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Encyclopedia > List of Kanto locations

This is a list of the major cities and locations from the fictional Kanto region featured in the Pokémon series. To meet Wikipedias quality standards and the Pokémon Collaborative Projects article style, this Pokémon-related article or section may require cleanup. ... The official Pokémon logo. ...

Contents

Cities

Many of the cities in Kanto are named after colors, such as Pewter City, Viridian City, and Saffron City and so on.


Pallet Town

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Pallet Town (マサラタウン Masara Taun?, Masara Town in original Japanese language versions) is the hometown of the protagonists of Pokémon Red, Blue, Yellow, FireRed, and LeafGreen, as well as Ash Ketchum, the protagonist of the Pokémon anime, and Red of Pokémon Adventures. It is also the home of Professor Oak, who gets them started with their first Pokémon, as well as Professor Oak's grandson (the player-named rival, Gary Oak, or Blue, depending on whether one is referring to the games, the anime, or Pokémon Adventures, respectively.) Image File history File links Pallet-town. ... Image File history File links Pallet-town. ... Japanese  ) is a language spoken by over 130 million people, mainly in Japan, but also by Japanese emigrant communities around the world. ... Pokémon Red and Pokémon Blue are the first two installments of the Pokémon series of role-playing video games, released for the Game Boy in Japan in 1996. ... Pokémon Yellow: Special Pikachu Edition is the fourth game in the Pokémon video game series in Japan, and the third in North America and Europe. ... Pokémon FireRed and Pokémon LeafGreen are two titles in the Pokémon video game series, released for the Game Boy Advance in 2004. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long. ... The main characters of the Advanced Generation: Brock, Ash, May, Max, along with Mudkip, Treecko, Pikachu, and Torchic. ... Red is a name used to refer to two related, but distinct, fictional characters in the Pokémon franchise, the protagonists of the series in their respective media. ... Pokémon Adventures, released in Japan as Pocket Monsters SPECIAL ), is a Pokémon-related manga based on the video games. ... Professor Samuel Oak[1] is a human character who appears in the Pokémon video games, anime series, and manga. ... Gary Oak, known in Japan as Shigeru ), is a fictional character in the Pokémon franchise. ... Blue, known as Green ) in the Japanese versions and FireRed and LeafGreen, is a name used to refer to two related, but distinct, fictional characters in the Pokémon franchise, both of them the antagonists of the media in which they appear. ...


In the video games, Pallet Town is a fairly tiny village situated south of Viridian City and north of Cinnabar Island. It has only three buildings: the protagonist's home, the Oak residence (home to Professor Oak, the rival, and the rival's sister), and Professor Oak's laboratory. Even in Pokémon Gold, Silver, and Crystal, while the protagonist and rival of Pokémon Red and Blue have grown up into respected Pokémon trainers, they still live at home in Pallet Town. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Pokémon Red and Pokémon Blue are the first two installments of the Pokémon series of role-playing video games, released for the Game Boy in Japan in 1996. ... Since Pokémon Crystal, trainers in the video games can be male or female. ...


In the anime, Pallet is a bit larger and more populous, with Professor Oak's laboratory situated on a hill overlooking the town. Ash Ketchum lives there, with his mother, Delia, and he returns there at the end of each saga of the anime. A number of episodes of Pokémon Chronicles are also set there. The Pokémon anime metaseries, based on the video game series, was created in Japan and was then adapted for the North American television market. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long. ... Pokémon Chronicles, known in Japan as ShÅ«kan Pokemon Hōsōkyoku (週刊ポケモン放送局) (Weekly Pokemon Broadcast), is a spin-off series of the Pokémon anime, revolving around characters other than Ash. ...


Viridian City

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Viridian City (トキワシティ Tokiwa Shiti?, Tokiwa City in original Japanese language versions) is the first major city the player visits in Pokémon Red and Blue and Pokémon Yellow. When the player first arrives, the gym is locked. However, here, the player can deliver a package to Professor Oak, and when it is delivered, the player will get the Pokédex. Also, it has the first Pokémon Centers and Pokémarts found in the game. Once the player defeats the other seven leaders, they can challenge Giovanni, the gym leader. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x640, 83 KB) Licensing http://img96. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x640, 83 KB) Licensing http://img96. ... Japanese  ) is a language spoken by over 130 million people, mainly in Japan, but also by Japanese emigrant communities around the world. ... Pokémon Red and Pokémon Blue are the first two installments of the Pokémon series of role-playing video games, released for the Game Boy in Japan in 1996. ... Pokémon Yellow: Special Pikachu Edition is the fourth game in the Pokémon video game series in Japan, and the third in North America and Europe. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Viridian City is a prominent location in the anime, as the main character, Ash, constantly returns there. The first visit was in episode two, (Pokémon Emergency); after Pikachu was badly injured in the first episode, it has to be healed in the Pokémon Center. While there, Ash first saw Officer Jenny and Nurse Joy. Misty also confronted him about her wrecked bike, eventually deciding to join him. Jessie and James of Team Rocket also appear for the first time, and decide to follow Ash until they capture Pikachu. Ash also accidentally blows up the Pokémon Center with a powered-up electrical attack from Pikachu. This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Pewter City

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Pewter City (ニビシティ Nibi Shiti?, Nibi City in original Japanese language versions) is a fictional city in the Pokémon series of video games, anime and manga. Pewter City is located in northwest Kanto, between Viridian Forest and Mt. Moon. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (767x640, 723 KB)[edit] Summary This image is from the Pokémon series of cartoons, video games, or other media, and the copyright for it is owned by Pokémon USA, Inc. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (767x640, 723 KB)[edit] Summary This image is from the Pokémon series of cartoons, video games, or other media, and the copyright for it is owned by Pokémon USA, Inc. ... Japanese  ) is a language spoken by over 130 million people, mainly in Japan, but also by Japanese emigrant communities around the world. ... This list is of fictional cities: villages, towns, and cities that do not exist in the world we know. ... The official Pokémon logo. ...


Pewter City is the first available city with a Gym Leader in the Red, Blue, Yellow, FireRed, and LeafGreen Pokémon video games and appears in Gold, Silver and Crystal after completion of the Pokémon League. Brock is the Pewter City Gym Leader, and specializes in Rock-type Pokémon. Pokémon Red and Pokémon Blue are the first two installments of the Pokémon series of role-playing video games, released for the Game Boy in Japan in 1996. ... Pokémon Yellow: Special Pikachu Edition is the fourth game in the Pokémon video game series in Japan, and the third in North America and Europe. ... Pokémon FireRed and Pokémon LeafGreen are two titles in the Pokémon video game series, released for the Game Boy Advance in 2004. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


In the video games, the Museum is one of the main attractions of Pewter City. On the first floor, fossils of ancient Pokémon (such as Aerodactyl and Kabutops) are on display, and the second floor houses a space exhibit featuring several meteorites (thought to be Moon Stones) and a large Space Shuttle model. The museum is closed in the Gold, Silver, and Crystal versions due to renovations. Aerodactyl , Ptera in original Japanese language versions) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... Kabutops ) is a fictional character from the Pokémon franchise. ... NASAs Space Shuttle, officially called Space Transportation System (STS), is the United States governments current manned launch vehicle. ...


Cerulean City

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Cerulean City (ハナダシティ Hanada Shiti?, Hanada City in original Japanese language versions) is the third city visited in the Kanto region by the protagonist, and the second gym match venue. It also has a Bike Shop. However, each bike costs $1,000,000, an amount higher than the maximum amount of money capable of carrying. To get a bike, the player needs to obtain a Bike Voucher from Vermilion City. Image File history File links Cerulean_City. ... Image File history File links Cerulean_City. ... Japanese  ) is a language spoken by over 130 million people, mainly in Japan, but also by Japanese emigrant communities around the world. ...


Cerulean City is named after the colour Cerulean, an azure blue. Its Gym Leader is Misty, a Water-type trainer, who is in charge of a swimming pool-style arena. Cerulean is a range of colors from deep blue, sky-blue, bright blue or azure color through greenish blue colors. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Cerulean City houses the Cerulean Cave, which is an optional dungeon in Pokémon Red/Blue/Yellow and FireRed/LeafGreen that is filled with high-leveled Pokémon. The dungeon is so fearsome that a guard blocks the entrance and will not let the player in until he or she has beaten the Elite Four. Hidden deep in the dungeon is the legendary Pokémon Mewtwo. In Gold, Silver, Crystal the entrance is flooded and the player cannot go further into it. The Elite Four (四天王 shitennō, literally Four heavenly kings in Japanese) is a fictional team of four Pokémon trainers in the Pokémon world. ... Mewtwo ) is one of the 493 Pokémon fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Pokémon media franchise. ...


In the anime, Cerulean City is the size of an average town. It has appeared in a number of episodes, as the gym is run by Misty's sisters. The Gym battles take place on a swimming pool, which is nowhere near the style of the Water Gym in Sootopolis City. The Pokémon anime metaseries, based on the video game series, was created in Japan and was then adapted for the North American television market. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A list of locations in the Hoenn region of the Pokémon Ruby, Sapphire and Emerald. ...


Misty becomes the Official Gym leader at the end of the Johto saga, and her time at the Gym is a part of Pokémon Chronicles. Pokémon Chronicles, known in Japan as ShÅ«kan Pokemon Hōsōkyoku (週刊ポケモン放送局) (Weekly Pokemon Broadcast), is a spin-off series of the Pokémon anime, revolving around characters other than Ash. ...


Vermilion City

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Vermilion City (クチバシティ Kuchiba Shiti?, Kuchiba City in original Japanese language versions) is a large city that is home to the Electric-type gym leader Lt. Surge. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (768x640, 76 KB) This image is from the Pokémon series of cartoons, video games, or other media, and the copyright for it is owned by Pokémon USA, Inc. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (768x640, 76 KB) This image is from the Pokémon series of cartoons, video games, or other media, and the copyright for it is owned by Pokémon USA, Inc. ... Japanese  ) is a language spoken by over 130 million people, mainly in Japan, but also by Japanese emigrant communities around the world. ...


Vermilion City is the only Kanto city to have a port, which houses a luxurious ship known as the S.S Anne. There, the player will encounter the rival again and battle him. After the player exits with the HM Cut, it will sail away. After finishing the sixth gym, the port will be reopened again, and is used to connect the Kanto region with the Sevii Islands. To meet Wikipedias quality standards and the Pokémon Collaborative Projects article style, this Pokémon-related article or section may require cleanup. ...


The Pokémon Fan Club is also located in Vermilion City. If the player listens to the president's story, he will give the player a Bike Voucher for chatting with him.


Lavender Town

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Lavender Town (シオンタウン Shion Taun?, Shion Town in original Japanese language versions) has the Pokémon Tower, which is the only place where one can catch a Gastly. It is one of the smallest towns in the region with a population of only 33 people, including the kindly Mr. Fuji, and is believed to be heavily haunted by Ghost Pokémon. A map of Lavender Town from Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen. ... A map of Lavender Town from Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen. ... Japanese  ) is a language spoken by over 130 million people, mainly in Japan, but also by Japanese emigrant communities around the world. ... Gastly , Ghos) is one of 493 fictional species from the Pokémon franchise. ... SCUMBAF! ... // Pokémon types are special attributes which determine the strengths and weaknesses of different Pokémon species. ...


In the Gold and Silver and Crystal versions, the tower was replaced by a radio tower, and the Pokémon graves were moved. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Celadon City

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Celadon City (タマムシシティ Tamamushi Shiti?, Tamamushi City in original Japanese language versions) is the second largest city in Kanto. It is home to a department store (the largest Pokémart in Kanto), a hotel, a Game Corner and a mansion. At the mansion, the player can get a certificate for completing their Pokédex and some tea, which gives the player access to Saffron City. By entering from the back side of the mansion, the player can also receive an Eevee. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Japanese  ) is a language spoken by over 130 million people, mainly in Japan, but also by Japanese emigrant communities around the world. ... Eevee , Eievui in original Japanese language versions) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards, and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ...


At the Celadon Game Corner, players may play casino games using a currency of coins. These coins can be redeemed at a shop next door to redeem prizes, such as rare Pokémon or Technical Machines. Underneath the Game Corner lies the Team Rocket Hideout, where the boss Giovanni is waiting. After he is defeated, he will return to his gym in Viridian City. This hideout does not exist in Gold/Silver. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Game designer Game Freak placed members of the development team in the mansion. After the player has completed his or her Pokédex (obtained all 150 Pokémon), the Game Freak designer will give the player a diploma as a reward for finishing the game. However, contrary to popular belief, the conversation ends here. The game designer will not give the player any Pokémon or any gifts and will only present this diploma. GAME FREAK, Inc. ...


The Gym houses Erika and her trainers, who use mainly Grass-type Pokémon.


Fuchsia City

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Fuchsia City (セキチクシティ Sekichiku Shiti?, Sekichiku City in original Japanese language versions) is the southernmost city on the Kanto mainland. It is most notable for housing the Safari Zone, a large area where players can catch Pokémon that cannot be found anywhere else. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Japanese  ) is a language spoken by over 130 million people, mainly in Japan, but also by Japanese emigrant communities around the world. ... The Safari Zone is an area of the Pokémon video game series. ...


Koga is the Fuchsia City Gym Leader in Pokémon Red, Blue, Yellow, Fire Red, and Leaf Green, as well as in the Pokémon anime and in Pokémon Adventures. In Pokémon Gold, Silver, and Crystal, he is replaced by his daughter, Janine. Both use Poison-type Pokémon. In Fire Red, and Leaf Green, Janine is seen above the Chansey enclosure in the Pokémon zoo. Koga (Kyō) is a character in the Pokémon video game series. ... A screenshot from Pokémon LeafGreen, showing the player in Blaines gym on Cinnabar Island Pokémon gyms are buildings situated throughout the fictional Pokémon world, where Pokémon trainers can train or compete to qualify for Pokémon League competitions. ... Pokémon Red and Pokémon Blue are the first two installments of the Pokémon series of role-playing video games, released for the Game Boy in Japan in 1996. ... Pokémon Yellow: Special Pikachu Edition is the fourth game in the Pokémon video game series in Japan, and the third in North America and Europe. ... Pokémon FireRed and Pokémon LeafGreen are two titles in the Pokémon video game series, released for the Game Boy Advance in 2004. ... The main characters of the Advanced Generation: Brock, Ash, May, Max, along with Mudkip, Treecko, Pikachu, and Torchic. ... Pokémon Adventures, released in Japan as Pocket Monsters SPECIAL ), is a Pokémon-related manga based on the video games. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Pokémon FireRed and Pokémon LeafGreen are two titles in the Pokémon video game series, released for the Game Boy Advance in 2004. ...


Saffron City

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Saffron City (ヤマブキシティ Yamabuki Shiti?, Yamabuki City in original Japanese language versions) is one of the larger cities of Kanto. It is most notable for housing Silph Co., a massive office complex that spans 11 floors. It is also notable for having two separate gyms, though one is unofficial. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x640, 23 KB) This image is from the Pokémon series of cartoons or video games, and the copyright for it is owned by Pokémon USA, Inc. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x640, 23 KB) This image is from the Pokémon series of cartoons or video games, and the copyright for it is owned by Pokémon USA, Inc. ... Japanese  ) is a language spoken by over 130 million people, mainly in Japan, but also by Japanese emigrant communities around the world. ...


Two Gyms exist in Saffron City. One is the official Pokémon League Gym, a group of Psychic trainers led by Sabrina, the gym leader. Next to it stands the Fighting Dojo, an unofficial gym made up of Fighting trainers. City residents say that the Fighting Dojo was once an official League Gym, but lost its status to the rival Psychic gym. The Pokémon League is an organization within the fictional Pokémon World whose feature members are the Elite Four and which is led by the Elite Four Champion. ... // Pokémon types are special attributes which determine the strengths and weaknesses of different Pokémon species. ... Since Pokémon Crystal, trainers in the video games can be male or female. ... Sabrina (Natsume) is a fictional character in the Pokémon video game series. ... // Pokémon types are special attributes which determine the strengths and weaknesses of different Pokémon species. ...


In the original three games and their remakes, the player must liberate Silph. Co from the control of Team Rocket. Silph Co. is a very elaborate location that utilizes teleport pads to warp the player from location to location. Team Rocket grunts and scientists are scattered around the place, making it more difficult to move around. At the top floor, Giovanni is waiting. He tells the player to go away, but seeing that he or she will not move, engages in battle. Giovanni then leaves the building.


There are several changes in Pokémon Gold, Silver, and Crystal. Silph Co. has improved security and the player can no longer see the top floors. Saffron also houses the the Magnet Train, which runs between Saffron and Goldenrod City in the Johto region. This is a list of the major cities and locations from the fictional Johto region featured in the Pokémon series. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


In Super Smash Bros., Saffron City is a playable stage, housing Silph Co. and other two buildings. This article is about the Nintendo 64 game. ...


Cinnabar Island

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Cinnabar Island (グレンじま or グレンタウン Guren-jima or Guren Taun?, Guren Island or Guren Town in original Japanese language versions) is home to a laboratory and an old, abandoned mansion. One can go to the laboratory to trade some Pokémon and identify the fossils found in Pewter City and Mt. Moon. There are also some trainers and diaries in the mansion, with brief information on Mewtwo's creation. Wild Pokémon also live in the mansion. To open the gym, one must retrieve a key from the mansion. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Japanese  ) is a language spoken by over 130 million people, mainly in Japan, but also by Japanese emigrant communities around the world. ... Mewtwo ) is one of the 493 Pokémon fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Pokémon media franchise. ...


In Pokémon Gold, Silver, and Crystal, Cinnabar Island has been destroyed in a volcanic eruption, and every building on the island except the Pokémon Center is gone. Blaine, the Gym Leader who uses Fire-type Pokémon, relocated his gym to the nearby Seafoam Islands, which in turn was reduced to a small cavern. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This is a list of the major cities and locations from the fictional Kanto region featured in the Pokémon series. ...


Other locations

Viridian Forest

Viridian Forest (トキワのもり Tokiwa no Mori?, Tokiwa Forest in original Japanese language versions) is is a forest that lies between Viridian City and Pewter City. The woods are filled a large quantity of Bug-type-using trainers and Bug Pokémon. Inside, the Pokémon franchise's mascot, Pikachu, can be found.[1] Japanese  ) is a language spoken by over 130 million people, mainly in Japan, but also by Japanese emigrant communities around the world. ... // Pokémon types are special attributes which determine the strengths and weaknesses of different Pokémon species. ...


Mt. Moon

Mt. Moon (オツキミやま Otsukimi-yama?, Mt. Otsukimi in original Japanese language versions) is a mountain that lies between Pewter City and Cerulean City. As it cannot be climbed, players must hike through the cave area. In Red, Blue, and Yellow, it is a three-floor dungeon with multiple paths. At the end of the path, a scientist holds two ancient fossils. After the player defeats him, he concedes and lets the player take one fossil. Contrary to popular belief, the scientist is not a part of Team Rocket, for it is never stated so by the game. Japanese  ) is a language spoken by over 130 million people, mainly in Japan, but also by Japanese emigrant communities around the world. ...


In the second generation, Mt. Moon is reduced to a simple path. It also contains an additional exit, which leads to the Mt. Moon Square, an open space in the middle of Mt. Moon where Clefairy play during Monday nights. If the player watches the Clefairy dance around a rock then break it using Rock Smash, they can obtain a Moon Stone.


Rock Tunnel

Rock Tunnel (イワヤマトンネル Iwa Yama Tonneru?, lit. "rock mountain tunnel") is a cave that connects Cerulean City and Lavender Town. It's notable for being the only cave in Kanto which needs the HM Flash.


Diglett's Cave

Diglett's Cave is a long tunnel that was dug by wild Diglett and Dugtrio between Route 2 south of Pewter City and Route 11 on the eastern edge of Vermillion City. After the trainer enters into Cerulean City, the only way back to Pewter City, Viridian City, and Pallet Town is through this cave. Of course, wild Diglett and Dugtrio can be found in here.


Pokémon Tower

Pokémon Tower (ポケモンタワー Pokemon Tawā?) is located in Lavender Town, built as a Pokémon graveyard. Memorial services are held here. The Channelers all speak of a ghost that haunts the tower. If the player doesn't have the Silph Scope, a device to identify ghosts, he/she will see them as strange shadows with eyes, and his or her Pokémon will refuse to attack. When the top floor is reached, the player will find Mr. Fuji, an old man that cares about Pokémon and is popular in Lavender Town. He will give the player the Pokémon Flute, which is needed to wake the Snorlax that are blocking two key routes. Snorlax Kabigon in original Japanese language versions) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ...


Celadon Game Corner

The Game Corner is "the playground for grown-ups" in Celadon City and is run by the criminal syndicate Team Rocket in the first generation. The player can play slot machines and earn coins to exchange for prizes such as TMs or a Pokémon next door. In Pokémon Gold, Silver and Crystal, the name is changed to Celadon Game Corner and its slogan to "The playground for everybody." This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In the Game Boy video games Pokémon Gold and Silver, players must become Pokémon Trainers by exploring Johto, collecting the eight regional gym badges, and capturing Pokémon. ... In the Game Boy video games Pokémon Gold and Silver, players must become Pokémon Trainers by exploring Johto, collecting the eight regional gym badges, and capturing Pokémon. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Silph Co.

Silph Co. (シルフカンパニー Shirufu Kanpanī?) is a company dedicated to creating tools related to Pokémon, especially for Pokémon trainers. Its offices reside in Saffron City objects created by Silph include Porygon, the Up-Grade (to evolve Porygon to Porygon2), Master Balls, and TMs and HMs. Since Pokémon Crystal, trainers in the video games can be male or female. ... Porygon ) is a fictional species featured in the Pokémon franchise. ... Porygon2 , Polygon2) are one of the 493   fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... In the fictional world of the Pokémon video games and anime television series, a Poké Ball (known as Monster Ball in Japan) is a spherical device used by Pokémon Trainers to capture new Pokémon and store them when they are not in use. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...


Safari Zone

Main article: Safari Zone

The Safari Zone (サファリゾーン Safari Zōn?) is a wide-open area in Fuchsia City where the player can play a game: Catching all the Pokémon they can in a certain amount of steps, with only thirty Safari Balls (a special type of Pokéball), and without using Pokémon of their own to battle. Giving them 500 steps to catch Pokémon. Notably, this is the sole place where a player can catch several types of Pokémon that are not found anywhere else. The Safari Zone is an area of the Pokémon video game series. ... In the fictional world of the Pokémon video games and anime television series, a Poké Ball (known as Monster Ball or Monsuta-bo-ru in Japan) is a spherical device used by Pokémon Trainers to capture new Pokémon and store them when they are not in use. ...


Pokémon Mansion

The Pokémon Mansion is an old, burned down mansion on Cinnabar Island. It got its name because a famous Pokémon researcher once lived there. The key to accessing the Cinnabar Gym is located within this mansion. Different floors can be accessed by pressing different switches hidden in the Rhydon statues. Information about Mew can be found in different areas of the Mansion.


Seafoam Islands

The Seafoam Islands (ふたごじま Futago-jima?, Twin Islands in original Japanese language versions) are a set of caves between Fuchsia City and Cinnabar Island. The legendary Pokémon Articuno resides in this area. During the second generation, as Cinnabar Island has been destroyed by a volcano, Blaine moved his gym to the Seafoam Islands. Japanese  ) is a language spoken by over 130 million people, mainly in Japan, but also by Japanese emigrant communities around the world. ... Articuno , Freezer in original Japanese language versions) is one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... Blaine is a character in the Pokémon video game series, the Pokémon anime series and the Pokémon manga series. ...


Power Plant

The Power Plant (むじんはつでんしょ Mujin Hatsudensho?, lit. "unmanned power plant") is an abandoned building, secretly found between the entrance and exit of the Rock Tunnel. It appears in the games Pokémon Red, Blue, and Yellow. At the end of the building is the legendary Pokémon Zapdos. In Gold, Silver and Crystal, the Power Plant has been reactivated and is used to run the Magnet Train. Zapdos is no longer in the plant. Pokémon Red and Pokémon Blue are the first two installments of the Pokémon series of role-playing video games, released for the Game Boy in Japan in 1996. ... Pokémon Red and Pokémon Blue are the first two installments of the Pokémon series of role-playing video games, released for the Game Boy in Japan in 1996. ... Pokémon Yellow: Special Pikachu Edition is the fourth game in the Pokémon video game series in Japan, and the third in North America and Europe. ... Zapdos , Thunder in original Japanese language versions) is a fictional character in the Pokémon franchise. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


In the anime, the Power Plant is known as the Battle Factory and is one of the seven Frontier facilities.[citation needed] Its leader, Noland uses an Articuno to battle Ash's Charizard. The main cast of the anime Cowboy Bebop (1998) (L to R: Spike Spiegel, Jet Black, Ed Tivrusky, Faye Valentine, and Ein the dog) For the oleo-resin, see Animé (oleo-resin). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and the Pokémon Collaborative Projects article style, this Pokémon-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Battle Frontier Brains top to bottom: Brandon, Anabel, Tucker, Lucy, Spencer, Noland, and Greta. ... Articuno , Freezer in original Japanese language versions) is one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... Ash Ketchum is a fictional character in the Pokémon line of game products. ... Charizard , Lizardon in original Japanese language versions) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Pokémon media franchise. ...


Victory Road

Victory Road (チャンピオンロード Chanpion Rōdo?, Champion Road in original Japanese language versions) is a cave that holds the only way to the Indigo Plateau. The protagonist must have all eight badges to enter. Victory Road contains many high-level Pokémon. In the Red, Blue, Green and Yellow versions, Moltres is found here.[2] Japanese  ) is a language spoken by over 130 million people, mainly in Japan, but also by Japanese emigrant communities around the world. ... Moltres , Fire in original Japanese language versions) is a fictional character in the Pokémon franchise. ...


Cerulean Cave

Cerulean Cave (ハナダのどうくつ Hanada no Dōkutsu?, Hanada Cave in original Japanese language versions), popularly known as "Unknown Dungeon" (ななしのどうくつ Nanashi no Dōkutsu?), is the home to the main legendary Pokémon in Kanto, Mewtwo. It is a dungeon so fearsome that a guard blocks the entrance, and will not let the player through until he or she has eight badges to prove that he or she is worthy of taking on the Pokémon who reside in the cave. Pokémon Gold and Silver, and Pokémon Crystal, the entrance has been flooded, and the player cannot access the location. Japanese  ) is a language spoken by over 130 million people, mainly in Japan, but also by Japanese emigrant communities around the world. ... Legendary Pokémon ) are characters in the Pokémon franchise. ... Mewtwo ) is one of the 493 Pokémon fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Pokémon media franchise. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Indigo Plateau

The Indigo Plateau (セキエイこうげん Sekiei Kōgen?, Sekiei Plateau in original Japanese language versions) is a fictional place in the Kanto region in the Pokémon series. It's the headquarters of the Pokémon League, located in northwest Kanto. In order to reach Indigo Plateau, trainers must collect all eight Gym Badges of Kanto or Johto and pass through Victory Road, a cave located at the foot of the Plateau that spans through Routes 22 and 23. Japanese  ) is a language spoken by over 130 million people, mainly in Japan, but also by Japanese emigrant communities around the world. ... Fiction (from the Latin fingere, to form, create) is storytelling of imagined events and stands in contrast to non-fiction, which makes factual claims about reality. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and the Pokémon Collaborative Projects article style, this Pokémon-related article or section may require cleanup. ... The official Pokémon logo. ... The Pokémon League is an organization within the fictional Pokémon World whose feature members are the Elite Four and which is led by the Elite Four Champion. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Trainers face off with the Elite Four and the current Champion to become the new Champion. The Elite Four are considered to the be the strongest trainers in the land, and each trainer specializes in a different type of Pokémon. The player must defeat all four trainers and the Champion consecutively to defeat the game and be crowned as the new Champion. The Elite Four (四天王 shitennō, literally Four heavenly kings in Japanese) is a fictional team of four Pokémon trainers in the Pokémon world. ...


In Pokémon Red, Blue, and Yellow, the Elite Four use these Pokémon:

  1. Lorelei - She specializes in Ice Pokémon.
  2. Bruno - He specializes in Fighting Pokémon.
  3. Agatha - She specializes in Ghost/Poison Pokémon.
  4. Lance - He specializes in Dragon Pokémon.
  5. In the last room, the player meets the current Champion, his or her rival.

In Pokémon Gold, Silver, and Crystal, the Elite Four has four new members, and each one specializes in different types: In the Pokémon video game series, the composition of Elite Four , lit. ... In the Pokémon video game series, the composition of Elite Four , lit. ... In the Pokémon video game series, the composition of Elite Four , lit. ... In the Pokémon video game series, the composition of Elite Four , lit. ... Blue, known as Green ) in the Japanese versions and FireRed and LeafGreen, is a name used to refer to two related, but distinct, fictional characters in the Pokémon franchise, both of them the antagonists of the media in which they appear. ...

  1. Will - He specializes in Psychic Pokémon.
  2. Koga - He specializes in Poison Pokémon.
  3. Bruno - He specializes in Fighting Pokémon.
  4. Karen - She specializes in Dark Pokémon.
  5. Champion Lance - He specializes in Dragon Pokémon.

In the anime, an annual tournament is held in the Indigo Stadium between trainers; the last trainer standing is crowned Champion. It is unknown whether or not the Champion faces off against the Elite Four afterwards. The Pokémon Village, a resort which caters to the Pokémon trainers and other people who have come to watch the competition, is located at the center of the Plateau. Once Pokémon Contests come to Kanto, the yearly Grand Festival is held here as well. In the Pokémon video game series, the composition of Elite Four , lit. ... In the Pokémon video game series, the composition of Elite Four , lit. ... In the Pokémon video game series, the composition of Elite Four , lit. ... In the Pokémon video game series, the composition of Elite Four , lit. ... In the Pokémon video game series, the composition of Elite Four , lit. ...


References

Pokémon regions and locations
Kanto: List of Kanto locations
Johto: List of Johto locations
Hoenn: List of Hoenn locations
Sinnoh: List of Sinnoh locations
Other: Orange IslandsSevii IslandsOrre • Fiore

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