 20th century. ... Insular Cases are several U. S. Supreme Court cases decided early in the 20th century. ... The Insular Cases are several U. S. Supreme Court cases decided early in the 20th century. ... Insular Cases are several U. S. Supreme Court cases decided early in the 20th century. ... The Insular Cases are several U. S. Supreme Court cases decided early in the 20th century. ... Insular Cases are several U. S. Supreme Court cases decided early in the 20th century. ... The Insular Cases are several U. S. Supreme Court cases decided early in the 20th century. ... Insular Cases are several U. S. Supreme Court cases decided early in the 20th century. ... Holding New Yorks regulation of the working hours of bakers was not a justifiable restriction of the right to contract freely under the 14th Amendments guarantee of liberty. ... Northwestern National Life Insurance Co. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Lynch law. ... Adair v. ... A Yellow Dog contract is legal contract or agreement made between an employer and an employee, wherein the employer agrees to employ the employee, and in exchange the employee agrees not to join or associate with a labor union. ... Holding Oregons limit on the working hours of women was constitutional under the Fourteenth Amendment, because it was justified by the strong state interest in protecting womens health. ... Holding Copyright holders did not have the statutory right to control the price of subsequent resales of lawfully purchased copies of their work. ... Berea College v. ... Holding --- Court membership Case opinions Laws applied --- Louisville & Nashville Railroad Company v. ...

1910–1919

The Insular Cases are several U. S. Supreme Court cases decided early in the 20th century. ... Insular Cases are several U. S. Supreme Court cases decided early in the 20th century. ... Bauer & Cie. ... The Insular Cases are several U. S. Supreme Court cases decided early in the 20th century. ... Insular Cases are several U. S. Supreme Court cases decided early in the 20th century. ... Guinn v. ... In Bi-Metallic Investment Co. ... Holding The Sixteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution makes it unnecessary to determine the source of income, which was previously required in order to tax with apportionment. ... Buchanan v. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... International News Service v. ... Holding Defendants criticism of the draft was not protected by the First Amendment, because it created a clear and present danger to the enlistment and recruiting practices of the U.S. armed forces during a state of war. ... “Shouting fire in a crowded theater” is an expression used in the U.S. judicial system to express the limits upon which free speech may be expressed under the terms of the First Amendment of the United States Constitution. ... Holding Defendants criticism of U.S. involvement in World War I was not protected by the First Amendment, because they advocated a strike in munitions production and the violent overthrow of the government. ...

1920–1929

Missouri v. ... Balzac v. ... Insular Cases are several U. S. Supreme Court cases decided early in the 20th century. ... In Federal Baseball Club v. ... Holding Mob-dominated trials were a violation of the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. ... Holding Minimum wage law for women violated the due process right to contract freely. ... Meyer v. ... The Food and Drugs Act (formal title An Act respecting food, drugs, cosmetics and therapeutic devices is a Canadian law regarding the production, import, export, transport across provinces and sale of food, drugs, contraceptive devices and cosmetics (including personal cleaning products such as soap and toothpaste). ... Pierce v. ... Holding Though the Fourteenth Amendment prohibits states from infringing free speech, the defendant was properly convicted under New Yorks criminal anarchy law for advocating the violent overthrow of the government, through the dissemination of Communist pamphlets. ... Myers v. ... Village of Euclid, Ohio v. ... In general, zoning is the division of an area into sub-areas, called zones. ... Due process of law is a legal concept that ensures the government will respect all of a persons legal rights instead of just some or most of those legal rights, when the government deprives a person of life, liberty, or property. ... Carrie Buck was a patient sentenced to compulsory sterilization. ... Compulsory sterilization programs sprouted up in many countries at the beginning of the 20th century, usually as part of a program of negative eugenics -- to prevent undesirable members of the population reproducing. ... Eugenics is the self-direction of human evolution: Logo from the Second International Congress of Eugenics, 1921, depicting it as a tree which unites a variety of different fields. ... Holding Defendants conviction under Californias criminal syndicalism statute for membership in the Communist Labor Party did not violate her free speech rights as protected under the Fourteenth Amendment, because states have the constitutional right to prohibit speech tending to incite to crime or violence, disturb the public peace... Gong Lum v. ... Olmstead v. ...

1930–1939

United States v. ... Stromberg v. ... Holding A Minnesota law that imposed permanent injunctions against the publication of newspapers with malicious, scandalous, and defamatory content violated the First Amendment, as applied to the states by the Fourteenth. ... Holding The majority opinion decided that due process had been violated when the Alabama court held the trials of the Scottsborough Boys. ... In the case Panama Refining Co. ... Holding Section 3 of the National Industrial Recovery Act was an unconstitutional delegation of legislative power to the Executive, and was not a valid exercise of congressional Commerce Clause power. ... In a key incorporation case, the Supreme Court ruled that the Fourteenth Amendments due process clause applies to freedom of assembly. ... Holding Washingtons minimum wage law for women was a valid regulation of the right to contract freely because of the states special interest in protecting their health and ability to support themselves. ... Holding --- Court membership Case opinions Laws applied --- National Labor Relations Board v. ... Connecticut General Life Insurance Company v. ... Holding No general federal common law. ... United States v. ... Footnote four is a famous footnote from a U.S. Supreme Court case, United States v. ... United States v. ... Coleman v. ...

1940–1949

Chambers v. ... Holding Fair Labor Standards Act was a constitutional exercise of Congressional power under the Commerce Clause. ... Article I, Section 8, Clause 3 of the United States Constitution, known as the Commerce Clause, empowers the United States Congress To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes. ... Edwards v. ... In its decision, Chaplinsky v. ... In its 1942 decision, Chaplinsky v. ... Holding Due process of law demands that where a man is tried for robbery, Maryland does not have to furnish counsel to an indigent defendant. ... Skinner v. ... Compulsory sterilization programs sprouted up in many countries at the beginning of the 20th century, usually as part of a program of negative eugenics -- to prevent undesirable members of the population reproducing. ... Eugenics is the self-direction of human evolution: Logo from the Second International Congress of Eugenics, 1921, depicting it as a tree which unites a variety of different fields. ... Wickard v. ... Holding The First Amendment prohibits public schools from forcing students to salute the American flag and say the Pledge of Allegiance. ... Holding --- Court membership Case opinions Laws applied --- Hirabayashi v. ... Smith v. ... Holding --- Court membership Case opinions Laws applied --- United States v. ... Holding The Japanese American internment was not unconstitutional because the need to protect against espionage outweighed Korematsus rights. ... Holding --- Court membership Case opinions Laws applied --- International Shoe v. ... Everson v. ... Oyama et al. ... The Equal Protection Clause is a part of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, providing that no state shall make or enforce any law which shall. ... Amendment XIV (the Fourteenth Amendment) of the United States Constitution is one of the post-Civil War amendments and includes the due process and equal protection clauses (Section 1). ... Shelley v. ... United States v. ... ... United States v. ... The General Motors streetcar conspiracy refers to a contention that General Motors (GM), acting in conjunction with several other companies and through the National City Lines (NCL) holding company, illegally acquired many streetcar systems in various cities around the United States, dismantled and replaced them with buses for the express... Wheeling Steel Corp. ... Article I, Section 8, Clause 3 of the United States Constitution, known as the Commerce Clause, empowers the United States Congress To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes. ... Holding The Fourteenth Amendment did not impose specific limitations on criminal justice in the states, and that illegally obtained evidence did not necessarily have to be excluded from trials in all cases. ...

1950–1959

Sweatt v. ... McLaurin v. ... Johnson v. ... In English Common Law habeas corpus is the name of several writs which may be issued by a judge ordering a prisoner to be brought before the court. ... In Universal Camera Corp. ... Holding Defendants convictions for conspiring, through their participation in the Communist Party, to overthrow the U.S. government by force were not prohibited by the First Amendment. ... The Alien Registration Act or Smith Act (18 USC 2385) of 1940 made it a criminal offense for anyone to knowingly or willfully advocate, abet, advise, or teach the duty, necessity, desirability, or propriety of overthrowing the Government of the United States or of any State by force or violence... In Rochin v. ... Holding The President did not have the inherent authority to seize private property in the absence of either specifically enumerated authority under Article Two of the Constitution or statutory authority conferred on him by Congress. ... Holding Racial segregation in public education violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment; separate facilities are “inherently unequal. ... Location in Kansas Founded  -Incorporated December 5, 1854 February 14, 1857  County Shawnee County Mayor Bill Bunten Area  - Total  - Water 147. ... Bolling v. ... Holding --- Court membership Case opinions Laws applied --- Berman v. ... Roth v. ... NAACP v. ... Speiser v. ...

1960–1969

Boynton v. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Torcaso v. ... Holding The state must exclude evidence seized in violation of the Fourth Amendment Court membership Chief Justice: Harlan Associate Justices: Case opinions Majority by: Clark Joined by: Black Dissent: Harlan Laws applied Mapp v. ... Baker v. ... Engel v. ... Holding In this sense, the court ruled specifically that no one, regardless of wealth, education or class, should be charged with a crime and then be forced to face his accusers in court without the guidance of counsel. ... Abington Township School District v. ... Gray v. ... Holding A mathematical algorithm is not patentable if its application is not novel. ... Escobedo v. ... Wesberry v. ... Holding The First Amendment, as applied through the Fourteenth, protected a newspaper from being sued for libel in state court for making false defamatory statements about the official conduct of a public official, because the statements were not made with knowing or reckless disregard for the truth. ... Holding --- Court membership Case opinions Laws applied --- Banco National de Cuba v. ... England v. ... An abstention doctrine is any one of several doctrines that a United States federal court might (or in some cases must) apply to refuse to hear a case, when hearing the case would potentially intrude upon the powers of the state courts. ... Reynolds v. ... Holding The First Amendment, as applied through the Fourteenth, protected a movie theatre manager from being prosecuted for possessing and showing a film that was not obscene. ... Holding Congress had the power under the Commerce Clause to prohibit racial discrimination in businesses that relied on interstate commerce. ... Holding Section 7 of the Clayton Act, which prohibits a corporation from aquiring another company when it results in a substantial reduction in competition, applies to competition between different industries for the same end user market. ... Antitrust or competition laws, legislate against trade practices that undermine competitiveness or are considered to be unfair. ... Holding --- Court membership Case opinions Laws applied --- United States v. ... Conscription is a general term for forced labor demanded by some established authority, e. ... Estelle Griswold, in front of the New Haven, Connecticut Planned Parenthood Holding A Connecticut law criminalizing the use of contraceptives violated the right to marital privacy. ... Memoirs v. ... Harper v. ... Miranda v. ... Case opinions Laws applied --- Katz v. ... Holding Virginias prohibition of interracial marriage violated the Equal Protection and Due Process clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment. ... Epperson v. ... Holding A criminal prohibition on the burning of draft cards did not violate the First Amendment, because its effect on speech was only incidental, and it was justified by the significant government interest in maintaining an efficient and effective military draft system. ... Holding Law enforcement officers may stop and frisk someone for weapons on the reasonable suspicion that a crime is or is about to take place without violating the Fourth Amendment prohibition on unreasonable searches and seizures. ... A death-qualified jury is a jury in a criminal law case involving the death penalty which excludes jurors opposed to capital punishment. ... Holding The First Amendment, as applied through the Fourteenth, did not permit a public school to punish a student for wearing a black armband as an anti-war protest, absent any evidence that the rule was necessary to avoid substantial interference with school discipline or the rights of others. ... The Fairness Doctrine was a policy enforced in the United States by the Federal Communications Commission that required broadcast licensees to present controversial issues of public importance, and to present such issues in a fair and balanced manner. ... The word broadcast can refer to: Broadcasting, the transmission of audio and video signals. ... Holding Ohios criminal syndicalism statute violated the First Amendment, as applied to the state through the Fourteenth, because it broadly prohibited the mere advocacy of violence rather than the constitutionally unprotected incitement to imminent lawless action. ...

1970–1979

In Goldberg v. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Swann v. ... Desegregation is the process of ending racial segregation, most commonly used in reference to the United States. ... Holding The First Amendment, as applied through the Fourteenth, prohibits states from making the public display of a single four-letter expletive a criminal offense, without a more specific and compelling reason than a general tendency to disturb the peace. ... In Lemon vs. ... New York Times Co. ... Parisi v. ... A conscientious objector is an individual whose personal beliefs are incompatible with military service, perhaps with any role in the armed forces or just with a particular war. ... Holding A Massachusetts law criminalizing the use of contraceptives by singal people violated the right to equal protection. ... Wisconsin v. ... Holding The arbitrary and inconsistant imposition of the death penalty violates the Eighth and Fourteenth Amendment, and constitutes cruel and unusual punishment. ... Perry v. ... The first ten Amendments to the U.S. Constitution make up the Bill of Rights. ... A professor is a senior teacher, lecturer and researcher, usually in a college or university. ... Tenure commonly refers to academic tenure systems, in which professors (at the university level)—and in some jurisdictions schoolteachers (at primary or secondary school levels)—are granted the right not to be fired without cause after an initial probationary period. ... Branzburg v. ... Holding Texas laws criminalizing abortion violated womens Fourteenth Amendment right to choose whether to continue a pregnancy. ... Note: The U.S. Supreme court has decided four cases titled . ... A public demonstration Freedom of speech is often regarded as an integral concept in modern liberal democracies, where it is understood to outlaw censorship. ... The Miller test is the United States Supreme Courts test for determining whether speech or expression can be labeled obscene, in which case it is not protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution and can be prohibited. ... Obscenity has several connotations. ... Miami Herald Publishing Co. ... United States v. ... Milliken v. ... Holding The imposition of the death penalty does not, automatically, violate the Eighth and Fourteenth Amendment, lower courts judgement is affirmed. ... Holding A judge will not be deprived of immunity because the action he took was in error, was done maliciously, or was in excess of his authority. ... In Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Corp. ... An agency is a department of a local or national government responsible for the oversight and administration of a specific function, such as a customs agency or a space agency. ... Time Regents of the University of California v. ... FCC v. ... The FCCs official seal. ...

1980–1989

The PruneYard Shopping Center is a sprawling 250,000 square foot (23,000 m²) shopping center located in Campbell, California at the intersection of Campbell Ave. ... Diamond v. ... Holding The First Amendment, as applied through the Fourteenth, protects the right of utility companies to include inserts on matters of controversial public policy with billing statements. ... Holding A machine controlled by a computer program was patentable. ... Bob Jones University v. ... An Environmental Impact Report (EIR) is a document required under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). ... Michigan v. ... Sony Corp v. ... For copyright issues in relation to Wikipedia itself, see Wikipedia:Copyrights. ... The video cassette recorder (or VCR, less popularly video tape recorder) is a type of video tape recorder that uses removable cassettes containing magnetic tape to record audio and video from a television broadcast so it can be played back later. ... The fair use doctrine is an aspect of United States copyright law that provides for the licit, non-licensed citation or incorporation of copyrighted material in another authors work under certain, specifiable conditions. ... Holding A states courts could assert personal jurisdiction over the author or editor of a libelous article, where the author or editor knew that the article would be widely circulated in the state where the subject of the article would be injured by the libelous assertion. ... Minimum contacts is a term used in the United States law of civil procedure to determine when it is appropriate for a court in one state to assert in personam jurisdiction (i. ... Personal jurisdiction, jurisdiction of (or over) the person, or jurisdiction in personam is the power of a court to require a party (usually the defendant) or a witness to come before the court. ... Holding --- Court membership Case opinions Laws applied U.S. Constitution, Amendment VI United States v. ... In the case of Bernal v. ... An Embossed Notary Seal A notary public is an officer who can administer and give oaths, and perform certain other acts varying from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. ... Hawaii Housing Authority v. ... Eminent domain (US), compulsory purchase (England and Wales) or compulsory aquisition (Australia) in common law legal systems is the power of the state to appropriate private property for its own use without the owners consent. ... In Chevron, Inc. ... Judicial review is the power of a court to review a law or an official act of a government employee or agent for constitutionality or for the violation of basic principles of justice. ... A statute is a formal, written law of a country or state, written and enacted by its legislative authority, perhaps to then be ratified by the highest executive in the government, and finally published. ... An agency is a department of a local or national government responsible for the oversight and administration of a specific function, such as a customs agency or a space agency. ... Allen v. ... Garcia v. ... The minimum wage is the minimum rate a worker can legally be paid (usually per hour) as opposed to wages that are determined by the forces of supply and demand in a free market. ... Holding Court membership Chief Justice: Warren E. Burger Associate Justices: Thurgood Marshall, William J. Brennan, Byron White, Harry Blackmun, Lewis Powell, John Paul Stevens, Sandra Day OConnor, William H. Rehnquist Case opinions Majority by: Joined by: Dissent: Laws applied Ake v. ... Holding --- Court membership Case opinions Laws applied --- Harper & Row v. ... The fair use doctrine is an aspect of United States copyright law that provides for the licit, non-licensed citation or incorporation of copyrighted material in another authors work under certain, specifiable conditions. ... Holding Just as the right to speak and the right to refrain from speaking are complementary components of a broader concept of individual freedom of mind, so also the individuals freedom to choose his own creed is the counterpart of his right to refrain from accepting the creed established... Dowling v. ... Copyright infringement is the unauthorized use of copyrighted material in a manner that violates one of the copyright owners exclusive rights, such as the right to reproduce or perform the copyrighted work, or to make derivative works that build upon it. ... Theft (also known as stealing) is in general, the wrongful taking of someone elses property without that persons willful consent. ... Nix v. ... In Batson v. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Holding A Georgia law prohibiting sodomy was valid because there was no constitutionally protected right to engage in homosexual sodomy. ... Bethel School District No. ... Holding A Missouri prison regulation restricting inmates from marrying without permission violated their constitutional right to marry because it was not logically related to a legitimate penological concern, but a prohibition on inmate-to-inmate correspondence was justified by prison security needs and so was permissible under the First Amendment... Edwards v. ... Creation science is a part of the creationist movement that claims to offer scientific evidence compatible with creation according to Genesis. ... This article is about biological evolution. ... Hazelwood School District et al. ... Holding The creators of parodies of public figures are protected by the First Amendment against civil liability, unless the parody includes false statements of fact made in knowing or reckless disregard of the truth. ... In May 16, 1988, the Supreme Court decided by 6-2 vote that post-consumer waste holds no reasonable expectation of privacy. ... Amendment IV (the Fourth Amendment) of the United States Constitution, which is part of the Bill of Rights, guards against unreasonable searches and seizures. ... Morrison v. ... Amendment VIII (the Eighth Amendment) of the United States Constitution, which is part of the U.S. Bill of Rights, prohibits excessive bail or fines, as well as cruel and unusual punishment. ... Holding --- Court membership Case opinions Laws applied 28 U.S.C. 1291 Lauro Lines s. ... An interlocutory appeal, in the law of civil procedure is an appeal of a ruling by a trial court that is made before the trial itself has concluded. ... Holding Court membership Case opinions Laws applied . Community for Creative Non-Violence v. ... For copyright issues in relation to Wikipedia itself, see Wikipedia:Copyrights. ... A work for hire is an exception to the general rule that the person who creates a work is the author of that work. ... Holding A Texas statute that criminalized the desecration of the American flag violated the First Amendment. ... Webster v. ...

1990–1999

The Court decided, based on the Equal Access Act, that schools did not violate the establishment clause by allowing Bible study clubs to meet after school using school facilities where public funds were not being used to pay teachers acting as advisors to the club. ... Holding Testimony by an alleged child sex abuse victim via closed-circuit television did not violate the defendants Sixth Amendment right to confront witnesses. ... Holding Federal courts have the power to order taxation by state authorities. ... United States vs. ... Feist Publications, Inc. ... R. A. V., Petitioner, v. ... Holding --- Court membership Case opinions Laws applied --- Lee v. ... Holding A Pennsylvania law that required spousal notification prior to obtaining an abortion was invalid under the Fourteenth Amendment because it created an undue burden on married women seeking an abortion. ... Nearly sixty countries around the world have implemented some form of freedom of information legislation, which sets rules on governmental secrecy. ... The Church of Lukumi Babalu Aye came up after Employment Division v. ... Holding The Federal Rules of Evidence do not require that a technique relied upon in expert testimony have general professional acceptance or have been subjected to peer review for that testimony to be judged reliable and admissible at trial. ... The Daubert Standard is a legal precedent set in 1993 by the Supreme Court of the United States regarding the admissibility of expert witnesss testimony during legal procedings. ... An expert witness is a witness, who by virtue of education, or profession, or experience, is believed to have special knowledge of his subject beyond that of the average person, sufficient that others may officially (and legally) rely upon his opinion. ... Campbell v. ... For copyright issues in relation to Wikipedia itself, see Wikipedia:Copyrights. ... The fair use doctrine is an aspect of United States copyright law that provides for the licit, non-licensed citation or incorporation of copyrighted material in another authors work under certain, specifiable conditions. ... In contemporary usage, parody is a form of satire that imitates another work of art in order to ridicule it. ... Holding --- Court membership Case opinions Laws applied --- Board of Education of Kiryas Joel Village School District v. ... Holding A fine for contempt that could not be purged by compliance with the order of the court was a criminal contempt, and could not be assessed without a jury trial. ... Contempt of court is the failure to obey a lawful order of a court, disrespect for the judge, disruption of the proceedings through poor behavior, or publication of material deemed likely to jeopardize a fair trial. ... A court is an official, public forum which a public power establishes by lawful authority to adjudicate disputes, and to dispense civil, labour, administrative and criminal justice under the law. ... United States v. ... Conspiracy, in common usage, is the act of working in secret to obtain some goal, usually understood with negative connotations. ... United States v. ... Article I, Section 8, Clause 3 of the United States Constitution empowers the United States Congress To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes. The Commerce Clause has been the subject of intense constitutional and political disagreement centering on the extent to... Holding ... Court membership Case opinions Laws applied ... Adarand Constructors, Inc. ... Amendment IV (the Fourth Amendment) of the United States Constitution, which is part of the Bill of Rights, guards against unreasonable searches and seizures. ... Amendment XIV (the Fourteenth Amendment) of the United States Constitution is one of the post-Civil War amendments and includes the due process and equal protection clauses (Section 1). ... Markman v. ... Patent claims define the extent of the protection conferred by a patent, in technical terms. ... A patent is a set of exclusive rights granted by a state to a person for a fixed period of time in exchange for the regulated, public disclosure of certain details of a device, method, process or substance (known as an invention) which is new, inventive and useful. ... Holding Excessive punitive damages awards violate procedural due process. ... Punitive damages are damages awarded to a successful plaintiff in a civil action, over and above the amount of compensatory damages, to: punish the conduct of the civil defendant; deter the civil defendant from committing the invidious act again; and deter others from doing the same thing. ... Amendment XIV (the Fourteenth Amendment) of the United States Constitution is one of the post-Civil War amendments and includes the due process and equal protection clauses (Section 1). ... Holding An amendment to the Colorado Constitution that allows discrimination against homosexuals and prevents the state from protecting them violated equal protection under the Fourteenth Amendment, because it was not rationally related to a legitimate state interest, but instead was motivated by animus towards homosexuals. ... The Equal Protection Clause is a part of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, providing that no state shall make or enforce any law which shall. ... Since its coining, the term homosexuality has acquired multiple meanings. ... Jaffe v. ... Confidentiality has been defined by the International Standards Organization (ISO) as ensuring that information is accessible only to those authorized to have access and is one of the cornerstones of Information security. ... In Reno v. ... Freedom of speech is the right to freely say what one pleases, as well as the related right to hear what others have stated. ... Obscenity has several connotations. ... [The Communications Decency Act (CDA) was Title V of the United States Telecommunications Act of 1996. ... Oncale v. ... Sexual harassment is harassment of a sexual nature, typically in the workplace or other setting where raising objections or refusing may have negative consequences. ... Since its coining, the term homosexuality has acquired multiple meanings. ... Hunt v. ... Printed in 1812, this political cartoon illustrates the electoral districts drawn by the Massachusetts legislature to favor the incumbent Democratic-Republican party candidates of Governor Elbridge Gerry over the Federalists. ... Sovereign immunity or crown immunity is a type of immunity that, in common law jurisdictions traces its origins from early English law. ...

2000–present

Decided and reported

Holding Laws banning partial-birth abortion are unconstitutional if they do not make an exception for the womans health, or if they cannot be reasonably construed to apply only to the partial-birth abortion (intact D&X) procedure and not to other abortion methods. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... Santa Fe Independent School Dist. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... United States v. ... Article I, Section 8, Clause 3 of the United States Constitution, known as the Commerce Clause, empowers the United States Congress To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes. ... Boy Scouts of America et al v. ... Freedom of association is a right granted under the constitution or interpretations thereof of several countries, or under certain international conventions pertaining to civil rights. ... Since its coining, the term homosexuality has acquired multiple meanings. ... Holding Any manual recount of votes seeking to meet the December 12 “safe harbor” deadline would be unconstitutional under the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. ... Holding --- Court membership Case opinions Laws applied --- TrafFix Devices, Inc. ... A trademark (Commonwealth English: trade mark)[1] is a distinctive sign of some kind which is used by a business to identify itself and its products and services to consumers, and to set the business and its products or services apart from those of other businesses. ... A patent is a set of exclusive rights granted by a state to a person for a fixed period of time in exchange for the regulated, public disclosure of certain details of a device, method, process or substance (known as an invention) which is new, inventive and useful. ... Easley v. ... An African-American drinks out of a water fountain marked for colored in 1939 at a street car terminal in Oklahoma City. ... Printed in 1812, this political cartoon illustrates the electoral districts drawn by the Massachusetts legislature to favor the incumbent Democratic-Republican party candidates of Governor Elbridge Gerry over the Federalists. ... Holding Police may make a warrantless arrest when someone commits a misdemeanor offense Court membership Case opinions Laws applied U.S. Const. ... Search and seizure is a legal tool of US law whereby police who suspect that a crime has been committed may do a search of the property. ... In Danny Lee Kyllo v. ... Amendment IV (the Fourth Amendment) of the United States Constitution, which is part of the Bill of Rights, guards against unreasonable searches and seizures. ... New York Times Co. ... Holding --- Court membership Case opinions Laws applied --- Festo Corp. ... Prosecution history estoppel, also known as file-wrapper estoppel, is a term used in United States patent law to indicate that a person who has filed a patent application, and then makes amendments to the application to accommodate the patent law, has no cause of action for infringement to the... Court membership Case opinions Laws applied Minnesota Code of Judicial Conduct 5(A)(3)(d)(i) United States Constitution Amendment I Republican Party of Minnesota v. ... Eldred v. ... For copyright issues in relation to Wikipedia itself, see Wikipedia:Copyrights. ... Gratz v. ... An African-American drinks out of a water fountain marked for colored in 1939 at a street car terminal in Oklahoma City. ... Affirmative action (U.S. English), or positive discrimination (British English), is a policy or a program providing access to systems for people of a minority group who have traditionally been discriminated against, with the aim of creating a more egalitarian society. ... The Equal Protection Clause is a part of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, providing that no state shall make or enforce any law which shall. ... Grutter v. ... An African-American drinks out of a water fountain marked for colored in 1939 at a street car terminal in Oklahoma City. ... Affirmative action (U.S. English), or positive discrimination (British English), is a policy or a program providing access to systems for people of a minority group who have traditionally been discriminated against, with the aim of creating a more egalitarian society. ... The Equal Protection Clause is a part of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, providing that no state shall make or enforce any law which shall. ... Holding A Texas law prohibiting homosexual sodomy violated the liberty under the Fourteenth Amendment of adults to engage in private intimate conduct. ... Liberty is generally thought of in English as a condition in which an individual has immunity from the arbitrary exercise of authority; it often also implies the right to exercise political rights such as standing for office. ... Due process of law is a legal concept that ensures the government will respect all of a persons legal rights instead of just some or most of those legal rights, when the government deprives a person of life, liberty, or property. ... Since its coining, the term homosexuality has acquired multiple meanings. ... McConnell v. ... , a First Amendment case decided in the Supreme Court in 2003, created a new category of restrictable speech: the true threat, where inquiry hinges not on the speaker’s intent but on the perception of the listener in question. ... Holding Plaintiffs must prove that some actual damages resulted from a federal agencys intentional or willful violation of the Privacy Act of 1974 in order to qualify for the statutory minimum award of $1000 provided for such a violation under that statute. ... Holding The use at trial of out of court statements made to police by an unavailable witness violated a criminal defendants Sixth Amendment right to confront witnesses against him. ...

Decided, but not yet reported

The cases in this section are recently decided and have not yet been published in a reporter, and thus have not yet been assigned an official United States Reports citation (e.g., 537 U.S. 186). They are identified using their Supreme Court docket number. The date listed is the date of decision. In addition, some of these cases use one of the following citations: Supreme Court Reporter (___ S.Ct. ___); Supreme Courts Reports, Lawyer's Edition (___ L.Ed. ___) [1]; or U.S. Law Week [2]. See Court citation, Unpublished decisions for additional guidance. Court citation is a standard system used in common law countries such as the United States, United Kingdom, Canada and Australia to uniquely identify the location of past court cases in special series of books called reporters. ...


Note: For easier finding, these are in order by the name of the plaintiff, that is, the first party named on the suit, and then by defendant's name if necessary: A plaintiff, also known as a claimant, or a complainant is the party who initiates a lawsuit (also known as an action) before a court. ... A defendant is any party who is required to answer the complaint of a plaintiff in a civil lawsuit before a court, or any party who has been formally charged or accused of violating a criminal statute. ...

Court membership Case opinions Laws applied 18 U.S.C. § 1512(b)(2)(A) and (B) (2000 version which has since been modified by Congress) Arthur Andersen LLP v. ... Holding The State of Washingtons criminal sentencing system violated the Sixth Amendment right to a jury trial, because it gave judges the ability to increase sentences based on their own determination of facts. ... Central Laborers Pension Fund v. ... The following, taken from http://www. ... Department of Transportation v. ... Newdow v. ... Dorothea Lange photograph of Japanese-American students reciting the Pledge of Allegiance The Pledge of Allegiance is a promise or oath of allegiance to the United States, and to its national flag. ... Gonzales v. ... Species Cannabis indica Cannabis ruderalis Cannabis sativa Cannabis is a genus of flowering plant that includes one or more species. ... Holding U.S. citizens designated as enemy combatants by the Executive Branch have a right to challenge their detainment under the Due Process Clause. ... Holding A Nevada law requiring suspects to identify themselves during investigative stops by law enforcement officers did not violate the Fourth or Fifth Amendments. ... Susette Kelo, et al v. ... Eminent domain (US), compulsory purchase, (England and Wales) or compulsory acquisition (Australia) in common law legal systems is the power of the state to appropriate private property for its own use without the owners consent. ... Intel Corp. ... Merck KGaA, Petitioner v. ... A patent is a set of exclusive rights granted by a state to a person for a fixed period of time in exchange for the regulated, public disclosure of certain details of a device, method, process or substance (known as an invention) which is new, inventive and useful. ... McCreary County v. ... In Lemon vs. ... Holding Producers of technology who promote the ease of infringing on copyrights can be sued for inducing copyright infringement committed by their users. ... Copyright infringement is the unauthorized use of copyrighted material in a manner that violates one of the copyright owners exclusive rights, such as the right to reproduce or perform the copyrighted work, or to make derivative works that build upon it. ... A peer-to-peer (or P2P) computer network is a network that relies on the computing power and bandwidth of the participants in the network rather than concentrating it in a relatively few servers. ... Sony Corp v. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. Rasul v. ... Map of Cuba with location of Guantanamo Bay indicated. ... Roper v. ... Amendment VIII (the Eighth Amendment) of the United States Constitution, which is part of the U.S. Bill of Rights, prohibits excessive bail or fines, as well as cruel and unusual punishment. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Gary Sherwood Small v. ... Spector v. ... The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 is the short title of United States Public Law 101-336, signed into law on July 26, 1990 by George H. W. Bush. ... United States v. ... Article I, Section 8, Clause 3 of the United States Constitution, known as the Commerce Clause, empowers the United States Congress To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes. ... Tenet v. ... This United States Supreme Court case began in California with Johnnie Cochran, the famed attorney who represented O.J. Simpson, suing his former client Ulysses Tory for libel and invasion of privacy. ... United States v. ... Amendment VI (the Sixth Amendment) of the United States Constitution guarantees rights related to criminal prosecutions in federal courts. ... Holding [T]he monument did not contravene the [ Establishment Clause ], ... the State had a valid secular purpose in recognizing and commending the Eagles for their efforts to reduce juvenile delinquency, and that a reasonable observer, mindful of history, purpose, and context, would not conclude that this passive monument conveyed the...

Not yet decided

The following is a partial list of cases awaiting decisions. The first number on each line is that case's docket number. The date listed before each case is that of the most recent oral arguments for each case. Transcripts of recently argued cases are available from the Court's website. The word docket can mean: A brief summary of a document, also called an abstract A listing of items that an organization plans on discussing, also called an agenda The official schedule of proceedings in lawsuits pending in a court of law. ...

Gonzales v. ... Euthanasia (Greek, good death) is the practice of killing a person or animal, in a painless or minimally painful way, for merciful reasons, usually to end their suffering. ...

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia: List of United States Supreme Court Cases (4949 words)
This is a chronological list of notable cases decided by the Supreme Court of the United States.
Seal of the Supreme Court The Supreme Court of the United States, the highest court in the United States of America, is the head of the Judicial Branch of the Federal Government.
Holding The Supreme Court had the power to order that a writ of habeas corpus be issued to release the petitioners from prison, because the Constitution grants that power to federal courts unless Congress suspends it.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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