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Encyclopedia > List of U.S. Presidential religious affiliations

This is a list of the religious affiliations of Presidents of the United States. The particular religious affiliations of U.S. Presidents can affect their electability, shape their visions of society and how they want to lead it, and shape their stances on policy matters. For example, a contributing factor to Alfred E. Smith's defeat in the presidential election of 1928 was his Roman Catholic faith. In the 1960 election, John F. Kennedy faced accusations that as a Catholic president he would do as Pope John XXIII would tell him to do. Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, and several other presidents were accused of being infidels during election campaigns—and at other times. Fishers of men; Oil on panel by Adriaen van de Venne (1614) Religion (see etymology below) —sometimes used interchangeably with faith or belief system—is commonly defined as belief concerning the supernatural, sacred, or divine; and the moral codes, practices, values, institutions and rituals associated with such belief. ... The President of the United States of America (unofficially abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States and the chief executive of the federal government. ... Alfred Emanuel Smith ( December 30, 1873– October 4, 1944), often known as Al Smith, was Governor of New York and a U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The Roman Catholic Church, (also known as the Catholic Church), is the ancient Christian Church led by the Pope, the Bishop of Rome. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), often referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK, or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... Pope John XXIII (Latin: ), born Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli (November 25, 1881 – June 3, 1963), reigned as the 261st Pope of the Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City from October 28, 1958 until his death in 1963. ... Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743 N.S. – July 4, 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–1809), author of the United States Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founders of the United States. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ...


Throughout much of American history, the religion of past American presidents has been the subject of contentious debate. Some devout Americans have been disinclined to believe that there may have been agnostic or even non-Christian presidents, especially amongst the Founding Fathers of the United States. As a result, apocryphal stories of a religious nature have appeared over the years about particularly beloved presidents such as Washington and Lincoln. On the other hand, secular-minded Americans have sometimes downplayed the prominence that religion played in the private and political lives of the Founding Fathers. The term agnosticism and the related agnostic were coined by Thomas Henry Huxley in 1869. ... sex sex ex they have hard buttsexFounding Fathers of the United States, also known to some Americans as the Fathers of Our Country, the Forefathers, Framers or the Founders are the men who signed the Declaration of Independence, United States Constitution or otherwise participated in the American Revolution as leaders... In Judeo-Christian theologies, apocrypha refers to religious Sacred text that have questionable authenticity or are otherwise disputed. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799) was the successful Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and later became the first President of the United States, an office to which he was elected, unanimously, twice (1789-1797). ... This article concerns secularity, that is, being secular, in various senses. ...


Episcopalians are extraordinarily well represented among the presidents. This is in part because the Episcopal Church was the state religion in some states (such as Virginia) before their Constitutions were changed. Before the American Revolution, the Episcopal Church was the American branch of the Church of England. The first seven presidents listed below with Episcopalian affiliation were also the first seven from Virginia, and five of those were among the six presidents most closely identified with Deism. Since there have seldom been any churches of Deism, strictly speaking Deist is not an affiliation in the same way Episcopalian is; it is included in the list below, however, to give a more complete view of the religious views of the presidents. Episcopalianism is virtually the same thing is Judaism The word episcopal is derived from the Greek επισκοπος epískopos, which literally means overseer; the word, however, is used in religious contexts to refer to a bishop. ... The Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in Washington DC is the National Cathedral of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America. ... A state religion (also called an established church or state church) is a religious body or creed officially endorsed by the state. ... The American Revolution is the series of events, ideas, and changes that resulted in the political separation of thirteen colonies in North America from the British Empire and the creation of the United States of America. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... Historical and modern Deism is defined by the view that reason, rather than revelation or tradition, should be the basis of belief in God. ...


The church closest to the White House is also Episcopal, and has been attended at least once by nearly every president since James Madison. St. John's Episcopal Church, just across Lafayette Square north of the White House, and built after the War of 1812, is one of about five sometimes referred to as "the Church of the Presidents". The southern side of the White House The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States of America. ... James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836) was the fourth (1809–1817) President of the United States. ... St. ... Presidents Park is a unit of the National Park Service, located in Washington, D.C., USA at 38° 53′ 42″ N 77° 02′ 11″ W. It includes the White House, a visitor center, Lafeyette Square, and the Ellipse. ... The War of 1812 was fought between the United States and United Kingdom from 1812 to 1815, on land in North America and at sea around the world. ...


Many people are interested not only in the religious affiliations of the presidents, but also in their inner beliefs. Some presidents, such as Madison and Monroe, were extremely reluctant to discuss their own religious views at all. In general, it is difficult to define with any certainty the faiths of presidents, because no one can truly be sure what relationship (if any) exists between another person and his deity, and because presidents, as public officials, have generally tried to remain outwardly within the mainstream of American religious trends. James Monroe (April 28, 1758 – July 4, 1831) was the fifth (1817–1825) President of the United States and author of the eponymous Monroe Doctrine. ... The word faith has various uses; its central meaning is similar to belief, trust or confidence, but unlike these terms, faith tends to imply a transpersonal rather than interpersonal relationship – with God or a higher power. ...


With regard to Christianity, distinguishing affiliation from belief can be somewhat complicated. At issue, to a certain extent, is "What counts as belonging to a church?" Must one be a communicant to belong, or is baptism or even simple attendance sufficient? Are Unitarians, Jehovah's Witnesses, and independents who generally hold Jesus in high regard, but do not believe that he is or was divine, to be counted as Christians or not? Numerous presidents changed their affiliations and/or their beliefs during their lives. George Washington, for example, gravitated from conventional Christianity as a youth towards deism as he aged. The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... The Eucharist is the rite that Christians perform in fulfillment of Jesus instruction, recorded in the New Testament, to do in memory of him what he did at his Last Supper. ... A Catholic baptism Baptism is any water purification ritual practiced in any of various religions including Christianity, Mandaeanism, and Sikhism, and has its origins with the Jewish ritual of mikvah. ... Historic Unitarianism believed in the oneness of God as opposed to traditional Christian belief in the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). ... Jesus, Jesus of Nazareth or Jesus the Nazarene (circa 4 BC/BCE – 30 AD/CE), is the central figure of Christianity, in which context he is known as Jesus Christ (from Greek Ιησούς Χριστός) with Christ being a title meaning Anointed One or Messiah. Christian viewpoints on Jesus (known as Christology) are... Historical and modern Deism is defined by the view that reason, rather than revelation or tradition, should be the basis of belief in God. ...

Contents


List of Presidential religious affiliations/beliefs (by President)

  1. George Washington Episcopalian (VA)
    • The religious views of George Washington are a matter of some controversy. There is strong evidence that he was a deist—believing in Divine Providence, but not believing in divine intervention in the world after the initial design. Before the revolution, when the Church of England was still the state religion in Virginia, he served as a member of the vestry (council) for his local congregation. He spoke often of the value of religion in general, and he sometimes accompanied his wife Martha Washington to Christian church services. However, there is no record of his ever becoming a communicant in any Christian church and he would regularly leave services before communion—with the other non-communicants. When Rev. Dr. James Abercrombie, rector of St. Peter's Episcopal Church in Philadelphia mentioned in a weekly sermon that those in elevated stations set an unhappy example by leaving at communion, Washington ceased attending at all on communion Sundays. Long after Washington died, asked about Washington's beliefs, Abercrombie replied: "Sir, Washington was a Deist." An unfinished book of copied prayers attributed to him (as a youth) by a collector was rejected by the Smithsonian Institution for lack of authenticity.[1] Various prayers said to have been composed by him in his later life are highly edited. He did not ask for any clergy on his deathbed, though one was available. His funeral services were those of the Freemasons.
  2. John AdamsUnitarian (MA)
  3. Thomas JeffersonDeist; Episcopalian (VA)
    • Though a vestryman (lay officer) of the Church of England in Virginia before the revolution, his beliefs were primarily Deist. Unlike its effect on Congregational churches, Deism had little influence on Episcopal churches, which have a more hierarchical structure making them slower to modify their teachings. Of only three things Jefferson chose for his epitaph, one was the 1786 Statute of Virginia for Religious Freedom. Jefferson's views are considered very close to Unitarian [3]. The Famous UUs website says: [4]
      "Like many others of his time (he died just one year after the founding of institutional Unitarianism in America), Jefferson was a Unitarian in theology, though not in church membership. He never joined a Unitarian congregation: there were none near his home in Virginia during his lifetime. He regularly attended Joseph Priestley's Pennsylvania church when he was nearby, and said that Priestley's theology was his own, and there is no doubt Priestley should be identified as Unitarian. Jefferson remained a member of the Episcopal congregation near his home, but removed himself from those available to become godparents, because he was not sufficiently in agreement with the trinitarian theology. His work, the Jefferson Bible, was Unitarian in theology..."
    • See Wikiquote and Positive Atheism for many relevant quotes.
  4. James Madison Episcopalian (VA)
    • In 1779 the Virginia General Assembly deprived Church of England ministers of tax support, but in 1784 Patrick Henry sponsored a bill to again collect taxes to support churches in general. Madison's 1785 Memorial and Remonstrance was written in opposition to another bill to levy a general assessment for the support of religions. The assessment bill was tabled, and instead the legislature in 1786 passed Jefferson's Bill for Religious Freedom, first submitted in 1779. Virginia thereby became the first state to disestablish religion — Rhode Island, Delaware, and Pennsylvania never having had an established religion.

Although in 1812, President Madison proposed a federal bill which economically aided the Bible Society of Philadelphia in its goal of the mass distribution of the Bible. “ An Act for the relief of the Bible Society of Philadelphia” Approved February 2, 1813 by Congress. George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799) was the successful Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and later became the first President of the United States, an office to which he was elected, unanimously, twice (1789-1797). ... The Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in Washington DC is the National Cathedral of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America. ... Historical and modern Deism is defined by the view that reason, rather than revelation or tradition, should be the basis of belief in God. ... Divine Providence, or simply Providence, is a theological term which refers to the sovereignty, superintendence, or agency of God over events in peoples lives and throughout history. ... According to many religions, a miracle, derived from the old Latin word miraculum meaning something wonderful, is a striking interposition of divine intervention by God in the universe by which the operations of the ordinary course of Nature are overruled, suspended, or modified. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... A state religion (also called an established church or state church) is a religious body or creed officially endorsed by the state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 35th 110,862 km² 320 km 690 km 7. ... A vestry is a room within or attached to a church which is used to store vestments and other items used in worship. ... Martha Washington Martha Dandridge Custis Washington (June 21, 1731 – May 22, 1802) was the wife of George Washington, the first president of the United States, and therefore is seen as the first First Lady of the United States (although that title was not coined until after her death; she was... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... The Eucharist is the rite that Christians perform in fulfillment of Jesus instruction, recorded in the New Testament, to do in memory of him what he did at his Last Supper. ... The Smithsonian Institution Building or Castle on the National Mall serves as the Institutions headquarters. ... The Masonic Square and Compasses. ... John Adams (October 30, 1735 – July 4, 1826) was the first (1789–1797) Vice President of the United States, and the second (1797–1801) President of the United States. ... Historic Unitarianism believed in the oneness of God as opposed to traditional Christian belief in the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... First Flag of New England, 1686-c. ... The Reformed churches are a group of Protestant denominations historically related by a similar Zwinglian or Calvinist system of doctrine but organisationally independent. ... Presbyterianism is a form of church government, practiced by many (although not all) of those Protestant churches (known as Reformed churches), which historically subscribed to the teachings of John Calvin. ... The First Great Awakening was a religious movement among American colonial Protestants in the 1730s and 1740s. ... For the Armenian nationality, see Armenia or the Armenian language. ... Historical and modern Deism is defined by the view that reason, rather than revelation or tradition, should be the basis of belief in God. ... Historic Unitarianism believed in the oneness of God as opposed to traditional Christian belief in the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). ... ... Calvinism is a system of Christian theology and an approach to Christian life and thought, put forward by the predecessors, associates, followers and admirers of John Calvin, a Protestant Reformer in the 16th century. ... Predestination is a religious idea, under which the relationship between the beginning of things and the destiny of things is discussed. ... Events and Trends Scientific navigation is developed The Seven Years War (1756-1763) fought between two rival alliances: the first consisting of the Kingdom of Great Britain, Hanover, and Prussia; the second consisting of Austria, France, Imperial Russia, Saxony, and Sweden. ... Universalism refers to concepts and issues which are said to be universal in appeal—i. ... Nickname: City on a Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Solar System), Athens of America Motto: Official website: www. ... Nontrinitarianism or (the Roman Catholic term) Antitrinitarianism, is the doctrine that rejects the Trinitarian doctrine that God subsists as three distinct persons in the single substance of the Holy Trinity. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743 N.S. – July 4, 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–1809), author of the United States Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founders of the United States. ... Historical and modern Deism is defined by the view that reason, rather than revelation or tradition, should be the basis of belief in God. ... Episcopalianism is virtually the same thing is Judaism The word episcopal is derived from the Greek επισκοπος epískopos, which literally means overseer; the word, however, is used in religious contexts to refer to a bishop. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... Historical and modern Deism is defined by the view that reason, rather than revelation or tradition, should be the basis of belief in God. ... The flaming chalice is the universally recognized symbol for Unitarian Universalism. ... Historic Unitarianism believed in the oneness of God as opposed to traditional Christian belief in the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). ... Joseph Priestley is often credited for the discovery of oxygen. ... Episcopalianism is virtually the same thing is Judaism The word episcopal is derived from the Greek επισκοπος epískopos, which literally means overseer; the word, however, is used in religious contexts to refer to a bishop. ... Trinitarianism is the Christian doctrine that God, although one being, exists in three distinct persons (hypostases) known collectively as the Holy Trinity. ... The Jefferson Bible, or The Life And Morals of Jesus of Nazareth as it is formally titled, was an attempt by Thomas Jefferson to compile the teachings of Jesus from the Christian Gospels. ... James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836) was the fourth (1809–1817) President of the United States. ... Episcopalianism is virtually the same thing is Judaism The word episcopal is derived from the Greek επισκοπος epískopos, which literally means overseer; the word, however, is used in religious contexts to refer to a bishop. ... The Virginia General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Virginia. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was a prominent figure in the American Revolution, known and remembered primarily for his stirring oratory. ...

  1. James MonroeDeist; Episcopalian (VA)
  2. John Quincy AdamsUnitarian (MA) [5]
  3. Andrew JacksonPresbyterian (NC/SC)
    • became a member about a year after retiring the presidency
  4. Martin Van BurenDutch Reformed or no affiliation (NY)
    • Van Buren did not join any church in Washington, nor in his home town of Kinderhook (village), New York. The sole original source to claim that he did join a church – in Hudson, New York – is Vernon B. Hampton, in Religious Background of the White House (Boston: Christopher Publishing House, 1932). The basis for this claim has not been found.
  5. William Henry HarrisonEpiscopalian possibly (VA)
    • Harrison died just one month after his inauguration. After Harrison's funeral, the rector at St. John's Episcopal Church in Washington, DC said Harrison had bought a Bible one day after his inauguration and had planned to become a communicant.
  6. John TylerDeist; Episcopalian (VA)
  7. James K. PolkPresbyterian; later Methodist (NC/TN)
    • Raised Presbyterian, Polk had never been baptized due to an early family argument with the local Presbyterian minister in rural North Carolina. Polk's father and grandfather were Deists, and the minister refused to baptize James unless his father affirmed Christianity, which he would not do. At age 38, Polk had a religious conversion to Methodism at a camp meeting, and thereafter he thought of himself as a Methodist. Out of respect for his mother and wife Sarah Childress Polk, however, he continued to attend Presbyterian services. Whenever his wife was out of town, or too ill to attend church, however, Polk worshipped at the local Methodist chapel. On his deathbed less than 4 months after leaving the Presidency, he summoned the man who had converted him years before, the Rev. John B. McFerrin, who then baptized Polk as a Methodist.
  8. Zachary TaylorEpiscopalian (VA)
  9. Millard FillmoreUnitarian (NY)
    • In the early 1830s, he worked to overturn the New York test law that required all witnesses in New York courts to swear an oath affirming their belief in God and the hereafter.
  10. Franklin PierceEpiscopalian (NH)
    • 1850: unsuccessfully worked to abolish that portion of the New Hampshire Constitution which made the Protestant religion the official religion.
    • 1853: Pierce's 12-year-old son died in a tragic train accident, which prompted Franklin into a great bout of depression, during which he questioned God's existence. At his inauguration he became the first, and to date only president to "affirm" rather than swear the oath of office; he also chose not to kiss the Bible.
    • 1861: 4 years after retiring the presidency, he was baptized, confirmed, and became a regular communicant in St. Paul's Episcopal Church, in Concord, NH.
  11. James BuchananPresbyterian (PA)
    • raised Presbyterian, he joined its church after he retired the presidency
  12. Abraham LincolnDeist; no affiliation known (KY/IN/IL)
    • Life before the presidency
      • For much of his life, Lincoln was undoubtedly Deist (see [6], [7]). In his younger days he openly challenged orthodox religions, but as he matured and became a candidate for public office he kept his Deist views more to himself, and would sometimes attend Presbyterian services with his wife Mary Todd Lincoln. He loved to read the Bible, and even quoted from it, but he almost never made reference to Jesus, and is not known to have ever indicated a belief in the divinity of Jesus.
      • Evidence against Lincoln's ever being Christian includes offerings from two of Lincoln's most intimate friends, Ward Hill Lamon and William H. Herndon. Both Herndon and Lamon published biographies of their former colleague after his assassination relating their personal recollections of him. Each denied Lincoln's adherence to Christianity and characterized his religious beliefs as deist or atheist.
    • Lincoln's religion at the time of his death is a matter about which there is more disagreement. A number of Christian pastors, writing months and even years after Lincoln's assassination, claimed to have witnessed a late-life conversion by Lincoln to protestant Christianity. Some pastors date a conversion following the death of his son Eddie in 1850, and some following the death of his son Willie in 1862, and some later than that. These accounts are hard to substantiate and historians consider most of them to be apocryphal.
      • One such account is an entry in the memory book The Lincoln Memorial Album—Immortelles (edited by Osborn H. Oldroyd, 1882, New York: G.W. Carleton & Co., p. 366) attributed to An Illinois clergyman (unnamed) which reads "When I left Springfield I asked the people to pray for me. I was not a Christian. When I buried my son, the severest trial of my life, I was not a Christian. But when I went to Gettysburg and saw the graves of thousands of our soldiers, I then and there consecrated myself to Christ. Yes, I do love Jesus." Other entries in the memory book are attributed by name. See a discussion of this story in They Never Said It, by Paul F. Boller & John George, (Oxford Univ. Press, 1989, p. 91).
      • Rev. Dr. Phineas D. Gurley, pastor of the New York Avenue Presbyterian church in Washington D.C., which Lincoln attended with his wife when he attended any church, never claimed a conversion. According to D. James Kennedy in his booklet, "What They Believed: The Faith of Washington, Jefferson, and Lincoln", "Dr. Gurley said that Lincoln had wanted to make a public profession of his faith on Easter Sunday morning. But then came Ford's Theater." (p. 59, Published by Coral Ridge Ministries, 2003) Though this is possible, we have no way of verifying the truth of the report. The chief evidence against it is that Dr. Gurley, so far as we know, never mentioned it publicly. The determination to join, if accurate, would have been extremely newsworthy. It would have been reasonable for Dr. Gurley to have mentioned it at the funeral in the White House, in which he delivered the sermon which has been preserved[8]. The only evidence we have is an affidavit signed more than sixty years later by Mrs. Sidney I. Lauck, then a very old woman. In her affidavit signed under oath in Essex County, New Jersey, February 15, 1928, she said, "After Mr. Lincoln's death, Dr. Gurley told me that Mr. Lincoln had made all the necessary arrangements with him and the Session of the New York Avenue Presbyterian Church to be received into the membership of the said church, by confession of his faith in Christ, on the Easter Sunday following the Friday night when Mr. Lincoln was assassinated." Mrs. Lauck was, she said, about thirty years of age at the time of the assassination.
  13. Andrew Johnsonno affiliation (NC/TN)
    • Some sources refer to Johnson having Baptist parents. He accompanied his wife Eliza McCardle Johnson to Methodist services sometimes, belonged to no church himself, and sometimes attended Catholic services—remarking favorably there was no reserved seating. Accused of being an infidel, he replied: "As for my religion, it is the doctrine of the Bible, as taught and practiced by Jesus Christ." (See The Age of Hate, 1930, by G.F. Milton, p. 80.)
  14. Ulysses S. Grantno affiliation known (OH)
    • Grant was never baptized into any church, though he accompanied his wife Julia Grant to Methodist services. Many sources list his religious affiliation as Methodist based on a Methodist minister's account of a deathbed conversion. He did leave a note for his wife in which he hoped to meet her again in a better world.
  15. Rutherford B. Hayesno affiliation (OH)
    • In his 1890, 17 May diary entry, he states: "I am not a subscriber to any creed. I belong to no Church. But in a sense satisfactory to myself, and believed by me to be important, I try to be a Christian and to help do Christian work." (page 435)
  16. James GarfieldDisciples of Christ (OH)
    • In his early adulthood, Garfield sometimes preached and held revival meetings.
  17. Chester A. ArthurEpiscopalian (VT/NY)
  18. Grover ClevelandPresbyterian (NJ/NY)
  19. Benjamin HarrisonPresbyterian (OH/IN)
    • Harrison became a church elder, and taught Sunday school
    • Franklin Steiner, in his book The Religious Beliefs Of Our Presidents[9], categorized Harrison as the first President who was unquestionably a communicant in an orthodox Church at the time he was elected
  20. Grover ClevelandPresbyterian (NJ/NY)
    • During his second (non-consecutive) term, Cleveland included mention of Jesus Christ in his Thanksgiving Proclamation, something no other President had ever done.
  21. William McKinleyMethodist (OH)
    • McKinley believed the U.S. government had a duty to help spread Christianity and Western civilization to the rest of the world.
  22. Theodore RooseveltDutch Reformed (NY)
  23. William Howard TaftUnitarian (OH)
    • Before becoming president, Taft was offered the presidency of Yale University, at that time affiliated with the Congregationalist Church; Taft turned the post down, saying that he could not in good conscience accept it because he "did not believe in the divinity of Christ." (See 1912, James Chace, page 24.)
  24. Woodrow WilsonPresbyterian (VA/GA/NJ)
  25. Warren G. HardingBaptist (OH)
  26. Calvin CoolidgeCongregationalist (VT/MA)
  27. Herbert Hoover – Quaker (IA/OR/CA)
  28. Franklin D. RooseveltEpiscopalian (NY)
  29. Harry S. TrumanBaptist (MO)
  30. Dwight D. EisenhowerJehovah's Witness; later Presbyterian (TX/KS/PA)
    • Brought up Jehovah's Witness, Eisenhower abandoned that before joining the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York. (See [10], [11], and [12].) He was baptized, confirmed, and became a communicant in the Presbyterian church in a single ceremony 1953 February 1, just weeks after his first inauguration. He is the only president known to be baptized, or to be confirmed, or to become a communicant while in office. Eisenhower was instrumental in the addition of the words "under God" to the Pledge of Allegiance in 1954, and the 1956 adoption of "In God We Trust" as the motto of the USA, and its 1957 introduction on paper currency. The chapel at his presidential library is intentionally inter-denominational.
  31. John F. KennedyRoman Catholic (MA)
    • The first and only Roman Catholic to serve as president, Kennedy's faith was previously seen by some to be a liability that would hurt his chances during his run for the White House. Critics argued that a Kennedy presidency would be subsidary to the wishes of the Vatican.
  32. Lyndon JohnsonDisciples of Christ (TX)
  33. Richard Nixon – raised Quaker (CA)
  34. Gerald R. FordEpiscopalian (NE/MI)
  35. Jimmy CarterBaptist, born again (GA)
  36. Ronald ReaganDisciples of Christ, Presbyterian (IL/CA)
    • Reagan, like his father John (Jack) was baptised as an infant in the Roman Catholic Church, but he was raised in his mother's Disciples of Christ denomination. Beginning in 1963 Reagan generally attended Presbyterian church services at Bel-Air Presbyterian Church, Bel-Air, California. During his presidency he rarely attended church services. He became an official member of Bel-Air Presbyterian after leaving the Presidency. Reagan stated that he considered himself a "born-again Christian".
  37. George H. W. BushEpiscopalian (MA/CT/TX)
  38. Bill ClintonBaptist (AR)
  39. George W. Bush – raised Episcopalian, at age 40 became Methodist, born again (CT/TX)

James Monroe (April 28, 1758 – July 4, 1831) was the fifth (1817–1825) President of the United States and author of the eponymous Monroe Doctrine. ... Historical and modern Deism is defined by the view that reason, rather than revelation or tradition, should be the basis of belief in God. ... Episcopalianism is virtually the same thing is Judaism The word episcopal is derived from the Greek επισκοπος epískopos, which literally means overseer; the word, however, is used in religious contexts to refer to a bishop. ... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767–February 23, 1848) was an American lawyer, diplomat, and politician. ... Historic Unitarianism believed in the oneness of God as opposed to traditional Christian belief in the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). ... Andrew Jackson (March 15, 1767 – June 8, 1845), was the seventh President of the United States (1829-1837), hero of the Battle of New Orleans (1815), a founder of the Democratic Party, and the eponym of the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... Presbyterianism is a form of church government, practiced by many (although not all) of those Protestant churches (known as Reformed churches), which historically subscribed to the teachings of John Calvin. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States. ... The Reformed Church in America (RCA) is a Calvinist Reformed Protestant denomination that was formerly known as the Dutch Reformed Church. ... Kinderhook is a village located in the Town of Kinderhook in Columbia County, New York. ... Hudson is a city located in Columbia County, New York. ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... Episcopalianism is virtually the same thing is Judaism The word episcopal is derived from the Greek επισκοπος epískopos, which literally means overseer; the word, however, is used in religious contexts to refer to a bishop. ... John Tyler (March 29, 1790 – January 18, 1862) was the tenth (1841-1845) President of the United States. ... Historical and modern Deism is defined by the view that reason, rather than revelation or tradition, should be the basis of belief in God. ... Episcopalianism is virtually the same thing is Judaism The word episcopal is derived from the Greek επισκοπος epískopos, which literally means overseer; the word, however, is used in religious contexts to refer to a bishop. ... James Knox Polk (November 2, 1795–June 15, 1849) was the eleventh President of the United States, serving from March 4, 1845 to March 3, 1849. ... Presbyterianism is a form of church government, practiced by many (although not all) of those Protestant churches (known as Reformed churches), which historically subscribed to the teachings of John Calvin. ... The Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Sarah Childress Polk (September 4, 1803 – August 14, 1891), wife of James K. Polk, was First Lady of the United States from March 4, 1845 to March 3, 1849. ... Zachary Taylor (November 24, 1784 – July 9, 1850), also known as Old Rough and Ready, was the twelfth President of the United States, serving from 1849 to 1850. ... Episcopalianism is virtually the same thing is Judaism The word episcopal is derived from the Greek επισκοπος epískopos, which literally means overseer; the word, however, is used in religious contexts to refer to a bishop. ... Millard Fillmore (January 7, 1800 – March 8, 1874) was the thirteenth President of the United States, serving from 1850 until 1853, and the last member of the Whig Party to hold the nations highest office. ... Historic Unitarianism believed in the oneness of God as opposed to traditional Christian belief in the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). ... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the 14th President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... Episcopalianism is virtually the same thing is Judaism The word episcopal is derived from the Greek επισκοπος epískopos, which literally means overseer; the word, however, is used in religious contexts to refer to a bishop. ... Look up depression in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... James Buchanan (April 23, 1791 – June 1, 1868) was the 15th president of the United States (1857–1861). ... Presbyterianism is a form of church government, practiced by many (although not all) of those Protestant churches (known as Reformed churches), which historically subscribed to the teachings of John Calvin. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... Historical and modern Deism is defined by the view that reason, rather than revelation or tradition, should be the basis of belief in God. ... Mary Todd Lincoln Mary Todd Lincoln Mary Ann Todd Lincoln (December 13, 1818 – July 16, 1882) was the sixteenth First Lady of the United States when her husband, Abraham Lincoln, served as the sixteenth President, from 1861 until 1865. ... Ward Hill Lamon (January 6, 1828 - May 7, 1893) was a personal friend and bodyguard of the American President Abraham Lincoln. ... William Henry Herndon (born in Kentucky, 1818 - 1891 in Springfield, Illinois) was the law partner and biographer of Abraham Lincoln. ... In Judeo-Christian theologies, apocrypha refers to religious Sacred text that have questionable authenticity or are otherwise disputed. ... February 15 is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Andrew Johnson (December 29, 1808 – July 31, 1875) was the sixteenth Vice President (1865) and the seventeenth President of the United States (1865–1869), succeeding to the presidency upon the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. ... Elizabeth McCardle Johnson, wife of President Andrew Johnson. ... Ulysses S. Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was the 18th President of the United States (1869–1877). ... Julia Grant Julia Dent Grant (January 26, 1826 - December 14, 1902), wife of Ulysses S. Grant, was First Lady of the United States. ... Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was the 19th President of the United States (1877 – 1881). ... 1890 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... May 17 is the 137th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (138th in leap years). ... James Abram Garfield (November 19, 1831 - September 19, 1881) was the 20th (1881) President of the United States, the first left-handed President, and the second U.S. President to be assassinated. ... The insignia of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). ... Chester Alan Arthur (October 5, 1829 – November 18, 1886) was an American politician who served as 21st President of the United States. ... Episcopalianism is virtually the same thing is Judaism The word episcopal is derived from the Greek επισκοπος epískopos, which literally means overseer; the word, however, is used in religious contexts to refer to a bishop. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ... Presbyterianism is a form of church government, practiced by many (although not all) of those Protestant churches (known as Reformed churches), which historically subscribed to the teachings of John Calvin. ... Benjamin Harrison (August 20, 1833 – March 13, 1901) was the 23rd President of the United States (1889-1893). ... Presbyterianism is a form of church government, practiced by many (although not all) of those Protestant churches (known as Reformed churches), which historically subscribed to the teachings of John Calvin. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ... Presbyterianism is a form of church government, practiced by many (although not all) of those Protestant churches (known as Reformed churches), which historically subscribed to the teachings of John Calvin. ... The name Mckinley redirects here. ... The Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Theodore Roosevelt, formally Theodore Roosevelt Jr. ... The Reformed Church in America (RCA) is a Calvinist Reformed Protestant denomination that was formerly known as the Dutch Reformed Church. ... In God We Trust on the twenty dollar bill In God We Trust is the current national motto of the United States of America. ... William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) was an American politician, the 27th President of the United States, and the 10th Chief Justice of the United States. ... Historic Unitarianism believed in the oneness of God as opposed to traditional Christian belief in the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). ... Yale University is a private university in New Haven, Connecticut. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation indepedently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924) was the 28th President of the United States (1913–1921). ... Presbyterianism is a form of church government, practiced by many (although not all) of those Protestant churches (known as Reformed churches), which historically subscribed to the teachings of John Calvin. ... Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 – August 2, 1923) was an American politician and the 29th President of the United States, serving from 1921 to 1923, when he became the sixth president to die in office. ... A Baptist is a member of a Baptist church. ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation indepedently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the 31st President of the United States (1929-1933), was a successful mining engineer, humanitarian, and administrator. ... The Religious Society of Friends (commonly known as Quakers or Friends) was founded in England in the 17th century. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882 – April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States (1933-1945), is best known for leading the U.S. through the Great Depression via his New Deal, building a powerful political coalition, the New Deal Coalition, that dominated American politics for decades, and for... Episcopalianism is virtually the same thing is Judaism The word episcopal is derived from the Greek επισκοπος epískopos, which literally means overseer; the word, however, is used in religious contexts to refer to a bishop. ... Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884 – December 26, 1972) was the thirty-fourth Vice President (1945) and the thirty-third President of the United States (1945–1953), succeeding to the office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. ... A Baptist is a member of a Baptist church. ... he is like an egg ... Presbyterianism is a form of church government, practiced by many (although not all) of those Protestant churches (known as Reformed churches), which historically subscribed to the teachings of John Calvin. ... The United States Military Academy, also known as West Point, or simply USMA or Army — and sometimes, irreverently among the cadets themselves, as Whoops or Woopoo — is a U.S. service academy and Army fort. ... West Point painting West Point is a federal military base (and a census-designated place) located in the Town of Highlands in Orange County, New York. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Dorothea Lange photograph of Japanese-American students reciting the Pledge of Allegiance The Pledge of Allegiance is a promise or oath of allegiance to the United States, and to its national flag. ... In God We Trust on the twenty dollar bill In God We Trust is the current national motto of the United States of America. ... A motto is a phrase or a short list of words meant to formally describe the general motivation or intention of a social group or organization. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), often referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK, or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... This article considers Catholicism in the broadest ecclesiastical sense. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... The insignia of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... The Religious Society of Friends (commonly known as Quakers or Friends) was founded in England in the 17th century. ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... Episcopalianism is virtually the same thing is Judaism The word episcopal is derived from the Greek επισκοπος epískopos, which literally means overseer; the word, however, is used in religious contexts to refer to a bishop. ... James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ... A Baptist is a member of a Baptist church. ... Born again is a term used originally and mainly in Christianity, where it is associated with salvation, conversion and spiritual rebirth. ... The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a United States cooperative ministry agency serving missionary Baptist churches around the world. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... The insignia of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). ... Presbyterianism is a form of church government, practiced by many (although not all) of those Protestant churches (known as Reformed churches), which historically subscribed to the teachings of John Calvin. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born in Milton, Massachusetts, June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States (1989–1993). ... Episcopalianism is virtually the same thing is Judaism The word episcopal is derived from the Greek επισκοπος epískopos, which literally means overseer; the word, however, is used in religious contexts to refer to a bishop. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... A Baptist is a member of a Baptist church. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... Episcopalianism is virtually the same thing is Judaism The word episcopal is derived from the Greek επισκοπος epískopos, which literally means overseer; the word, however, is used in religious contexts to refer to a bishop. ... The Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Born again is a term used originally and mainly in Christianity, where it is associated with salvation, conversion and spiritual rebirth. ...

List of Presidential religious affiliations (by religion)

A Baptist is a member of a Baptist church. ... Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 - August 2, 1923) was the 29th (1921-1923) President of the United States and the sixth President to die in office. ... For the victim of Mt. ... James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a United States cooperative ministry agency serving missionary Baptist churches around the world. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... Deism is belief in a God or first cause based on reason, rather than on faith or revelation, and thus a form of theism in opposition to fideism. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799) was the successful Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and later became the first President of the United States, an office to which he was elected, unanimously, twice (1789-1797). ... Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743 N.S. – July 4, 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–1809), author of the United States Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founders of the United States. ... James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836) was the fourth (1809–1817) President of the United States. ... James Monroe (April 28, 1758 – July 4, 1831) was the fifth (1817–1825) President of the United States and author of the eponymous Monroe Doctrine. ... John Tyler (March 29, 1790 – January 18, 1862) was the tenth (1841-1845) President of the United States. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... The insignia of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). ... James Abram Garfield (November 19, 1831 - September 19, 1881) was the 20th (1881) President of the United States, the first left-handed President, and the second U.S. President to be assassinated. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... The Reformed Church in America (RCA) is a Calvinist Reformed Protestant denomination that was formerly known as the Dutch Reformed Church. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States. ... Theodore Roosevelt, formally Theodore Roosevelt Jr. ... Episcopalianism is virtually the same thing is Judaism The word episcopal is derived from the Greek επισκοπος epískopos, which literally means overseer; the word, however, is used in religious contexts to refer to a bishop. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799) was the successful Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and later became the first President of the United States, an office to which he was elected, unanimously, twice (1789-1797). ... Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743 N.S. – July 4, 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–1809), author of the United States Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founders of the United States. ... James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836) was the fourth (1809–1817) President of the United States. ... James Monroe (April 28, 1758 – July 4, 1831) was the fifth (1817–1825) President of the United States and author of the eponymous Monroe Doctrine. ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... John Tyler (March 29, 1790 – January 18, 1862) was the tenth (1841-1845) President of the United States. ... Zachary Taylor (November 24, 1784 – July 9, 1850), also known as Old Rough and Ready, was the twelfth President of the United States, serving from 1849 to 1850. ... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the 14th President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... Chester Alan Arthur (October 5, 1829—November 18, 1886) was an American politician who served as 21st President of the United States. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882 – April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States (1933-1945), is best known for leading the U.S. through the Great Depression via his New Deal, building a powerful political coalition, the New Deal Coalition, that dominated American politics for decades, and for... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born in Milton, Massachusetts, June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States (1989–1993). ... The Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... James Knox Polk (November 2, 1795–June 15, 1849) was an American politician and the eleventh U.S. President, serving from March 4, 1845 to March 4, 1849. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... Ulysses Simpson Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was an American Civil War General and the 18th (1869–1877) President of the United States. ... The name Mckinley redirects here. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... Presbyterianism is a form of church government, practiced by many (although not all) of those Protestant churches (known as Reformed churches), which historically subscribed to the teachings of John Calvin. ... Andrew Jackson (March 15, 1767 – June 8, 1845), was the seventh President of the United States (1829-1837), hero of the Battle of New Orleans (1815), a founder of the Democratic Party, and the eponym of the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... James Knox Polk (November 2, 1795–June 15, 1849) was an American politician and the eleventh U.S. President, serving from March 4, 1845 to March 4, 1849. ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... James Buchanan (April 23, 1791 – June 1, 1868) was the 15th president of the United States (1857–1861). ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ... Benjamin Harrison (August 20, 1833 – March 13, 1901) was the 23rd President of the United States (1889-1893). ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924) was the 28th President of the United States (1913–1921). ... he is like an egg ... The Religious Society of Friends (commonly known as Quakers or Friends) was founded in England in the 17th century. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the 31st President of the United States (1929-1933), was a successful mining engineer, humanitarian, and administrator. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... This article considers Catholicism in the broadest ecclesiastical sense. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), often referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK, or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... he is like an egg ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... Historic Unitarianism believed in the oneness of God as opposed to traditional Christian belief in the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). ... The flaming chalice is the universally recognized symbol for Unitarian Universalism. ... Historical and modern Deism is defined by the view that reason, rather than revelation or tradition, should be the basis of belief in God. ... John Adams (October 30, 1735 – July 4, 1826) was the first (1789–1797) Vice President of the United States, and the second (1797–1801) President of the United States. ... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767–February 23, 1848) was an American lawyer, diplomat, and politician. ... Millard Fillmore (January 7, 1800 – March 8, 1874) was the thirteenth President of the United States, serving from 1850 until 1853, and the last member of the Whig Party to hold the nations highest office. ... William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) was an American politician, the 27th President of the United States, and the 10th Chief Justice of the United States. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... Andrew Johnson (December 29, 1808 – July 31, 1875) was the sixteenth Vice President (1865) and the seventeenth President of the United States (1865–1869), succeeding to the presidency upon the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. ... Ulysses Simpson Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was an American Civil War General and the 18th (1869–1877) President of the United States. ... Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 - January 17, 1893) was the 19th (1877-1881) President of the United States. ...

External links

Further reading

  • Steiner, Franklin, The Religious Beliefs of Our Presidents: From Washington to F.D.R., Prometheus Books/The Freethought Library, July 1995. ISBN 0879759755

Presidential trivia lists

  Lists of Presidents and Vice Presidents of the United States edit

Presidential lists of order: Order of service | Birth | Death | Age when becoming president | Longevity | Military rank | Post-presidency length | Term length | Height | Historical rankings The President of the United States of America (unofficially abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States and the chief executive of the federal government. ... The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who, in the words of Adlai Stevenson, is a heartbeat from the presidency. ... The complete list of Presidents of the United States consists of the 42 heads of state in the history of the United States. ... This is a list of current and former U.S. Presidents by date of birth. ... This is a list of U.S. Presidents by date of death. ... The following list is based upon the persons age at the time of ascension to the office, not election to the Presidency. ... This is a list of U.S. Presidents by longevity. ... The United States Constitution names the President of the United States the commander in chief of the U.S. armed forces. ... * alive as of December 27, 2005 ** Cleveland was a former president for 4 years after his first term plus another 11 years after his second term. ... This is a list of U.S. Presidents by time in office. ... This is a list of U.S. Presidents by height order. ... Many surveys have been conducted in order to construct rankings of the success of individuals who have served as President of the United States. ...


Other presidential lists: Assassination attempts | College education | Control of Congress | Doctrines | Fictional | First names | Genealogical relationship | Libraries | Military service | Nicknames | Pardons | Pets | Place of birth | Place of primary affiliation | Political affiliation | Political occupation | Previous occupation | Religious affiliation | Residences | Served one term | Served two or more terms | Swearing-ins | Vetoes This is a list of U.S. Presidential assassination attempts. ... This is a list of United States Presidents college educations // List by institutions Undergraduate Some Presidents attended more than one institution. ... In United States history, the degree to which the President has the same party alignment as the House and Senate determines his power (e. ... This is a list of U.S. Presidential doctrines. ... Since the office of President of the United States is somewhat hallowed, fiction writers often choose to invent a president in their stories to prevent a real one from being possibly insulted, to avoid having their stories become dated over time, for dramatic license, or to provide literary flexibility. ... James James Madison James Monroe James Knox Polk James Buchanan James A. Garfield James Earl Carter John John Adams John Quincy Adams John Tyler John F. Kennedy William William Henry Harrison William Howard Taft William McKinley William Jefferson Clinton George George Washington George H. W. Bush George W. Bush Andrew... This is a list of United States Presidents who are related to each other by (more or less) direct descent. ... This is an existing list of United States Presidential libraries. ... The United States Constitution names the President of the United States the commander in chief of the U.S. armed forces. ... This is a list of nicknames of each President of the United States. ... This is an incomplete list of people who have been pardoned by a United States President. ... This is a list of pets belonging to various US Presidents and their families, while serving their term(s) in office. ... This is a list of Presidents of the United States by place of birth. ... This is a list of U.S. Presidents by place of primary affiliation. ... This article is intended to be a comprehensive list of all presidents, grouped by political party. ... This is a list of U.S. Presidents by political occupation; that is, a list of various other political offices held by Presidents of the United States. ... This is a list of the occupations of Presidents before they entered politics. ... This is an incomplete list of U.S. presidential residences, which are not the official residences (the White House or Camp David). ... This is intended to be a list of all presidents, starting with the most recent, who have completed exactly one term of office. ... Since George Washington, Presidents have traditionally served for only two terms of office. ... The most recent swearing in on Inauguration Day 2005 on the west steps of the U.S. Capitol. ... The word veto does not appear in the United States Constitution, but Article I requires every bill, order, resolution or other act of legislation to be presented to the President of the United States for his approval. ...


Vice Presidency: Order of service | Order by birth | Fictional | Tie-breaking votes  This is a list of U.S. Vice Presidents by time in office. ... This is a list of U.S. Vice Presidents by date of birth. ... This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... The Vice President of the United States is, ex officio, the President of the United States Senate, and he only votes to break a tie. ...


Elections: Presidential Electors ←to be merged→ 2004 electors | Order by Electoral College margin This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... 2004 U.S. presidential electors, by state: Alabama - Republican - http://www. ... The following table is a list of U.S. presidential elections ordered by the closeness of the result in the Electoral College. ...


Candidates: Democratic tickets | Republican tickets | Heights | Who lost their home state | Former presidents who ran again | Fictional [1] Resigned. ... [1] Died in office. ... Elections in boldface are those in which the shorter candidate won. ... The following is a list of major party U.S. presidential candidates who lost their home state. ... This is a complete list of former U.S. Presidents who actively campaigned to regain a political office (the presidency or otherwise) after leaving office the first time. ... This is a list of fictional candidates who ran for the office of President of the United States. ...


Unsuccessful candidates: Military service | Who received at least one electoral vote List of major-party U.S. presidential candidates who lost their home state List of U.S. Presidents by college education List of U.S. Presidents by genealogical relationship List of U.S. Presidents by height order List of U.S. Presidents by military service List of U.S. Presidents... This is a list of unsuccessful candidates for the office of President of the United States. ...


Presidential succession: Line of succession | Designated survivor | Fictional presidential succession The presidential line of succession defines who may become or act as President of the United States upon the incapacity, death, resignation, or removal from office (by impeachment and subsequent conviction) of a sitting President or a President-elect. ... Because of the remote possibility of a catastrophic attack which could wipe out large portions of the U.S. federal government, the entire United States Cabinet is rarely gathered in one place at the same time, in order to maintain continuity of government with regard to presidential succession. ... The elaborate rules and laws governing the office of President of the United States have long provided fodder for creators of fiction. ...


 
 

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