FACTOID # 27: If you're itching to live in a trailer park, hitch up your home and head to South Carolina, where a whopping 18% of residences are mobile homes.
 
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Encyclopedia > List of Latin proverbs
It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into List of Latin phrases. (Discuss)

The following is a partial list of Latin proverbs and sayings, in alphabetical order, with English translations. This list contains Latin proverbs or sayings where more significant information exists than merely their literal meaning. Those sayings without additional information best belong at the relevant Wikiquote page. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... This page lists direct English translations of common Latin phrases, such as veni vidi vici and et cetera. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... A proverb (from the Latin proverbium) is a pithy saying which had gained credence through widespread or frequent use. ...


For shorter phrases, see: List of Latin phrases. A phrase is a group of words that functions as a single unit in the syntax of a sentence. ... This page lists direct English translations of common Latin phrases, such as veni vidi vici and et cetera. ...



Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


A

A mari usque ad mare
"From sea all the way to sea" — motto of Canada.
Acta non verba
"Actions, not words" — motto of the United States Merchant Marine.
Ad astra per aspera
"To the stars through difficulties" — motto of Kansas. Also written per aspera ad astra. Ad Astra ("to the stars") is the title of a magazine published by the National Space Society.
Alea iacta est
"The die is cast" — Julius Caesar; see note under Rubicon.
Ars gratia artis
"Art for the sake of art" — motto of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Latinized from Baudelaire's "L'art pour l'art".
Ad vitam aeternam
"For eternal life"
Ars longa vita brevis
"Art is long, life is short" — the Latin translation by Horace of a phrase from Hippocrates, often used out of context. The "art" referred to in the original aphorism was the craft of medicine, which took a lifetime to acquire.
Audi alteram partem
"Hear the other side" — a legal principle of fairness.
Ave Caesar morituri te salutant
"Hail, Caesar! The ones who are about to die salute you!" — the traditional greeting of gladiators prior to battle; passed on by Suetonius, Cladius 21. Also rendered with imperator instead of Caesar, and morituri is also translated as "we who are about to die" based on the context in which it was spoken.

Flag of the United States Merchant Marine The United States Merchant Marine is a fleet of ships that is used to transport both imports and exports during peace time and serves as an auxiliary to the United States Navy during times of war, delivering both troops and supplies. ... State nickname: The Sunflower State Official languages None Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Governor Kathleen Sebelius (D) Senators Sam Brownback (R) Pat Roberts (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 15th 82,277 mi²; 213,096 km² 0. ... National Space Society logo The National Space Society (NSS) is an international nonprofit 501(c)(3), educational, and scientific organization specializing in space advocacy. ... Gaius Julius Caesar (Classical Latin: IMP·C·IVLIVS·CAESAR·DIVVS) (b. ... Presumed course of the Rubicon The Rubicon (Rubico, in Italian Rubicone) is an ancient Latin name for a small river in northern Italy. ... Art for arts sake - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ... Charles Baudelaire Charles Pierre Baudelaire (April 9, 1821–August 31, 1867) was one of the most influential French poets. ... Horace Quintus Horatius Flaccus, (December 8, 65 BC - November 27, 8 BC), known in the English-speaking world as Horace, was the leading lyric poet in Latin, the son of a freedman, but himself born free. ... Hippocrates: a conventionalized image in a Roman portrait bust (19th century engraving) Hippocrates of Kos (c. ... Audi alteram partem (or Audiatur et altera pars) is a Latin phrase that means, literally, hear the other side or hear both sides. ... Caesar (Latin:CAESAR, IPA: kaɪsÉ‘r [kae-sahr], common English IPA:siːzÉš [see-zr]) was originally a cognomen in ancient Rome, derived from cai- (of unknown meaning) from which Gaius also derives. ... Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus (69/70 AD - After 130 AD) or known as Suetonius was a prominent Roman Writer. ...

B

Beati pauperes spiritu quoniam ipsorum est regnum caelorum
"Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of the heavens" — Vulgate, Matthew 5:3.
Boni pastoris est tondere pecus non deglubere
"It is of a good shepherd to shear his flock, not to flay them" — Tiberius to his regional commanders, meaning "don't tax the populace excessively".

For the Arthurian Vulgate Cycle, see Lancelot-Grail Cycle. ... A bust of younger Emperor Tiberius For the city in Israel, see Tiberias. ...

C

Carpe diem
"Seize the day" — Horace, Odes I,11,8, to Leuconoe.
Cessante ratione legis cessat ipsa lex
"When the reason for the law ceases, the law itself ceases" — A rule of law becomes ineffective when the reason for its application has ceased to exist or does not correspond to the reality anymore.
Ceterum censeo Carthaginem esse delendam
"In conclusion, I declare that Carthage must be destroyed" — Roman senator Cato the Elder ended every speech during the Punic Wars with this quote. Other translations include "For the rest, I move for Carthage to be destroyed" and "Furthermore, I am of the opinion that Carthage is to be destroyed".
Cogito ergo sum
"I think, therefore I am" — argument used by René Descartes as proof of his own existence.
Credo quia absurdum
"I believe it because it is absurd" — attributed to Tertullian; see fideism.
Crescat scientia vita excolatur
"Let knowledge grow, let life be enriched" — motto of the University of Chicago.
Cuius regio, eius religio
"Whose province, his religion" — the privilege of a ruler to choose the religion of his subjects, established at the Peace of Augsburg in 1555.
Cura te ipsum
"Take care of yourself" — an exhortation to medical doctors or experts in general.

This article is about the Latin phrase. ... Horace Quintus Horatius Flaccus, (December 8, 65 BC - November 27, 8 BC), known in the English-speaking world as Horace, was the leading lyric poet in Latin, the son of a freedman, but himself born free. ... Odes is the title of an album of Greek Folk Songs by Vangelis and Irene Papas. ... A map of the central Mediterranean Sea, showing the location of Carthage (near modern Tunis). ... Marcus Porcius Cato (Latin: M·PORCIVS·M·F·CATO) (234 BC - 149 BC), Roman statesman, surnamed The Censor, Sapiens, Priscus, or Major (the Elder), to distinguish him from Cato the Younger (his great-grandson), was born at Tusculum. ... The Punic Wars were a series of three wars fought between Rome and the Phoenician city of Carthage. ... René Descartes (1596–1650) René Descartes Latin statement cogito, ergo sum (traditionally translated as I think, therefore I am, but more accurately as I am thinking, therefore I exist) is possibly the single best-known philosophical statement. ... Wikisource has original works written by or about: René Descartes Works by René Descartes at Project Gutenberg A summary of his book A Discourse On Method French Translations of Descartes Meditations: [5] French Audio Book (mp3) : excerpt about animals/machines from Discourse On the Method Discourse On the Method – at... Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus, anglicized as Tertullian, (ca. ... In Christian theology, fideism is any of a number of positions. ... The University of Chicago is a private co-educational university located in Chicago, Illinois. ... Cuius regio, eius religio is a phrase in Latin that means, Whose the region is, his religion. ... The Peace of Augsburg was a treaty signed between Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, and the forces of the Schmalkaldic League on September 25, 1598 at the city of Augsburg in Germany. ... Cura te ipsum (Physician, heal thyself!) is a classical injunction, urging medical doctors to heal themselves first. ... The word physician should not be confused with physicist, which means a scientist in the area of physics. ...

D

De minimis non curat praetor
"The commander does not care about trivial things" — sometimes rex ("the king") or lex ("the law") is used in place of praetor.
Deliriant isti Romani
"They are mad, those Romans" — René Goscinny, Asterix and Obelix comic; a translation of "ils sont fous, ces romains!"
Dei sub numine viget
"Under God's light she flourishes" — motto of Princeton University.
De nobis fabula narratur
"About us is the story told" — refers to the end of Rome's dominance, and comparisons between historical or literary events and modern events in general.
Deo vindice
"With God as protector" — motto of the Confederate States of America. An alternate translation is "With an avenging God".
Deus lo vult
"God wills it!" — slogan of the Crusades.
Diem perdidi
I have lost the day" — Emperor Titus; passed down in Suetonius's biography (8).
Divide et impera
"Divide and rule" — Louis XI; adopted by Machiavelli. Commonly rendered "divide and conquer".
Dominus illuminatio mea
"The Lord is my light" — motto of Oxford University.
Do ut des
"I give that you may give" — often said or written for sacrifices, when one "gives" and expects something back from the gods.
Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori
"It is sweet and honorable to die for the fatherland" — Horace, Odes III, 2, 13. Frequently quoted, notably in the poem Dulce et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen.
Dum Roma deliberat Saguntum perit
"While Rome debates, Saguntum is in danger" — used when someone has been asked for urgent help, but responds with no immediate action. Similar to Hannibal ante portas, but referring to a less personal danger.

De minimis is a Latin expression meaning about minimal things, which is mostly used as part of de minimis non curat praetor or de minimis non curat lex, in the sense that law is not interested in trivial matters. ... // Definition According to Cicero, Praetor was a title which designated the consuls as the leaders of the armies of the state. ... René Goscinny (August 14, 1926 – November 5, 1977) French author, editor and humorist, who is best known for the comic strip Astérix, which he created with illustrator Albert Uderzo, and the comic strip Lucky Luke. // Early life René was born in Paris in 1926, to Stanislaw Simkha Goscinny, a... A shrewd, cunning little warrior; all perilous missions are immediately entrusted to him. ... Obelix Obelix (originally Obélix) is a character, a sidekick with superhuman strength in the Asterix comic books. ... Princeton University, located in Princeton, New Jersey, is the fourth-oldest institution of higher education in the United States. ... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: With God As Our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Danville, Virginia April 3–April 10, 1865 Largest city New Orleans February 4, 1861 until captured... This article is about the medieval crusades. ... This is about the emperor of ancient Rome. ... Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus (69/70 AD - After 130 AD) or known as Suetonius was a prominent Roman Writer. ... In politics and sociology, divide and rule (also known as divide and conquer) is a strategy of gaining and maintaining power by breaking up larger concentrations of power into chunks that individually have less power than the one implementing the strategy. ... Louis XI Louis XI the Prudent (French: Louis XI le Prudent) (July 3, 1423 - August 30, 1483), also informally nicknamed luniverselle aragne (old French for universal spider), was a King of France (1461 - 1483). ... Detail of the portrait of Machiavelli, ca 1500, in the robes of a Florentine public official Niccolò Machiavelli (May 3, 1469—June 21, 1527) was an Italian political philosopher during the Renaissance. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori is a line from the Roman lyrical poet Horaces Odes (iii 2. ... Horace Quintus Horatius Flaccus, (December 8, 65 BC - November 27, 8 BC), known in the English-speaking world as Horace, was the leading lyric poet in Latin, the son of a freedman, but himself born free. ... Dulce Et Decorum Est (written in 1917 and published posthumously in 1921) is a poem written by English poet and World War I soldier Wilfred Owen. ... Wilfred Owen Wilfred Edward Salter Owen, MC (March 18, 1893 – November 4, 1918) was an English poet. ... Saguntum, now Sagunt, (Castilian Sagunto) is an ancient city in the fertile district of Camp de Morvedre in the province of Valencia in eastern Spain. ...

E

Entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem
"Entities must not be multiplied beyond necessity" — Ockham's Razor.
Errare humanum est perseverare diabolicum
"To err is human; to persist is of the Devil" — Seneca.
Et nunc reges intelligite erudimini qui iudicati terram
"And now, kings, understand: be instructed, you who have judged the Earth"
Et tu Brute?
"And you, Brutus?" — used to indicate a betrayal by someone close. Said by Julius Caesar in William Shakespeare's play of the same name, though its historical accuracy as Caesar's last words is heavily disputed.
E pluribus unum
"Out of many, one" — motto of the United States and of the Sport Lisboa e Benfica portuguese soccer club.
Ex astris scientia
"From the stars, knowledge" — the motto of the Apollo 13 Mission, which later became the motto of the fictional Starfleet Academy in Star Trek.
Ex oriente lux
"From the East, the light" — superficially refers to the sun rising in the east, but alludes to culture coming from the Eastern world.
Ex nihilo nihil fit
"Nothing may come from nothing" — from Lucretius, and said earlier by Empedocles. Its original meaning is "work is required to succeed", but it is commonly applied to other fields, such as theology and the conservation laws in philosophy and modern science.
Ex scientia tridens
"From knowledge, a trident" — the United States Naval Academy motto. Refers to knowledge bringing men power over the sea comparable to that of the Greek god Poseidon.
Extra Ecclesiam Nulla Salus
"Outside the Church [there is] No Salvation" — a disputed thesis of Roman Catholic theology.

Occams Razor (also Ockhams Razor or any of several other spellings), is a principle attributed to the 14th century English logician and Franciscan friar, William of Ockham that forms the basis of methodological reductionism, also called the principle of parsimony or law of economy. ... This page includes English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations such as . ... Seneca the Younger Lucius Annaeus Seneca (often known simply as Seneca, or Seneca the Younger) (ca. ... Julius Caesar is a tragedy by William Shakespeare probably written in 1599. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... E pluribus unum is included in the Great Seal of the United States E pluribus unum is a national motto of the United States of America. ... Sport Lisboa e Benfica (commonly referred to as simply SL Benfica, Benfica or Benfica Lisbon) is a football club based in Lisbon, Portugal. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... Apollo 13 was an American space mission, part of the Apollo program. ... The official logo of Starfleet Academy, circa 2370. ... http://www. ... The term Eastern world refers very broadly to the various cultures, social structures and philosophical systems of the East, namely Asia (including China, India, Japan, and surrounding regions). ... Nothing comes from nothing is a philosophical expression often stated in its Latin form: ex nihilo nihil fit. ... Lucretius Titus Lucretius Carus (ca. ... Empedocles of Agrigentum Empedocles (c. ... In physics, a conservation law states that a particular measurable property of an isolated physical system does not change as the system evolves. ... Poseidon sculpture holding a trident A trident is a three pronged staff. ... The United States Naval Academy (USNA) is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers of the United States Navy and Marine Corps and is located in Annapolis, Maryland. ... In Greek mythology, Poseidon (Ποσειδῶν) was the god of the sea. ... The Ecclesiastical Latin phrase Extra Ecclesiam Nulla Salus (sometimes briefly Extra Ecclesiam), literally meaning outside the church there is no salvation, is a slogan that summarises the doctrine that one must be a member of the Roman Catholic church in order to be saved. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Theology is reasoned discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, word or reason). It also refers to the study of other religious topics. ...

F

Festina lente
"Hurry slowly" — a motto of Augustus Caesar. It encourages proceeding quickly, but with caution.
Fiat iustitia et pereat mundus
"Let there be justice, even should the world perish" — Ferdinand I.

Augustus Caesar Caesar Augustus (Latin: IMP·CAESAR·DIVI·F·AVGVSTVS)¹ (23 September 63 BC – 19 August AD 14), known earlier in his life as Gaius Octavius or Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus, was the first Roman Emperor and is traditionally considered the greatest. ... Ferdinand I Habsburg Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor (March 10, 1503 – July 27, 1564) was one of the Habsburg emperors that at various periods during his life ruled over Austria, Germany, Bohemia and Hungary. ...

G

Gutta cavat lapidem non vi sed saepe cadendo
"A drop hollows a stone not by force, but by often falling" — Ovid, Epistulae ex Ponto IV, 10, 5.

Engraved frontispiece of George Sandyss 1632 London edition of Publius Ovidius Naso (Sulmona, March 20, 43 BC â€“ Tomis, now Constanta AD 17) Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid, wrote on topics of love, abandoned women, and mythological transformations. ...

H

Hannibal ante portas
"Hannibal before the gates" — refers to wasting time while the enemy is already here.
Historia vitae magistra
"History, the teacher of life" — Cicero, Tusculanas, 2, 16. Also "History is the mistress of life".
Homo sum humani a mi nihil alienum puto
"I am a human being; nothing human is strange to me" — Terence, Heautontimoroumenos. Originally "strange" or "foreign" (alienum) was used in the sense of "irrelevant", as this line was a response to the speaker being told to mind his own business, but it is now commonly used to advocate respecting different cultures and being humane in general. Puto ("I consider") is not translated because it is meaningless outside of the line's context within the play.
Hypotheses non fingo
"I do not fabricate hypotheses" — Newton, Principia. Less literally means "I do not assert that any hypotheses are true".
Homo homini lupus est.
"Man is a wolf to man" — Hobbes, Leviathan. The claim that humans prey on their own kind, i.e. that they are inherently selfish. Originally found in Plautus' Asinaria.

Hannibals feat in crossing the Alps with war elephants passed into European legend: a fresco detail, 1510, Capitoline Museums, Rome Hannibal (from Punic, literally Baal is merciful to me, 247 BC – 182 BC) was a politician, statesman and considered one of the greatest military commanders in history. ... Marcus Tullius Cicero (standard English pronunciation ; Classical Latin pronunciation ) (January 3, 106 BC – December 7, 43 BC) was an orator and statesman of Ancient Rome, and is generally considered the greatest Latin orator and prose stylist. ... Publius Terentius Afer, better known as Terence, was a comic playwright of the Roman Republic. ... Sir Isaac Newton, PRS (4 January [O.S. 25 December 1642] 1643 – 31 March [O.S. 20 March] 1727) was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, alchemist, and philosopher who is one of the most influential scientists in history. ... Newtons own copy of his Principia, with hand written corrections for the second edition. ... Thomas Hobbes (April 5, 1588–December 4, 1679) was a noted English political philosopher, most famous for his book Leviathan (1651). ... Frontispiece of Leviathan Leviathan (1651) by Thomas Hobbes, is one of the most famous and influential books of political philosophy. ... Titus Maccius Plautus (born at Sarsina, Umbria in 254 B.C.) was a comic playwright in the time of the Roman Republic. ...

I

Igne natura renovatur integra
"Through fire, nature is reborn whole" — an alchemical aphorism invented as an alternate meaning for the acronym INRI.
In hoc signo vinces
"By this sign you will conquer" — words Constantine claimed to have seen in a vision before the Battle of Milvian Bridge.
In necessariis unitas, in dubiis libertas, in omnibus caritas
"In necessary things unity, in doubtful things liberty, in all things charity" — motto of the Cartellverband der katholischen deutschen Studentenverbindungen. Often misattributed to Augustine of Hippo.
Inter arma enim silent leges
"During warfare, in fact, the laws are silent" — said by Cicero in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar to describe the Rome that thought Caesar could do no wrong, even though he had committed a heinous crime. Also used in the Star Trek DS9 episode of the same name to justify Admiral William Ross' decision to assist Agent Sloan from Section 31 in destabilizing the Romulan Senate.
In lumine tuo videbimus lumen
"In your light we will see the light" — motto of Columbia University.
In vino veritas
"In wine there is truth" — i.e. wine loosens the tongue.
Iura novit curia
"The court knows the laws" — a legal principle (e.g. in Germany) that says that lawyers are not to argue the law, as that is the office of the court. Sometimes miswritten as iura novat curia ("the court renews the laws").
Iustitia omnibus
"Justice for all" — motto of the District of Columbia.

Alchemy is an early protoscientific practice combining elements of chemistry, physics, astrology, art, semiotics, metallurgy, medicine, and mysticism. ... A Crucifix with the stylized INRI plaque attached. ... Constantine. ... The Battle of Milvian Bridge took place on October 28, 312 between the Roman Emperors Constantine the Great and Maxentius. ... The Latin phrase in necessariis unitas, in dubiis libertas, in omnibus caritas means in certain things unity; in doubtful things liberty; in all things charity. It is often misattributed to St. ... Cartellverband The Cartellverband der katholischen deutschen Studentenverbindungen or Cartellverband (CV) is a german umbrella organisation of catholic student fraternities (Studentenverbindung). ... St. ... Marcus Tullius Cicero (standard English pronunciation ; Classical Latin pronunciation ) (January 3, 106 BC – December 7, 43 BC) was an orator and statesman of Ancient Rome, and is generally considered the greatest Latin orator and prose stylist. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Julius Caesar is a tragedy by William Shakespeare probably written in 1599. ... http://www. ... Columbia University is a private university in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. ... ...

L

Labor omnia vincit
"Work conquers all things" — motto of Oklahoma.
Luctor et emergo
"I struggle and emerge" — motto of the Dutch province of Zeeland. Believed to be associated with the province's continuous struggle with the water.
Lucus a non lucendo
"It is a grove by not being light" — a pun based on the word lucus ("dark grove") having a similar appearance to the verb lucere ("to shine"), arguing that the former word is derived from the latter word because of a lack of light in wooded groves. Often used as an example of absurd etymology.
Lupus non mordet lupum
"A wolf does not bite a wolf"

Oklahoma is a state of the United States, lying mostly in the southern Great Plains, and its U.S. postal abbreviation is OK; others abbreviate the states name Okla. ... Location of Zeeland in the Netherlands Zeeland is a province of the Netherlands. ... The Latin sentence Lucus a non lucendo can be translated as The word for grove is lucus because it is not light [non lucet] in a grove. ... A pun (also known as paronomasia) is a figure of speech which consists of a deliberate confusion of similar words or phrases for rhetorical effect, whether humorous or serious. ... Etymology is the study of the origins of words. ...

M

Malum in se
"Evil in itself" — a legal term meaning that something is inherently wrong; see also malum prohibitum.
Malum prohibitum
"Evil due to being prohibited" — a legal term meaning that something is only wrong because it is against the law.
Memento mori
"Be mindful of dying" — figuratively "Remember your mortality", and also translated ironically as "Remember to die". It is the motto of the Trappist order.
Mens agitat molem
"The mind moves the mass" — Virgil; motto of the University of Oregon, the University of Warwick and the Eindhoven University of Technology.
Mens et manus
"Mind and hand" — motto of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Mens sana in corpore sano
"A sound mind in a sound body"
Mundus vult decipi
"The world wants to be deceived"

Malum in se (plural mala in se) is a Latin phrase meaning wrong in itself; it is an act that is illegal from the nature of the act, i. ... Malum prohibitum (plural mala prohibita, literal translation: wrong because prohibited) is a Latin phrase used in law to refer to crimes made so by statute, as opposed to crimes based on English common law and obvious violations of societys standards which are defined as malum in se. ... Memento mori is a Latin phrase that means Remember that you are mortal (or literally remember mortality). It names a genre of artistic creations that vary widely from one another, but which all share the same purpose, which is to remind people of their own mortality. ... The Order of Cistercians of the Strict Observance, or Trappists, are a Roman Catholic religious order, and follow the Rule of St. ... A sculpture of Virgil, probably from the 1st century AD. Publius Vergilius Maro (October 15, 70 BC–19 BC), known in English as Virgil or Vergil, is a Latin poet, the author of the Eclogues, the Georgics and the Aeneid, the last being an epic poem of twelve books that... University of Oregon The University of Oregon (UO) is a public university located in Eugene. ... The University of Warwick is a campus university in the United Kingdom. ... The Eindhoven University of Technology (in Dutch: Technische Universiteit Eindhoven or TU/e) is a technical university located in Eindhoven, the Netherlands. ... The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, or MIT, is a university located in the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. MIT is known for its strength in science and technology, as well as in numerous other fields, including management, economics, linguistics, political science, and philosophy. ... Mens sana in corpore sano is a famous quotation by Decimus Iunius Iuvenalis. ...

N

Natura non contristur
"Nature is not saddened" — indicates that the natural world is not sentimental or compassionate.
Natura non facit saltum ita nec lex
"Nature does not make a leap, thus neither does the law" — shortened form of "Sicut natura nil facit per saltum, ita nec lex" ("Just as nature does nothing by a leap, so neither does the law"), referring to both nature and the legal system moving gradually.
Navigare necesse est vivere non est necesse
"To sail is necessary; to live is not necessary" — attributed by Plutarch to Gnaeus Pompeius, who, during a severe storm, commanded sailors to bring food from Africa to Rome.
Non bis in idem
"Not twice in the same thing" — legal principle forbidding double jeopardy.
Non olet
"It doesn't smell" — "it" refers to money (pecunia). According to Suetonius, when Emperor Vespasian was challenged by his son Titus for taxing the public lavatories, the emperor held up a coin before his son and asked whether it smelled.
Nosce te ipsum
"Know thyself" — Cicero, from the Greek gnothi seauton, inscribed on the Temple of Apollo at Delphi. An non-traditional Latin rendering, "temet nosce", is used in The Matrix.

The Nature Conservancy - a charitable organization devoted to preserving natural diversity worldwide English Nature UK government organization devoted to preserving natural diversity in the UK Nature Detectives An online research and education project for under 18s in the UK A Guide to Nature and Wildlife Conservation Philosophy Quick Topic Guide... Plutarch Mestrius Plutarchus (ca. ... Gnaeus Pompeius (c. ... Double jeopardy is a procedural defense (and, in the United States and India, a constitutional right) that forbids a defendant from being tried a second time for a crime, after having already been tried for the same crime. ... Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus (69/70 AD - After 130 AD) or known as Suetonius was a prominent Roman Writer. ... Emperor Vespasian Caesar Vespasianus Augustus (November 18, 9 – June 23, 79), originally known as Titus Flavius Vespasianus and best known as Vespasian, was the emperor of Rome from 69 to 79. ... This is about the emperor of ancient Rome. ... The Ancient Greek aphorism Know thyself (Greek: ΓΝΩΘΙ ΣΕΑΥΤΟΝ or gnothi seauton) was inscribed in golden letters at the lintel of the entrance to the Temple of Apollo at Delphi. ... Marcus Tullius Cicero (standard English pronunciation ; Classical Latin pronunciation ) (January 3, 106 BC – December 7, 43 BC) was an orator and statesman of Ancient Rome, and is generally considered the greatest Latin orator and prose stylist. ... Apollo (Greek: Απόλλων, Apóllōn) is a god in Greek and Roman mythology, the son of Zeus and Leto, and the twin of Artemis (goddess of the hunt). ... The theatre, seen from above Delphi (Greek Δελφοί - Delphoi; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is an archaeological site and a modern town in Greece. ... The Matrix is a film first released in the USA on March 31, 1999, written and directed by the Wachowski brothers (Andy and Larry). ...

O

Obscuris vera involvens
"The truth being enveloped by obscure things" — Virgil.
Odi et amo
"I hate and I love" — The opening of Catullus 85. The entire poem reads, "I hate and I love. Why do I do this, you perhaps ask. I do not know, but I feel it happening and am tormented."
Odi profanum vulgus et arceo
"I hate the unholy rabble and keep them away" — Horace
Orbis non sufficit
"The world does not suffice" — James Bond's family motto, used in the nineteenth James Bond film, The World Is Not Enough.

The phrase Obscuris vera involvens means Truth is enveloped by obscurity. ... A sculpture of Virgil, probably from the 1st century AD. Publius Vergilius Maro (October 15, 70 BC–19 BC), known in English as Virgil or Vergil, is a Latin poet, the author of the Eclogues, the Georgics and the Aeneid, the last being an epic poem of twelve books that... Gaius Valerius Catullus (ca. ... Catullus 85 is the poem Catullus himself chose as the 85th segment of his published set of poems. ... Horace Quintus Horatius Flaccus, (December 8, 65 BC - November 27, 8 BC), known in the English-speaking world as Horace, was the leading lyric poet in Latin, the son of a freedman, but himself born free. ... Official sites James Bond Official Homepage Official Danjaq 007 website Ian Fleming Publications official website Miss Moneypennys Rolodex Mr. ... The World Is Not Enough is the nineteenth official James Bond film made by EON Productions and the third to star Pierce Brosnan as Ian Flemings secret agent, James Bond. ...

P

  • Pacta sunt servanda — "Agreements must be honoured."
  • Pax maternum, ergo pax familiarum — "If the mother is peaceful, then the family is peaceful."
  • Per ardua ad astra — "Through hardship to the stars" (motto of the Royal Air Force and Royal New Zealand Air Force and Royal Australian Air Force).The motto was derived from Sir Henry Rider Haggard’s famous novel, “The People of the Mist” and was selected and approved as a motto for the Royal Flying Corps on 15 March 1913 and remains with the RAF today. In 1929 the Royal Australian Air Force decided to adopt it too.
  • Per aspera ad astra — "Through difficulties to the stars" (motto of NASA and the South African Air Force) from Seneca.
  • Primum non nocere — "First, do no harm" (often falsely attributed to the Hippocratic Oath).
  • Prior tempore, potior jure — "Earlier in time, stronger in law."
  • Propter vitam, vivendi perdere causas — "to lose the reasons for living for the sake of life itself."

Pacta sunt servanda (Latin for pacts must be respected) is a Brocard, a basic principle of civil law and of international law. ... The Royal Air Force (often abbreviated to RAF) is the air force branch of the British Armed Forces. ... The Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) is the air force arm of the New Zealand Defence Force. ... The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) is the air force branch of the Australian Defence Force. ... NASA Logo Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-09-01, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... SAAF flag The South African Air Force (SAAF) is the Air Force of South Africa. ... Seneca the Younger Lucius Annaeus Seneca (often known simply as Seneca, or Seneca the Younger) (ca. ... Primum non nocere is a Latin phrase that means First, do no harm. ... The Hippocratic Oath is an oath traditionally taken by physicians, in which certain ethical guidelines are laid out. ...

Q

  • Quem di diligunt, adulescens moritur — "Whom the gods love dies young" (Plautus, Bacchides, IV, 7, 18). In the comic play, a sarcastic servant says this to his aging master. The rest of the sentence reads: dum valet, sentit, sapit, "while he is full of health, perception and judgement."
  • Quia suam uxorem etiam suspiciore vacare vellet. — "Caesar's wife may not be suspected" (Plutarch, Caesar 10) The rhetorian Clodius was having an affair with Caesar's second wife, Pompeia. At a party attended by Pompeia Clodius arrived in disguise but was caught. In the following trial, Caesar claimed that nothing wrong had happened, but he still had to divorce her.
  • Quidquid latine dictum sit altum videtur. — "Whatever is spoken in Latin sounds profound." a modern, humorous quote.
  • Quod licet Iovi, non licet bovi — "What is permitted to Jupiter is not permitted to the ox" i.e. if an important person does something, it does not necessarily mean that everyone can do it.
  • Quod natura non dat Salmantica non praestat. —"What nature does not provide, Salamanca does not add".
  • Quo vadis Domine? —"Where are you going, Lord?"

Titus Maccius Plautus (born at Sarsina, Umbria in 254 B.C.) was a comic playwright in the time of the Roman Republic. ... Plutarch Mestrius Plutarchus (ca. ... Publius Clodius Pulcher (born around 92 BC, murdered January 18, 52 BC), was a Roman politician, chiefly remembered for his feuds with Milo and Marcus Tullius Cicero. ...

R

Canterbury Tales Woodcut 1484 The Canterbury Tales is a collection of stories written by Geoffrey Chaucer in the 14th century (two of them in prose, the rest in verse). ... The Monty Python troupe in 1970. ... Life of Brian is a film from 1979 by Monty Python which deals with the life of Brian (played by Graham Chapman), a young man born at the nearly the same time as, and in a manger right down the street from Jesus. ...

S

  • Salus populi suprema lex esto — "Let the welfare of the people be the supreme law" (motto of the U.S. state of Missouri).
  • Sapere aude — "Dare to be wise."
  • Semper excelsius — "Ever higher" (motto of K.A.V. Lovania Leuven)
  • Semper Fidelis — "Always Faithful" (motto for the U.S. Marine Corps)
  • Semper Paratus — "Always Prepared" (motto for the U.S. Coast Guard)
  • Si quaeris peninsulam amoenam circumspice — "If you seek a pleasant peninsula, look about you" (the motto of the U.S. state of Michigan).
  • Si vis pacem, para bellum. — "If you want peace, prepare for war." (Vegetius, Epitoma rei militaris) origin of the name parabellum for some ammunition and firearms, e.g. Luger parabellum
  • Si peccasse negamus, fallimur, et nulla est in nobis veritas — "If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and there's no truth in us" (Faust)
  • Sic gorgiamus allos subjectatos nunc — "We gladly feast on those who would subdue us" (motto of The Addams Family).
  • Sic semper tyrannis — "Thus always to tyrants" (motto of the U.S. state of Virginia; attributed to assassin Brutus, perhaps John Wilkes Booth also).
  • Sic transit gloria mundi — "Thus passes the glory of the world." In Bible; also, during papal coronations, a barefoot monk interrupts the procession three times, holding a burning tow, and after it goes out says "Pater sancte (Holy Father), sic transit gloria mundi" — to remind the new Pope that, despite the grand procession, he is still a mortal man.
  • Similia similibus curantur. — "Like cures like" (Samuel Hahnemann, founder of homeopathy).
  • Stipendium peccati mors est — "The reward of sin is death" (Faust)
  • Sutor, ne ultra crepidam! — "Cobbler, no further than the sandal!" I.e. don't offer your opinion on things that are outside your competence. It is said that Greek painter Apelles once asked the advice of a cobbler on how to render the sandals of a soldier he was painting. When the cobbler started offering advice on other parts of the painting, Apelles rebuked him with this phrase (but in Greek).

A U.S. state is any one of the fifty states (four of which officially favor the term commonwealth) which, together with the District of Columbia and Palmyra Atoll (an uninhabited incorporated unorganized territory), form the United States of America. ... State nickname: The Show Me State Official languages English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City (largest metropolitan area is Saint Louis) Governor Matt Blunt (R) Senators Kit Bond (R) Jim Talent (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 21st 69,709 mi²; 180,693 km² 1. ... Sapere aude is a Latin phrase meaning Dare to know. ... K.A.V. Lovania Leuven is a catholic academic fraternity, founded in 1896 at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Louvain, Belgium. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the U.S. military. ... Coast Guard shield The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is the coast guard of the United States. ... A U.S. state is any one of the fifty states (four of which officially favor the term commonwealth) which, together with the District of Columbia and Palmyra Atoll (an uninhabited incorporated unorganized territory), form the United States of America. ... State nickname: The Wolverine State, The Great Lakes State Official languages English de-facto Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Governor Jennifer Granholm (D) Senators Carl Levin (D) Debbie Stabenow (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 11th 96,889 mi² / 250,941 km² 41. ... Vegetius (Publius Flavius Vegetius Renatus) was a celebrated military writer of the 4th century. ... for the French rock group see Parabellum (band) The term parabellum comes from the Latin for prepare for war. The term is often heard in relation to ammunition – for example, nine millimeter parabellum. Parabellum ammunition is designed to be legal under international law; usually this means that rounds are full... Boxes of ammunition clog a warehouse in Baghdad Ammunition is a generic military term meaning (the assembly of) a projectile and its propellant. ... M1900 American Eagle Commercial For other uses of the word see Luger A Luger (Pistole Parabellum), is a toggle lock pistol based on principles by Hiram Maxim. ... Faust (sometimes Latinized as Faustus) is the protagonist of a popular German tale of a pact with the Devil. ... The Addams Family is the creation of American cartoonist Charles Addams. ... Sic semper tyrannis is a Latin phrase meaning Thus always to tyrants. It is the state motto of Virginia (and also that of the USS Virginia), recommended by George Mason to the Virginia Convention in 1776. ... A U.S. state is any one of the fifty states (four of which officially favor the term commonwealth) which, together with the District of Columbia and Palmyra Atoll (an uninhabited incorporated unorganized territory), form the United States of America. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Official languages English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner (D) Tim Kaine (D-Governor Elect) Senators John Warner (R) George Allen (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 35th 110,862 km² 7. ... Marcus Junius Brutus Caepio (85 BC – 42 BC), or simply Brutus, was a Roman senator of the late Roman Republic. ... John Wilkes Booth John Wilkes Booth (May 10, 1838 – April 26, 1865) was an American actor who is most famous for assassinating Abraham Lincoln. ... A List of Latin proverbs is provided at Wikiquote:Latin proverbs. ... Christian Friedrich Samuel Hahnemann, M.D. (10th April 1755 - 2nd July 1843), born in Meissen, Saxony [now Germany]. He was better known as Samuel Hahnemann, a Saxon physician who, beginning with an article he published in a German medical journal in 1796, founded homoeopathic medicine. ... Samuel Hahnemann, the father of homeopathy Homeopathy (also spelled homÅ“opathy or homoeopathy) from the Greek words όμοιος, hómoios (similar) and πάθος, páthos (suffering), is a controversial system of alternative medicine. ... Faust (sometimes Latinized as Faustus) is the protagonist of a popular German tale of a pact with the Devil. ... A painter is a person who paints woodwork, walls, etc. ... Another Apelles was the founder of a Gnostic sect in the 2nd century; Apelles (theologian). ...

T

  • Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis. — "Times are changing, and we change in them." (John Owen)
  • Teneo te, Africa! — "I have you, Africa!" Suetonius attributes this to Julius Caesar, when Caesar was on the African coast.
  • Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes — "I fear the Danaens [the Greeks] even if they bring presents" (Virgil, Æneis, 2, 49) Uttered by Laocoön as he warns his fellow Trojans against accepting the Trojan Horse.
  • Timor mortis conturbat me — "the fear of death confounds me" - The Latin refrain which originates in the response to the seventh lesson in the Office of the Dead. In the Middle Ages, this service was read each day by clerics. As a refrain, it appears also in other poems and can frequently be found inscribed on tombs. As to the meaning, a better translation would be "I am scared to death of dying."
  • Tu ne cede malis, sed contra audentior ito — "do not give in to evil but proceed ever more boldly against it" (Virgil, Æneis, 6, 95)

Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus (69/70 AD - After 130 AD) or known as Suetonius was a prominent Roman Writer. ... Gaius Julius Caesar (Classical Latin: IMP·C·IVLIVS·CAESAR·DIVVS) (b. ... A sculpture of Virgil, probably from the 1st century AD. Publius Vergilius Maro (October 15, 70 BC–19 BC), known in English as Virgil or Vergil, is a Latin poet, the author of the Eclogues, the Georgics and the Aeneid, the last being an epic poem of twelve books that... The Aeneid is a Latin epic written by Vergil in the 1st century BC that tells the legendary story of Aeneas, a Trojan who traveled to Italy where he became the ancestor of the Romans. ... Laocoön in the Vatican Museum, Rome Laocoön (Greek Λαοκοων, pronounced roughly La-oh-koh-on), son of Acoetes, was allegedly a priest of Poseidon (or of Apollo, by some accounts) at Troy; he is famous for warning the Trojans in vain against accepting the Trojan Horse from the Greeks... 19th century etching of the Trojan Horse The Trojan Horse is part of the myth of the Trojan War, as told in the Latin epic poem The Aeneid of Virgil. ... A refrain (from the Old French refraindre to repeat, likely from Vulgar Latin refringere) is the line or lines that are repeated in music or in verse; the chorus of a song. ... The Office of the Dead was an office traditionally read before a burial mass in the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... A cleric is: A member of the clergy of a religion, especially one that has trained or ordained priests, preachers, or other religious professionals; or A member of a character class in Dungeons & Dragons and similar fantasy role-playing games. ... A sculpture of Virgil, probably from the 1st century AD. Publius Vergilius Maro (October 15, 70 BC–19 BC), known in English as Virgil or Vergil, is a Latin poet, the author of the Eclogues, the Georgics and the Aeneid, the last being an epic poem of twelve books that... The Aeneid is a Latin epic written by Vergil in the 1st century BC that tells the legendary story of Aeneas, a Trojan who traveled to Italy where he became the ancestor of the Romans. ...

U

  • Una salus victis nullam sperare salutem. — "The only safety for the defeated is to expect no safety." From Virgil, Aeneid II, 354.
  • Ubi dubium, ibi libertas — "Where there is doubt, there is freedom." Anon.
  • Ubi jus ibi remedium; "Where there is a right there is a remedy"
  • ubi non accusator, ibi non judex Literally "Where there is no accuser, there is no judge," (i.e. judgement, justice) but humorously represented as "Where there are no police, there is no speed limit."

A sculpture of Virgil, probably from the 1st century AD. Publius Vergilius Maro (October 15, 70 BC–19 BC), known in English as Virgil or Vergil, is a Latin poet, the author of the Eclogues, the Georgics and the Aeneid, the last being an epic poem of twelve books that... The Aeneid is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BCE (between 29 and 19 BCE) that tells the legendary story of Aeneas, a Trojan who traveled to Italy where he became the ancestor of the Romans. ...

V

  • Vae Victis — "Woe to the conquered." Attributed by Livy to the chief of the Gauls as they sacked Rome in 390 BC.
  • Veni Vidi Vici — "I came, I saw, I conquered." Message sent to the Senate by Julius Caesar after defeating Pharnaces II in 47 BC
  • Video meliora proboque deteriora sequor. — "I see the better way and approve it, but I follow the worse way."
  • Vi Veni Vniversum Vivus Vici — "By the power of truth, I, while living, have will conquered the universe" - Faust (Sometimes quoted with the form Veniversum, which is presumably a combination of universum and oeniversum, two classically attessted spellings)
  • Video sed non credo. — "I see it, but I can not believe it" Caspar Hofmann after being shown proof of the circulatory system by William Harvey.
  • Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis. — "You know how to win victory, Hannibal, you do not how to use it." According to Livy a cavalry colonel told Hannibal this after the victory at Cannae in 216 BC, meaning that Hannibal should have marched on Rome directly
  • Victrix causa diis placuit sed victa Catoni — "The victorious cause was pleasing to the Gods, but the lost cause to Cato" (Lucanus, Pharsalia 1, 128) (Dedication on the south side of the Confederate Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery)
  • Vox Populi, Vox Dei — "The voice of people is the voice of God"

Vae victis is Latin for Woe to the conquered. In 390 BC, an army of Celtic Gauls led by Brennus attacked Rome, capturing all of the city except for the Capitoline Hill, which was successfully held against them. ... Bust of Livy Titus Livius (around 59 BC - 17 AD), known as Livy in English, wrote a monumental history of Rome, Ab urbe condita, from its founding (traditionally dated to 753 BC). ... Map of Gaul circa 58 BC Gaul (from Latin Gallia, c. ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC - 390s BC - 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC 340s BC 395 BC 394 BC 393 BC 392 BC 391 BC - 390 BC - 389 BC 388 BC 387... Veni Vidi Vici means I came, I saw, I conquered in Latin. ... Gaius Julius Caesar (Classical Latin: IMP·C·IVLIVS·CAESAR·DIVVS) (b. ... Pharnaces II of Pontus (63 BC - 47 BC), was the king of Pontus and son of the great Mithridates VI. Pompey had defeated Mithridates VI in 64 BC and gained control of much of Asia Minor, but Pharnaces II attempted to take advantage of the Roman civil war to retake... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC - 40s BC - 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC 0s Years: 52 BC 51 BC 50 BC 49 BC 48 BC 47 BC 46 BC 45 BC 44 BC... Faust (sometimes Latinized as Faustus) is the protagonist of a popular German tale of a pact with the Devil. ... William Harvey (1578–1657) was a medical doctor who is credited with first correctly describing, in exact detail, the properties of blood being pumped around the body by the heart. ... Hannibals feat in crossing the Alps with war elephants passed into European legend: a fresco detail, 1510, Capitoline Museums, Rome Hannibal (from Punic, literally Baal is merciful to me, 247 BC – 182 BC) was a politician, statesman and considered one of the greatest military commanders in history. ... Bust of Livy Titus Livius (around 59 BC - 17 AD), known as Livy in English, wrote a monumental history of Rome, Ab urbe condita, from its founding (traditionally dated to 753 BC). ... The Battle of Cannae, August 2, 216 BC, was a significant battle of the Second Punic War. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC - 210s BC - 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC Years: 221 BC 220 BC 219 BC 218 BC 217 BC - 216 BC - 215 BC 214 BC... Marcus Porcius Cato Uticencis (95 BC–46 BC), known as Cato the Younger to distinguish him from his great-grandfather Cato the Elder, was a politician and statesman in the late Roman Republic, and a follower of the Stoic philosophy. ... Arlington Cemetery Arlington National Cemetery, in Arlington, Virginia, is an American military cemetery established during the American Civil War on the grounds of Robert E. Lees home. ...

Mock Latin

  • Cur tu me vexas — "Why do you annoy me"
  • Minutus cantorum, minutus balorum, minutus carborata descendum pantorum — "A little song, a little dance, a little seltzer down your pants."
  • Illegitimi Non Carborundum or Nil illegitimi carborundum.mock Latin for "Do not let the bastards wear you down." (Carborundum is a commercial abrasive).
  • Semper ubi sub ubi — "Always wear underwear." (literally "Always where under where.")
  • Veni, vidi, velcro — "I came, I saw, I stuck around."
  • Veni, vidi, VD — "I came, I saw, I got the clap."
  • Carpe Dentum — "Seize the teeth"(Mike McComb)
  • Carpe Jugulum — "Sieze the throat" A title by Terry Pratchett in his Discworld Novels

Illegitimi non carborundum is a mock-Latin aphorism jokingly taken to mean dont let the bastards grind you down. There are many variants of the phrase, such as Non illegitimis carborundum. ... The phrase Dog Latin refers to the creation of a phrase or jargon in imitation of Latin, often by directly translating English words into Latin without conjugation or declension. ... Silicon carbide (SiC) or moissanite is a ceramic compound of silicon and carbon. ... An abrasive is usually a material that is used to smooth or to machine another softer material through extensive rubbing. ... Carpe Jugulum is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett, the twenty third in the Discworld series. ... Terence David John Pratchett OBE is an English fantasy author (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England), best known for his Discworld series. ... The Discworld is a series of 35 humorous fantasy novels and a number of shorter works by Terry Pratchett set on the Discworld. ...

See also


 
 

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