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Encyclopedia > List of Islamic terms in Arabic

Part of a series on
Islam
For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ...



Image File history File links Mosque02. ...

Beliefs
Aqidah (sometimes spelled as Aqeeda, Aqida or Aqeedah) (Arabic: عقيدة) is an Islamic term meaning creed. ...

Allah · Oneness of God
Muhammad · Prophets of Islam Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Islam reveres the One and Only God, known as Allah (الله) in Arabic. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... Prophets of Islam are male human beings who are regarded by Muslims to be prophets chosen by God. ...

Practices

Profession of Faith · Prayer
Fasting · Charity · Pilgrimage The Five Pillars of Islam (Arabic: أركان الإسلام) is the term given to the five duties incumbent on every Muslim. ... White flag featuring the Shahada text as used by the Taliban. ... Salat redirects here. ... Sawm (Arabic: صوم) is an Arabic word for fasting regulated by Islamic jurisprudence. ... This is a sub-article of Islamic economical jurisprudence. ... This article is about the Islamic tradition. ...

History & Leaders
Muslim history began in Arabia with Muhammads first recitations of the Quran in the 7th century. ... Islamic religious leaders have traditionally been persons who, as part of the clerisy, mosque, or government, performed a prominent role within their community or nation. ...

Timeline of Muslim history
Ahl al-Bayt · Sahaba
Rashidun Caliphs · Shi'a Imams There is much more to Muslim history than military and political history; this particular chronology is almost entirely of military and political history. ... Ahl al-Bayt (Arabic: ) is a phrase meaning People of the House, or family. ... In Islam, the SÌ£aḥābah (Arabic: ‎ companions) were the companions of Muhammad. ... The Rightly Guided Caliphs or The Righteous Caliphs ( transliteration: ) is a term used in Sunni Islam to refer to the first four Caliphs. ... This article is about the Shia concept, for the more general Islamic term, see Imam. ...

Texts & Laws
// Quran Text Surahs Ayah Commentary/Exegesis Tafsir ibn Kathir (by Ibn Kathir) Tafsir al-Tabari (by Tabari) Al Kordobi Tafseer-e-kabir (by Imam Razi) Tafheem-al-Quran (by Maulana Maududi) Sunnah/Hadith Hadith (Traditions of The Prophet) The Siha-e-Sitta al-Bukhari (d. ... This article is about Islamic religious law. ...

Qur'an · Sunnah · Hadith
Fiqh · Sharia
Kalam · Tasawwuf (Sufism) The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Sunnah(t) () literally means “trodden path”, and therefore, the sunnah of the prophet means “the way of the prophet”. Terminologically, the word ‘Sunnah’ in Sunni Islam means those religious actions that were instituted by Muhammad(PBUH) during the 23 years of his ministry and which Muslims initially received through consensus... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about Islamic religious law. ... Kalam (علم الكلم)is one of the religious sciences of Islam. ... Sufism is a mystic tradition within Islam that encompasses a diverse range of beliefs and practices dedicated to divine love and the cultivation of the heart. ...

Major branches
The religion of Islam has many divisions, sects, schools, traditions, and related faiths. ...

Sunni · Shi'a

Culture & Society
Sunni Muslims are the largest denomination of Islam. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Muslim culture is a term primarily used in secular academia to describe all cultural practices common to historically Islamic peoples. ... Nations with a Muslim majority appear in green, while nations that are approximately 50% Muslim appear yellow. ...

Academics · Animals · Art
Calendar · Children · Demographics
Festivals · Mosques · Philosophy
Politics · Science · Women Islamic Studies is the academic discipline which focuses on Islamic issues. ... This article is about the attitudes of Islam regarding animals. ... The Taj Mahal, Agra. ... The Islamic calendar or Muslim calendar (Arabic: التقويم الهجري; at-taqwÄ«m al-hijrÄ«; Persian: تقویم هجري قمری ‎ taqwÄ«m-e hejri-ye qamari; also called the Hijri calendar) is the calendar used to date events in many predominantly Muslim countries, and used by Muslims everywhere to determine the proper day on which to celebrate... This article discusses childrens rights given by Islam, childrens duties towards their parents, parents treatment of their children, both males and females, biological and foster children, also discussed are some of the differences regarding rights with respect to different schools of thoughts. ... Muslim percentage of population by country Distribution of Islam per country. ... Muslim holidays generally celebrate the events of the life of Islams main prophet, Muhammad, especially the events surrounding the first hearing of the Kuran. ... The Masjid al-Haram in Mecca as it exists today A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... Islamic philosophy (الفلسفة الإسلامية) is a branch of Islamic studies, and is a longstanding attempt to create harmony between philosophy (reason) and the religious teachings of Islam (faith). ... Islam as a political movement has a diverse character that has at different times incorporated elements of many other political movements, while simultaneously adapting the religious views of Islamic fundamentalism, particularly the view of Islam as a political religion. ... In the history of science, Islamic science refers to the science developed under the Islamic civilisation between the 8th and 15th centuries (the Islamic Golden Age). ... The complex relationship between women and Islam is defined by both Islamic texts and the history and culture of the Muslim world. ...

Islam & other religions
This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Christianity · Jainism
Judaism · Sikhism

See also
This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Jainism and Islam came in close contact with each other following the Islamic Conquest from Central Asia and Persia in the seventh to the twelfth centuries when much of north and central India came under the rule of the Delhi Sultanate, and later the Mughal dynasty. ... This article is about the historical interaction between Islam and Judaism. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...

Criticism of Islam · Islamophobia
Glossary of Islamic terms Criticism of Islam has existed since Islams formative stages on philosophical, scientific, ethical, political and theological grounds. ... This box:      Islamophobia is a criticized[1][2] though increasingly accepted[3][4] term that refers to prejudice or discrimination against Islam or Muslims. ...

Islam Portal  v  d  e 

The following list consists of concepts that are derived from both Islamic and Arab tradition, which are expressed as words in the Arabic language. The main purpose of this list is to disambiguate multiple spellings, to make note of spellings no longer in use for these concepts, to define the concept in one or two lines, to make it easy for one to find and pin down specific concepts, and to provide a guide to unique concepts of Islam all in one place. For other uses, see Concept (disambiguation). ... Islam ▶(?) (Arabic: الإسلام al-islām) the submission to God is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions, the worlds second-largest religion, and said by some sources to be the fastest growing religion in some parts of the world. ... For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ... Arabic redirects here. ...


Separating concepts in Islam from concepts specific to Arab culture, or from the language itself, can be difficult. Many Arabic concepts have an Arabic secular meaning as well as an Islamic meaning. One example is the concept of dawah. One of the complexities of the Arabic language is that a single word can have multiple meanings. The word Islam is itself a good example. For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ...


Readers should also note that Arabic is written in its own alphabet, with letters, symbols, and orthographic conventions that do not have exact equivalents in the Latin alphabet (see Arabic alphabet). The following list is a transliteration of Arabic terms and phrases. Consequently, Muslims may transliterate certain Arabic words differently, such as din as opposed to deen, and aqidah as opposed to aqeedah. Most items in the list also contain their actual Arabic spelling. ABCs redirects here, for the Alien Big Cats, see British big cats. ... The orthography of a language specifies the correct way of using a specific writing system to write the language. ... The Latin alphabet, also called the Roman alphabet, is the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world today. ... The Arabic alphabet is the script used for writing languages such as Arabic, Persian, Urdu, and others. ... Transliteration is the practice of transcribing a word or text written in one writing system into another writing system. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ...



Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


A

‘Abd (عبد) 
servant, worshipper, slave. Muslims consider themselves servants and slaves of God. Common Muslim names such as Abdullah (Servant of God), Abdul-Malik (Slave of the King), Abdur-Rahmān (Slave of the most Beneficent), Abdus-Salām (Slave of Peace), all refer to names of Allah.
Adab (أدب) 
Traditionally describes good manners, as in etiquette. For example, being courteous is good adab. However, the term can be used very broadly, and the proper translation would be "the proper way to go about something," as in the example, Aadaab al Qitaal, or, "The Proper Way of Fighting in War," (Qitaal in Arabic means mortal combat) in which the word "etiquette" does not befit the context.
Athān (أذان) 
call to salat (prayer), sometimes alternatively spelled and pronounced Azaan and Adhan.
‘Adl (عدل) 
Justice especially distributive justice: social, economic, political, environmental.
A.H. : "After Hijra." The Islamic calendar starts counting years starting from the time when Muhammad had to leave Mecca and go to Medina, an event known as the Hijra: July 16th, 622.
Aḥad (أحد)
literally "one." Islamically, ahad means One Alone, unique, none like God. Al-Wahid is one of the names of God.
Aḥkām (أحكام)
rulings and orders of the Qu'ran and Sunnah. Five kinds of orders: Wajib, Mustahab, Muharram, Makruh, and Halal.
Ahlul-Bayt (أهل البيت ) 
members of Muhammad's Household. Also known among Shia as the Masumin (infallibles; spiritually pure).
Ahlul-Fatrah ( أهل الفترة) 
people who live in ignorance of the teachings of a revealed religion, but according to the "Fitra", the "Natural Religion" innate to human nature as created by God.
Ahl ul-Kitāb (أهل الكتاب ) 
"People of the Book", or followers of pre-Islamic monotheistic religions with some form of scripture believed to be of divine origin which were mentioned in Quran: Jews, Christians, Sabians, Magians or Zoroastrians. Sometimes said to include also Hanifs. Has at times been extended to include pre-Islamic religious traditions with scriptures which were not mentioned in Quran, e.g.: Buddhists, Hindus, Taoists, Confucians.
Ākhirah (الآخرة) 
hereafter or eternal life
Akhlāq (أخلاق) 
The practice of virtue. Morals.
Akhlasu 
Genuine in religious beliefs.
‘Ālamīn (عالمين) 
Literally "worlds", humankind, jinn, angels and all that exists
Alayhis Salam 
"Peace be upon him" This expression normally follows after naming a prophet (other than Muhammad), or one of the noble Angels (i.e. Jibreel[Gabriel], Mikaeel[Michael], etc.)
Al-Ḥamdu lillāh (الحمد لله) 
"Praise be to God!" Qur'anic exclamation
Allāh (الله)
God (in monotheistic understanding of the word); the only entity worthy of worship
Allahumma (اللَّهُمَّ) 
"O God."
Allāhu Akbar (الله أكبر) 
"God is the Greatest." Islamic expression.
Al-’Isrā’ (الإسراء) 
"Night journey" of Muhammad
‘Ālim (عالم) 
One who knows. A scholar (in any field of knowledge); a scientist (who knows science) or a theologian (who knows religion); similar to Japanese sensei, "teacher"
Amānah (أمانة)
the trust. Of all creation, only human beings carry the "trust", which is free will.
Āmīn (آمين)
Amen, a supplication meaning, "O God, accept our invocation!" (used only in Sunni Islam)
Amīrul-Mu’minīn (أمير المؤمنين) 
In some countries like Morocco, a Amīrul-Mu’minīn or Commander of the faithful is the religious chief.
Aminah (أمنة) 
Muhammad's mother. Aminah fell sick and died in Abwa, near Madina (then Yathrib) when Muhammad was six years old.
Al Amr Bi'l Maruf 
fundamental Islamic doctrine of enjoining right and discovering wrong
anfal 
Property of the Imam
Anṣār (أنصار)
"Helpers." The Muslim converts at Medina who helped the Muslims from Mecca after the Hijrah.
‘Aqīdah (عقيدة) 
The Islamic creed, or the six article of faith, which consists of the belief in God, Angels, Messengers and Prophets, Scriptures, the Day of Judgment, and Destiny.
‘Aql (عقل)
Intelligence, intellect, mind, understanding
Arkan singular rukn (ركن/أركان) 
The five rukn "pillars" of Islam. (See rukn)
A.S. ('Alayhis-salaam) 
This acronym evokes a blessing and is appended to the names of the prophets who came before Muhammad. It will also be applied the mothers of those prophets. When following a woman's name, the feminine form is 'Alayhas-salaam.
Aslim Taslam (أسلم تسلم)
"Submit to Islam" (See dawah)
Asmā’ Allah al-Ḥusnā (أسماء الله الحسنى)
List of God's 99 names. According to a hadith, the one who enumerates them all will enter Paradise.
‘Aṣr (العصر)
The third salat prayer. The time of the day before sunset and after noon. also means "era".
Aṣ-Ṣirāṭ
The bridge on which judgement of where a person's Akhira (afterlife) will lie is passed.
‘Asharatul-mubashshirūn (العشرة المبشّرون)
The ten companions of Muhammad who were promised paradise (only in Sunni Islam)
‘Āshūrā’ (عاشوراء) 
Tenth day of the month of Muharram. It is the day God saved Moses and the children of Israel from the Pharaoh. The grandson of the prophet Muhammad, Imam Hussayn sacrificed his life along with 72 of his companions on the sand dunes of Karbala. Sunni Scholars recommended to fast during this day. To the Shias, it is also a day on which they mourn the death of the third Shia Imam, Husayn ibn Ali, along with his family and companions, who were killed in the famous battle in Karbala. They cry and weep and organize lamentating programmes where they not only learn how to live a proper Islamic life and improve their Spiritual Self but also cry at the end of the ritual to show their true love and faith towards imam Hussayn.
As-Salāmu ‘Alaykum (السلام عليكم)
The Islamic greeting; literally "Peace be upon you"; In addition, wa-Raḥmatullāhi wa-Barakātuhu means "and the Mercy of God and His blessing". The response to this greeting is wa-‘Alaykum us-Salām wa-Raḥmatullāhi wa-Barakātuhu --"And on you be the Peace and Mercy of God and His Blessing".
Astaghfirullāh (أستغفر الله)
"I seek forgiveness from God." Islamic expression.
Audhu billah (أعوذ بالله ’A‘ūdhu billāh)
"I seek refuge in God". This is a paraphrase on the beginnings of the two last suras in the Qur'an.
Awliyā’ (أولياء)
Friends, protectors, helpers, caretaker, maintainer . (singular: wali)
‘Awrah (عورة) 
The part of a person's body that must be covered before everybody but a spouse. It may also be used to refer to what must be concealed of a woman before non-related men
Āyah (آية), plural āyāt (آيات) 
A sign. More specifically, a verse in the Qur'an.
Āyatullāh (آية الله, also spelled Ayatollah)
Sign of God Title given to highly ranked religious scholars in Sh'ia sect.
‘Azl (عزل) 
coitus interruptus, Intercourse characterized by withdrawal of the penis before ejaculation. Literally means "isolation".

This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... // The 99 Names of God, also known as The 99 attributes of Allah (Arabic: ‎ translit: ), are the names of God revealed to man in the Quran;[1] even though His names (as adjectives, word constructs, or otherwise) exceed ninety-nine in the Quran. ... gadfglkjfdgvkleajbvgopigreogaerpo[gkaerokgkflgsgopsadfvgks;dfkgsdg;dlsfskgsdfgskgkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk ... Adhan (Azaan) (أَذَان) is the Islamic call to prayer, recited by the muezzin. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Adl is an Arabic term roughly meaning Justice. It is used in the everyday sense of the word: for example, wizeer al-adl translates to The Minister of Justice. ... This article is about the concept of justice. ... Distributive justice - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Social justice refers to the concept of an unjust society that refers to more than just the administration of laws. ... Islamic economics is economics in accordance with Islamic law. ... Ijmāʿ (إجماع) is an Arabic tern referring to the consensus of the ummah, the community of Muslims, those practicing Islam, or of the ulema, those learned in the relevant topic. ... Hima means (is Arabic for) inviolate zones solely for the conservation of natural capital, typically fields, wildlife and forests (contrast haram to protect areas for more immediate human purposes). ... Ahad is an Arabic word meaning Single or One and refers to God. ... In Islamic context, the Ahkam (أحكام) are rulings and orders of the Quran and Sunnah. ... Ahl al-Bayt (Arabic: أهل البيت ) is a phrase meaning People of the House, or family. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... In Islamic theology, the term Ahl al-Fatrah () refers to everyone whom the dawah (message of Islam) has not reached in an uncorrupted manner, i. ... The term People of the Book (Hebrew עם הספר, Am HaSefer) is used in Judaism where it refers specifically to the Jewish people and the Torah. ... Many religions and spiritual movements believe that their sacred texts (or scriptures) are the Word of God, often feeling that the texts are wholly divine or spiritually inspired in origin. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... (Arabic , plural حنفاء) is an Arabic term that refers to pre-Islamic non-Jewish nor Christian Arabian monotheists. ... Akhirah is the day of judgment in the Islamic fatih. ... Afterlife (also known as life after death) is a generic term referring to a continuation of existence, typically spiritual and experiential, beyond this world, or after death. ... Akhlaq (أخلاق) (English: Disposition) is the practice of virtue, morality and manners in Islam. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... ć Alhamdulillah (الحمد لله) (Turkish: Elhamdülillah) means Praise to God in Arabic, similar to the Hebrew Halelu Yah. ... Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... This article is about Islamic religious phrase God is most great. For other usages, see Allahu Akbar (disambiguation). ... Surat Al-Isra (Arabic: سورة الإسراء ) (ie The Night Journey) is the 17th sura of the Quran . ... Ulema (Arabic: علماء) is the community of legal scholars of Islam and the Sharia. ... This article is about the profession. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In Islamic context, Amanah (أمانة) (lit. ... The word Amen (Tiberian Hebrew אמן ’ĀmÄ“n So be it; truly, Standard Hebrew אמן Amen, Arabic آمين ’ĀmÄ«n) is a declaration of affirmation found in the Hebrew Bible and in the Quran. ... Sunni Muslims are the largest denomination of Islam. ... Amir al-Muminin (Arabic أمير المؤمنين) usually translated Commander of the Faithful or Prince of the Faithful (a better translation might be Leader of the Believers), is the Arabic style of Caliphs and other independent sovereign Muslim rulers that claim legitimacy from a community of Muslims. ... Aminah bint Wahab (Arabic: transliteration: )(???-577) was the mother of Muhammad. ... This article is about the Saudi city of Medina. ... Ansar is A Islamic term that literally means helper and denotes the Medinan citizens that helped Muhammad and the Muhajirun on the arival to the city after the Migration to Medina // Abd-Allah ibn Ubaiy — chief [1] Sad ibn Ubadah, the chief of the Khazraj[2] Hassan ibn Thabit... Aqidah (sometimes spelled as Aqeeda, Aqida or Aqeedah) (Arabic: عقيدة) is an Islamic term meaning creed. ... Aquila (Latin for Eagle; sometimes named the Vulture), is one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy, also mentioned by Eudoxus (4th cent. ... The Five Pillars of Islam (Arabic: أركان الإسلام) is the term given to the five duties incumbent on every Muslim. ... The Five Pillars of Islam (Arabic: أركان الإسلام) is the term given to the five duties incumbent on every Muslim. ... The Five Pillars of Islam is the term given to the five most fundamental aspects of Sunni Islam. ... The Five Pillars of Islam is the term given to the five most fundamental aspects of Sunni Islam. ... Aslim Taslam (Arabic: أسلم تسلم) (submit to Islam) is a phrase that was taken from the letters sent by the Prophet Muhammed to the chiefs of tribes in his times in which he urged them to convert to Islam to spare their lives. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... // The 99 Names of God, also known as The 99 attributes of Allah (Arabic: ‎ translit: ), are the names of God revealed to man in the Quran;[1] even though His names (as adjectives, word constructs, or otherwise) exceed ninety-nine in the Quran. ... The three-letter acronym ASR may refer to: Age Standardized Rate American Safety Razor Company Acceleration Slip Regulation Accredited Seller Agency, is a designation earned by real estate agents and Realtors. ... Al-Sirât (Arabic: الصراط) is the hair-narrow bridge of Islam, which according to Muslim belief every person must pass on the Day of Judgement to enter Paradise. ... The Asharatu mubashshirun, according to the teachings of Sunni Islam, were the ten companions of Muhammad who were given the glad tidings of assurance of entering Paradise. ... Sunni Muslims are the largest denomination of Islam. ... This article refers to the Islamic remembrance. ... In mathematics, arithmetic or plain old numbers a tenth is one part of a unit or one divided equally into ten parts. ... Muharram (Arabic: محرم ) is the first month of the Islamic calendar. ... // Karbala (Arabic: ; BGN: Al-Karbalā’; also spelled Karbala al-Muqaddasah) is a city in Iraq, located about 100 km southwest of Baghdad at 32. ... The Shia Imam is considered by the Shia sect of Islam to be the rightful successor to Muhammad, and is similar to the Caliph in Sunni Islam. ... This article is about Husayn ibn Ali ibn Abi Talib (626 – 680). ... // Karbala (Arabic: ; BGN: Al-Karbalā’; also spelled Karbala al-Muqaddasah) is a city in Iraq, located about 100 km southwest of Baghdad at 32. ... As-Salāmu `Alaykum (السلام عليكم) is an Arabic language greeting used in both Muslim and Christian cultures. ... Istighfar (Arabic: إستغفار) means the act of seeking forgiveness from God and is one of the essential parts of worship in Islam. ... For other uses, see Allah (disambiguation). ... Wali (Arabic ولي, plural Awliya أولياء, Persian/Turkish pronunciation Vali), is an Arabic word, meaning protector or guardian (most literally etymologically near one), also adopted in various other Islamic cultures. ... Awrah (Arabic: عورة) is a term used within Islam which denotes the parts of the body that are not meant to be exposed in public. ... Ayah ( , plural Ayat ) is the Arabic word for sign or miracle. ... For other uses, see Ayatollah (disambiguation). ... Shia Islam, also Shi`ite Islam or Shi`ism (Arabic: ‎ translit: Persian: ‎ ) is the second largest denomination of the religion of Islam. ... Azl (عزل) is the Arabic word for isolation. ... Coitus interruptus, also known as withdrawal or the pull out method, is a method of contraception in which, during sexual intercourse, the penis is removed from the vagina prior to ejaculation, primarily to avoid introducing semen into the vagina. ...

B

Baghawat 
insurgency against a legitimate government
Bai'a 
pledge
Batil 
void
Baitullah (بيت الله baytullāh
A mosque, literally "house of God".
Barakah (بركة) 
a blessing. Also, spiritual wisdom and blessing transmitted from master to pupil. The special favor or divine grace which is possessed by the "friends of God," or Sufi masters in particular.
Barzakh (برزخ)
life after death in which the soul of the deceased is transferred across the boundaries of the mortal realm into the spirit world.
Basher (بشر) 
Human(s). Literally means 'face' but generally it refers to a person (man/woman).
Baṣīrah (بصيرة) 
Insight, discernment, perceptivity, deep knowledge. Sometimes used by Sufis to denote the ability to directly perceive a transcendental Truth.
Batin 
The interior or hidden meaning. A person who devotes himself to studying such hidden meanings is a batini.
Bid‘ah (بدعة)
Innovation in religion, i.e. inventing new methods of worship. Bad Bid'ahs in Islam are considered a deviation and a serious sin by many Muslims.
Bid'ah sayyi'ah 
Inquiry prohibited in Islam.
Bint (بنت)
daughter
Bismi-llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم)
"In the name of God, Most Gracious, Most Merciful".
Burda (بردة)
not an Arabic term; means "curtain" in Persian. Means covering or to cover.
Bay‘ah (بيعة)
an oath of allegiance to a leader, traditionally the Caliph or Imam.

// Mosque; Aswan, Egypt. ... For other uses, see Baraka. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Basher (بشر) is the Arabic word for face. ... Basirah (بصيرة) is an Arabic word meaning insight, discernment, and perceptivity when used by Sufis to denote the ability to directly perceive a transcendental truth, or meaning dark, sad, and frowning when referring to non-believers on Yaum al-Qiyamah. ... Sufism is a mystic tradition within Islam that encompasses a diverse range of beliefs and practices dedicated to divine love and the cultivation of the heart. ... The interior or hidden meaning of the Quran. ... Bidah (Arabic: بدعة ) is an Islamic term meaning (improper) innovation of religious beliefs or worship. ... Look up bint in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Basmala or Bismillah Basmala calligraphy Basmala (Arabic بسملة) is an Arabic language noun which is used as the collective name of the whole of the recurring Islamic phrase  . This phrase constitutes the first verse of the first sura (or chapter) of the Quran, and is used in a number of... The Qasida Burda (Poem of the Mantle) is one of the most famous poems in the qasida form. ... Bayah, in Islamic terminology is an oath of allegiance to a leader. ... An oath of allegiance is an oath whereby a subject or citizen acknowledges his duty of allegiance and swears loyalty to his monarch or country. ... For main article see: Caliphate The Caliph (pronounced khaleef in Arabic) is the head of state in a Caliphate, and the title for the leader of the Islamic Ummah, or global Islamic nation. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

C

Caliph (خليفة khalīfah
literally successor; refers to the successor of the Prophet Muhammad, the ruler of an Islamic theocratic monarchy

For main article see: Caliphate The Caliph (pronounced khaleef in Arabic) is the head of state in a Caliphate, and the title for the leader of the Islamic Ummah, or global Islamic nation. ...

D

Dahri 
atheist - from the root ad dahr meaning time. in Islam, atheists are seen as those who think that time only destroys, hence the term ad dahriyyah for the concept of atheism.
Dajjal (دجّال) 
an Islamic figure similar to the Antichrist; means "liar" or "deceiver"
Dallal (ضلال)
going astray
Dar al-`Ahd (دار العهد) 
the Ottoman Empire's relationship with its Christian tributary states
Dar al-Amn (دار الأمن) 
translated (house of safety) refers to status of a Muslim living in some of the Western world.
Dar ad-Dawa (دار الدعوة) 
a region where Islam has recently been introduced.
Dar al-Harb (دار الحرب) 
translated (house of war), refers to areas outside Muslim rule; the non-Islamic world
Dar al-Islam (دار الإسلام)
the abode, or land, of Islam.
Dar al-Kufr (دار الكفر) 
translated (domain of disbelief), the term originally refers to the Quraish-dominated society of Mecca between Prophet Mohammed's flight to Medina (the Hijra) and his triumphant return.
Dar ash-Shahada (دار الشهادة) 
See Dar al-Amn
Darūd  
blessing
Da`wah (الدعوة) 
the call to Islam. (See aslim taslam)
Darwīš (درويش) 
an initiate of the Sufi Path, one who practices Sufism
Dhikr 
A Sufi devotional practice whereby the name of God is repeated in a rhythmical manner
Dhimmi (ذمّي) 
"Protected person"; Jews and Christians (and sometimes others[1], such as Buddhists, Sikhs, Hindus, and Zoroastrians), living in an Islamic state whose right to practice their religion is tolerated under Islamic law.
Dīn (الدين) 
the way of life based on Islamic revelation; the sum total of a Muslim's faith and practice. Dīn is often used to mean the faith and religion of Islam.
Diyya (ديت)
fine for unintentional murder.
Dua (دعاء) 
personal prayer, supplication
Dhikr (ذكر) 
remembrance of God; Sufi spiritual exercise; Muslims believe that the primary function of prophets is to remind people of God.
Dhuhr (الظهر)
second salat prayer
Dunya (دنيا)
The physical Universe, as opposed to the Hereafter

al-Dajjal sometimes spelled Dajal, (Arabic: الدّجّال, al-dajjāl) (The Deceiver/impostor), also known as the false Messiah (see also: Antichrist) is an evil figure in Islamic eschatology, who will appear before Yawm al-Qiyamah (The Day of Resurrection, Judgement Day). ... For the Friedrich Nietzsche book, see The Antichrist. ... dar al-Amn (Arabic: house of safety) is a term proposed by Western Muslim philosophers to describe the status of Muslims in the West. ... Occident redirects here. ... Dar al-Harb (Arabic: house of war) is a term used in many Islamic countries to refer to those areas outside Muslim rule. ... Dar al-Islam (Arabic: دار الإسلام literally house of submission) is a term used to refer to those lands under Muslim government(s). ... dar al-Kufr (Arabic: house of unbelievers) is a term used by the Prophet Muhammed to refer to the Quraish-dominated society of Mecca between his flight to Medina (the Hijra) and his triumphant return. ... Quraish (Arabic: ‎ translit: ) is the Meccan tribe that the Islamic prophet Muhammad belonged to before he received the revelations of Islam. ... Darood can mean: Darod, a Somali clan Darood-e-pak, an Urdu phrase complimenting the Prophet Muhammad. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Aslim Taslam (Arabic: أسلم تسلم) (submit to Islam) is a phrase that was taken from the letters sent by the Prophet Muhammed to the chiefs of tribes in his times in which he urged them to convert to Islam to spare their lives. ... For other uses, see Dervish (disambiguation). ... This article is about dhimmi in the context of Islamic law. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... Zoroastrianism is the religion and philosophy based on the teachings ascribed to the prophet Zoroaster (Zarathustra, Zartosht). ... Deen (دين) is an Arabic word usually explained as way of life or complete code of life. It is not exclusive to Islam, as it also used by Arab Christians. ... Blood money is money paid as a fine to the next of kin of somebody who was killed intentionally (in Arabic: Qisas قصاص) or unintentionally (in Arabic: Diyat or Diyya ديت). Islam has not prescribed any specific amount for Diyat nor has it obligated to discriminate in this matter between a man... What does this mean? It means ‘Supplication and Invocation to Allah’ THE MERIT OF MAKING DUA (SUPPLICATION) Allah Almighty says in the Quran: When my servants ask you concerning me, (tell them) I am indeed close (to them). ... Dhikr , ذکر (Zikr in Urdu and Zekr in Persian) (Arabic pronouncement, invocation or remembrance) is an Islamic practice that focuses on the remembrance of God. ... The Dhuhr prayer (dh pronounced as th in Thou, or simplified to zo) is the mid-day or noon daily prayer recited by practising Muslims. ... In Islamic terminology, the Arabic word dunya (دنيا) means this world — and its earthly concerns and possessions — as opposed to more spiritual realms, or the hereafter. ...

E

Eid Al-Adhha 
The "feast of sacrifice." It is celebrated from the tenth through the thirteenth days of Zul-Hijjah, the twelfth month of the Muslim calendar. (See Id)

F

Fajarah (فجرة)
Wicked evil doers. Plural of "Fajir" (فاجر).
Fajr (فجر)
morning, as in the morning prayer. The time of the day when there is light in the horizon before sunrise.
Falāḥ (فلاح)
success, happiness, well-being
Falsafah 
"philosophy" The methods and content of Greek philosophy which were brought into Islam. A person who tries to interpret Islam though rationalist philosophy was called a faylasuf ("philosopher").
Fanā' (فناء) 
Sufi term meaning extinction - to die to this life while alive. Having no existence outside of God.
Faqih (pl. fuqaha) 
One who has a deep understanding of Islam, its laws, and jurisprudence. (see fiqh)
Al-Faraj 
the return of the Shia Mahdi
Farḍ (فرض), plural Fara’id (فرأض) 
a religious duty, or an obligatory action: praying 5 times a day is fard Neglecting a fard will result in a punishment in the hereafter. (See wajib)
Fard ayn 
obligatory on every individual Muslim to aid in any way he can.
Fard kifayah 
an obligation on the Muslim community as a whole, from which some are freed if others take it up.
Fāsiq (فاسق)
anyone who has violated Islamic law; usually refers to one whose character has been corrupted (plural "fasiqun").
Fatiha 
the short, opening sura of the Qur'an, which begins "In the name of God, the Merciful, the Compassionate. Praise be to God, the Lord of the Worlds..." These words hold an important place in Muslim liturgies and forms the core of the salat.
Fatwā (فتوى) 
legal opinion of an (alim) binding on him and on those who follow his taqlid
Fiqh (فقه) 
jurisprudence built around the shariah by custom (al-urf). Literally means "deep understanding", refers to understanding the Islamic laws. (see faqih)
Fī sabīlu-llāhi (في سبيل الله)
on the path of Allah; common Islamic expression for Jihad and for 'qatlu' (fighting in mortal combat on the path of Allah.) It means for the sake of Allah (eg. giving in charity for the sake of Allah)
Fitna (فتنة) 
trial or tribulation; also refers to any period of disorder, such as a civil war, or the period of time before the end of the world or any civil strife.
Fiṭrah (فطرة)
innate disposition towards virtue, knowledge, and beauty. Muslims believe every child is born with fitrah.
Furqān (فرقان)
the criterion (of right and wrong, true and false); for example, the Qur'an as furqan.

In Islamic context, a Fajir (فاجر) (pl. ... The Fajr prayer is the dawn daily prayer recited by practicing Muslims. ... Falah (فلاح) is the Arabic word for success (especially from self-improvement), happiness and well-being. ... Fanaa (فناء) is the Sufi term for extinction. ... Sufism is a mystic tradition within Islam that encompasses a diverse range of beliefs and practices dedicated to divine love and the cultivation of the heart. ... Fard (Arabic: ) also farida (Arabic: ) is an Islamic term which denotes a religious duty. ... Fard also farida (arabic فرض obligation, duty) is an Islamic term which denotes a religious duty. ... A term in Islam. ... A fatwā (Arabic: ; plural fatāwā Arabic: ), is a considered opinion in Islam made by a mufti, a scholar capable of issuing judgments on Sharia (Islamic law). ... Ulema (, transliteration: , singular: , transliteration: , scholar) (The people of Islamic Knowledge) refers to the educated class of Muslim legal scholars engaged in the several fields of Islamic studies. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For the jurisprudence of courts, see Case law. ... Sharia (Arabic شريعة also Sharia, Shariah or Syariah) is traditional Islamic law. ... In Islamic law (Sharia Arabic: شريعة), al-urf العرف is the custom of a given society, leading to change in the Egypt, marriage the Urfi way means to get married without offical papers issued by the state (Zawag Urfi:زو&#1575... Fi sabil Allah (في سبيل الله) is an Arabic term meaning in the cause of Allah. ... For other uses, see Jihad (disambiguation). ... Fitna (فتنة) is an Arabic word, generally regarded as very difficult to translate but at the same time is considered to be an all encompassing word referring to schism, secession, upheaval and anarchy at once. ... The Horsemen of the Apocalypse, the entities that bring false peace, War, famine, pestilence, and death. ... For the eschatological beliefs of various religions, see End Times. ... In Islamic context, Fitrah (فطرة) is humanitys innate disposition towards virtue, knowledge, and beauty. ... Surat Al-Furqan (Arabic: سورة الفرقان ) (The Criterion, The Standard) is the 25th sura of the Quran with 77 ayat. ...

G

Ghafara (غفر)
(verb in past tense) to forgive, to cover up (sins). A characteristic of God.
Ghaflah (غفلة)
heedlessness, forgetfulness of God, indifference
Ghayb (غيب)
the unseen, unknown.
Ghasbi  
possessed unlawfully
Ghusl (غسل)
full ablution of the whole body (see wudu). Ghusl jenobat is the mandatory shower after having sexual discharge.

In Islamic context, Ghafara (غفر) (v. ... Ghaflah (غفلة) is the Arabic word for negligence, heedlessness. ... In Islamic context, (al-)Ghaib (غيب) is (the) unseen and unknown, in reference to Allah and the forces that shape the world. ... Ghusl (غسل) is an Arabic term referring to the full Ablution in Islam. ... This article is about Hygiene in Islam. ...

H

Hādī (هادي)
a guide, one who guides; A Muslim name for God is The Guide, or Al-Hadi.
Hidāyah (هداية) 
guidance from God.
Hadath asghar 
minor ritual impurity
Hadath akbar  
major ritual impurity which requires Niyyat for cleaning
Hadith (حديث ḥadīth) plural ahādīth 
literally "speech"; recorded saying or tradition of the Prophet Muhammad validated by isnad; with sira these comprise the sunnah and reveal shariah
Haid 
menstruation
Ḥalāl (حلال) 
lawful, permitted, good, beneficial, praiseworthy, honourable. (See mustahabb, mandub)
Ḥāfiẓ (حافظ) 
someone who knows the Qur'an by heart. Literal translation = memorizer or Protector.
Hajj (الحجّ haj
pilgrimage to Mecca. Sunnis regard this as the fifth Pillar of Islam
Ḥākim (حاكم) 
a ruler's or gubernatorial title
Hakmiya 
sovereignty
Ḥanīf (حنيف) 
pre-Islamic non-Jewish or non-Christian monotheists. Plural: ḥunafā' (حنفاء).
Haqq (‎‍حق)
truth, reality, right, righteousness. Al-Haqq is one of 99 names of God.
Ḥarām (حرام) 
forbidden. An individual is rewarded for keeping away from haram done out of obedience, (rather than out of fear, shyness or the inability to do it.) Antonym: halal. (See mazur, makrouh)
Ḥaram (حرم) 
sanctuary.
Ḥasan (حسن)
Good, beautiful, admirable. Also a categorization of a hadith's authenticity as "acceptable". (other categorizations include authenic and fabricated).
Ḥijāb (حجاب) 
literally "cover". It describes the self-covering of the body for the purposes of modesty and dignity; broadly, a prescribed system of attitudes and behaviour regarding modesty and dignity. (See abayah, al-amira, burnuk, burqa, chador, jilbab, khimar, milfeh, niqab, purdah, shayla)
Hikmah 
Literally this means "wisdom" and refers to the highest possible level of understanding attainable by a Muslim. In particular, it refers to the illuminative, mystical sort of wisdom which a Gnostic or Sufi might accomplish.
Hijra (الهجرة) 
Muhammad and his followers' emigration from Mecca to Medina. Literally, "migration". This holiday marks the beginning of the Muslim New Year on the first day of the month of Muharram. See Rabi Al-Awwal and abbreviation A.H..
Ḥimā (حمى) 
wilderness reserve, protected forest, grazing commons, important to khalifa
Ḥizb (حزب) 
one half of a juz', or roughly 1/60th of the Qur'an
Houri (حورية ḥūrīya; pl. ḥūrīyāt حوريات) 
beautiful and pure young men and women, that Muslims believe inhabit Paradise, or Heaven.
Hudā (هدى) 
guidance
Hudna (هدنة) 
Truce. Cease-fire (often temporary)
Ḥudūd (حدود) (sing. hadd) 
Literally, limits or boundaries. Usually refers to limits placed by Allah on man; penalties of the Islamic law (sharia) for crimes which are described in the Qur'an such as theft and adultery.
Hujjaj 
Pilgrim
Ḥukm (حكم)
ruling in the Qur'an or Sunnah

Hidayah is the Arabic word for present or gift. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... The isnad (Arabic اسناد or in Quranic era Arabic اسند) are the citations or backings that establish the legitimacy of the hadith, which are the sayings of Muhammad, Prophet of Islam. ... For the river and also village in Norway named Sira, see Sira, Norway. ... Sunnah(t) () literally means “trodden path”, and therefore, the sunnah of the prophet means “the way of the prophet”. Terminologically, the word ‘Sunnah’ in Sunni Islam means those religious actions that were instituted by Muhammad(PBUH) during the 23 years of his ministry and which Muslims initially received through consensus... Sharia (Arabic شريعة also Sharia, Shariah or Syariah) is traditional Islamic law. ... Halal (حلال, alāl, halaal) is an Arabic term meaning permissible. In the English language it most frequently refers to food that is permissible according to Islamic law. ... Mustahabb (Arabic مستحبّ), literally recommended, is an Islamic term referring to actions whose status of approval in Islamic law (ahkam) falls between mubah (neutral) and wajib (actions which must be performed). ... For other uses, see Hafiz (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Islamic tradition. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... The Five Pillars of Islam (Arabic: أركان الإسلام) is the term given to the five duties incumbent on every Muslim. ... Hakim is a title in various oriental languages, derived from two separate Arabic words, both transcribed into English as Hakim: // حكيم ħakÄ«m It means wise man or physician Furthermore, al-Hakim the Wise is #47 of names of Allah revealed to man حاكم ħākim It means a ruler, governor, or judge. ... (Arabic , plural حنفاء) is an Arabic term that refers to pre-Islamic non-Jewish nor Christian Arabian monotheists. ... Haqq is the Arabic word for truth. ... // The 99 Names of God, also known as The 99 attributes of Allah (Arabic: ‎ translit: ), are the names of God revealed to man in the Quran;[1] even though His names (as adjectives, word constructs, or otherwise) exceed ninety-nine in the Quran. ... harām (Arabic: حرام Ḥarām, Turkish: Haram, Malay: Haram) is an Arabic word, used in Islam to refer to anything that is prohibited by the faith. ... This article covers the word as used in Islamic urban planning. ... Halal (حلال, alāl, halaal) is an Arabic term meaning permissible. In the English language it most frequently refers to food that is permissible according to Islamic law. ... Mazur can refer to: Mazurian ethnic group Mazur (Masur), a Polish or German surname (see also Mazurek) This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... In Islamic context, a Makrouh is a disliked or offensive act. ... This article covers the word as used in Islamic urban planning. ... Hasan is the Arabic word for good and by extension beautiful or admirable. ... “Higab” redirects here. ... Hijab or ħijāb () is the Arabic term for cover (noun), based on the root حجب meaning to veil, to cover (verb), to screen, to shelter In some Arabic-speaking countries and Western countries, the word hijab primarily refers to womens head, face, or body covering. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... A chador (Persian چادر) is an outer garment worn by some Iranian women when they venture out into public; it is one possible way in which a Muslim woman may follow the Islamic ħijāb dress code. ... The jilbāb a long, flowing, baggy overgarment worn by some to fulfill the mandates of sartorial hijab. ... Note: The word Hijab is often used in news reports and common use, by both Muslims and non-Muslims, to refer to a form of headscarf. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Ladies of Caubul (1848 lithograph, by James Rattray) showing the lifting of purdah in zenana areas. ... Hikmah is a word important to Islamic philosophy that entered Arabic through Greek in the 8th and 9th centuries. ... For other uses, see Hijra. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... Hima means (is Arabic for) inviolate zones solely for the conservation of natural capital, typically fields, wildlife and forests (contrast haram to protect areas for more immediate human purposes). ... It has been suggested that Reserve design be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about a community of trees. ... In England and Wales, a common is a piece of land over which other people -- often neighbouring landowners -- could exercise one of a number of traditional rights, such as allowing their cattle to graze upon it. ... Omdurman, Sudan. ... A hizb (حزب , plural ahzab,احزاب) is one half of a juz and thus comprises roughly one 60th of the text of the Quran. ... A juz (جزء, plural ajza, اجزاء) is one of thirty parts of roughly equal length into which the Quran is divided for the purpose of reciting the entire text in one month. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... In Islam, the ḥūr or ḥūrÄ«yah (Arabic: ) are described as (splendid)[1] companions of equal age (well-matched)[2], lovely eyed[3], of modest gaze[4], voluptuous,[5] pure beings or companions pure of paradise, denoting humans and jinns who enter paradise after being recreated anew in... Huda is the Arabic word for guidance or guide. ... Hudna (هدنة) is an Arabic term meaning truce or armistice as well as calm or quiet, in order to rearm for the next battle, although the latter part of the definition is often lost in the media. ... Hudud ( Arabic , also transliterated hadud, hudood; plural for hadd, , limit, or restriction) is the word often used in Islamic social and legal literature for the bounds of acceptable behaviour and the punishments for serious crimes. ... This article is about Islamic religious law. ... In Islamic context, a Hukm (pl. ...

I

`Ibādah (عبادة) 
worship, but not limited to ritual: all expressions of servitude to Allah, including the pursuit of knowledge, living a pious life, helping, charity, and humility, can be considered ibadah.
Iblīs (إبليس) 
a jinn banished to Hell for his arrogance and disobedience; aka Satan : derived from the Greek Diabolos or Devil He is the equivalent of Lucifer.
`Id (عيد)
festival or celebration.
`Id ul-Adha (عيد الأضحى) 
"the Festival of Sacrifice." The four day celebration starting on the tenth day of Dhul-Hijja.
`Id ul-Fitr (عيد الفطر) 
"the Festival of Fitr (Breaking the fast)." A religious festival that marks the end of the fast of Ramadan.
I'dad Al-'oda  
"preparation for battle" according to Qur'an
Itaqu 
The faithful who fear Allah.
Ifṭār (إفطار)
a meal eaten by Muslims breaking their fast after sunset during the month of Ramadan.
Iḥrām (إحرام) 
state of consecration for hajj. Includes dress and or prayer.
Iḥsān (إحسان)
perfection in worship, such that Muslims try to worship God as if they see Him, and although they cannot see Him, they undoubtedly believe He is constantly watching over them.
Ijaz (إعجاز) 
miracle, the character of the Qur'an in both form and content.
Ijazah
a certificate authorizing one to transmit a subject or text of Islamic knowledge
Ijmā` (إجماع) 
the consensus of either the ummah (or just the ulema) - one of four bases of Islamic Law. More generally, political consensus itself. Shi'a substitute obedience to the Imam.
Ijtihād (إجتهاد) 
During the early times of Islam, the possibility of finding a new solution to a juridical problem. Has not been allowed in conservative Islam since the Middle Ages. However, Liberal movements within Islam generally argue that any Muslim can perform ijtihad, given that Islam has no generally accepted clerical hierarchy or bureaucratic organization. The opposite of ijtihad is taqlid, Arabic for "imitation".
Ilāh (إله)
deity, a god; including gods worshiped by polytheists.
`Ilm (علم) 
all varieties of knowledge, usually a synonym for science
Imām (إمام) 
literally, leader; e.g. a man who leads a community or leads the prayer; the Shi'a sect use the term only as a title for one of the twelve Allah-appointed successors of Prophet Muhammad.
Imamah (إمامة) or imamate 
successorship of Prophet Muhammad and the leadership of mankind.
Imān (إيمان) 
personal faith
Infāq (إنفاق)
the habitual inclination to give rather than take in life; the basis for charity
Injīl (الإنجيل) 
Arabic term for the holy book called The Gospel said to have been given to Jesus, who is known as Isa in Arabic; Muslims believe the holy book has been lost and the New Testament gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John) are not the word of Allah, only Christian stories about Jesus.
Insha'Allah (إن شاء الله) 
Allah Willing.
Iqamah (إقامة) 
the second call to prayer. Similar to the azhan.
Irtidad 
apostasy (see murtadd.)
`Īsā (عيسى)  
Jesus - 'Isa ibn Maryam (English: Jesus son of Mary), a matronymic (since he had no biological father. The Qur'an asserts that Allah has no sons and therefore, 'Isa is not the son of Allah. Muslims honor 'Isa as a nabi and rasoul.
`Ishā' (عشاء)
night; the fifth salat prayer
Islam (الإسلام)   
"submission to God". The Arabic root word for Islam means submission, obedience, peace, and purity.
Isnād (إسناد) 
chain of transmitters of any given hadith
Isra (الإسراء) 
the night journey during which Muhammad (محمّد)is said to have visited Heaven. See miraj.
Istihada 
vaginal bleeding except Haid and Nifas
Istislah (إستصلاح) 
public interest - a source of Islamic Law.
Istish'hād (إستشهاد) 
martyrdom.
Itikaf 
seclusion in the masjid for the purpose of worship usually performed during the last 10 days of Ramadan.
Ittihad 
"identity" or "union," the experience of personal union with Allah as felt by a mystic.
Itmām al-hujjah (اتمام الحجة) 
clarification of truth in its ultimate form.

In Arabic, Ibadah means obedience, submission, and humility. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Genie (disambiguation). ... This article is about the concept of Satan. ... The word Eid can mean several things: There are two Islamic festivals of Eid: One is called Eid ul-Fitr (Arabic: عيد الفطر) that marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan, The other is Eid ul-Adha (Arabic: عيد الأضحى) or Eid-e Qurban (Persian: عید قربان) which is celebrated to commemorate Prophet Ibrahim... Eid al-Adha (Arabic: عيد الأضحى ‘Īd al-’Aḍḥā) is a religious festival celebrated by Muslims worldwide as a commemoration of Ibrahims (Abrahams) willingness to sacrifice his son Ismael for Allah. ... Dhul Hijjah (ḏū-l-ḥiǧǧatu ذو الحجة) is the 12th month on the Islamic calendar. ... Eid ul-Fitr or Id-Ul-Fitr (Arabic: عيد الفطر ‘Īdu l-Fiá¹­r), often abbreviated as simply Eid, is a Muslim holiday that marks the end of Ramadan, the month of fasting. ... This article is about Islamic religious observances in the month of Ramadan. ... Ramadan or Ramadhan (Arabic: رمضان ) is the ninth month of the Islamic year. ... Ihram (إحرام) is an Arabic word that denotes a sacred state in which a Muslim must enter in order to perform the major pilgrimage, hajj or the minor pilgrimage, umrah. ... This article is about the Islamic tradition. ... Ihsan (or Ehsan or Ahsan or احسان) is an Arabic term meaning perfection or excellence. ... Ijaz is the Arabic term for the act of rendering incapable or powerless. ... An ijazah is a certificate used primarily by Muslims to indicate that one has been authorized by a higher authority to transmit a certain subject or text of Islamic knowledge. ... Ijmāʿ (إجماع) is an Arabic tern referring to the consensus of the ummah, the community of Muslims, those practicing Islam, or of the ulema, those learned in the relevant topic. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Ulema (, transliteration: , singular: , transliteration: , scholar) (The people of Islamic Knowledge) refers to the educated class of Muslim legal scholars engaged in the several fields of Islamic studies. ... Sharia (Arabic شريعة also Sharia, Shariah or Syariah) is traditional Islamic law. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In Islamic context, an Ilah is the concept of a deity, lord or god and does not necessarily refer to Allah. ... Ilm or ILM can refer to: ilm (Arabic), Arabic for knowledge, as an Islamic term it refers to knowledge of Islam. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Shia Islam ( Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite or Shiite) is the second largest Islamic denomination; some 20-25% of all Muslims are said to follow a Shia tradition. ... The Imamate was the state built up by the imams of Dagestan during the early and middle of the nineteenth century in the Eastern Caucasus, especially in Chechnya and Dagestan, to fight against the invasion of the Russian Empire. ... The Imamate was the state built up by the imams of Dagestan during the early and middle of the nineteenth century in the Eastern Caucasus, especially in Chechnya and Dagestan, to fight against the invasion of the Russian Empire. ... Iman is an Arabic word meaning faith also a common name. ... In Islamic context, Infaq is defined as the habitual inclination to give rather than take in life, the basis for charity and donation in a manner beneficial to Islam. ... The Injil (Arabic إنجيل , also transcribed Injeel) is one of the four Islamic Holy Books the Quran records as revealed by Allah - the others being the Zabur, Tawrat, and Quran. ... Islam holds Jesus (Arabic: `Īsā) to have been a messenger and a prophet of God. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... Gospel, from the Old English good tidings is a calque of Greek () used in the New Testament (see Etymology below). ... InshaAllah (ان شاء الله ) is an Arabic phrase evoked by Muslims to indicate hope for an aforementioned event to occur in the future. ... The word iqama (Arabic: إقامة) refers to the second call to Islamic Prayer, given immediately before the prayer begins. ... Apostasy in Islam (Arabic: ارتداد, irtidād or ridda) is commonly defined as the rejection of Islam in word or deed by a person who has been a Muslim. ... Look up isa in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Nabi can refer to the Arabic and Hebrew word for Prophet the Korean word for butterfly one of the Nabis, a group of artists in Paris in the 1890s the 2005 Typhoon Nabi North American Bus Industries, a major transit bus manufacturing company Nabi Biopharmaceuticals, a Biopharmaceutical company based in... Isha is the nighttime prayer said by observant Muslims when the sun has completely set; it may be prayed on time until sunrise, but is preferably prayed before midnight. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Image File history File links Ar-al islam. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Chains of Authority. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... Although unrelated, Miraj can also refer to the Islamic doctrine of Prophet Mohammuds ascent to heaven, as documented in the Kitab al Miraj. ... Istislah (to deem proper) a norm employed by Muslim jurists to solve perplexing problems that find no clear answer in sacred religious texts. ... Sharia (Arabic شريعة also Sharia, Shariah or Syariah) is traditional Islamic law. ... Shahid (شهيد, plural: شهداء) is a religious-Muslim term, that its literal meaning is witness. It is a title that is given to the Muslim after his death, if he died during fulfillment of a religious commandment, or during a war for the religion. ... Itikaf or Etikaf or Etikaf means staying in the mosque for a specific purpose which is to worship Allah. ... Itmām al-hujjah (Arabic completion of proof, from completion, realization and pretext, proof) is an Islamic term, which is used when the unveiling of truth by a Messenger of God to his addressees occurs to the extent that the addressees have no excuse but stubbornness and enmity to deny...

J

Jahannam (جهنم) 
the Hell-fire; Hell
Jāhiliyyah (الجاهليّة) 
the time of ignorance before Islam was realized. Describes polytheistic religions.
Jahl (جهل) 
ignorance, arrogance
Jāmi‘ah (جامعة) 
"gathering"; i.e. a university, a mosque, or more generally, a community or association.
Janaza (جنازة) 
funeral prayer
Jannah (جنة) 
Paradise, Heaven, the Garden
Jazakallahu Khayran (جزاك الله خير) 
"May God reward you for the good." Islamic expression of gratitude.
Jihād (جهاد) 
struggle. Any earnest striving in the way of God, involving personal, physical, for righteousness and against wrong-doing;
"Lesser Jihad" (الجهاد الأصغر): in defence, fighting to protect Islam from attack or oppression. In such fighting, no woman, child or innocent civilian is to be harmed, and no tree is to be cut down. (see Qitaal)
"Greater Jihad" (الجهاد الأعظم): internal struggle for the soul (nafs) against evil, e.g. Lust, Greed, Envy, etc. Also to thrive to do actions that have great value in Islam, and that one has to overcome one's self to do it, e.g.: to overcome the temptation to sleep when it is time to pray the morning prayer is a greater jihad.
Jihād al talab 
Offensive jihad.
Jihād al daf’a 
Defensive jihad.
Jilbāb (جلباب) 
(pl. jalabib) a long, flowing, baggy garment worn by some to fulfill the mandates of sartorial hijab. Some more conservative Muslims believe that jilbāb is incumbent upon Muslim women to wear this as a sign of modesty. (See abaya. burka, chador)
Jinn (جنّ) 
An invisible being of fire
Jizya (جزية)
A tax specified in the Koran (9:29) to be paid by non-Muslim males living under Muslim political control.
Juhud 
To deny. Jaahid (the denier). Disbelief out of rejection. When there comes to them that which they [should] have recognized, they refuse to believe in (kafaru) it.( 2:89) Accordingly, juhud includes rejection (kufr at-taktheeb) and resistance (kufr al-‘inaad)
Jumu‘ah (جمعة) 
Friday prayer
Junub 
an unclean state of body as in breaking Wudu
Janabat 
an unclean state of body caused by discharge of semen or sexual intercourse
Juz' (جزء) 
one of thirty parts of the Qur'an

Jahannam (Arabic: ) is the Islamic equivalent to hell. ... Jahiliya (Ignorance) refers to the time of pagan Arabs preceding Islam. ... Jahl is the Arabic word for ignorance, thoughtlessness, arrogance (as opposed to rational judgement) and passion (as opposed to self-control). ... Jamia (جامعة) (or Jamia) is the Arabic word for gathering (n. ... Salatul Janazah is a prayer carried out for Muslims at Islamic funerals, after the wrapping of the body and before the procession. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Jazakallahu Khayran is an Arabic term and Islamic expression of gratitude meaning May Allah reward you for the good. ... For other uses, see Jihad (disambiguation). ... Drawing from Quranic verses, virtually all Sufis distinguish Lataif-e-Sitta (The six subtleties), Nafs, Qalb, Sirr, Ruh, Khafi & Akhfa. ... For other uses, see Jihad (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Jihad (disambiguation). ... Woman wearing jilbāb In modern day usage, jilbāb (Arabic جلباب) refers to a long, flowing, baggy overgarment worn by some Muslim women. ... External Hijab is a phrase used to denote garments (typically female) associated with the modest dress of Muslims. ... This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ... A shop selling abayasin Bahrain The abaya is an overgarment worn by some women in Muslim-majority countries. ... Afghan woman wearing Afghan burqa Two different items of traditional Muslim womens clothing are known as a burqa, (sometimes misspelled as burka or burqua). ... A chador (Persian چادر) is an outer garment worn by some Iranian women when they venture out into public; it is one possible way in which a Muslim woman may follow the Islamic ħijāb dress code. ... For other uses, see Genie (disambiguation). ... In states ruled by Islamic law, jizya or jizyah (Arabic: جزْية; Ottoman Turkish cizye) is a per capita tax imposed on able bodied non-Muslim men of military age. ... The Friday prayer (or Jumuah) is a congregational prayer that Muslims hold Fridays just after noon. ... Junub is an Islamic term meaning ritually impure due to sexual intercourse or semen discharge. A person in such a state needs to take a ghusl in order to become ritually pure and be able to perform his salah. ... A juz (جزء, plural ajza, اجزاء) is one of thirty parts of roughly equal length into which the Quran is divided for the purpose of reciting the entire text in one month. ...

K

Ka‘bah (الكعبة) 
cube-house; the cube-shaped building i.e in Mecca toward which Muslims pray. Muslims, however, do not worship it, nor pray to it. Muslims only pray to Almighty God.
Kāfir (كافر) 
from the word kafara - "to hide." Those who deliberately hide the truth; unbelievers, truth-concealers; one who is ungrateful. Plural: Kāfirūn. Extreme care ought to be taken with this word, as it is was (and is) occasionally misused as an offensive term for black people by white South Africans.
Kalam (علم الكلم) 
Islamic theology
Khalīfah (خليفة) 
Caliph, more generally, one performing the duties of khilafa.
Khalq 
Creation - the act of measuring; determining, estimating and calculating. Khalq is the noun form of the verb khalaqa (see bara, sawwara)
Al-khaliq 
The Creator, Allah.
Khāṭib (خاطب)
the speaker at the Friday Muslim prayer, or Jumu'ah prayer
Khilāfah (خلافة) 
Man's trusteeship and stewardship of Earth; Most basic theory of the Caliphate; Flora and fauna as sacred trust; Accountability to ; God for harms to nature, failure to actively care and maintain. Three specific ways in which khalifa is manifested in Muslim practice are the creation of haram to protect water, hima to protect other species (including those useful to man), and by resisting infidel domination over Muslim lands, in jihad.
Khalīfāt Rashīdūn 
four first caliphs, believed by most Muslims to be most righteous rulers in history
Kharāj (خراج) 
a land tax
Khums (خمس) 
a Shi'a article of faith that refers to a one-fifth tax, divided between Sehme Sadaat, a poor sayyid, and Sehme Imam, given to a Mujtahid
Khuṭbah (خطبة)
the sermon at Jumu'ah prayer
Kitāb (كتاب) 
book; The Qur'an is often referred to as "Al-Kitāb" (The Book)
Kufr (كفر) 
In Arabic - ungratefulness and disbelief in God and denial of the truth.
Kufr-i jahli 
Disbelief from not being aware of or not understanding.
Kufr-i-juhudi 
Disbelief from obstinacy after being presented with truth.
Kufr-i-hukmi 
Disbelief from judgment.
Kun (كن) 
God's command to the universe, 'Be!' is sufficient to create it.

The Kaaba or Kaabah, is a building located inside the mosque known as Masjid al Haram in Mecca (Makkah). ... This article is about an Islamic term. ... Kalam in Arabic means speech or discourse and refers to the Islamic tradition of seeking theological principles through dialectic. ... For main article see: Caliphate The Caliph (pronounced khaleef in Arabic) is the head of state in a Caliphate, and the title for the leader of the Islamic Ummah, or global Islamic nation. ... The Caliphate (Arabic خلافة) is the theoretical federal government that would govern the Islamic world under Islamic law, ruled by a Caliph as head of state. ... The Khātīb is an Islamic term used to descibed the person who delivers the khutba, or sermon, during the Friday or Id prayers. ... Anglicized/Latinized version of the Arabic word خليفة or Khalifah, Caliph is the term or title for the Islamic leader of the Ummah, or community of Islam. ... In common law legal systems, a trust is a relationship in which a person or entity (the trustee) has legal control over certain property (the trust property or trust corpus), but is bound by fiduciary duty to exercise that legal control for the benefit of someone else (the beneficiary), according... Look up stewardship in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... A caliphate (from the Arabic خلافة or khilāfah), is the Islamic form of government representing the political unity and leadership of the Muslim world. ... This article covers the word as used in Islamic urban planning. ... Hima means (is Arabic for) inviolate zones solely for the conservation of natural capital, typically fields, wildlife and forests (contrast haram to protect areas for more immediate human purposes). ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... For other uses, see Jihad (disambiguation). ... The Rightly Guided Caliphs or The Righteous Caliphs ( transliteration: ) is a term used in Sunni Islam to refer to the first four Caliphs. ... In Islamic law, kharaj is a tax on land, specifically agricultural land. ... Khums (خمس) is the Arabic word for One Fifth (1/5). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... ijtihad is a technical term of the Islamic law and means the process of making a legal decision by independent interpretation of the sources of the law, the Quran and the Sunna. ... Khutba is an Islamic sermon delivered after or before Salah. ... The Quran (Arabic , literally the recitation; also called or The Noble Quran; also transliterated Quran, Koran, and less commonly Alcoran) is the holy book of Islam. ... see kaffir lime for the condiment, kaffir for the derogatory Afrikaans term for native Africans. ... Kun is an Arabic word referring to the act of manifesting, existing or being. ...

L

Laghw (لغو) 
Dirty, false, evil vain talk
Lā ilāha ill-Allāh (لاإله إلا الله) 
"There is no god other than Allah." The most important expression in Islam. It is part of the first pillar of Islam. Also is the message of all the Prophets, such as Abraham, Moses, Jesus and Muhammad.
La‘nah (لعنة) 
Imploration for withdrawal of God's mercy
Laylat al-Qadr (ليلة القدر) 
the Night of Power, towards the end of Ramadan, when Muhammad received the first revelation of the Qur'an.

In Islamic context, Laghw means evil vain talk, vain, dirty, false, falsehood, nonsensical, meaningless and anything forbidden by Allah. ... There is also a town called Shāhāda, which is now in Nandurbār district (formerly in Dhule district) in the northwest corner of Maharashtra state in India. ... Lanat means curse, and can be used in expresions as in Laanatullah , Gods Curse (be upon him/her/it) See also Curses in Islam ... Laylat al-Qadr (Arabic: لیلة القدر) (also known as Shab-e-Qadr), literally the Night of Decree or Night of Measures, is the anniversary of two [] very important dates in Islam that occurred in the month of Ramadan. ...

M

Madh'hab (مذهب) 
(pl. Madhahib) school of religious jurisprudence, school of thought
Madrasah (مدرسة) 
school, university
Maghrib (مغرب)
the fourth daily salat prayer
Mahdi (مهدي) 
"a guide". More specifically al-Mahdi (the guide) is a figure who will appear with Prophet Jesus before the end of time, when God allows it, to bring world peace, order and justice, after it has been overcome with injustice and aggression. The Shi'ah regard the twelfth Imam as Imam Mahdi Imam-e-Zamana who was hidden in a cave when he was 5 years old ghabat and will reappear zuhur. The Sunnis regard someone else as the Mahdi.
Mahram (محرم) 
a relative of the opposite gender usually described as being "within the forbidden limits"; a better description is "within the protected limits". means relatives who one can appear before without observing hijab and who one cannot marry.
Makrūh 
Means "detested", though not haraam (forbidden); something that is disliked or offensive. There is no sin and no punishment if a person commits the Makruh, but it is blameworthy.
Malā’ikah (ملائكة) 
angels. It was one of these mala'ika, Jibril (Gabriel) who delivered Allah's revelation to Muhammad.
Ma malakat aymanukum (ما ملكت أيمانكم)
one's rightful spouse (literally: what your right hands possess)
Mandub 
commendable or recommended. Failure to do it would not be a sin. (See halal mustahabb)
Manzil (منزل)
one of seven parts of the Qur'an
Ma‘rūf (معروف) 
consensus of the community
Maqaṣid (مقصد) 
goals or purposes; such as the purposes of Islamic law
Masha Allah (ما شاء الله) 
God has willed it.
Mashhad 
a shrine. Literally, a "place of martyrdom," and such shrines usually are located where someone has been martyred.
Masīḥ (مسيح) 
the (Biblical) Messiah, Jesus Christ.
Masjid (مسجد) 
place of prayer; mosque
Masjidul Haram 
the area around the Kaaba
Ma‘ṣūm (معصوم), plural Ma'sumin (معصومين) 
literally, innocent or free of sin; children are considered masum. Can also refer to an adult individual who does not commit sins, does not make mistakes, does not forget, etc. although he/she does have the choice to commit sins. The Shi'as regard the Prophet Muhammad, his daughter Fatimah, and the twelve Imams to be the fourteen Masumin. Finally assumed as a title for an 'infallible leader sent by God', notably by the Almohads' founding Mahdi and Imam.
Mawla (pl. mawli) 
any non-Arab convert to Islam.
Mawlānā (مولانا) 
an Arabic word literally meaning "our lord" or "our master". It is used mostly as a title preceding the name of a respected religious leader, in particular graduates of religious institutions. The term is sometimes used to refer to Rumi.
Maulvi (مولوی) 
an honorific Islamic religious title often, but not exclusively, given to Muslim religious scholars or Ulema preceding their names. Maulvi generally means any religious cleric or teacher.
Mi‘ād (معاد)
the Resurrection; God will resurrect all of humankind to be judged. Shi'as regard this as the fifth Pillar of Islam.
Mecca (مكّة Makkah
the holiest city in Islam
Medina (مدينة Madīnah
"city"; Medinat-un-Nabi means "the City of the Prophet." See Hijra (Islam).
Mihrab (محراب) 
a niche in the wall of all mosques, indicating the direction of prayer
Millah 
In Arabic, millah means "religion," but it has only been used to refer to religions other than Islam, which is din.
Millet 
In an Islamic state, "Ahl al Kitab" may continue to practice their former religion in a semi-autonomous community termed the millet.
Minaret (منارة) 
a tower built onto a mosque from the top of which the call to prayer is made
Minbar (منبر) 
a raised pulpit in the mosque where the Imam stands to deliver sermons
Minhaj (منهج) 
methodology, e.g. methods, rules, system, procedures.
Miraj (المعراج) 
the Ascension to the Seven Heavens during the Night Journey See also: isra
Muhartiq () 
heretic.
Muta'sibūn 
fanatics
Mu‘awwidhatayn (المعوذتين) 
suras Al-Falaq and an-Nas, the "Surahs of refuge", should be said to relieve suffering (also protect from Black Magic)
Mubāḥ (مباح) 
literally permissible; neither forbidden nor commended. Neutral. (See halal)
Mufti (مفتى) 
an Islamic scholar who is an interpreter or expounder of Islamic law (Sharia), capable of issuing fataawa (plural of "fatwa").
Mubaligh (مبلغ) 
person who recites Qur'an
Muhajabah (محجبة) 
woman who wears hijab (polite form of hijabi).
Muhammadun rasulullah 
"Muhammad is the messenger of God." This statement is the second part of the first pillar of Islam. This is the second most important statement in Islam.
Mu'adhdhin (مأذن)
a person who performs the call to prayer
Mufsidūn (مفسدون) 
a person who wages jihad not in accordance with the Qur'an. Plural mufsideen.
Muhājirūn (مهاجرون) 
The first Muslims that accompanied Muhammad when he traveled to Medina.
Mujāhid (مجاهد) 
a fighter for Islam. Plural mujahidīn.
Mujtahid (مجتهد) 
a scholar who uses reason for the purpose of forming an opinion or making a ruling on a religious issue. Plural: Mujtahidun.
Mullah (ملا) 
are Islamic clergy. Ideally, they should have studied the Qur'an, Islamic traditions (hadith), and Islamic law (fiqh).
Mu'min (مأمن) 
A Muslim who observes the commandments of the Qur'an.
Munafiq (منفق) 
hypocrite. Plural: Munafiqun
Muntaqabah (منتقبة) pl. muntaqabāt (منتقبات) 
woman who wears niqab
Mushaf 
a copy, codex or redaction of the Qur'an.
Murshid (مرشد) 
a Sufi teacher
Murtadd (مرتد) 
apostate (see irtidad.)
Muslim (مسلم) 
a follower of the religion of Islam. One who sumbits their will to Allah (God)
Mustaḥabb (مستحبّ) 
commendable or recommended. (See halal, mandub)
Mut‘ah (متعه) 
literally joy; a type of temporary marriage practiced only by the shi'ites; or a practice between Umrah and Hajj.
Mutaween (مطوعين) Singular = mutawa 
Religious police.
Mutawātir (متواتر)  
"agreed upon"--used to describe hadith that were narrated by many witnesses through different narration chains (isnads) leading back to Muhammad

Madhhab or Mazhab (Arabic مذهب pl. ... Madrassa in the Gambia The word madrassa in the Arabic language (and other languages of the Islamic nations such as Persian, Turkish, Indonesian etc. ... Maghrib is an Arabic term for of the setting (sun); from the root ghuroob (to set; to be hidden). It is also used in a manner similar to the metaphorical use of to be eclipsed, which is used in the English language. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Muhammad al-Mahdi. ... Muhammad al-Mahdi (868 - ?) is the twelfth and final Imam of the Shia. ... In Islamic sharia legal terminology, a mahram (Arabic محرم, also transcribed mahrim or maharem) is an unmarriageable kin with whom sexual intercourse would be considered incestuous, a punishable taboo. ... “Higab” redirects here. ... In Islamic context, a Makrouh is a disliked or offensive act. ... harām (Arabic: حرام Ḥarām, Turkish: Haram, Malay: Haram) is an Arabic word, used in Islam to refer to anything that is prohibited by the faith. ... See angels ... This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... Halal (حلال, alāl, halaal) is an Arabic term meaning permissible. In the English language it most frequently refers to food that is permissible according to Islamic law. ... Mustahabb (Arabic مستحبّ), literally recommended, is an Islamic term referring to actions whose status of approval in Islamic law (ahkam) falls between mubah (neutral) and wajib (actions which must be performed). ... A manzil (منزل, plural manazil, منازل) is one of seven parts of roughly equal length into which the Quran is divided for the purpose of reciting the entire text in one week. ... Maruf (معروف) is an Arabic Islamic term meaning that which is commonly known understood recognized acknowledged accepted The word is most often found in the Quranic exhortation This is often translated as Command the good and forbid the evil, but this translation fails to reflect the subtleties of the... Maqasid is the Arabic word for goals or purposes. ... MashaAllah (ما شاء الله) is an Arabic phrase evoked by Muslims to indicate appreciation for an aforementioned individual or event. ... Mashhad (Persian: , literally the place of martyrdom) is the second largest city in Iran and one of the holiest cities in the Shiah world. ... Masih is the Arabic word for Messiah. ... A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... Shia Islam ( Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite or Shiite) is the second largest Islamic denomination; some 20-25% of all Muslims are said to follow a Shia tradition. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... For other persons of the same name, see Fatima (name). ... The Shia Imam is considered by the Shia sect of Islam to be the rightful successor to Muhammad, and is similar to the Caliph in Sunni Islam only with regards to the aspect of political leadership. ... The Almohad Dynasty (From Arabic الموحدون al-Muwahhidun, i. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Muhammad al-Mahdi. ... The word Mawla has two meanings. ... Maulana is a title of respect, technically reserved for Muslim scholars or Ulema (plural of Aalim) who are knowledgable about Islam and have studied under a scholar or at a religious institution, e. ... Rumi (born November 29, 1982) is a Persian-Canadian Singer-songwriter and a Photographer who is currently based in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... Maulvi (also spelled: Moulvi, Mawlawi and Mawlvi Persian: مولوی) is an honorific Islamic religious title often, but not exclusively, given to Muslim religious scholars or Ulema preceding their names, similar to the titles Maulana, Mullah or Shaykh. ... In Islamic context, the Miad (Arabic: mi‘ād) is the Resurrection and the fifth Shia UsÅ«l ad-DÄ«n. ... The Five Pillars of Islam (Arabic: أركان الإسلام) is the term given to the five duties incumbent on every Muslim. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... For other uses, see Hijra. ... Mihrab (in Persian مهراب or محراب, in Arabic ألمحراب pl. ... Look up din in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Minbar in the Ortaköy mosque in Istanbul. ... Isra is an Arabic word referring to what Muslims regard as Muhammads miraculous night journey from Mecca to Jerusalem - specifically, to the site of Masjid al-Aqsa - alluded to in Surat Al-Isra 1: سبحان الذي أسرى ب&#1593... The muawwadhitayn (المعوذتين), sometimes translated suras of refuge, is an Arabic term referring to suras al-Falaq and an-Nas of the Quran, two consecutive short prayers which begin Say: I seek refuge in the Lord. ... Surat Al-Falaq (Dawn, Daybreak) is the 113th Sura of the Quran. ... Surat an-Nas (Mankind) is the 114th and last sura of the Quran. ... Mubah is an Islamic Arabic term denoting an action as neither forbidden nor commended; neutral. ... Halal (حلال, alāl, halaal) is an Arabic term meaning permissible. In the English language it most frequently refers to food that is permissible according to Islamic law. ... A Mufti (Arabic: مفتى ) is an Islamic scholar who is an interpreter or expounder of Islamic law (Sharia), capable of issuing fataawa (plural of fatwa). // Role of a Mufti in governments In theocracies like Saudi Arabia and Iran, and in some countries where the constitution is based on sharia law, such... Hijab (Arabic: حجاب) is the Arabic term for barrier or dressing modestly. ... “Higab” redirects here. ... Muhammadun rasulullah literally means Muhammad is the messenger of Allah. ... The müezzin (the word is pronounced this way Turkish, Urdu, etc. ... Muhajir or Mohajir (Arabic: مهاجر) is an Arabic word meaning refugee or immigrant or emigrant. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... Mujahideen (مجاهدين; also transliterated as mujāhidīn, mujahedeen, mujahedin, mujahidin, mujaheddin, etc. ... Mujahideen (مجاهدين; also transliterated as mujāhidīn, mujahedeen, mujahedin, mujahidin, mujaheddin, etc. ... ijtihad is a technical term of the Islamic law and means the process of making a legal decision by independent interpretation of the sources of the law, the Quran and the Sunna. ... Mullah (Persian: ملا) is a title given to some Islamic clergy, coming from the Arabic word mawla, means both `vicar` and `guardian. ... Mumin is an Arabic Islamic term, frequently referenced in the Quran, meaning beliver and denotes a Muslim that has complete submission to the will of God (Allah), and has faith firmly established in his heart. ... Munafiq is a term in Islam used to describe a hypocrite, who while outwardly practicing the forms of Islam, inwardly conceals (perhaps even unknowingly) kufr; considered worse than a kafir. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... ... A Murshid is the teacher and guide to his disciples (Mureedh). ... Apostasy in Islam (Arabic: ارتداد, irtidād or ridda) is commonly defined as the rejection of Islam in word or deed by a person who has been a Muslim. ... Apostasy in Islam (Arabic: ارتداد, irtidād or ridda) is commonly defined as the rejection of Islam in word or deed by a person who has been a Muslim. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... Mustahabb (Arabic مستحبّ), literally recommended, is an Islamic term referring to actions whose status of approval in Islamic law (ahkam) falls between mubah (neutral) and wajib (actions which must be performed). ... Halal (حلال, alāl, halaal) is an Arabic term meaning permissible. In the English language it most frequently refers to food that is permissible according to Islamic law. ... Mutah is a Arabic term meaning joy. Mutah in itself is also an Islamic Term that denotes two other Islamic terms: Nikah Mutah — The second Quranic Marriage form. ... The Mutaween (مطوعين in Arabic) (variant English spellings: mutawwain, muttawa, mutawallees, mutawa’ah, mutawi’) are the government -authorized or -recognized religious police (or clerical police or public order police) within Islamist theocracies which adhere to varied interpretations of Sharia Law, and in which the governments are either directly controlled by, or... Mutawatir is an Arabic term meaning agreed upon. ...

N

Nabī (نبي) 
literally, prophet. In the Islamic context, a Nabi is a man sent by God to give guidance to man, but not given scripture. The Prophet Abraham was a Nabi. This is in contrast to Rasul, or Messenger. Plural: Anbiya. See: Rasul.
Nafs (النفس) 
soul, one's self
Najāsah 
Impurity
Najasat, Najis  
an unclean thing
Naji 
impure
Nakir and Munkar 
two malaikah who test the faith of the dead in their graves
Nasīha 
advice
Naṣṣ (نصّ) 
a known, clear legal injunction
Nifas 
the bleeding after childbirth (see Haid)
Nifaq 
falsehood; dishonesty
Niyyat 
intention
Niqāb (نقاب) 
veil covering the face
Nubuwwah (نبوّة) 
prophethood. Shi'as regard this as the third Pillar of Islam.
Nūr 
light. Muslims believe angels were created from light.

For other senses of this word, see Prophet (disambiguation). ... In Islam, a rasul ( رسول) (Arabic: messenger, plural rusul) is a prophet sent by God (Allah in Arabic) with a revelation. ... Drawing from Quranic verses, virtually all Sufis distinguish Lataif-e-Sitta (The six subtleties), Nafs, Qalb, Sirr, Ruh, Khafi & Akhfa. ... Najaasah is an Arabic word referring to a state of impurity. ... Munkar and Nakeer, in Islamic eschatology, are two black, blue-eyed malaikah (angels) who test the faith of the dead in their graves. ... See angels ... Naseeha is the Arabic word for advice. ... The word Nass refers, variously, to a people of northern British Columbia: Nisgaa the Tsimshianic language of the Nisgaa people: Nisgaa language a river in northern British Columbia: Nass River Category: ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Veils as articles of clothing, worn almost exclusively by women, are intended to cover some part of the head or face. ... Nubuwwah means Prophethood and denotes that God has appointed perfect Prophets and Messengers to teach mankind Gods religion. ... The Five Pillars of Islam (Arabic: أركان الإسلام) is the term given to the five duties incumbent on every Muslim. ... Noor may refer to: An Arabic name, common among royalty The Arabic term for light (نور) Queen Noor of Jordan Noor Jahan, a Mughal Empress Noor Jehan, Pakistani actress/singer Noor Actress, actress Princess Noor Inyat Khan, a descendant of Tipu Sultan The city of Noor in northern Iran in the...

P

P.B.U.H. 
an ancronym which stands for "peace be unto him" a blessing which is affixed to Muhammad's name whenever it is written. This is obviously the English version of it, and the Arabic version is S.A.W.
Prophet 
A person who has had messages from Allah. (see nabi).
Prayer
Prayer is preformed five times a day. It is the direct link between the worshiper and Allah. The prayers are said in Arabic.

Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... For other senses of this word, see Prophet (disambiguation). ... Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ... Nabi can refer to the Arabic and Hebrew word for Prophet the Korean word for butterfly one of the Nabis, a group of artists in Paris in the 1890s the 2005 Typhoon Nabi North American Bus Industries, a major transit bus manufacturing company Nabi Biopharmaceuticals, a Biopharmaceutical company based in... For other uses, see Prayer (disambiguation). ...

Q

Qadar 
predestination.
Qādī (قاضي) 
judge of Islamic Law
Qiblah 
the direction Muslims face during prayer
Qitaal fee sybil Allah ( وقاتلوا في سبيل الله ) 
fight in the cause of Allah, a Qur'anic commandment.
Qiyāmah 
resurrection; return of the dead for the Day of Judgment
Qiṣāṣ (قصاص) 
fine for intentional murder if heirs forgive
Qiyam  
to stand, a position of prayer
Qiyās (القياس) 
analogy - foundation of legal reasoning and thus fiqh
Qutba (خطبة)
sermon given by the imam in a mosque. See khutbah
Qudsī 
classification of a hadith that are believed to be narrated by Muhammad from God.
Qur'ān (القرآن) 
Muslims believe that the Qur'an (Koran) is the literal word of God and culmination of God's revelation to mankind, revealed to Prophet Muhammad in the year 610 A.D.

Qadar in Arabic means fate or divine destiny. ... Qadi (قاضى) is an Arabic term meaning judge. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sharia (Arabic شريعة also Sharia, Shariah or Syariah) is traditional Islamic law. ... The Kaaba or Kaaba, in the mosque known as Masjid al Haram in Mecca (Makkah), is the holiest place in Islam. ... Yawm al-QÄ«yāmah (Arabic: literally: Day of the Resurrection) is the Last Judgement in Islam. ... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary. ... In Sunni Islamic jurisprudence, Qiyas is the process of analogical reasoning from a known injunction (nass) to a new injunction. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Khutba is the Arabic term for the Friday sermon given by the imam in a mosque. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Masjid al-Haram in Mecca as it exists today A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... Khutba is an Islamic sermon delivered after or before Salah. ... Qudsi is the Arabic word for sacred. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ...

R

Rabb 
Lord, Sustainer, Cherisher, Master.
Rahman 
Merciful; Ar-Rahman means "The Most Merciful"
Rahim 
compassionate; Ar-Rahim means "The Most Compassionate" as in the Basmala
Rajm  
the practice of stoning
Rakaat 
one unit of Islamic prayer, or Salat. Each daily prayer is made up of a different number of rakaat.
Ramadhan 
holy month of fasting when the Qur'an was first revealed
Rashidun 
Sunnis consider the first four caliphs as the "orthodox" or "rightly guided" caliphs. They were Abu Bakr, 'Umar, 'Uthman and 'Ali.
Rasul 
messenger; Unlike prophets (Nabi), messengers are given scripture. Moses, David, Jesus and Mohammed are considered messengers. All messengers are considered prophets, but not all prophets are given scripture. See: Nabi.
Riba (ربا) 
interest, the charging and paying of which is forbidden by the Qur'an
Riddah : apostasy, in which a person abandons Islam for another faith or no faith at all.
Risalah 
literally, message or letter. Used both in common parlance for mail correspondences, and in religious context as divine message.
Ruh 
spirit; the divine breath which God blew into the clay of Adam.
Rukn plural arkan 
means what is inevitable. One of the five pillars of Islam. (See fard, wajib)
Ruk'u 
the bowing performed during Muslim prayer

This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary. ... Rahman is the Arabic word for merciful. ... [[[[ == == #REDIRECT [[#REDIRECT [[#REDIRECT [[]]]]]] == ==]]]] ... Basmala or Bismillah Basmala calligraphy Basmala (Arabic بسملة) is an Arabic language noun which is used as the collective name of the whole of the recurring Islamic phrase  . This phrase constitutes the first verse of the first sura (or chapter) of the Quran, and is used in a number of... Rajm is an Arabic term that means to stone. ... The Arabic word rakaah (pl. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Arabic word rakaah (pl. ... Ramadan or Ramadhan (Arabic: رمضان ) is the ninth month of the Islamic year. ... The Rightly Guided Caliphs or The Righteous Caliphs ( transliteration: ) is a term used in Sunni Islam to refer to the first four Caliphs. ... In Islam, a rasul ( رسول) (Arabic: messenger, plural rusul) is a prophet sent by God (Allah in Arabic) with a revelation. ... Nabi can refer to the Arabic and Hebrew word for Prophet the Korean word for butterfly one of the Nabis, a group of artists in Paris in the 1890s the 2005 Typhoon Nabi North American Bus Industries, a major transit bus manufacturing company Nabi Biopharmaceuticals, a Biopharmaceutical company based in... Nabi can refer to the Arabic and Hebrew word for Prophet the Korean word for butterfly one of the Nabis, a group of artists in Paris in the 1890s the 2005 Typhoon Nabi North American Bus Industries, a major transit bus manufacturing company Nabi Biopharmaceuticals, a Biopharmaceutical company based in... Riba is the (Arabic: ربا ) term for intrest, the charging of which is forbidden by the Quran here, among other places: And that which you give in gift (loan) (to others), in order that it may increase (your wealth by expecting to get a better one in return) from other... For other senses of this word, see interest (disambiguation). ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Riddah are a group of false prophets appearing right after the death of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. ... Risalah is the Arabic word for message or (postal) letter. ... Drawing from Quranic verses, virtually all Sufis distinguish Lataif-e-Sitta (The six subtleties), Nafs, Qalb, Sirr, Ruh, Khafi & Akhfa. ... The Five Pillars of Islam is the term given to the five most fundamental aspects of Sunni Islam. ... Željko Ražnatović or in Serbian Cyrillic writing Жељко Ражњатовић, (April 17, 1952 - January 15, 2000), widely known as Arkan or Аркан, was a Serbian paramilitary leader, nationalistic politician, assembly... Fard (Arabic: ) also farida (Arabic: ) is an Islamic term which denotes a religious duty. ... Fard also farida (arabic فرض obligation, duty) is an Islamic term which denotes a religious duty. ... Ruku is the bowing performed during Muslim prayer. ...

S

Ṣabr 
patience, endurance, self-restraint
Sadaqah 
charity; voluntary alms above the amount for zakat.
Sahabah (الصحابه) (sing. Sahābi)
companions of Muhammad. A list of the best-known Companions can be found at List of companions of Muhammad.
Sahih 
"Sound in isnad." A technical attribute applied to the "isnad" of a hadith.
Sajda 
kneeling down, a position of Salat
Sakina 
divine "tranquility" or "peace" which descends upon a person when the Qur'an is recited.
Salaf (السلف الصالح) 
(righteous) predecessors/ancestors. In Islam, Salaf is generally used to refer to the first three generations of Muslims.
Ṣalah (صلاة) or salat 
any one of the 5 daily obligatory prayers. Sunnis regard this as the second Pillar of Islam
Salaat al-Istikharah 
Prayer for guidance is done in conjunction with two rakaahs of supererogatory prayer.
Salām (سلام) 
peace
Sallallahu alayhi wa sallam (صلى الله عليه و سلم) 
"May Allah bless him and grant him peace." The expression should be used after stating Prophet Muhammad's name. See abbreviation : S.A.W. or S.A.W.S. also P.B.U.H.
Samad 
eternal, absolute; Muslims believe Allah is "The Eternal."
Salsabil 
a river in heaven (al-firdaus)
Sawa 
awakening, revival
S.A.W. (or S.A.W.S.) 
Sallallahu alayhi wa sallam (صلى الله عليه و سلم). See P.B.U.H.
Ṣawm (صَوم) 
fasting during the month of Ramadhan. The word sawm is derived from Syriac sawmo.
Sayyid (سيّد) 
master or a descendant of a relative of Muhammad [upon whom be peace], usually a title given to a descendant who comes from Hussayn.
Sema 
refer to some of the ceremonies used by various sufi orders
Shahādah (الشهادة) 
The expression of faith: La ilaha illa Allah. Muhammadun rasulullah. ("There is no god but Allah. Muhammad is the messenger of Allah."). Sunnis regard this as the first Pillar of Islam. Also may be used as a synonym for the term Istish'hād meaning martyrdom.
Shahīd (شهيد) pl. shuhada 
witness, martyr. Usually refers to a person killed whilst fighting in "jihad fee sybil Allah" (jihad for the sake of Allah). Often used in modern times for deaths in a political cause (including victims of soldiers, deaths in battle, et cetera) which are viewed by some Muslims as a spiritual cause not just a political cause. But the real meaning of Jihad is to defend Islam in any way; thus, it could be in an economic way or could refer to fighting for the rights of the oppressed or the believers; most often it refers to mastering one's own inclination for evil and shirk.
Shaykh (شيخ) 
a spiritual master, Muslim clergy
Sharī‘ah (الشريعة) 
"the path to a watering hole"; the eternal ethical code and moral code based on the Qur'an and Sunnah; basis of fiqh
Sharīf (شريف) 
a title bestowed upon the descendants of Muhammad through Hasan, son of his daughter Fatima Zahra and son-in-law Ali ibn Abi Talib
Shaytan (شيطان) 
Satan, the Devil; also known as Iblis
Shī‘ah (الشيعة) 
a follower of Prophet Muhammad and his successors (the twelve Imams), the first being Ali. Shi'as constitute the second largest sect in Islam.
Shirk (شرك) 
idolatry; polytheism; the sin of believing in any divinity except God and of associating other gods with God.
Shūrā (شورى) 
consultation
Majlis ash-shūrā (مجلس الشورى) 
advisory council in a Caliphate
Sirah (السيرة) 
life or biography of the Prophet Muhammad; his moral example - with hadith this comprises the sunnah
Sirat al-Mustaqim 
the Straight Path
Subhanahu wa ta'ala (abbreviated S.W.T.) 
expression used following written name or vocalization of Allah in Arabic meaning highly glorified is He and come
Subhan'allah  
expression used by Muslims to express strong feelings of joy or relief.
Ṣūfī (صوفي) 
a Muslim mystic; See: Sufism (tasawwuf).
Suhūr 
the meal eaten by fasting Muslims just before dawn.
Sukuk 
bond that generates revenue from sales, profits, or leases rather than interest.
Sunnah (السنّة) or sunnah al-Nabi (سنّة النبي) 
the "path" or "example" of the Prophet Muhammad, i.e., what the Prophet did or said or agreed to during his life. He is considered by Muslims to be the best human moral example, the best man to follow.
Sunnat 
optional
Sunni (سنّي) 
the largest sect in Islam.
Sūrah (سورة) 
chapter; the Qur'an is comprised of 114 suras

Sabr is the Arabic word for patience, endurance and self-restraint. ... This is a sub-article of Zakat, Infaq and Mustahabb. ... This is a sub-article of Islamic economical jurisprudence. ... In the Islamic religion, the Sahaba (Asahaaba,الصحابه) are the companions of the Prophet Muhammad. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... This article is on the group of early Muslims. ... Sahih is a Islamic term that means authentic. ... Surat As-Sajda (Arabic: سورة السجدة ) (The Prostration, Worship, Adoration) is the 32nd sura of the Quran with 30 ayat. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Sakina (Arabic: سكينة) is an Arabic word derived from Sakoon, meaning peace or tranquility. Usage in the Quran Sakina is the Spirit of Tranquillity, or Peace of Reassurance, mentioned in the Quran which descended upon Muhammad and the believers, when faced with opposing forces at Hudaybiyah. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... This article is on the group of early Muslims. ... Salat redirects here. ... The Five Pillars of Islam (Arabic: أركان الإسلام) is the term given to the five duties incumbent on every Muslim. ... Look up Salaam in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Peace be upon him (Arabic: , also transliterated as sallalahu aleyhi wasallam or salallahu alayhi wasalaam) is a phrase that Muslims often say after saying the name of a prophet of Islam. ... Samad is an Arabic word interpreted as eternal, absolute. ... Salsabil (Arabic: سلسبيل) is an Islamic Arabic term referring to a river in paradise (Jannah). ... Józef Sawa-CaliÅ„ski (died 1771) was a Polish noble and a prominent leader of the Confederation of Bar, a movement aimed against the Polish king and his close relations with Russia. ... Peace Be Upon Him – in Arabic: صلى الله عليه وسلم; salla Allahu alayhi wa sallam, also transliterated as sallalahu aleyhi wasallam – is a phrase that Muslims often say after mentioning the name of the Prophet Muhammad. ... Peace be upon him (Arabic: , also transliterated as sallalahu aleyhi wasallam or salallahu alayhi wasalaam) is a phrase that Muslims often say after saying the name of a prophet of Islam. ... Sawm (Arabic: صوم) is an Arabic word for fasting regulated by Islamic jurisprudence. ... Ramadan or Ramadhan (Arabic: رمضان ) is the ninth month of the Islamic year. ... Syriac ( Suryāyā) is an Eastern Aramaic language that was once spoken across much of the Fertile Crescent. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... See also SEMA. Sema or sama is a term that means remembering in Arabic and Persian. ... Sufism is a mystic tradition within Islam that encompasses a diverse range of beliefs and practices dedicated to divine love and the cultivation of the heart. ... White flag featuring the Shahada text as used by the Taliban. ... The Five Pillars of Islam (Arabic: أركان الإسلام) is the term given to the five duties incumbent on every Muslim. ... Shahid (شهيد, plural: شهداء) is a religious-Muslim term, that its literal meaning is witness. It is a title that is given to the Muslim after his death, if he died during fulfillment of a religious commandment, or during a war for the religion. ... Shahid (شهيد, plural: شهداء) is a religious-Muslim term, that its literal meaning is witness. It is a title that is given to the Muslim after his death, if he died during fulfillment of a religious commandment, or during a war for the religion. ... Shaikh (شيخ, also rendered as Sheik, Shaykh or Sheikh) is a word in the Arabic language meaning an elder or a revered old man. ... This article is about Islamic religious law. ... In the context of a code adopted by a profession or by a governmental or quasi-governmental organ to regulate that profession, an ethical code may be styled as a code of professional responsibility, which may dispense with difficult issues of what behavior is ethical. Some codes of ethics are... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Morality. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Sunnah(t) () literally means “trodden path”, and therefore, the sunnah of the prophet means “the way of the prophet”. Terminologically, the word ‘Sunnah’ in Sunni Islam means those religious actions that were instituted by Muhammad(PBUH) during the 23 years of his ministry and which Muslims initially received through consensus... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Sayyid. ... Shaitan (شيطان) is the Arabic word for Adversary, except in different contexts, the word is translated subversely as Separator. It could possibly be a derivation of from שָׂטָן (Hebrew) Satan. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Shia Islam ( Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite or Shiite) is the second largest Islamic denomination; some 20-25% of all Muslims are said to follow a Shia tradition. ... Ali ibn Abu Talib (Arabic: علي بن أبي طالب translit: ‘AlÄ« ibn Abu Ṭālib Persian: علی پسر ابو طالب) ‎ (599 – 661) is an early Islamic leader. ... Shirk is the Islamic concept of the sin of idolatry. ... Shura is an Arabic word for consultation. It is believed to be the method by which pre-Islamic Arabian tribes selected leaders and made major decisions. ... ... For the river and also village in Norway named Sira, see Sira, Norway. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... Moral example is trust in the moral core of another, a role model, without the obvious mediation of any theory or language. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Sunnah(t) () literally means “trodden path”, and therefore, the sunnah of the prophet means “the way of the prophet”. Terminologically, the word ‘Sunnah’ in Sunni Islam means those religious actions that were instituted by Muhammad(PBUH) during the 23 years of his ministry and which Muslims initially received through consensus... Sirat al-Mustaqim is the Arabic term for the straight path. ... S.W.T. appears often after the name of Allah in Islamic texts. ... Subhanallah is an Arabic phrase literally meaning praise be to God. It is commonly used by Arab Muslims as an exclamation of joy or relief after tenuous times. ... Sufism (Arabic تصوف taṣawwuf) is a system of esoteric philosophy commonly associated with Islam. ... Sufism is a mystic tradition within Islam that encompasses a diverse range of beliefs and practices dedicated to divine love and the cultivation of the heart. ... Suhoor is an Islamic Arabic term referringto the meal eaten early in the morning by Muslims before fasting in daylight hours during the Islamic month of Ramadan. ... Sukuk is the Arabic name for a financial certificate but can be seen as an Islamic equivalent of bond. ... Sunnah(t) () literally means “trodden path”, and therefore, the sunnah of the prophet means “the way of the prophet”. Terminologically, the word ‘Sunnah’ in Sunni Islam means those religious actions that were instituted by Muhammad(PBUH) during the 23 years of his ministry and which Muslims initially received through consensus... Sunnah(t) () literally means “trodden path”, and therefore, the sunnah of the prophet means “the way of the prophet”. Terminologically, the word ‘Sunnah’ in Sunni Islam means those religious actions that were instituted by Muhammad(PBUH) during the 23 years of his ministry and which Muslims initially received through consensus... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... See also: Sura (disambiguation). ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ...

T

Taba'īn 
followers of the Sahabah
Tafsīr (تفسير) 
exegesis, particularly such commentary on the Qur'an
Taghut 
impurity; anything worshipped other than God, i.e. all the false deities.
Tahajjud 
optional (supererogatory), late-night (pre-dawn) prayer
Taharah 
purification from ritual impurities by means of wudu or ghusl
Tahir 
pure, ritually clean
Taḥrīf (تحريف) 
corruption, forgery. Muslims believe the Bible Scriptures were corrupted but the Qur'an is in its original form.
Tajdīd (تجديد)
to purify and reform society in order to move it toward greater equity and justice
Tajdif 
blasphemy
Tajwīd (تجويد) 
a special manner of reciting the Qur'an according to prescribed rules of pronunciation and intonation.
Takbīr (تكبير)
a proclamation of the greatness of Allah; a Muslim invocation.
Takfir (تكفر)
is a practice of declaration of individual or group of previously considered Muslim as kaffir.
Tamaninat 
to be motionless
Taqlīd (تقليد) 
to blindly follow a person whose following is not based on proof and does not rely upon knowledge.
Taqiyya (تقيّة) 
the mostly Shi'a principle that one is allowed to hide one's true beliefs in certain circumstances.
Taqwa 
righteousness; goodness; Piety : Taqwa is taken from the verbe Ittaqua, witch means Avoiding, Fearing the punishement from Allah for committing sins. It is piety obtained by fearing the punishement of Allah.
Tarawih 
tarawih prayers are extra prayers in Ramadan after the Isha prayer.
Tarkīb (تَرْكِيب) 
the study of Arabic grammar issued from the Qur'an
Ṭarīqah (طريقة) 
a Muslim religious order, particularly a Sufi order
Tartīl (ترتيل) 
slow and measured (meditative) recitation of the Qur'an
Tashkīl (تشكيل) 
vocalization of a text, for example the Qur'an
Taslim (تسلم)
salutation at the end of prayer
Tawassul 
asking Allah Almighty through the medium and intercession of another person.
Tawbah 
repentance
Tasawwuf (التصوّف) or Sufism
Tawaf 
circumambulating the Ka'bah during Hajj.
Tawhīd (توحيد) 
monotheism; affirmation of the Oneness of Allah. Muslims regard this as the first part of the Pillar of Islam, the second part is accepting Muhammad as rasoul (messenger). The opposite of Tawheed is shirk
Tawrat 
the uncorrupted form of the Torah revealed to Musa (Moses.)
Tayyib 
all that is good as regards things, deeds, beliefs, persons, foods, etc. Means "pure." The Shahaddath is tayyib.
Tazkiyah 
Purification of the Soul.
Tilawa 
ritual recitation of passages of the Qur'an.

The Tabaeen (or Followers) are the generation of Muslims that came after the Sahaba. ... In the Islamic religion, the Sahaba (Asahaaba,الصحابه) are the companions of the Prophet Muhammad. ... A tafsir ( (Arabic: تفسير) tafsÄ«r, Arabic explanation) is Quranic exegesis or commentary. ... Exegesis (from the Greek to lead out) involves an extensive and critical interpretation of an authoritative text, especially of a holy scripture, such as of the Old and New Testaments of the Bible, the Talmud, the Midrash, the Quran, etc. ... In Islamic context, Taghut refers to idolatry, considered impurity. ... Tahajjud Prayer And during part of the night, pray Tahajjud, beyond what is incumbent upon you; maybe your Lord will raise you to a position of great glory. ... This article is about Hygiene in Islam. ... This article is about Hygiene in Islam. ... Ghusl (غسل) is an Arabic term referring to the full Ablution in Islam. ... In Islamic context, Tahir refers to purity and cleanliness in accordance with religious rituals. ... Tahrif (Arabic: ‎ corruption, forgery; the stem-II verbal noun of the consonantal root , to make oblique) is an Arabic term used by Muslims with regard to words, and more specifically with regard to what Jews and Christians are supposed to have done to their respective Scriptures. ... Tajdid is the Arabic word for renewal. ... TajwÄ«d (تجويد) is an Arabic word meaning proper pronunciation during recitation, as well as recitation at a moderate speed. ... For other usages of the phrase Allahu Akbar, see Allahu Akbar (disambiguation). ... In Shia terminology, takfir also refers to the practice of crossing the arms when standing upright during salat (or takattuf, called qabd by Sunnis). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Within Islamic tradition, the concept of Taqiyya (التقية - fear, guard against)[1] refers to a controversial dispensation allowing believers to conceal their faith when under threat, persecution or compulsion. ... Taqwa is a concept in Islam that is interpreted by some Islamic Scholars as God consciousness. ... Tarawih (تراويح) is an Arabic phrase referring to extra prayers given at night in the Islamic month of Ramadan. ... Tarkib (تَرْكِيب) is the Arabic word for construction (primarily syntaxic, but also mechanic), assembly. ... Arabic is a Semitic language. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... This article is in need of attention. ... A religious order is an organization of people who live in some way set apart from society in accordance with religious devotion. ... Sufism is a mystic tradition within Islam that encompasses a diverse range of beliefs and practices dedicated to divine love and the cultivation of the heart. ... In Islamic context, Tartil (ترتيل) is a way of reciting the Quran. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Tashkil (تشكيل) is the Arabic word for vocalization. ... Intercession in Islam (Arabic: Tawassul) is a hotly debated topic between Shia and Salafis. ... Tawbah is an Islamic phrase meaning repentance or return to Allah. ... Sufism is a mystic tradition within Islam that encompasses a diverse range of beliefs and practices dedicated to divine love and the cultivation of the heart. ... Sufism is a mystic tradition within Islam that encompasses a diverse range of beliefs and practices dedicated to divine love and the cultivation of the heart. ... In Islamic context, Tawaf refers to the ritual of circumambulating the Kabah (the holiest building in Mecca) during the Hajj (pilgrimage). ... Tawhid (توحيد), meaning declaring God one, is the Islamic concept of monotheism. ... For the Celtic Frost album, see Monotheist (album) In theology, monotheism (from Greek one and god) is the belief in the existence of one deity, or in the oneness of God. ... The Five Pillars of Islam (Arabic: أركان الإسلام) is the term given to the five duties incumbent on every Muslim. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Torah () is the most important document in Judaism, revered as the inspired word of G-d (the vocal is never spelled), traditionally said to have been revealed to Moses. ... // Musa (Musaceae), one of three genera in the family Musaceae that includes bananas and plantains MÅ«Å¡a, a river in Lithuania and Latvia Musa, a small village in Chhachh (Attock District) Musa Dağı a mountain peak in Turkey Abu Musa, an island in the Persian Gulf Jabal Musa, Sinai, a... Quran reading is the reading (tarteel, tajwid, or taghbir) aloud, reciting, chanting portions of the Quran. ...

U

‘Ulamā’ (علماء) or ulema 
the leaders of Islamic society, including teachers, Imams and judges. Singular alim.
Ummah (الاُمّة) or umma 
the global community of all Muslim believers
‘Umrah (عمرة) 
the lesser pilgrimage performed in Mecca. Unlike hajj, ‘umrah can be performed throughout the year.
‘Urf (عرف) 
custom of a given society, leading to change in the fiqh
Usul al-Fiqh 
the study of the origins and practice of Islamic jurisprudence (fiqh)

Ulema (, transliteration: , singular: , transliteration: , scholar) (The people of Islamic Knowledge) refers to the educated class of Muslim legal scholars engaged in the several fields of Islamic studies. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Ulema (Arabic: علماء) is the community of legal scholars of Islam and the Sharia. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Umrah or (Arabic: عمرة ) is a pilgrimage to Mecca performed by Muslims that can be undertaken at any time of the year. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Uṣūl al-fiqh (Arabic: ‎ ) is a term which literally translates to the roots of the law and refers to the study of the origins, sources, and practice of Islamic jurisprudence. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

W

Wafat 
death (Barah-wafat) Muhammad was born on the twelfth day of Rabi-ul-Awwal, the third month of the Muslim year. His death anniversary also falls on the same day, the word 'barah' standing for the twelve days of Muhammad's sickness.
Waḥdat al-wujūd (وحدة الوجود) 
"unity of being". Philosophical term used by some Sufis. Related to fanaa
Wahy 
revelation or inspiration of God to His prophets for all humankind
Wajib 
obligatory or mandatory see fard
Wali (والي) 
friend, protector, guardian, supporter, helper
Waqf 
An endowment of money or property: the return or yield is typically dedicated toward a certain end, for example, to the maintenance of the poor, a family, a village, or a mosque
Warrāq (ورّاق) 
traditional scribe, publisher, printer, notary and book copier
Wasat 
the middle way, justly balanced, avoiding extremes, moderation
Waseelah 
the means by which one achieves nearness to Allah (see tawassul )
Witr (وتر) 
a voluntary, optional night prayer of three rakaat
Wudu (الوضوء) 
ablution for ritual purification from minor impurities before salat (see ghusl)

Wahdat al-Wujud means oneness of existence. ... Sufism (Arabic تصوف taṣawwuf) is a system of esoteric philosophy commonly associated with Islam. ... It has been suggested that Fana be merged into this article or section. ... Wahy is the Arabic word for revelation. ... Fard also farida (arabic فرض obligation, duty) is an Islamic term which denotes a religious duty. ... Fard (Arabic: ) also farida (Arabic: ) is an Islamic term which denotes a religious duty. ... Wali (Arabic ولي, plural Awliya أولياء, Persian/Turkish pronunciation Vali), is an Arabic word, meaning protector or guardian (most literally etymologically near one), also adopted in various other Islamic cultures. ... Warraq (ورّاق) is the Arabic word for stationer or papermaker. ... Wasat is the Arabic word for middle, centered, balanced. ... Intercession in Islam (Arabic: Tawassul) is a hotly debated topic between Shia and Salafis. ... Witr is an optional Muslim prayer yet that can be said at night between Ishaa (night) and Fajr (morning) prayers. ... The Arabic word rakaah (pl. ... This article is about Hygiene in Islam. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Ghusl (غسل) is an Arabic term referring to the full Ablution in Islam. ...

Y

Ya Allah 
O, God!
Yaqin 
certainty, that which is certain
Yawm ul-Qiyāmah (يوم القيامة) 
"Day of the Resurrection"; Day of Judgement

Phrases containing Allah Allah is Arabic for God and is the only god (monotheism) in the religion of Islam. ... Yaqin is the Arabic word for certainty, or that which is certain. ... Yawm al-Qīyāmah (Arabic: literally: Day of the Resurrection) is the Last Judgement in Islam. ...

Z

Zabur (زبور) 
the Psalms revealed to King David
Zahir 
Exterior meaning
Zaidi (الزيدية) 
Islamic sub-sect of Shi'ah, popularly found in Yemen , with similarities to Sunni
Zakat (زكاة) 
tax, alms, tithe as a Muslim duty; Sunnis regard this as the fourth Pillar of Islam. Neither charity nor derived from Islamic economics, but a religious duty and social obligation.
Zalimun 
polytheists, wrong-doers, and unjust.
Zinā (زناء , زنى) 
sexual activity outside of marriage (covering the English words adultery and fornication)
Zuhr 
midday prayer beginning at noon

Zabur (Arabic: زبور) is the holy book of the Seboun (Ar:صابؤون, Grk:Σεβομενοι) which is equated by some scholars with Psalms, is, according to Islam, one of the holy books revealed by God before the Quran (the others mentioned in the Quran being the Tawrat and Injil). ... The exterior or apparent meaning of the Quran. ... Zaiddiyah (also: Zaidi, Zaydi, or in the West Fivers) refers to a sect within Shia Islam. ... Shia Islam or Shi`ism (from the Arabic word شيعة, short for the historic phrase shi`at `Ali شيعة علي, meaning the followers or party of Ali) is the second-largest Islamic denomination. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... This is a sub-article of Islamic economical jurisprudence. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... The Five Pillars of Islam (Arabic: أركان الإسلام) is the term given to the five duties incumbent on every Muslim. ... Islamic economics is economics in accordance with Islamic law. ... Zina (زنا) is an Arabic term for extramarital or premarital sex. ... This article is about the act of adultery. ...

Notes

  • Arabic words are created from three-letter "roots" which convey a basic idea. For example, k-t-b conveys the idea of writing. Addition of other letters before, between, and after the root letters produces many associated words: not only "write" but also "book", "office", "library", and "author". The abstract consonantal root for Islam is s-l-m.
  • Some English words or phrases would translate very poorly into Arabic for cultural reasons, for instance the English word "crusade" would most likely be interpreted as meaning "genocide", and "infinite justice" would most likely be interpreted as meaning "divine judgement" – adl in Arabic implying God's justice. Probably it is best to avoid such terms for anything one intends to translate into Arabic, or knows will be translated.
  • Some Islamic concepts are usually referred to in Persian or Turkic. Those are typically of later origin than the concepts listed here; for completeness it may be best to list Persian terms and those unique to Shi'a on their own page, likewise Turkic terms and those unique to the Ottoman period on their own page, as these are culturally very distinct.
  • The word "crusade" in English is usually translated in Arabic as "Hamlah Ssaleebiyah" which means literally "campaign of Cross-holders" (or close to that meaning). In Arabic text it is "حملة صليبية" and the second word comes from "Ssaleeb" which means "cross."
  • The verses in the Qur'an that Christians usually refer to as jihad verses have the phrase "qitl fee sybil Allah" (fight/kill for the sake of Allah).
  • Westerners use the terms non-observant (secular), fundamentalist, extremist, reformist or moderate to refer to differing Muslim practices. Muslims use the terms tableeghi, takfiri, ikhwani, shirazi.[citation needed]

Arabic redirects here. ... In the terminology used to discuss the grammar of the Semitic and some other Afro-Asiatic languages, a triliteral (Arabic: جذر ثلاثي, ǧaḏr thalathi) is a root containing a sequence of three consonants (so also known as a triconsonantal root). ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ... For other uses, see Genocide (disambiguation). ... Infinite Justice may mean: ZGMF-X19A Infinite Justice Gundam, a fictional weapon from the Cosmic Era of the anime Gundam metaseries. ... Adl is an Arabic term roughly meaning Justice. It is used in the everyday sense of the word: for example, wizeer al-adl translates to The Minister of Justice. ... “Farsi” redirects here. ... Turkish (, ) is a language spoken by 65–73 million people worldwide, predominantly in Turkey, with smaller communities of speakers in Cyprus, Greece and Eastern Europe, as well as by several million immigrants in Western Europe, particularly Germany, making it the most commonly spoken of the Turkic languages. ... Ottoman redirects here. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.usc.edu/dept/MSA/fundamentals/hadithsunnah/bukhari/053.sbt.html#004.053.384

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... There are many new trends in Islamic Philosophy and meanwhile some traditional schools are still very alive and active. ... Hans Wehr (1909-1981), German arabist who was professor at University of Münster from 1957-1974. ... The Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic by Hans Wehr is widely regarded as the foremost Arabic-English bilingual or translation dictionary and has particular usefulness for students of Modern Standard Arabic. ...

See also

// The 99 Names of God, also known as The 99 attributes of Allah (Arabic: ‎ translit: ), are the names of God revealed to man in the Quran;[1] even though His names (as adjectives, word constructs, or otherwise) exceed ninety-nine in the Quran. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The following list consists of concepts that are derived from both Christianity and Arab tradition, which are expressed as words in the Arabic language. ... Prophets of Islam are male human beings who are regarded by Muslims to be prophets chosen by God. ... Islamic eschatology is concerned with the Qiyamah (end of the world; Last Judgement) and the final judgement of humanity. ...

External links

  • Voiced Dictionary of Islamic and Arabic Key Words

  Results from FactBites:
 
Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > List of Islamic terms in Arabic (1142 words)
The Qur'an is expressed in Arabic and traditionally Muslims deemed it untranslatable, though this view has changed somewhat in recent decades.
The prime purposes of this list are to disambiguate multiple spellings, make note of spellings no longer in use for these concepts, define the concept in one line to make it easy to pin down the one you're looking for, and provide a guide to unique concepts of Islam all in one place.
Arabic numerals are what we use in English ("0", "1", "2",...).
List of Islamic terms in Arabic - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography (4271 words)
The following list consists of concepts that are derived from both Islam and Arab tradition, which are expressed as words in the Arabic language.
The following list is a transliteration of Arabic terms and phrases.
The opposite of ijtihad is taqlid, Arabic for "imitation".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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