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Encyclopedia > List of Institute Professors
The title of Institute professor is an honor bestowed by the Faculty and Administration of MIT on a faculty colleague who has demonstrated exceptional distinction by a combination of leadership, accomplishment, and service in the scholarly, educational, and general intellectual life of the Institute or wider academic community.[1]

—MIT Policies and Procedures: Special Professorial Appointments, Institute Professor

Institute Professor is the highest title that can be awarded to a faculty member at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. It is analogous to the titles of Distinguished Professor, University Professor, or Regents Professor used at other universities in recognition of a professor's extraordinary research achievements and dedication to the school. At MIT, Institute Professors are granted a unique level of freedom and flexibility to pursue their research and teaching interests without regular departmental or school responsibilities; they report only to the Provost.[1] Usually no more than twelve professors hold this title at any one time. [1] The position was created by President James R. Killian in 1951 and Professor John C. Slater was the first to hold the position.[2] This list of Massachusetts Institute of Technology faculty includes current, emeritus, former, and deceased professors, lecturers, and researchers. ... The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a private, coeducational research university located in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... At many universities the honorary title of Distinguished Professor is given to a small number of members of the faculty who are recognized by colleagues throughout the world as leaders in their fields. ... A professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) (or prof for short) is a senior teacher, lecturer and/or researcher usually employed by a college or university. ... At many universities the honorary title of Distinguished Professor is given to a small number of members of the faculty who are recognized by colleagues throughout the world as leaders in their fields. ... John Clark Slater (1900-1976) was a major physicist and theoretical chemist. ...


Institute Professors are initially nominated by leaders representing either a Department or School. The Chair of the Faculty then consults with the Academic Council and jointly appoints with the President an ad-hoc committee from various departments and non-MIT members to evaluate the qualifications and make a documented recommendation to the President. The final determination is made based upon recommendations from professionals in the nominee's field. The case is then reviewed again by the Academic Council and approved by the Executive Committee of the MIT Corporation.[1] This list of Massachusetts Institute of Technology departments and laboratories covers the universitys diverse and interdisciplinary research interest. ...

Contents

List of Institute Professors

Current

Name Department Elected Notability Reference
Emilio Bizzi Brain and Cognitive Sciences 2002 Motor control; President of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2006– ) [3]
John M. Deutch Chemistry 1990 Deputy Secretary of Defense (1994–1995); Director of Central Intelligence (1995–1996); Provost of MIT (1985–1990). [4][5].
Peter A. Diamond Economics 1997 Social Security reform. [6]
Mildred S. Dresselhaus Physics & Electrical Engineering 1985 Carbon nanotubes; National Medal of Science (1990). [7]
John Harbison Music and Theater Arts 1995 Choral composer; Pulitzer Prize (1987) for Flight into Egypt; MacArthur Fellow (1989). [8]
Robert S. Langer Chemical Engineering & Biological Engineering 2005 Drug delivery and tissue engineering; youngest person to be elected to 3 American academies; 225 U.S. patents, Draper Prize (2002). [9]
John D.C. Little Management Little's law; marketing; e-commerce. [10]
Thomas Magnanti Mechanical Engineering 1997 Operations research; Dean of Engineering (1999–2007). [6]
Joel Moses Computer Science 1999 Algebraic manipulation algorithms; MACSYMA; Provost of MIT (1995–1998); Dean of Engineering (1991–1995). [11]
Phillip Sharp Biology 1999 RNA interference and splicing; Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (1993). [12]
Isadore Singer Mathematics Atiyah–Singer index theorem; Abel Prize (2004); National Medal of Science (1983). [13]
Daniel I.C. Wang Chemical Engineering 1995 Biochemical process engineering. [8]
Sheila Widnall Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering 1998 Secretary of the Air Force (1993–1997); First woman appointed to MIT engineering faculty; first woman to chair the MIT faculty. [14]

This article, image, template or category should belong in one or more categories. ... Motor control is the field of Neuroscience that studies neuronal mechanisms of movements. ... The House of the Academy, Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... John Deutch John Mark Deutch (born July 27, 1938) was Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) from May 10, 1995 until December 14, 1996. ... The United States Deputy Secretary of Defense is the second-highest ranking official in the United States Department of Defense. ... The Office of Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) was established on January 23rd 1946 with Adm. ... Peter Diamond (b. ... Social security primarily refers to a field of social welfare service concerned with social protection, or protection against socially recognized conditions, including poverty, old age, disability, unemployment, families with children and others. ... Mildred S. Dresselhaus (born Mildred Spiewak on November 11, 1930 in The Bronx, New York) is an Institute Professor and Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... An electronic device known as a diode can be formed by joining two nanoscale carbon tubes with different electronic properties. ... National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science, also called the Presidential Medal of Science, is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social... John Harris Harbison (born December 20, 1938 in Orange, New Jersey) is a composer, best known for his operas and large choral works. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation is a private, independent grantmaking institution. ... Robert S. Langer (born August 29, 1948 in Albany, New York) is an Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... Drug delivery is a term that refers to the delivery of a pharmaceutical compound to humans or animals. ... Tissue engineering is the use of a combination of cells, engineering or tissue-matrix materials, and suitable biochemical factors to improve or replace biological functions. ... The United States National Academy of Engineering (NAE) is a private, non-profit institution which was founded in 1964, under the same congressional act that led to the founding of the National Academy of Sciences, signed by President Abraham Lincoln, in 1863. ... In queueing theory, Littles result, theorem, or law says: The average number of customers in a stable system (over some time interval) is equal to their average arrival rate, multiplied by their average time in the system. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Operations management. ... Professor Joel Moses received his undergraduate degree in Mathematics from Columbia University and a masters degree in Mathematics, also from Columbia. ... MACSYMA Reference Manual, MIT, 1977 Macsyma is a computer algebra system that was originally developed from 1967 to 1982 at MIT as part of Project MAC and later marketed commercially. ... Phillip Allen Sharp (born June 6, 1944), U.S. geneticist and molecular biologist; co-discovered gene splicing; shared the 1993 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Richard J. Roberts for the discovery that genes in eukaryotes are not contiguous strings but contain introns, and that the splicing of messenger... Figure 1. ... In genetics, splicing is a modification of genetic information after transcription, in which introns are removed and exons are joined. ... List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physiology or Medicine from 1901 to the present day. ... Isadore Singer (born 1924) is an Institute Professor in the Department of Mathematics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... In the mathematics of manifolds and differential operators, the Atiyah–Singer index theorem states that for an elliptic differential operator on a compact manifold, the analytical index (closely related to the dimension of the space of solutions) is equal to the topological index (defined in terms of some topological data). ... The Abel Prize is awarded annually by the King of Norway to outstanding mathematicians. ... National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science, also called the Presidential Medal of Science, is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social... “Process engineering is about applying engineering approaches, techniques, and tools to the construction of Process Models. ... The Secretary of the Air Force is the civilian head of the United States Department of the Air Force, a component organization of the Department of Defense. ...

Emeritus

Name Department Elected Notability Reference
Noam Chomsky Linguistics 1976 Generative grammar; political activist; influential scholar.[15][16] [17]
Jerome I. Friedman Physics 1991 Quantum chromodynamics; Nobel Prize in Physics (1990). [18]
Morris Halle Linguistics and Philosophy Phonology; The Sound Pattern of English. [19]
Chia-Chiao Lin Mathematics 1966 Fluid mechanics. [20][21]
Mario Molina Earth, Atmosphere, and Planetary Sciences 1997 Stratospheric ozone chemistry; Nobel Prize in Chemistry (1995). [6]
Paul Samuelson Economics 1966 John Bates Clark Medal (1947); Nobel Prize in Economics (1970); National Medal of Science (1996). [22]
Nevin S. Scrimshaw Nutrition and Food Science 1980 Eliminating nutritional deficiency; World Food Prize (1991). [23]
Robert M. Solow Economics 1973 National Medal of Science (1999); John Bates Clark Medal (1961); Nobel Prize in Economics (1987). [24]
John S. Waugh Chemistry Computational studies of spin systems. [25]

Avram Noam Chomsky (Hebrew and Yiddish: אברם נועם חומסקי) , Ph. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Generative linguistics. ... Jerome Isaac Friedman (born 1930) is a U.S. physicist. ... Quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is the theory of the strong interaction, a fundamental force describing the interactions of the quarks and gluons found in nucleons (such as the proton and neutron). ... Hannes Alfvén (1908–1995) accepting the Nobel Prize for his work on magnetohydrodynamics [1]. List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... Morris Halle, né Pinkowitz, is an American linguist. ... Phonology (Greek phonē = voice/sound and logos = word/speech), is a subfield of linguistics which studies the sound system of a specific language (or languages). ... The Sound Pattern of English (frequently referred to as SPE) is a work on phonology (a branch of linguistics) by Noam Chomsky and Morris Halle. ... Fluid mechanics is the subdiscipline of continuum mechanics that studies fluids, that is, liquids and gases. ... Mario J. Molina (born March 19, 1943) was awarded the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his role in elucidating the threat to the Earths ozone layer of chlorofluorocarbon gases (or CFCs). ... Global monthly average total ozone amount Ozone depletion describes two distinct, but related observations: a slow, steady decline of about 4 percent per decade in the total amount of ozone in Earths stratosphere since around 1980; and a much larger, but seasonal, decrease in stratospheric ozone over Earths... This is a list of Nobel Prize laureates in Chemistry from 1901 to 2006. ... Paul Anthony Samuelson Paul A. Samuelson (born May 15, 1915, in Gary, Indiana) is an American economist known for his work in many fields of economics. ... The biennial John Bates Clark Medal is awarded by the American Economic Association to that American economist under the age of forty who is adjudged to have made a significant contribution to economic thought and knowledge. Named after the American Neoclassical economist John Bates Clark (1847-1938), it is considered... The Bank of Sweden Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel (in Swedish Sveriges Riksbanks pris i ekonomisk vetenskap till Alfred Nobels minne), is a prize awarded each year for outstanding intellectual contributions in the field of economics. ... National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science, also called the Presidential Medal of Science, is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social... Percentage of population affected by malnutrition by country, according to United Nations statistics. ... The World Food Prize is an international award recognizing the achievements of individuals who have advanced human development by improving the quality, quantity or availability of food in the world. ... Robert Merton Solow (born August 23, 1924) is an American economist particularly known for his work on the theory of economic growth. ... National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science, also called the Presidential Medal of Science, is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social... The biennial John Bates Clark Medal is awarded by the American Economic Association to that American economist under the age of forty who is adjudged to have made a significant contribution to economic thought and knowledge. Named after the American Neoclassical economist John Bates Clark (1847-1938), it is considered... The Bank of Sweden Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel (in Swedish Sveriges Riksbanks pris i ekonomisk vetenskap till Alfred Nobels minne), is a prize awarded each year for outstanding intellectual contributions in the field of economics. ... In chemistry, a molecular orbital is a region in which an electron may be found in a molecule. ...

Deceased

Name Department Elected Notability Reference
Manson Benedict Nuclear Engineering 1969 National Medal of Science (1975). [26]
Gordon S. Brown Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 1973 Automatic feedback-control systems; computer numerical control; Dean of Engineering (1959–1968). [27]
Morris Cohen Material Science and Engineering 1974 Metallurgy of steel. [28]
Charles S. Draper Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 1966 Inertial guidance; gyro gunsight; founder of the Instrumentation Laboratory. [29]
Harold Eugene "Doc" Edgerton Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 1966 High-speed photography; Co-founder of EG&G; National Medal of Science (1973). [30]
Herman Feshbach Physics 1983 Nuclear reaction theory; National Medal of Science (1986). [31]
Edwin R. Gilliland Chemical Engineering 1971 Fractional distillation columns and fluidized catalytic cracking; President's Science Advisory Committee (1961–1965). [32]
Hermann Anton Haus Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 1986 Optical communications; National Medal of Science (1995). [33]
Arthur von Hippel Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 1962 Dielectric materials. [34]
Arthur Ippen Civil Engineering Hydraulic engineering and water resources. [35]
Roman O. Jakobson Linguistics Slavic studies and linguistics; Russian formalism. [36]
György Kepes Architecture 1970 Founded the Center for Advanced Visual Studies; Bauhaus contributor; Hungarian Medal of Honor and Middle Cross (1996). [37]
Norman Levinson Mathematics 1971 Non-linear differential equations; mathematical analysis; analytic number theory; testified at 1953 House Un-American Activities Committee. [21][38]
John Little Management Management consulting. [39]
Francis E. Low Physics Condensed matter physics; Provost of MIT (1980-1985). [40]
Franco Modigliani Economics & Management 1970 Nobel Prize in Economics (1985). [41]
Philip Morrison Physics 1973 Theoretical astrophysics. [42]
Walle J.H. Nauta Brain and Cognitive Sciences 1973 Nauta Silver Impregnation Method used to trace degenerating nerve fibers. [43]
Walter A. Rosenblith Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 1975 Psychoacoustics; elected to all three National Academies. [44]
Bruno Rossi Physics 1966 X-ray astronomy and discovery of cosmic rays; National Medal of Science (1983); Wolf Prize (1987). [45]
Francis O. Schmitt Biology 1955 Biological electron microscopy. [46]
Ascher H. Shapiro Mechanical Engineering 1975 Fluid mechanics and biomedical engineering. [47]
John C. Slater Physics 1952 Quantum theory and Electromagnetic theory of microwaves; Advisor to William Shockley and Richard Feynman. [48]
Cyril S. Smith Materials Science & Humanities Metallurgy and crystallography; metallography of archaeological artifacts. [49]
Carl R. Soderberg Mechanical Engineering 1959 Steam turbine electric generators; Dean of Engineering (1954–1959); consultant on the J-57 turbojet. [50]
Victor Wiesskopf Physics 1965 National Medal of Science (1980); Wolf Prize (1981); co-founder of the Union of Concerned Scientists. [21]
Jerome Wiesner Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 1980 Chairman of the President's Science Advisory Committee (1961–1964); Dean of Science (1964–1966); Provost of MIT (1966–1971); President of MIT (1971–1980). [51]
Jerrold R. Zacharias Nuclear Science and Engineering 1966 Atomic beams and clocks; educational reform; microwave radar. [52]

Manson Benedict (9 October 1907 in Lake Linden, Michigan — 18 September 2006 in Naples, Florida) was a professor of nuclear engineering at MIT. From 1958 to 1968, he was the chairman of the advisory committee to the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. ... National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science, also called the Presidential Medal of Science, is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social... Gordon Stanley Brown (born 1907 in Australia — died 23 August 1996 in Tucson, Arizona) was a professor of electrical engineering at MIT. He originated many of the concepts behind automatic-feedback control systems and the numerical control of machine tools. ... In engineering and mathematics, control theory deals with the behavior of dynamical systems. ... The acronym CNC stands for Computer(ized) Numerical(ly) Control(led), and refers specifically to the computer control of machine tools for the purpose of (repeatedly) manufacturing complex parts in metal as well as other materials, using a program written in a notation conforming to the EIA-274-D standard... Morris Cohen (November 27, 1911 - May 27, 2005). ... Metallurgy is a domain of materials science and of materials engineering that studies the physical and chemical behavior of metallic elements, their intermetallic compounds, and their mixtures, which are called alloys. ... The steel cable of a colliery winding tower. ... An inertial navigation system measures the position and altitude of a vehicle by measuring the accelerations and rotations applied to the systems inertial frame. ... The Ferranti Gyro Sight Mk IIc A gyro gunsight is a type of gunsight in which target lead (the amount of aim-off in front of a moving target) and bullet drop are allowed-for automatically, the sight incorporating a gyroscopic mechanism that computes the necessary deflections required to ensure... The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc. ... Sequence of a race horse galloping. ... EG&G logo EG&G is a defense contractor and provider of management and technical services. ... National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science, also called the Presidential Medal of Science, is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social... Institute Professor Emeritus Herman Feshbach of Cambridge, a renowned nuclear physicist and champion of equal opportunity at MIT and around the world, died December 22 2000 of congestive heart failure at Youville Hospital in Cambridge. ... In nuclear physics, a nuclear reaction is a process in which two nuclei or nuclear particles collide to produce products different from the initial particles. ... National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science, also called the Presidential Medal of Science, is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social... A fractionating column is an essential item used in the distillation of liquid mixtures so as to separate the mixture into its component parts, or fractions, based on the differences in their volatilities. ... A fluidized bed reactor (FBR) is a type of reactor device that can be used to carry out a variety of multiphase chemical reactions. ... // In 1951 President Harry S. Truman established the Science Advisory Committee as part of the Office of Defence Mobilization (ODM). ... Optical communication is any form of telecommunication that uses light as the transmission medium. ... National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science, also called the Presidential Medal of Science, is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social... Arthur R. von Hippel at age 100; photo taken by his grandson, photographer Jonas A. Kahn Arthur Robert von Hippel (November 19, 1898 – December 31, 2003) was a German-American materials researcher and physicist and a pioneer in the study of dielectrics, ferromagnetic and ferroelectric materials, as well as semiconductors. ... A dielectric, or electrical insulator, is a substance that is highly resistant to electric current. ... Hydraulic engineering is a sub-discipline of civil engineering concerned with the flow and conveyance of fluids, principally water. ... Water resources are sources of water that are useful or potentially useful to humans. ... Slavistics or Slavic Studies is the study of Slavic languages, literature and culture. ... Linguistics is the scientific study of language, which can be theoretical or applied. ... // Introduction The distinctive feature of Russian Formalism is the emphasis on the functional role of literary devices and the original conception of the evolution of literary history. ... The Center for Advanced Visual Studies at MIT was founded in 1967 by artist and teacher Gyorgy Kepes. ... Typography by Herbert Bayer above the entrance to the workshop block of the Bauhaus, Dessau, 2005. ... Norman Levinson (August 11, 1912 - October 10, 1975) was an American mathematician. ... In mathematics, a differential equation is an equation in which the derivatives of a function appear as variables. ... Analysis is the branch of mathematics most explicitly concerned with the notion of a limit, either the limit of a sequence or the limit of a function. ... Analytic number theory is the branch of number theory that uses methods from mathematical analysis. ... HUAC hearings House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC or HCUA) (1938–1975) was an investigative committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... John D.C. Little is an Institute Professor and the Chair Management Science at the MIT Sloan School of Management. ... Management consulting (sometimes also called strategy consulting) refers to both the practice of helping companies to improve performance through analysis of existing business problems and development of future plans, as well as to the industry composed of firms that specialize in this sort of consulting. ... Condensed matter physics is the field of physics that deals with the macroscopic physical properties of matter. ... Franco Modigliani (June 18, 1918 – September 25, 2003) was an Italian-American economist at the MIT Sloan School of Management, and winner of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 1985. ... The Bank of Sweden Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel (in Swedish Sveriges Riksbanks pris i ekonomisk vetenskap till Alfred Nobels minne), is a prize awarded each year for outstanding intellectual contributions in the field of economics. ... Philip Morrison, (November 7, 1915 – April 22, 2005), was institute Professor, Emeritus and Professor of Physics, Emeritus at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). ... Theoretical astrophysics is the discipline that seeks to explain the phenomena observed by astronomers in physical terms with a theoretic approach. ... Psychoacoustics is the study of subjective human perception of sounds. ... The United States National Academies consist of four organizations: the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, the Institute of Medicine, and the National Research Council. ... Bruno B. Rossi (April 13, 1905 – November 21, 1993) was a leading Italian-American experimental physicist. ... ROSAT image of X-ray fluorescence of, and occultation of the X-ray background by, the Moon. ... Cosmic rays can loosely be defined as energetic particles originating outside of the Earth. ... National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science, also called the Presidential Medal of Science, is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social... The Wolf Prize has been awarded annually since 1978 to living scientists and artists for achievements in the interest of mankind and friendly relations among peoples . ... The electron microscope is a microscope that can magnify very small details with high resolving power due to the use of electrons rather than light to scatter off material, magnifying at levels up to 500,000 times. ... Ascher H. Shapiro (born: May 1916 — died: Nov. ... Fluid mechanics is the subdiscipline of continuum mechanics that studies fluids, that is, liquids and gases. ... The AbioCor artificial heart, an example of a biomedical engineering application of mechanical engineering with biocompatible materials for Cardiothoracic Surgery using an artificial organ. ... John Clark Slater (1900-1976) was a major physicist and theoretical chemist. ... Quantum theory is a theory of physics that uses Plancks constant. ... Maxwells equations are the set of four equations, attributed to James Clerk Maxwell, that describe the behavior of both the electric and magnetic fields, as well as their interactions with matter. ... Microwaves are electromagnetic waves with wavelengths longer than those of terahertz (THz) frequencies, but relatively short for radio waves. ... William Bradford Shockley (February 13, 1910 – August 12, 1989) was a British-born American physicist and inventor. ... Richard Phillips Feynman (May 11, 1918 – February 15, 1988; surname pronounced ) was an American physicist known for expanding the theory of quantum electrodynamics, the physics of the superfluidity of supercooled liquid helium, and particle theory. ... Metallurgy is a domain of materials science and of materials engineering that studies the physical and chemical behavior of metallic elements, their intermetallic compounds, and their mixtures, which are called alloys. ... Crystallography (from the Greek words crystallon = cold drop / frozen drop, with its meaning extending to all solids with some degree of transparency, and graphein = write) is the experimental science of determining the arrangement of atoms in solids. ... Metallograhy is a science, related to metallurgy that looks at the composition and structure of metals and alloys. ... I archaeology, an artifact or artefact is any object made or modified by a human culture, and often one later recovered by some archaeological endeavor. ... A rotor of a modern steam turbine, used in a power plant A steam turbine is a mechanical device that extracts thermal energy from pressurized steam, and converts it into useful mechanical work. ... Generator redirects here. ... // Background YJ57-P-3 at USAF Museum The Pratt & Whitney J57 was a development of the T45 turboprop engine intended for the XB-52. ... Weisskopf redirects here. ... National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science, also called the Presidential Medal of Science, is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social... The Wolf Prize has been awarded annually since 1978 to living scientists and artists for achievements in the interest of mankind and friendly relations among peoples . ... The Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) is an advocacy organization based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States. ... Jerome Wiesner (Jerome Bert Wiesner) (May 30, 1915-October 21, 1994) was an educator, a science advisor to U.S. Presidents Eisenhower and Kennedy, an advocate for arms control, and a critic of anti-ballistic-missile defense systems. ... // In 1951 President Harry S. Truman established the Science Advisory Committee as part of the Office of Defence Mobilization (ODM). ... Jerrold Reinach Zacharias was an American physicist and Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... Atomic beam is special case of particle beam; it is is the collimated flux (beam) of neutral atoms. ... Chip-Scale Atomic Clock Unveiled by NIST An atomic clock is a type of clock that uses an atomic resonance frequency standard to feed its counter. ... This long range radar antenna, known as ALTAIR, is used to detect and track space objects in conjunction with ABM testing at the Ronald Reagan Test Site on the Kwajalein atoll. ...

Former

Name MIT Department Current Institution Elected Notability Reference
David Baltimore Biology Caltech 1995 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (1975). [8]
Charles H. Townes Physics UC Berkeley 1961 Radio astronomy and astrophysics; Nobel Prize in Physics (1964); National Medal of Science (1982). [53]

David Baltimore (b. ... California Institute of Technology The California Institute of Technology (commonly known as Caltech) is a private, coeducational university located in Pasadena, California, in the United States. ... List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physiology or Medicine from 1901 to the present day. ... Charles Hard Townes (born July 28, American physicist and educator. ... The University of California, Berkeley (also known as Cal, UC Berkeley, UCB, or simply Berkeley) is a prestigious, public, coeducational university situated in the foothills of Berkeley, California to the east of San Francisco Bay, overlooking the Golden Gate and its bridge. ... Radio astronomy is the study of celestialphenomena through measurement of radio waves emitted by physical processes occurring in space. ... Spiral Galaxy ESO 269-57 Astrophysics is the branch of astronomy that deals with the physics of the universe, including the physical properties (luminosity, density, temperature, and chemical composition) of celestial objects such as stars, galaxies, and the interstellar medium, as well as their interactions. ... Hannes Alfvén (1908–1995) accepting the Nobel Prize for his work on magnetohydrodynamics [1]. List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science, also called the Presidential Medal of Science, is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social...

References

  1. ^ a b c d MIT Policies and Procedures: Special Professorial Appointments, Institute Professor. Retrieved on 2007-03-24.
  2. ^ "Slater Takes New Post as Roving Physics Professor", The Tech, September 18, 1951. Retrieved on 2007-04-22. 
  3. ^ Elizabeth A. Thomson. "Bizzi is named an Institute Professor", MIT News Office, June 5, 2002. Retrieved on 2007-03-23. 
  4. ^ John M. Deutch Biography. Retrieved on 2007-03-26.
  5. ^ Deutch named Institute professor (December 7, 1990). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  6. ^ a b c "Diamond, Magnanti and Molina are Institute Professors", MIT News Office, June 4, 1997. Retrieved on 2007-03-24. 
  7. ^ MIT Physics Faculty. Retrieved on 2007-03-26.
  8. ^ a b c "Baltimore, Harbison, Wang elevated to ranks of Institute Professors", MIT News Office, June 7, 1995. Retrieved on 2007-03-24. 
  9. ^ Elizabeth A. Thomson. "Bob Langer named an Institute Professor", MIT News Office, March 2, 2005. Retrieved on 2007-03-23. 
  10. ^ MIT Sloan Faculty webpage. Retrieved on 2007-03-26.
  11. ^ "Joel Moses named Institute Professor at MIT", MIT News Office, September 16, 1999. Retrieved on 2007-03-23. 
  12. ^ "Sharp named an Institute Professor", MIT News Office, March 10, 1999. Retrieved on 2007-03-23. 
  13. ^ "MIT professor shares international prize for mathematics", MIT News Office, March 25, 2004. Retrieved on 2007-03-23. 
  14. ^ "Former Secretary of Air Force named Institute Professor by MIT", MIT News Office, December 1, 1998. Retrieved on 2007-03-23. 
  15. ^ "Chomsky Is Citation Champ", MIT News Office, April 15, 1992. Retrieved on 2007-03-26. 
  16. ^ "According to a recent survey by the Institute for Scientific Information, only Marx, Lenin, Shakespeare, Aristotle, the Bible, Plato, and Freud are cited more often in academic journals than Chomsky, who edges out Hegel and Cicero." Samuel Hughes, The Pennsylvania Gazette, July/August, 2001 [1]
  17. ^ "Chomsky Named Killian Lecturer", May 22, 1991. Retrieved on 2007-03-26. 
  18. ^ "Friedman Named Institute Professor", MIT News Office, May 29, 1991. Retrieved on 2007-03-23. 
  19. ^ MIT Department of Linguistics faculty homepage. Retrieved on 2007-03-26.
  20. ^ MIT Facts 2007: Faculty. Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  21. ^ a b c 3 Institute Profs Selected (September 21, 1973). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  22. ^ "Economist Paul Samuelson of MIT to Receive National Medal of Science", June 11, 1996. Retrieved on 2007-03-26. 
  23. ^ "Scrimshaw to Receive Food Prize", August 28, 1991. Retrieved on 2007-03-26. 
  24. ^ Students Persuade Solow to Teach One Last Course (November 7, 1995). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  25. ^ MIT Chemistry faculty webpage. Retrieved on 2007-03-26.
  26. ^ Manson Benedict, 98, chemist on Manhattan Project, dies (September 27, 2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  27. ^ "Gordon Brown, pioneer electrical engineer, educator at MIT, dies at 88", MIT News Office, August 26, 1996. Retrieved on 2007-04-22. 
  28. ^ Sarah H. Wright. "Institute Professor Morris Cohen dies", MIT News Office, May 31, 2005. Retrieved on 2007-03-23. 
  29. ^ Dr. Draper & His Lab. Draper Labs. Retrieved on 2007-04-22.
  30. ^ MIT Loses a Colorful, Beloved Professor (January 10, 1990). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  31. ^ "Renowned nuclear physicist Feshbach, Institute Professor emeritus, dies at 83", MIT News Office, January 10, 2001. Retrieved on 2007-03-23. 
  32. ^ P.L. Thibaut Brian. Memorial Tributes: National Academy of Engineering, Volume 1 (1979). National Academies Press. Retrieved on 2007-04-22.
  33. ^ "Institute Professor Hermann Haus, quantum optics pioneer, dies at 77", MIT News Office, June 4, 2003. Retrieved on 2007-03-23. 
  34. ^ "Institute Prof. von Hippel dies at 105; was leader in materials research", MIT News Office, January 14, 2004. Retrieved on 2007-03-23. 
  35. ^ Hunter Rouse. Memorial Tributes: National Academy of Engineering, Volume 1 (1979). National Academies Press. Retrieved on 2007-04-22.
  36. ^ Obituary: Roman Jackobson (1896-1982). Journal of American Folklore. Retrieved on 2007-04-22.
  37. ^ "Gyorgy Kepes, founder of CAVS, dies at 95", MIT News Office, January 16, 2002. Retrieved on 2007-04-22. 
  38. ^ Levinson biography. School of Mathematics and Statistics University of St Andrews, Scotland. Retrieved on 2007-04-22.
  39. ^ Awards and Honors (May 16, 1990). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  40. ^ "Physicist Francis E. Low, former MIT provost, dies at 85", MIT News Office, February 20, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-03-23. 
  41. ^ Nobel laureate Franco Modigliani dies at 85 (September 25, 2003). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  42. ^ "Institute Professor Philip Morrison dies at 89", MIT News Office, April 25, 2005. Retrieved on 2007-03-07. 
  43. ^ "Institute Professor Walle J.H. Nauta dies", MIT News Office, March 30, 1994. Retrieved on 2007-03-24. 
  44. ^ "Retired MIT Professor Rosenblith dies at 88; Pioneered use of computers to study brain", MIT News Office, May 3, 2002. Retrieved on 2007-03-23. 
  45. ^ "Dec. 15 memorial planned for Bruno Rossi", MIT News Office, December 1, 1993. Retrieved on 2007-04-22. 
  46. ^ "Institute Professor Francis O. Schmitt dies at 91", MIT News Office, October 4, 1995. Retrieved on 2007-03-24. 
  47. ^ "Bruno B. Rossi", MIT The Tech, November 23, 1993. Retrieved on 2007-04-22. 
  48. ^ John C. Slater papers. American Philosophical Society. Retrieved on 2007-04-22.
  49. ^ "Cyril Stanley Smith Dies at 88", September 2, 1992. Retrieved on 2007-04-22. 
  50. ^ Ascher H. Shapiro. Carl Richard Soderberg (1895-1979). National Academies Press. Retrieved on 2007-04-22.
  51. ^ President emeritus Jerome Wiesner is dead at 79 (October 26, 2004). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  52. ^ Norman F. Ramsey. Jerrold R. Zacharias (1905-1896). Retrieved on 2007-04-22.
  53. ^ "Nobelist and former Institute Professor to speak at MIT", MIT News Office, April 11, 2001. Retrieved on 2007-03-24. 

2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 24 is the 83rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (84th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 23 is the 82nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (83rd in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (86th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (95th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 24 is the 83rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (84th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (86th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 24 is the 83rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (84th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 23 is the 82nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (83rd in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (86th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 23 is the 82nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (83rd in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 23 is the 82nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (83rd in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 23 is the 82nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (83rd in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 23 is the 82nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (83rd in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (86th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (86th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 23 is the 82nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (83rd in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (86th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (95th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (95th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (86th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (86th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (95th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (86th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (95th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 23 is the 82nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (83rd in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (95th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 23 is the 82nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (83rd in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 23 is the 82nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (83rd in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 23 is the 82nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (83rd in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (95th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 23 is the 82nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (83rd in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (95th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 7 is the 66th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (67th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 24 is the 83rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (84th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 23 is the 82nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (83rd in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 24 is the 83rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (84th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (95th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 24 is the 83rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (84th in leap years). ...

External links


Academics The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a private, coeducational research university located in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ...

OpenCourseWareBiologyChemistryEconomicsElectrical Engineering and Computer ScienceMathematicsPhysicsSloan School of Management MIT OpenCourseWare (MIT OCW) is an initiative of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to put all of the educational materials from MITs undergraduate- and graduate-level courses online, free and openly available to anyone, anywhere, by the year 2007. ... The MIT Biology Department is a world-renowned center for research in the life sciences. ... The Chemistry Department at MIT is one of the top university faculties in the world. ... MIT Economics Department is one of the foremost economics faculties in the world. ... The Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at MIT offers academic programs leading to the S.B., S.M., M.Eng. ... The Department of Mathematics at MIT is one of the leading mathematics departments in America. ... The Physics Department at MIT is one of the top physics faculties in the world. ... The MIT Sloan School of Management is one of the five schools of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. It is one of the worlds leading business schools, conducting research and teaching in finance, entrepreneurship, marketing, strategic management, economics, organizational behavior, operations management, supply chain...

MIT

Research

LaboratoriesBroad InstituteCenter for Theoretical PhysicsComputer Science and Artificial Intelligence LaboratoryLaboratory for Information and Decision SystemsLincoln LaboratoryMcGovern Institute for Brain ResearchMedia LabPicower Institute for Learning and MemoryPlasma Science and Fusion CenterResearch Laboratory of ElectronicsMIT Nuclear Reactor Lab This list of Massachusetts Institute of Technology departments and laboratories covers the universitys diverse and interdisciplinary research interest. ... The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, formerly the Whitehead Institute/MIT Center for Genome Research (WICGR), is a multidisciplinary institution dedicated to fulfilling the potential of genomics for the biomedical sciences. ... MIT Center for Theoretical Physics is a subdivision of MIT Department of Physics. ... MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, or CSAIL, is an interdisciplinary research laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, formed on July 1, 2003 by the merger of MIT Laboratory for Computer Science and MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. ... The MIT Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems is a research labotarory of MIT, working in the areas of communication, controls, and signal processing. ... MIT Lincoln Laboratory, also known as Lincoln Lab, is a federally funded research and development center managed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and funded by the United States Department of Defense. ... The McGovern Institute for Brain Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is a research and teaching center, which conducts Integrated Research in neuroscience, molecular neurobiology, cognitive science, computation and related areas. ... The building interior near the entrance The MIT Media Lab in the School of Architecture and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology engages in education and research in the digital technology used for expression and communication. ... The Picower Institute for Learning and Memory is, along with the McGovern Institute for Brain Research and the department of cognitive science, one of the three neuroscience groups at MIT. It is run by Nobel Prize laureate Susumu Tonegawa. ... PSFC logo The Plasma Science and Fusion Center (PSFC) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is a research laboratory for the study of plasma physics and nuclear fusion. ... The Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) was founded in 1946 as the successor to the famed MIT Radiation Laboratory (RadLab) of World War II. During the war, large scale research at the RadLab was devoted to the rapid development of microwave radar. ...

Culture

History of MITStudent lifeMIT in popular cultureAlumniFacultyPresidentsInstitute ProfessorAthenaBrass RatHacksThe TechScience FictionTMRCTech SquaresMIT $100K6.370 The Massachusetts Institute of Technology was founded in 1861 and has played pivotal roles in the many scientific and technological developments since then. ... The student life and culture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology encompasses hundreds of student activities, organizations, and athletics that contribute to MITs distinct culture. ... The mad scientist is one character type frequently referenced in connection with MIT The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), an educational and research institution in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has been referenced in many works of cinema, television and the written word. ... This list of Massachusetts Institute of Technology alumni includes students who studied as undergraduates or graduate students at MITs School of Engineering, School of Science, Sloan School of Management, School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, School of Architecture and Urban Studies, or Whitaker College. ... This list of Massachusetts Institute of Technology faculty includes current, emeritus, former, and deceased professors, lecturers, and researchers. ... The Massachusetts Institute of Technology has had 18 presidents in its 141-year history. ... Project Athena was a joint project of MIT, Digital Equipment Corporation, and IBM. It was launched in 1983, and research and development ran through June 30, 1991, eight years after it began. ... MIT Class of 2007 ring. ... An MIT hack is defined as a clever, benign, and ethical prank or practical joke at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... Front page of The Tech, issue of January 18, 2006 The Tech, first published in 1881, is the oldest and largest campus newspaper at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, as well as the first newspaper to be published online. ... The MIT Science Fiction Society (or MITSFS) is a literary society and library of science fiction and fantasy books and magazines, located at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... The Tech Model Railroad Club (TMRC), also known as The Midnight Requisitioning Committee a student organization at MIT, is one of the most famous model railroad clubs in the world. ... Tech Squares is a square and round dance club at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... The MIT $100K Entrepreneurship Competition is one of the largest and most famous student business plan competitions in the world. ... 6. ...

Buildings

Architecture of MITChapelGreen BuildingInfinite CorridorKresge AuditoriumMIT MuseumStata CenterWiesner buildingGraduate ResidencesUndergraduate ResidencesFraternities and Sororities The Massachusetts Institute of Technologys Cambridge, Massachusetts campus has a diverse and varied architecture, reflecting its hundred years history. ... Exterior. ... Green Building, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... The Infinite Corridor is the hallway, 251 meters (825 feet) long, that runs through the main building of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... Kresge Auditorium from rear, looking toward I. M. Peis Green Building. ... MIT Museum, founded in 1971, is the museum of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... Stata Center Building 32 at Night View from a window The Ray and Maria Stata Center is a 430,000-ft² (40,000 m²) academic complex designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Frank Gehry for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... The Wiesner building houses the MIT Media Lab, the Center for Bits and Atoms (Neil Gershenfelds lab) and the List Visual Arts Center. ... This is a list of the graduate dorms at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... The following is a list of MITs fraternities and sororities. ...


 
 

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