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Encyclopedia > List of The Future Is Wild species

This is a list of possible species postulated in the 2003 Animal Planet/ORF and ZDF series The Future Is Wild. The series examined twelve ecosystems at three different distant future times. Image File history File links Mergefrom. ... The Future is Wild is about the human race ten thousand years in the future. ... Animal Planet, launched in 1996, is a cable and satellite television network co-owned by Discovery Communications, Inc. ... The Future Is Wild was a 2003 joint Animal Planet/ORF (Austria) and ZDF (Germany) co-production, which used computer-generated imagery to show the possible future of life on Earth. ... In ecology, an ecosystem is a community of organisms (plant, animal and other living organisms - also referred as biocenose) together with their environment (or biotope), functioning as a unit. ...

Contents

Five million years

Babookari

The Babookari is a social monkey that inhabits the Amazonian grasslands. It is descended from the uakari, an adaptable monkey that inhabits rainforests. The babookari is one of the first terrestrial New World monkey, excluding the extinct Cuban Monkey and its Caribbean relatives. It can grow to 3 feet tall. The legs of the babookari lengthened so it can cover long distances and escape predatory carakillers. Its tail became longer to signal the rest of the troop. Otherwise the bright colors on its bald face and rear work well for signaling. The diet of the babookari is quite variable, eating just about anything available. To satisfy their poor diet, the babookari catch fish by weaving basket-like traps. Their predators include other babookaris and carakillers. Approximate worldwide distribution of monkeys. ... Amazon River basin The Amazon Basin is the part of South America drained by the Amazon River and its tributaries. ... The Konza tallgrass prairie in the Flint Hills of northeastern Kansas. ... Type Species Simia melanocephalus Humboldt, 1812 Species Cacajao melanocephalus Cacajao calvus Uakari is the common name for the New World monkeys of the genus Cacajao. ... Binomial name †Paralouatta varonai Rivero & Arredondo, 1991 The Cuban Monkey (†Paralouatta varonai) is an extinct species of small primate that lived on the island of Cuba. ... Binomial name Onychopteryx sudamericanum The carakiller is a giant flightless bird of prey created for the book and film The Future is Wild. ... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... Four styles of household basket. ... Binomial name Onychopteryx sudamericanum The carakiller is a giant flightless bird of prey created for the book and film The Future is Wild. ...

Carakiller

The carakiller is a giant flightless bird of prey. The carakiller inhabits the dry Amazonian grasslands. The ancestor of the carakiller was the caracara. The carakiller is much different. The caracara could still fly, but the carakiller became flightless. After becoming flightless, the carakiller specializes in speed. Packs of carakillers scour the grasslands, flushing out babookaris in their wake. The wings of the carakiller became useful in another way - they became arms. The wing is tipped with a sharp claw, used for tearing up its prey. The carakiller stands about 7 feet tall, sporting a bald head and neck. The only plumage on its head is a fan of display plumage, like those in the tail of a peacock. Carakillers commonly hunt along the edges of brushfires, killing animals struggling to escape from the flames. Amazon River basin The Amazon Basin is the part of South America drained by the Amazon River and its tributaries. ... Genera Daptrius Phalcoboenus Polyborus Milvago Caracaras are birds of prey in the family Falconidae. ... The Babookari is a species of mammal created for the film The Future is Wild. ... Peacock re-directs here; for alternate uses see Peacock (disambiguation). ... Brushfire may refer to: Brushfire Records, a record label Brushfire (comics), a fictional supervillain Brushfire Fairytales, an album by Jack Johnson Category: ...

Cryptile

The cryptile is a small lizard, about 18 inches long that imitates the frilled lizard, to which it is supposed to be closely related. It inhabits the salt flats of the dry bed of the Mediterranean Sea. It runs on two legs, minimizing its contact with the hot salt. Its tail is elongated to balance such an agile gait. It has a large net-like frill around its neck, reinforced with ribs of cartilage. The frill is full of holes and covered in a waxy adhesive. The cryptile eats brine flies, using its net-like frill to catch flies, and licking them off with its tongue. Both sexes have an extra crest atop the head, used for display and communication. The only time a cryptile leaves the salt flats is to lay eggs among the limestone plateaus, where it has problems keeping its eggs from being eaten by grykens and scrofas. For other uses, see Lizard (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Chlamydosaurus kingii John Edward Gray, 1827 The Frill-necked Lizard, or Frilled Lizard also known as the Frilled Dragon, (Chlamydosaurus kingii) is so called because of the large ruff of skin which usually lies folded back against its head and neck. ... The playa and shore of Lake Hart, an endorheic desert lake in South Australia An alkali flat (known in US and Mexico as a playa) is a dry lakebed, generally the shore of, or remnant of, an endorheic lake. ... Mediterranean redirects here. ... Cartilage is a type of dense connective tissue. ... For the band, see Adhesive (band). ... In most birds and reptiles, an egg (Latin ovum) is the zygote, resulting from fertilization of the ovum. ...

Deathgleaner

The deathgleaner is a giant predatory descendant of the vampire bat that inhabits the North American cold desert. Due to the freezing temperatures of the desert night, the deathgleaner is a diurnal hunting bat. The deathgleaner hunts spinks and young desert rattlebacks, plus it eats carrion. The deathgleaner has a wingspan of over 4 feet across, rendering it to solve the same problems of the pterosaurs of the past. Its wings are fragile membranes and they lose heat easily. The deathgleaners solved the problem of heat loss by evolving a mechanism that cools the blood before it reaches its wings. Flocks of deathgleaners follow rattlebacks. When a desert rattleback uncovers tubers for food, it also uncovers spinks. The deathgleaners then attack the spinks. To promote survival, the deathgleaners share their food with roostmates. This snapping turtle is trying to make a meal of a Canada goose, but the goose is too wary. ... Genera Desmodus Diphylla Diaemus Vampire bats are bats that feed on blood (hematophagy). ... North America North America is a continent [1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... This article is about arid terrain. ... A diurnal animal (dī-ŭrnəl) is an animal that is active during the daytime and sleeps during the night. ... This is a list of possible species postulated in the 2003 Animal Planet/ORF and ZDF series The Future Is Wild. ... This is a list of possible species postulated in the 2003 Animal Planet/ORF and ZDF series The Future Is Wild. ... An American Black Vulture feeding on squirrel carrion For other uses, see Carrion (disambiguation). ... Suborders Pterodactyloidea Rhamphorhynchoidea * Pterosaurs (, from the Greek πτερόσαυρος, pterosauros, meaning winged lizard, often referred to as pterodactyls, from the Greek πτεροδάκτυλος, pterodaktulos, meaning winged finger ) were flying reptiles of the clade Pterosauria. ... For fungal genus, see tuber (genus). ...

Gannetwhale

The gannetwhale is a large seal-like seabird that grows 14 feet (4.3 m) long and lives along the Atlantic coast of northern Europe. The gannetwhale evolved from gannets: seabirds that can swim underwater and can also fly. The gannetwhale however is flightless, turning its wings into flippers for swimming. Unfortunately it still needs to return to land to lay eggs, leaving it vulnerable to predators. Females lay a single egg during the short summer, balancing it on its feet, so it stays warm. Gannetwhales hunt fish and squid in the Arctic waters. The gannetwhale has a powerful beak and the ability to vomit a foul-smelling substance to protect itself from predators. Families Odobenidae Otariidae Phocidae Pinnipeds (fin-feet, lit. ... The Sooty Tern is highly aerial and marine and will spend years flying at sea without returning to land. ... The Atlantic Ocean is Earths second-largest ocean, covering approximately one_fifth of its surface. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Species Morus bassanus Morus capensis Morus serrator The gannets are part of the family Sulidae. ... For other uses, see Wing (disambiguation). ... This snapping turtle is trying to make a meal of a Canada goose, but the goose is too wary. ...

Gryken

The gryken is a small predatory mammal, roughly 3 feet long and is descended from pine martens and lives on the rocky plateaus on the Mediterranean Basin. It is related to the larger snowstalker, which lives in the Arctic north. Since its ancestors were tree-dwellers, the change to terrestrial life took place during the colder climate of the ice age at this time. A similar evolution occurred in the past, producing prairie dogs and baboons. In the gryken, its tail became shorter and its feet longer. Overall its build is much like that of a dachshund, with an elongated body and short legs. This body design is perfect for wriggling through the deep cracks in the rocky surface, or grykes. However it can only accomplish short bursts of speed for catching prey, such as cryptiles and baby scrofas. To make up for this, the gryken evolved sharp canine teeth for disemboweling its prey. The gryken has probably evolved to take the place of the lynx or another large predator that was around during the time when humans still walked the earth. In fact, it was probably humans that caused the extinction of the dominant predator in that area. This would have left an ecological niche that would need to be filled quickly so as to keep the population of herbivores in check. The gryken was in the best position to fill this niche because it was the only predator left in the area. Binomial name Martes martes (Linnaeus, 1758) This article is about the European Pine Marten. ... This is a list of possible species postulated in the 2003 Animal Planet/ORF and ZDF series The Future Is Wild. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ... Species Cynomys gunnisoni Cynomys leucurus Cynomys ludovicianus Cynomys mexicanus Cynomys parvidens The prairie dog (Cynomys) is a small, burrowing rodent native to the grasslands of North America. ... For other uses, see Baboon (disambiguation). ... The dachshund is a short-legged, elongated dog breed of the hound family. ... This is a list of possible species postulated in the 2003 Animal Planet/ORF and ZDF series The Future Is Wild. ... This is a list of possible species postulated in the 2003 Animal Planet/ORF and ZDF series The Future Is Wild. ... For other uses, see Lynx (disambiguation). ...

Rattleback

The rattleback inhabits the tropical Amazonian grasslands of South America. Its body is covered in tough armored scales, made from compressed hair (such hair forms the scales of pangolins and the horns of rhinoceroses). This armor is hollow, so when shaken these plates rattle, hence the name "rattleback". Amazon River basin The Amazon Basin is the part of South America drained by the Amazon River and its tributaries. ... Manis redirects here. ... Species Ceratotherium simum Dicerorhinus sumatrensis Diceros bicornis Rhinoceros unicornis A rhinoceros is any of five surviving species of odd-toed ungulate in the family Rhinocerotidae. ...


The rattleback has massive armored plates to defend itself against predators, like the carakiller. Even its face is armored and its sides are laced with spines. These plates are also used for territorial display, fending off invaders. The rattleback is carnivorous, feeding on carakiller eggs. When there is a bushfire, the rattleback's fire-proof scales help it avoid being burned. The grassland rattleback uses the spines on its sides to lodge itself tightly to the ground so it can not be easily dislodged by a carakiller and because of this it does not curl up into a ball like modern day pangolins. Binomial name Onychopteryx sudamericanum The carakiller is a giant flightless bird of prey created for the book and film The Future is Wild. ... Backburning in Townsville, Australia. ... Fire-resistance rated wall assembly with fire door, cable tray penetration and intumescent [1] cable coating. ... Binomial name Onychopteryx sudamericanum The carakiller is a giant flightless bird of prey created for the book and film The Future is Wild. ... Manis redirects here. ...


There is a sub-species of the South American rattleback. In the harsh desert the insulation properties of the scales and the behaviour of clamping down to the ground have helped it thrive in the hostile desert. Bristles around face keep sand out of the face.


The rattleback evolved from a terrestrial South American rodent, possibly the paca but probably the agouti. Once the rainforests opened into grasslands, the pacas/agoutis had no place to hide and no defense against predators. The pacas/agoutis have to migrate north to find food. The rattleback specializes in such tactics. Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1766) For the village in Slovakia see Pača The Paca (Agouti paca), also known as the Spotted Paca, is a large rodent found in tropical and sub-tropical America, from East-Central Mexico to Paraguay. ... Agouti refers to a number of species of rodents, as well as a number of genes affecting coat coloration in several different animals. ...

Scrofa

The scrofa is descended from wild boars (but are very small by pig standards, only 8-12 inches high) and lives on the remains of Mediterranean islands. They have very narrow legs so they can move quickly and safely climb rocks. They do not appear to be very intelligent and are hunted by the Gryken. Binomial name Sus scrofa Linnaeus, 1758 The Wild Boar (Sus scrofa) is the wild ancestor of the domesticated pig. ...

Shagrat

The shagrat is a giant rodent that inhabits the northern European tundra. The shagrat is descended from marmot, which today inhabit harsh tundra-like regions in mountains. The shagrat stands 3 feet tall and is built similarly to mammoths and musk-oxen. It has short legs, short tail, and other small extremities. Its body is covered with two types of hair: woolly underfur and hollow air-filled guard hairs. Those and a layer of fat beneath the skin protect it from the cold. Shagrats wander in herds, feeding on shrubs and grass. It fears the deadly snowstalker, which brings down weak shagrats with its dagger-like saber-teeth. Its only defense is staying in a pack. Suborders Sciuromorpha Castorimorpha Myomorpha Anomaluromorpha Hystricomorpha Rodentia is an order of mammals also known as rodents, characterised by two continuously-growing incisors in the upper and lower jaws which must be kept short by gnawing. ... For other uses, see Tundra (disambiguation). ... Species See text. ... For other uses, see Mountain (disambiguation). ... This article is about the genus Mammuthus. ... Binomial name Ovibos moschatus (Zimmermann, 1780) The Musk Ox (Ovibos moschatus) is an arctic mammal of the Bovidae family, noted for its thick coat and for the strong odor of pralines and cream. ... For other uses, see Grass (disambiguation). ...

Snowstalker

The snowstalker is a saber-toothed mustelid. It is descended from the wolverine and inhabits the tundra of Northern Europe. The creators recognized the adaptability of wolverines and the past records of saber-toothed cats during the last ice age. The saber-teeth evolved to kill large shagrats, since the snowstalker should not waste too much energy bringing down large prey. All the snowstalker does is bite and wait for its victim to die. Also, it will sometimes approach nesting gannetwhales to get at their eggs and chicks. The snowstalker grows 2 feet high at the shoulder, 4 feet in length and weigh at 75 pounds, making it larger than its descendent, and is covered in a thick white pelt for camouflage against the snow. The female snowstalker has a quick estrus cycle, lasting about three weeks. The reason for this is snowstalker are solitary and have massive territories due to lack of prey. Subfamilies Lutrinae Melinae Mellivorinae Taxidiinae Mustelinae Mustelidae is a family of carnivorous mammals. ... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Tundra (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The fossilized skeleton of a saber-toothed cat (Smilodon californicus). ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ... This article is about protective camouflage used to disguise people, animals, or military targets. ... The oestrus cycle (also Å“strus or estrous cycle) refers to the recurring physiologic changes that are induced by reproductive hormones in most mammalian placental females (humans and great apes are the only mammals who undergo a menstrual cycle instead). ...

Spink

The spink is a burrowing bird. The spink inhabits the dry cold North American deserts and grows to 10-12 inches long. The ancestor of the spink is the quail: a type of game bird that spends most of its time on the ground. The spink looks like a mole, with a rounded body and a small beak. Its tail feathers and bird-like feet betray its ancestry. Its wings reduced to spade-like forelimbs, sheathed in keratin. The spink is a colonial bird, dwelling in colonies like those of mole rats and ants. Queen spinks sit on eggs, most of which would hatch into new workers. Spinks eat tubers and create intricate tunnel systems just to find them. However, spinks are helpless on the desert surface, where they become prey for deathgleaners. Genera Dendrortyx Oreortyx Callipepla Philortyx Colinus Odontophorus Dactylortyx Cyrtonyx Rhynchortyx The New World quails are small birds only distantly related to the quails of the Old World, but named for their similar appearance and habits. ... For other uses, see Mole. ... Not to be confused with kerogen or carotene. ... Genera Georychus Cryptomys Heliophobius Bathyergus Heterocephalus The blesmols, also known as mole rats, or African mole-rats, are burrowing rodents of the family Bathyergidae. ... For other uses, see Ant (disambiguation). ...

100 million years

Falconfly

The falconfly is a giant wasp. that inhabits the rainforests of Antarctica. It is very large, with a 70-80 cm wingspan, about that of a modern kestrel. Its massive size is the result of enrichment of oxygen in the atmosphere, which had also allowed for the evolution of giant insects during the Carboniferous period. The falconfly hunts flutterbirds, using skewer-like front legs to skewer its prey and cleaver-like jaws for butchering it. It creates nests underground, feeding its giant larvae juicy bits of flutterbird. However, the falconfly avoids the spitfire bird, which is known to spray acid at it. For other uses, see Wasp (disambiguation). ... The Daintree Rainforest in Queensland, Australia. ... The name kestrel is given to several different members of the falcon genus, Falco. ... General Name, symbol, number oxygen, O, 8 Chemical series nonmetals, chalcogens Group, period, block 16, 2, p Appearance colorless (gas) pale blue (liquid) Standard atomic weight 15. ... President Bush- Deres gold in dem dere mines The Carboniferous is a major division of the geologic timescale that extends from the end of the Devonian period, about 359. ... Reconstruction of a post-Marian pilum A Roman coin showing Antoninianus of Carinus holding pilum and globe. ... For other uses, see Acid (disambiguation). ...


Great blue windrunner

The great blue windrunner is a large bird with a wingspan of 3 meters (about 10 feet). This bird inhabits the mountainous Great Plateau during the warmer months. Its ancestors were cranes. The Great Plateau is much higher than the former Tibetan Plateau, so the windrunner had to adapt to cope with the thin air. These birds are able to reach high altitudes but the thin air cannot support wings as well as denser air near the ground, and the windrunner must also be able to spend its winters in the lowlands. To solve the problem, the windrunner evolved flight feathers on its legs, so it can use them as an extra pair of wings for gliding by spreading them out to the sides in midflight, like the prehistoric Microraptor. Its head also has feathery tufts which act as gliding wings to support its head in flight. At such high altitude, more ultraviolet light from the sun leaks through the atmosphere. The windrunner is covered in fluorescent blue feathers that reflect this ultraviolet light. Windrunners can also see in ultraviolet and so use the light to recognize one another. Their eyes are protected from this otherwise dangerous light by lenses which act as "built-in sunglasses". The great blue windrunners primarily eat silver spiders snatched from their webs. For other uses, see Mountain (disambiguation). ... For other meanings, see Plateau (disambiguation). ... Genera Grus Anthropoides Balearica Bugeranus Cranes are large, long-legged and long-necked birds of the order Gruiformes, and family Gruidae. ... Tibet Autonomous Region, Qinghai Province and Sichuan Province of China lie on the Tibetan Plateau. ... For other uses, see Wing (disambiguation). ... Species (type) Xu et al, 2003 Microraptor (small thief) is a genus of small, dromaeosaurid dinosaur known from well-preserved fossil remains recovered from Liaoning, China, and dating from the early Cretaceous Period (Barremian stage), 130-125. ... Note: Ultraviolet is also the name of a 1998 UK television miniseries about vampires. ... Two feathers Feathers are one of the epidermal growths that form the distinctive outer covering, or plumage, on birds. ... The Silver Spider is a fictional species of spider created for the film The Future is Wild. ...

Lurkfish

The lurkfish grows 13 feet long and lives in the Bengal Swamps. The lurkfish is descended from electric eels or electric catfish. It has evolved a sophisticated way of killing venomous swampuses: electricity. The lurkfish has a massive head, branch-like barbs and an elongated body. All those can advance its surface area to store muscle blocks that produce electricity. To hunt, it creates a weak electric field and detects whatever movement goes through the field. Once its victim comes within range, it releases a thousand volts to stun its prey. Then the lurkfish can eat in leisure. This behavior is similar to many electric fish in murky, brackish water - such as the electric eel. It occupies a similar niche to crocodiles. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Binomial name Electrophorus electricus The electric eel (Electrophorus electricus) is a most unusual species of fish. ... Genera Malapterurus Paradoxoglanis Electric catfish is the common name for the catfish (order Siluriformes) family Malapteruridae. ... The Swampus Swampuses are fictional octopi that were created for the TV series The Future is Wild. ... Electricity (from New Latin Ä“lectricus, amberlike) is a general term for a variety of phenomena resulting from the presence and flow of electric charge. ... Josephson junction array chip developed by NIST as a standard volt. ... This article is about the animal. ... For other uses, see Crocodile (disambiguation). ...

Ocean Phantom

The ocean phantom is a huge sea creature that visits the algal reef, approximately 30 feet (9 meter) long and 13 (3.9 meter) feet wide. Descended from the present day portuguese man-of-wars, they form a floating mass with highly advanced systems of coordination and functions. Each phantom is actually a colony of thousands of individual creatures, such as spindle troopers, combined into one giant organism. Binomial name Physalia physalis (Linnaeus, 1758) The Portuguese man o war (genus Physalia), also known as the blue bottle, is commonly thought of as a jellyfish but is actually a siphonophore—a colony of four sorts of polyps. ...

Poggle

The poggle inhabits the Great Plateau (the point where Australia collides with Asia and North America). The poggle is a small large-eyed rodent which evolved from hamsters. After 100 million years, the poggle is the last mammal to survive. Once the climate warmed up, insects, birds, and reptiles rose to dominance, quickly displacing the mammals. Poggles are very prolific mammals and they feast on grass tree seeds. They live in small caves along with silver spider colonies. The spiders provide the seeds for the poggles. Once the poggles become fat and slow, the spiders slaughter one and eat it. Just as the poggles rely on the spiders for seeds, so too do the spiders for poggle flesh. For other meanings, see Plateau (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... North America North America is a continent [1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Suborders Sciuromorpha Castorimorpha Myomorpha Anomaluromorpha Hystricomorpha Rodentia is an order of mammals also known as rodents, characterised by two continuously-growing incisors in the upper and lower jaws which must be kept short by gnawing. ... Species see text Xanthorrhoea is a genus of flowering plants native to Australia and a member of family Xanthorrhoeaceae. ... A ripe red jalapeño cut open to show the seeds For other uses, see Seed (disambiguation). ...

Reef glider

The reef gliders descended from sea slugs. The adults are 13 feet (3.9 meter) long and shaped like a giant teardrop. Swimming using a series of wings along their flanks, they patrol the shallow seas hunting for ocean phantoms. They have keen eyesight and can also sense chemical changes in the water. Because of its body size and behavior, the reef glider has probably evolved to take the place of the whales and seals from modern times. This is not unlike the gannetwhale, which evolved to fill this niche 95,000,000 years earlier. The baby reef gliders eat red algae, and are hunted by the ocean phantom. The adults, however, are much larger than the babies, and hunt ocean phantoms. Suborders Cephalaspidea Sacoglossa Anaspidea Notaspidea Thecosomata Gymnosomata Nudibranchia   Infraorder Anthobranchia   Infraorder Cladobranchia For information on the anti-aircraft weapons system, see Sea Slug missile In zoology, the Opisthobranchia (Milne Edwards, 1848) (also known as opisthobranchs) used to be a subclass of gastropods, within the phylum Mollusca, but they are now...

Roachcutter

The roachcutter is a small purple bird with a thick beak and is descended from the tube-nosed birds that inhabit Antarctica in the 21st century and have adapted to live in the Antarctic forest of 100 million years in the future (as Antarctica would then occupy a tropical position). Due to its elegant wing design, the roachcutter is the fastest and one of the most manoeuverable birds living in the Antarctic forests. Like Gallimimus and the other ostrich dinosaurs of the Mesozoic, the roachcutter has virtually no method of defense other than its speed, so it is still sometimes caught and preyed upon by the giant predatory wasp, the falconfly. Species (type) Gallimimus (gal-ih-MY-mus) meaning rooster mimic, because its fossils resembled that of a very large rooster (Latin gallus = rooster + mimus = mimic), was an ornithomimosaur from the Late Cretaceous of Mongolia. ... The Mesozoic Era is one of three geologic eras of the Phanerozoic eon. ...


Silver spider

The silver spider is a colonial spider that inhabits the Great Plateau. The silver spider is silvery to reflect ultraviolet light. Otherwise its greenish stripes along its silvery body is used to foil its main predator: the great blue windrunner. Since the windrunner sees in ultraviolet light, the silver spider creates an ultraviolet pattern that makes it imitate a grass tree seed. For other uses, see Spider (disambiguation). ... For other meanings, see Plateau (disambiguation). ... This article is about the chemical element. ... Note: Ultraviolet is also the name of a 1998 UK television miniseries about vampires. ... A ripe red jalapeño cut open to show the seeds For other uses, see Seed (disambiguation). ...


Silver spiders are divided into castes depending on size. The smallest and youngest spiders start a web by ballooning over a ravine, trailing a line of silk behind it. Larger web-building spiders start the framework of the web and fill in the gaps. These webs are for trapping grass-tree seeds, which are blown by the wind into the webs. Harvester spiders collect the seeds and pile them in their nest. These seeds are fed to poggles, which are the main food for the spiders and the last species of mammal. This is not a surprising relationship for today leafcutter ants do a similar thing: collect leaves to feed to a fungus. The largest member of the spider colony is the queen, which grows to the size of a football and is the only spider to breed in the colony. When the fat poggles living in the silver spider colony are killed, one by one, often according to the poggle's age, they are fed to the queen first to trigger a reproductive hormone to produce eggs and eventually, more spiders. Ballooning is a term to describe the way many spider species disperse through the air. ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria Mammals (class Mammalia) are warm-blooded, vertebrate animals characterized by the presence of sweat glands, including milk producing sweat glands, and by the presence of: hair, three middle ear bones used in hearing, and a neocortex... Genera Acromyrmex Atta Leafcutter ants are social insects found in warmer regions of Central and South America. ... For the fictional character, see Fungus the Bogeyman. ... For other uses, see Hormone (disambiguation). ...

Spindle trooper

The spindle trooper exists in a symbiotic relationship with another fictional creature, the ocean phantom, a future descendant of Siphonophora (creatures related to the Portuguese Man O' War). When the ocean phantom is attacked by a reef glider, the ocean phantom releases the spindle troopers to protect itself. Upon being released, the spindle troopers climb down the tentacles of the ocean phantom and spear the predatory reef gliders with its poisonous fangs. In return for protection, the ocean phantom feeds the spindle troopers. Families See text. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) The Portuguese Man O War (Physalia physalis), also known as the bluebubble, bluebottle or the man-of-war, is commonly thought of as a jellyfish but is actually a siphonophore—a colony of specialized polyps and medusoids. ...


Spitfire beetle

The spitfire beetle inhabits the rainforests of Antarctica. The ancestors of the spitfire beetle are the blister beetle. They appear to be rather large, at least half the size of the spitfire birds that they hunt. Their evolution coincides with the spitfire tree and the spitfire bird. The spitfire bird defends itself from predatory insects like the falconfly by spraying hot chemicals, which are collected from the flowers of the spitfire tree. The spitfire beetle found a way around this. Their wings and wingcases are patterned like the flower of the spitfire tree. But one beetle can not work by itself. So four beetles cooperate to catch a spitfire bird. When four beetles arrange their wings and wingcases at the right angle, they imitate the spitfire flower. The spitfire bird visits flowers when it needs the chemicals used for defense. So when approached by the spitfire bird, the spitfire beetles all fall upon their victim and eat it. When the spitfire tree stops flowering, the spitfire beetles lay their eggs and die. As the larvae develop over the winter, they emerge during the spring to feed on more spitfire birds. The Daintree Rainforest in Queensland, Australia. ... Genera See text. ... This snapping turtle is trying to make a meal of a Canada goose, but the goose is too wary. ... A larval insect A larva (Latin; plural larvae) is a juvenile form of animal with indirect development, undergoing metamorphosis (for example, insects or amphibians). ...


Spitfire bird

In the tropical forests, the spitfire bird has adapted the ability to use chemical weapons to fend off predators like the falconfly. They get their chemical weapons from a tree called the spitfire tree. The chemical they use is very corrosive and harmful to the bird's attackers. It is descended from a modern albotross and still keeps their nose tubes. Early detection of chemical agents Sociopolitical climate of chemical warfare While the study of chemicals and their military uses was widespread in China, the use of toxic materials has historically been viewed with mixed emotions and some disdain in the West (especially when the enemy were doing it). ...


A species similar in appearance, the false spitfire bird, has also evolved but that species is harmless


Swampus

Descendants of octopi, swampi live in the brackish Bengal swamps, formed when Africa merged with and blocked the Bay of Bengal. They have a deadly venomous bite that can even kill a baby toraton. Unfortunately for the swampus, adult toratons have no predators and are not affected by their venom. One of the only things that can kill a swampus is a lurkfish, because of the electric field surrounding the lurkfish's body. Infant swampi are nurtured in a leafy plant filled with fresh water, into which the mother urinates to maintain the proper salinity. Four of the swampus' arms have "devolved" back into four individual snail-style foot-muscles, and its mantle cavity can also be used as a lung for four days. Families 14 in two suborders, see text The octopus is a cephalopod of the order Octopoda that inhabits many diverse regions of the ocean, especially coral reefs. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up Bay of Bengal in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In physics, the space surrounding an electric charge or in the presence of a time-varying magnetic field has a property called an electric field. ... The mantle is an organ found in mollusks. ... Human respiratory system The lungs flank the heart and great vessels in the chest cavity. ...

Toraton

The toraton lurks in the Bengal Swamp, which replaced the Bay of Bengal after Africa collides with Southeast Asia. The toraton is 23 feet (7 m) tall and weighs 120 tons. Its closest ancestor is the giant tortoise. The toraton is the largest creature (let alone the largest turtle) to walk the earth, if measured in terms of bulk and weight (growing even larger than the dinosaurs), though the sauropod Argentinosaurus and other giant sauropods like it rival the giant turtle in weight. Although young toratons are small enough to be killed by swampus venom, the adults are too big to be harmed. In fact, a full grown toraton has practically no predators. The toraton eats constantly, consuming 1,300 pounds of vegetation a day. It requires less food than a mammal of the same size because of its ectothermic ancestry Look up Bay of Bengal in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Giant tortoises are characteristic reptiles of certain tropical islands. ... Orders & Suborders Saurischia Sauropodomorpha Theropoda Ornithischia Thyreophora Ornithopoda Marginocephalia Dinosaurs were vertebrate animals that dominated the terrestrial ecosystem for over 160 million years, first appearing approximately 230 million years ago. ... Families Brachiosauridae Camarasauridae Cetiosauridae Diplodocidae Euhelopodidae Nemegtosauridae Titanosauridae Vulcanodontidae Sauropoda, the sauropods, are a suborder or infraorder of the saurischian (lizard-hipped) dinosaurs. ... Binomial name Bonaparte & Coria, 1993 Argentinosaurus (meaning Argentina lizard) was a herbivorous sauropod dinosaur that was quite possibly the largest, heaviest land animal that ever lived. ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria Mammals (class Mammalia) are warm-blooded, vertebrate animals characterized by the presence of sweat glands, including milk producing sweat glands, and by the presence of: hair, three middle ear bones used in hearing, and a neocortex... Cold-blooded organisms, more technically known as poikilothermic, are animals that have no internal metabolic mechanism for regulating their body temperatures. ...


The toraton cannot withdraw into its shell like the tortoise could, but its shell is used to protect and partially support its weak muscles. The toraton has evolved a digestive system that has a muscular stomach (to grind its food) and a gut filled with bacteria (to digest the rest of the vegetation). Its legs have moved from its sides, to completely underneath to support the tons of massive muscle on this enormous creature. In anatomy, the stomach is a bean-shaped hollow muscular organ of the gastrointestinal tract involved in the second phase of digestion, following mastication. ... Phyla Actinobacteria Aquificae Chlamydiae Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi Chloroflexi Chrysiogenetes Cyanobacteria Deferribacteres Deinococcus-Thermus Dictyoglomi Fibrobacteres/Acidobacteria Firmicutes Fusobacteria Gemmatimonadetes Lentisphaerae Nitrospirae Planctomycetes Proteobacteria Spirochaetes Thermodesulfobacteria Thermomicrobia Thermotogae Verrucomicrobia Bacteria (singular: bacterium) are unicellular microorganisms. ...

In the children's tv series, the toraton knows when it is about to die. Most toraton carcasses are found in large groups (similar to elephants) that are like toraton graveyards. It is also said that the toraton have special bacteria that produces a tremendous amount of heat when the toraton's body decays. When toraton infants hatch their mother must help break them free with her beak. Toraton infants must consume special chemicals found only in their mother's waste to grow big and large.


200 million years

Bumblebeetle

The bumblebeetle is a sparrow-sized descendant of beetles that inhabits the Rainshadow Desert (southeastern Pangaea II). The wingcases of the bumblebeetle reduce into streamlined airfoils. Its body is covered in sensory hairs, specifically for detecting smell. The bumblebeetle has no mouth and practically no digestive system: the bumblebeetle spends only a day in its adult form. It has fat reserves for food, from the larval stage of its life, Grimworms, that feed on Ocean Flish carcasses and each other. The bumblebeetle spends its entire life pregant, mating in it's larval form, and spends it's entire life searching for flish carcasses, to realese it's young. After this, she soon dies, also becoming food for her larva. For other uses, see Sparrow (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Beetle (disambiguation). ... A Rainshadow is an area which is unusally dry due to nearby geographic features. ... This article is about arid terrain. ... For other uses, see Pangaea (disambiguation). ...


Grimworm

Most of its life, the bumblebeetle is a larva, which is called a grimworm. When a bumblebeetle emerges as an adult, it already carries its cargo of grimworms. Then it flies away to a flish carcass. With no other landmasses to break up storms, powerful hurricanes called "hypercanes" blow dead flish over the mountains into the desert. When the bumblebeetle finds a flish, its abdomen splits to release the grimworms and dies. The grimworms burrow into the flish and eat the rotting flesh. Male grimworms leave for other flish carcasses and mate with female grimworms. When the flish carcass is stripped of flesh, the grimworm females pupate and emerge as adult bumblebeetles. Thus all bumblebeetles are female.


The bumblebeetle serves another role to the Rainshadow Desert ecology. The deathbottle plant can fertilize itself, but it can not spread its seeds. So it evolves silvery leaves that imitate a flish corpse. Bumblebeetles land on this leaf and fall into a seed chamber. Covered in adhesive seeds, the bumblebeetle deposits them far from the parent plant.

Deathbottle

The deathbottle grows in the Rainshadow Desert of the continent of Pangea II. It grows natural pitfall traps lined with poisonous spikes. Desert hoppers sometimes land on these traps and fall into them, where they are impaled and consumed. Since its main diet consists of animals, it is a carnivorous plant. Pangea may refer to: a common alternative spelling of the name Pangaea given to the supercontinent that is believed to have existed during the Paleozoic and Mesozoic eras Pangea, a geology equipment supplier/developer of mineralogical testing equipment Pangea (cable system), a submarine telecommunications cable system connecting the Netherlands and... Screenshot Pitfall! (Atari 2600) Pitfall! was a popular video game released by Activision for the Atari 2600 in 1982. ... The Desert Hopper is a mollusk created for the film The Future is Wild. ... Nepenthes mirabilis in flower, growing on a road cut in Palau Carnivorous plants (sometimes called insectivorous plants) are plants that derive some or most of their nutrients (but not energy) from trapping and consuming animals or protozoans, most focusing on insects and other arthropods. ...


Deathbottles reproduce with seeds. Since they are incapable of spreading them on their own, they rely on bumblebeetles to spread them. Bumblebeetles are drawn into a seed chamber that imitates the appearance and odor of a dead flish on the outside. After many adhesive seeds attach to the bumblebeetle, it is catapulted out of the seed chamber and continues on its way.


Desert Hopper

The desert hopper is an advanced cone snail about 1 foot tall and inhabits the Rainshadow Desert of Amasia. Today, snails are restricted in size on land and they slide along on a sheet of mucus. In a desert, water for creating a lubricant is too valuable for use since water could be lost easily. The desert hopper takes this specialization a step further. Instead of eyes on stalks, the eyes of the desert hopper rest on movable turrets like those of chameleons. To conserve water, the desert hopper's skin is like that of modern reptiles. Instead of sliding on mucus, the foot of the desert hopper modified like a spring for hopping over the desert. To eat tough desert plants, its toothed tongue functions like a drill to bore into plant material. This weakness for plant food makes it common prey for deathbottles. To protect itself from intense heat and predators, the desert hopper retreats into a spike-covered eight-inch shell. Genera Asprella Chelyconus Conus Floraconus Leptoconus The cone snails or cone shells, sometimes simply known as cones, (family Conidae), are a taxonomic family of medium-sized to large, sophisticated predatory sea snails, marine gastropod mollusks. ... This article is about arid terrain. ... There is a concern the topic of this article may be unencyclopedic. ... Mucus cells. ... For other uses, see Eye (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Chameleon (disambiguation). ... Reptilia redirects here. ... For other uses, see Drill (disambiguation). ...


Ocean Flish

The ocean flish is descended from flying fish or cod, which was one of the last fish - or vertebrates for that matter - on Earth 200 million years from now. Unlike the flying fish, the flish can accomplish something beyond any modern fish: flight. Today, flying fish use their broad fins for gliding. The flish takes this one step further. It attaches powerful pectoral fin muscles to its gill arches. It breathes air outside of water. The flish retains two pelvic fins for resting atop the oceanic surface. To provide more force for flight, the caudal fins rotated 90 degrees, so they are flat like the flukes of a whale. Because birds are extinct when flish evolved, the flish filled every niche of seabirds along the global ocean that surrounds Pangaea II. They hunt silverswimmers and are in turn hunted by rainbow squid. Flish hunt by expanding toothed jaws from its beak-like sheath. Genera Cheilopogon Cypselurus Danichthys Exocoetus Fodiator Hirundichthys Oxyporhamphus Parexocoetus Prognichthys The Execoetidae or flyingfishes are a marine fish family comprising about 70 species grouped in 7 to 9 genera. ... COD may refer to many different topics, including: Cash on delivery Completion of discharge, shipping College of DuPage, a public Junior College with campuses in the suburbs of Chicago Call of Duty (series), a series of computer games Canadian Oxford Dictionary Carrier onboard delivery Catastrophic optical damage, a failure mode... Genera Cheilopogon Cypselurus Danichthys Exocoetus Fodiator Hirundichthys Oxyporhamphus Parexocoetus Prognichthys The Execoetidae or flyingfishes are a marine fish family comprising about 70 species grouped in 7 to 9 genera. ... This article is about the animal. ... The Silverswimmer Silverswimmers are fictional creatures created for the television series The Future is Wild. ... The Rainbow Squid The rainbow squid, a fictional animal from the television series The Future Is Wild, will be a giant carnivorous squid, with a body of 60 feet long and with tentacles another 60 feet, they are about 120 feet long. ...


Along the northwestern coast of Pangaea II, flish evolved to fit the role of forest birds. Unlike the oceanic flish, the forest flish has hook-like claws on its pelvic fins for hanging upside-down. They are also much smaller, taking on the role of old world hummingbirds and general forest birds.

Gardenworm

The gardenworm is an 18 inch (0.45 meter) long wormlike creature with a symbiotic algae in its multi-branched limbs. During the day it goes above ground and spreads these leaf-like limbs to the sun, where the algae feed the gardenworm through photosynthesis. While feeding thus, it resembles a plant. The gardenworm is vulnerable to terabytes while on land, as they "farm" its algae inside their nests. Common Clownfish (Amphiprion ocellaris) in their Magnificent Sea Anemone (Heteractis magnifica) home. ... Algae have conventionally been regarded as simple plants within the study of botany. ... The leaf is the primary site of photosynthesis in plants. ...


When not above ground, the worm lives in the large reservoirs of groundwater below the desert, where it is vulnerable to attacks from slickribbons. If pursued by a slickribbon, it can release a cloud of liquid that serves as a distraction, allowing the gardenworm to escape.


Gloomworm

These are very simple worms that swim around in dark caves. They live on bacteria and get eaten by just about anything else in the cave. All the species of worm here except the garden worm, which evolved from convoluta worms are descended from a common ancestor, a bristleworm that survived the mass extinction by living in caves.


Megasquid

After mammals became extinct, squids filled in the nitches, creating a new group. They are Terasquids. The Squibbon and the Megasquid are examples. The megasquid is a 12-foot (3.65 m) tall, 8 ton terrestrial air-breathing descendant of squid. With tentacles that extend to 10 feet (3 m) and rhino-like skin, the megasquid is a formidable creature. It roams the northern forests of the planet. Eight of its arms have evolved to become legs that look like thick columns, each a 1/3 of a meter thick. The remaining two arms have evolved to become manipulatory appendages. Its locomotion is different from other animals: it first moves its right front and back legs and the left middle legs, then its left front and back legs and its right middle legs. Although it would appear that an invertebrate of this size would not be able to live on land (it would be crushed by gravity and lack of bones), it has specialized muscles that form rings and columns in the legs to form a mock skeleton-like supporting structure. For other uses, see Squid (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rhinoceros (disambiguation). ... Invertebrate is an English word that describes any animal without a spinal column. ...

Rainbow squid

Not a Terasquid, the rainbow squid is one of the ocean's largest species, and is a giant carnivorous descendant of squid, with a total length of 120 feet (36 meters) long. When hunting it can change colour and camouflage well. It is nearly at the top of the food chain but is still disturbed and hunted by the pack-hunting sharkopaths. Rainbow squid hunt ocean fish. To catch an ocean fish, the squid mimics a group of silverswimmers, the fish's prey. When a fish comes close, the rainbow squid will lash out and grab the ocean fish. Rainbow squids are, however, a banquet themselves for the sharkopaths who hunt them. When attracting a female the male displays flashing bioluminescence from which the species derives its name; as an unfortunate side-effect, this makes it easily visible to predators. Overall, the appearance of this future squid is quite different from any present-day squid. For other uses, see Squid (disambiguation). ... This article is about protective camouflage used to disguise people, animals, or military targets. ... Bioluminescence is the production and emission of light by a living organism as the result of a chemical reaction during which chemical energy is converted to light energy. ...

Sharkopath

The sharkopath are an advanced pack-hunting descendant of the spined pygmy shark that can grow up to 13 feet (3.9 meters) in length and hunt in packs of dozens of individuals. They can hunt at speeds of over 25 mph and have powerful jaws with the force of 40,000 pounds per square inch. They have specialized ridges around their heads packed with sense organs. Within the array each individual passes information on the location of prey to the others around it via bioluminescent patches that run along their flanks. These features help make it possible for a pack of sharkopaths to hunt down and kill prey ranging from silverswimmers to the massive rainbow squid, which are many times their size. Binomial name Squaliolus laticaudus Smith & Radcliffe, 1912 The spined pygmy shark, Squaliolus laticaudus, is a sleeper shark of the family Dalatiidae with a circumglobal distribution between latitudes 48° N and 40° S, at depths between 200 and 1,200 m. ... Bioluminescence is the production and emission of visible light by a living organism as the result of a chemical reaction during which chemical energy is converted to light energy. ... The Silverswimmer Silverswimmers are fictional creatures created for the television series The Future is Wild. ... The Rainbow Squid The rainbow squid, a fictional animal from the television series The Future Is Wild, will be a giant carnivorous squid, with a body of 60 feet long and with tentacles another 60 feet, they are about 120 feet long. ...

Silverswimmer

In the future, virtually all the species of fish have been wiped out, leaving all the niches they filled vacant and Silverswimmers, neotenous forms of crab, have filled that vacancy. Their ancestors were microscopic crab larvae, but now they are as diverse in size and shape as fish once were, and they fill the void in the sea left by the absence of fish. There are hundreds of different species of Silverswimmer and they fill every available niche. Some are predators, some prey, some are parasites and others are scavengers. Only one filter-feeding species is focussed on. Neoteny describes a process by which paedomorphism is achieved, and is a subject studied in the field of developmental biology. ... For other uses, see Crab (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Crab (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ...


Slickribbon

The slickribbon is a transparent wormlike creature up to 3 feet in length. It has powerful pincer jaws and a nasty sting, and is equipped with numerous bristles on its side to help with swimming and sensing water pressure changes. The Slickribbon mainly feeds on gardenworms and gloomworms. It is the only predator in the underwater caves where it lives. According to the television program, its family is Megafaucidae. For other uses, see Worm (disambiguation). ...


Squibbon

After mammals became extinct, squids filled in the nitches, creating a new group. They are Terasquids. The Squibbon and the Megasquid are examples. Squibbons are air-breathing descendat of squid who can swing through trees. They swing better than modern day gibbons due to their lack of an internal skeleton. Because of their need to coordinate their many-muscled limbs and the complex visual perception needed to swing from branch to branch, their brains are highly developed. As a result, they are highly intelligent and can even outsmart a megasquid, which sometimes tries to eat them. They are highly agile, snatching Forest Flish from the air to eat. It is implied that they have the capacity to evolve into sapient beings, thus allowing civilization to once again develop on Earth. For other uses, see Squid (disambiguation). ... Genera Hylobates Hoolock Nomascus Symphalangus Gibbons are the small apes that are grouped in the family Hylobatidae. ... Not to be confused with sentience. ...

Terabyte

Terabytes are termite-like desert insects. They are the descendants of modern termites. Families Mastotermitidae Kalotermitidae Termopsidae Hodotermitidae Rhinotermitidae Serritermitidae Termitidae Termites, sometimes known as white ants, are a group of social insects usually classified at the taxonomic rank of order Isoptera. ... This article is about arid terrain. ... Orders Subclass Apterygota Archaeognatha (bristletails) Thysanura (silverfish) Subclass Pterygota Infraclass Paleoptera (Probably paraphyletic) Ephemeroptera (mayflies) Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) Infraclass Neoptera Superorder Exopterygota Grylloblattodea (ice-crawlers) Mantophasmatodea (gladiators) Plecoptera (stoneflies) Embioptera (webspinners) Zoraptera (angel insects) Dermaptera (earwigs) Orthoptera (grasshoppers, etc) Phasmatodea (stick insects) Blattodea (cockroaches) Isoptera (termites) Mantodea (mantids) Psocoptera... Families Mastotermitidae Kalotermitidae Termopsidae Hodotermitidae Rhinotermitidae Serritermitidae Termitidae Reference: Earthlife as of 2002-07-26 A termite (also known as a white ant) is any member of the order Isoptera, a group of social insects that eat wood and other cellulose-rich vegetable matter. ...


Like termites, terabytes are organized into castes but are even more specialized than any present-day insects: Caste systems are traditional, hereditary systems of social classification, that evolved due to the enormous diversity in India (where all three primary races met, not by forced slavery but by immigration). ...

  • Transporters, which carry other legless castes to a specified area
  • Gum-spitters, which do nothing else but spit sticky gum for building purposes
  • Biters, which, oddly enough, do not bite anything
  • Rock-borers, which use chemicals to dissolve the hard limestone under the desert to get to the underground pools below (the chemical in question is concentrated hydrochloric acid).
  • Water-carriers, which suck up water to water the algae that they grow.

To get this alga they have to fight gardenworms. The terabytes cultivate gardenworm algae in their mounds, using the water-carriers to water it, and getting it sunlight from transparent panes in the top made of terabyte saliva. Gardenworms are either found vulnerable, lying around near oases, or inaccessibly swimming around in the underground caves. The transporter terabytes carry gum-spitters to the attack point and the gum-spitters freeze the worms in their tracks. Then other transporter terabytes apprehend the worms to grab some algae to take back to their enormous nests. Underneath the nests are a series of caverns that disperse heat from the nests. This is so the terabytes don't get hot in the blistering desert. For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation). ... Algae have conventionally been regarded as simple plants within the study of botany. ...


External links

  • http://www.thefutureiswild.com.
  • http://www.sivatherium.h12.ru/englver.htm

The Neocene world - 25 MY in the future (chapters translated into English)


 
 

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