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Encyclopedia > List of Greek phrases

List of Greek Phrases/Proverbs

Contents
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Αα

(h)a


Ἀγεωμέτρητος μηδεὶς εἰσίτω

Ageōmetrētos mēdeis eisitō.
"Let no-one without knowledge of geometry enter". Motto over the entrance to Plato's Academy (quoted in Elias' commentary on Aristotle's Categories).

Ἀεὶ Λιβύη φέρει τι κακόν / καινόν Calabi-Yau manifold Geometry (Greek γεωμετρία; geo = earth, metria = measure) is a part of mathematics concerned with questions of size, shape, and relative position of figures and with properties of space. ... PLATO was one of the first generalized Computer assisted instruction systems, originally built by the University of Illinois (U of I) and later taken over by Control Data Corporation (CDC), who provided the machines it ran on. ...

Aei Libyē pherei ti kakon / kainon.
"Libya always bears something evil / new", Aristotle, Historia Animalium. (Cf. Latin Ex Africa semper aliquid novi, "From Africa always something new".)
Ἀεὶ κολοιὸς παρὰ κολοιῷ ἱζάνει
Ἀεὶ κολοιὸς παρὰ κολοιῷ ἱζάνει

Ἀεὶ κολοιὸς παρὰ κολοιῷ ἱζάνει Aristotle (Greek: AristotélÄ“s) (384 BC – 322 BC) was a Greek philosopher, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 407 pixelsFull resolution (2088 × 1061 pixel, file size: 780 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Corvus monedula. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 407 pixelsFull resolution (2088 × 1061 pixel, file size: 780 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Corvus monedula. ...

Aei koloios para koloiōi hizanei.
"A jackdaw is always found near a jackdaw", i.e. "birds of a feather flock together."

Ἀεὶ ὁ θεὸς γεωμετρεῖ Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Jackdaw range The Jackdaw (Corvus monedula), sometimes known as the Eurasian Jackdaw or European Jackdaw, is one of the smallest species (34–39 cm in length) in the genus of crows and ravens. ...

Aei ho theos geōmetrei.
"Always god geometrizes", Plato

Ἀεὶ ὁ θεὸς ὁ μέγας γεωμετρεῖ τό σύμπαν PLATO was one of the first generalized Computer assisted instruction systems, originally built by the University of Illinois (U of I) and later taken over by Control Data Corporation (CDC), who provided the machines it ran on. ...

Aei ho theos ho megas geōmetrei to sumpan.
"Always the great god applies geometry to everything", A mnemonic for π (pi); Ἀεί =3, =1, θεός=4, =1, μέγας=5, γεωμετρεῖ=9,τό=2, σύμπαν=6

Ἀετοῦ γῆρας, κορυδοῦ νεότης When a circles diameter is 1, its circumference is Ï€. Pi or Ï€ is the ratio of a circles circumference to its diameter in Euclidean geometry, approximately 3. ...

Aëtou gēras, korudou neotēs.
"An eagle's old age (is worth) a sparrow's youth".

Ἀνάγκᾳ δ’οὐδὲ θεοὶ μάχονται

Anankāi d'oude theoi machontai.
"Even the Gods do not fight necessity", Simonides, 8, 20.

Ἄνθρωπος μέτρον Bold textil8jjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjpooSimonides of Ceos (ca. ...

Anthrōpos metron.
"Man the measure (of all things)", motto of Protagoras.

Ἅπαξ λεγόμενον Protagoras (in Greek Πρωταγόρας) was born around 481 BC in Abdera, Thrace in Ancient Greece. ...

Hapax legomenon.
"Once said", i.e. a word that only occurs once in a text or body of literature.

Ἀπὸ μηχανῆς Θεός A hapax legomenon (pl. ...

Apo mēchanēs Theos
Deus ex machina

Ἄριστον μὲν ὕδωρ // The phrase deus ex machina (literally god out of a machine) describes an unexpected, artificial, or improbable character, device, or event introduced suddenly in a work of fiction or drama to resolve a situation or untangle a plot (e. ...

Ariston men hudōr.
"Greatest however is water", Pindar, Olymp. 1, 1. Used as the inscription over the Pump Room at Bath.

Pindar (or Pindarus) (probably born 522 BC in Cynoscephalae, a village in Boeotia; died 443 BC in Argos), was perhaps the greatest of the nine lyric poets of ancient Greece. ... Bath is a city in Somerset, England most famous for its baths fed by three hot springs. ...

Ββ

b


Βρῶμα θεῶν

Brōma theōn.
"Food of the gods" — allegedly said by Nero of the poisoned mushrooms with which his mother Agrippina the younger murdered Claudius.

Nero[1] Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (December 15, 37 – June 9, 68)[2], born Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, also called Nero Claudius Caesar Drusus Germanicus, was the fifth and last Roman Emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty. ... Mushroom(s) are the fleshy, spore-bearing fruiting bodies of fungi typically produced above ground on soil or on their food sources. ... Julia Vipsania Agrippina Minor or Julia Agrippina; known as Agrippina Minor (Latin for the ‘younger’, Classical Latin: IVLIA•AGRIPPINA; from the year 50, called IVLIA•AVGVSTA•AGRIPPINA[1], Greek: η Ιουλία Αγκιππίνη, November 6, 15 - between 19-23 March, 59), sometimes called Agrippinilla (to distinguish her from her mother) was an Empress. ... For other persons named Claudius, see Claudius (disambiguation). ...

Γγ

g


Γλαῦκ’ Ἀθήναζε / Γλαῦκ’ εἰς Ἀθήνας

Glauk’ Athēnaze / Glauk’ eis Athēnas.
"Owls to Athens", i.e. coals to Newcastle, ice to the Inuits.

Γνῶθι σεαυτόν ISO 4217 Code GRD User(s) Greece Inflation 3. ... Athens is the largest and the capital city of Greece, located in the Attica periphery. ... Newcastle in Britain is a coal mining, distributing and selling hub. ... For other uses, see Inuit (disambiguation). ...

Gnōthi seauton.
"Know yourself" — the motto over the entrance to the temple of Apollo at Delphi, as well as the motto of Hamilton College, a small, prestigious liberal arts college in the United States.

The Ancient Greek aphorism Know yourself (Greek: γνῶθι σεαυτόν or gnothi seauton) was inscribed at the lintel of the entrance to the Temple of Apollo at Delphi. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... Delphi (Greek , [ðe̞lˈfi]) is an archaeological site and a modern town in Greece on the south-western spur of Mount Parnassus in a valley of Phocis. ... Hamilton College is a private, independent, highly selective liberal arts college located in Clinton, New York. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ...

Δδ

d


Δῶς μοι πᾶ στῶ καὶ τὰν γᾶν κινάσω

Dōs moi pā stō, kai tan gān kināsō.
"Give me a place to stand and I will move the earth". Attributed to Archimedes.

Archimedes of Syracuse (Greek: c. ...

Εε

(h)e


Εἷς οἰωνὸς ἄριστος, ἀμύνεσθαι περὶ πάτρης

Eis oiōnos aristos, amunesthai peri patrēs
"There is only one omen, that a man should fight for his country" (Homer, Iliad, 12).

Ἓν οἶδα ὅτι οὐδὲν οἶδα Examples of omens from the Nuremberg Chronicle (1493): natural phenomena and strange births. ... Homer (Greek: ) is the name given to the supposed unitary author of the early Greek poems the Iliad and the Odyssey. ... title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ...

Hen oida hoti ouden oida
"I know one thing, that I know nothing", (Socrates, paraphrased from Plato's Apology)

Ἐπεὶ δ' οὖν πάντες ὅσοι τε περιπολοῦσιν φανερῶς καὶ ὅσοι φαίνονται καθ' ὅσον ἂν ἐθέλωσιν θεοὶ γένεσιν ἔσχον, λέγει πρὸς αὐτοὺς ὁ τόδε τὸ πᾶν γεννήσας τάδε This page is about the ancient Greek philosopher. ... A Paraphrase is a statement or remark explained in other words or another way, so as to simplify or clarify its meaning. ... (The) Apology (of Socrates) is Platos version of the speech given by Socrates as he defends himself against the charges of being a man who corrupted the young, did not believe in the gods, and created new deities. Apology here has its earlier meaning (now usually expressed by the...

Epei d' oun pantes hōsoi te peripolousin phanerōs kai hōsoi phainontai kath' hōson an ethelōsin theoi genesin eschon, legei pros autous ho tode to pan gennēsas tade
"When all of them, those gods who appear in their revolutions, as well as those other gods who appear at will had come into being, the creator of the universe addressed them the following" (Plato, Timaios on gods and the creator of the universe)

PLATO was one of the first generalized Computer assisted instruction systems, originally built by the University of Illinois (U of I) and later taken over by Control Data Corporation (CDC), who provided the machines it ran on. ... Timaeus is a theoretical treatise of Plato in the form of a Socratic dialogue, written circa 360 B.C. The work puts forward speculation on the nature of the physical world. ...

Ζζ

Ηη

(h)ē


Ἢ τὰν ἢ ἐπὶ τᾶς

Ē tan ē epi tas

"Either with it, or on it", "Either with your shield, or upon it " - meaning "either you will win the battle, or you will die and then be carried back home on your shield". It was said by Spartan mothers to their sons before they went out to battle to remind them of their bravery and duty to sparta and greece. A hoplite could not escape the field of battle unless he tossed the heavy and cumbersome shield. Therefore losing one's shield meant desertion. The hoplite was a heavy infantryman that was the central focus of warfare in Ancient Greece. ...


Θθ

th


Θάλασσα καὶ πῦρ καὶ γυνή, κακὰ τρία

Thalassa kai pūr kai gunē, kaka tria.
"Sea and fire and woman, three evils."

Ιι

(h)i

Ἰησοῦς Χριστὸς Θεοῦ Υἱὸς Σωτήρ
Ἰησοῦς Χριστὸς Θεοῦ Υἱὸς Σωτήρ

Ἰησοῦς Χριστὸς Θεοῦ Υἱὸς Σωτήρ Image File history File links Ephesus_Ichthys. ... Image File history File links Ephesus_Ichthys. ...

Iēsous Christos Theou Huios Sōtēr
"Jesus Christ, Son of God, Saviour." As an acronym: ΙΧΘΥΣ (Ichthys) — "fish".

It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Backronym and Apronym (Discuss) Acronyms and initialisms are abbreviations, such as NATO, laser, and ABC, written as the initial letter or letters of words, and pronounced on the basis of this abbreviated written form. ... The ichthys has been used to represent a number of ideas. ...

Κκ

k, c

Καὶ σὺ τέκνον. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Ancient marble bust of Marcus Brutus Marcus Junius Brutus (85 BC – 42 BC), or Quintus Servilius Caepio Brutus, was a Roman senator of the late Roman Republic. ...

Kai sū teknon.
Et tu, Brute?
On March 15, 44 BC, Julius Caesar was attacked by a group of senators, including Marcus Junius Brutus, a senator and Caesar's close friend. Caesar initially resisted his attackers, but when he saw Brutus, he supposedly spoke those words and resigned himself to his fate. It is almost certain that Caesar did not actually say these exact words. Ancient sources report that he either died wordlessly or said "Καὶ σὺ τέκνον" (Kai su, teknon?), Greek for "You too, my child?" (Suetonius, De Vita Caesarum, LXXXII [1]). This Latin version was made famous by William Shakespeare, who used it in his play, Julius Caesar (act 3, scene 1,85).

Κακοῦ κόρακος κακὸν ὠόν Et tu, Brute? were, according to legend, the last words of Julius Caesar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC - 40s BC - 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC 0s Years: 49 BC 48 BC 47 BC 46 BC 45 BC 44 BC 43 BC 42 BC 41 BC... The Roman Senate (Latin: Senatus) was the main governing council of both the Roman Republic, which started in 509 BC, and the Roman Empire. ... Ancient marble bust of Marcus Brutus Marcus Junius Brutus (85 BC – 42 BC), or Quintus Servilius Caepio Brutus, was a Roman senator of the late Roman Republic. ... The Twelve Caesars is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Tragedy of Julius Cæsar, more commonly known simply as Julius Caesar, is a tragedy by William Shakespeare written in around 1600. ...

Kakou korakos kakon ōön.
"From a bad crow, a bad egg", i.e. like father, like son.

Κακὸς ἀνὴρ μακρόβιος Species See text. ...

Kakos anēr makrobios
"A bad man lives long"

Καλλίστῃ

Kallistēi
"For the prettiest one", "To the most beautiful", from the myth of the Golden Apple of Discord.

Κάτθανε, Διαγόρα, οὐ καὶ ἐς Ὄλυμπον ἀναβήσῃ An apple of discord is a reference to the Golden Apple of Discord which, according to Greek mythology, the goddess Eris (Gr. ...

Katthane, Diagora, ou kai es Olympon anabēsē.
"Die, Diagoras, for ascend Olympus (i.e. join the gods) you cannot" — A Spartan spectator to Diagoras of Rhodes, a former Olympic champion himself, during the 79th Olympiad, when his two sons became Olympic champions and carried him around the stadium on their shoulders.

κτῆμα ἐς ἀεί Ruins of the training grounds at Olympia The Ancient Olympic Games, originally referred to as simply the Olympic Games (Greek: ; Olympiakoi Agones) were a series of athletic competitions held between various city-states of Ancient Greece. ... This article is about the Greek mountain. ... Ruins of the training grounds at Olympia The Ancient Olympic Games, originally referred to as simply the Olympic Games (Greek: ; Olympiakoi Agones) were a series of athletic competitions held between various city-states of Ancient Greece. ...

ktema es aei
"everlasting possession" (Thucydides)

Κύριε ἐλέησον Bust of Thucydides residing in the Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto. ...

Kurie eleēson.
"Lord have mercy" — a very common phrase in Greek Orthodox liturgies, and also used in Greek (but transliterated as kyrie eleison) in the Roman Catholic Mass.

Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Coptic Orthodox Pope · Roman Catholic Pope Archbishop of Canterbury · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Faith... Kyrie is the vocative case of the Greek word κύριος (kyrios - lord) and means O Lord; it is the common name of an important prayer of Christian liturgy, also called Kyrie eleison which is Greek for Lord, have mercy. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic... A Medieval Low Mass by a bishop. ...

Λλ

l


Λάθε βιώσας

Lathe biōsas
"Live in obscurity", an Epicurean phrase.

Epicureanism is a system of philosophy based upon the teachings of Epicurus (c340-c270 BC), founded around 307 BC. Epicurus was an atomic materialist, following in the steps of Democritus. ...

Μμ

m


Μέτρον ἄριστον or Πάν μέτρον ἄριστον

Métron áriston or Pan métron áriston
"Moderation is the best thing", literally: "there is a perfect measure for everything" Cleobulus

Μὴ γένοιτο Cleobulus was a native of Lindus, and the son of Evagoras. ...

Mē genoito.
"Let it not be!" / "Heaven forbid!" — phrase used by St Paul.

Μὴ χείρον βέλτιστον Paul of Tarsus (b. ...

Mē cheíron véltiston.
"The least bad [choice] is the best", when there is no good option, one should pick the one that does the least harm.

Μηδὲν ἄγαν

Mēden agan.
"Nothing in excess" — a carving from the temple of Apollo at Delphi.

Μηκέτι ὑδροπότει, ἀλλ' οἴνῳ ὀλίγῳ χρῶ διὰ τὸν στόμαχόν σου καὶ τὰς πυκνάς σου ἀσθενείας For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... Delphi (Greek , [ðeÌžlˈfi]) is an archaeological site and a modern town in Greece on the south-western spur of Mount Parnassus in a valley of Phocis. ...

Mēketi hudropotei, all' oinōi oligōi chrō dia ton stomachon sou kai tas puknas sou astheneias
Drink no longer water, but take a little wine for thy stomach's sake, and thine often infirmities.
I Timothy 5:23

Μολὼν λαβέ! The three pastoral epistles are books of the canonical New Testament: the First Epistle to Timothy (1 Timothy) the Second Epistle to Timothy (2 Timothy), and the Epistle to Titus. ... The words MOLON LABE (ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ) in Greek as they are inscribed on the marble of the modern era monument at Thermopylae. ...

Molōn labe!
"Come take them!" — King Leonidas of Sparta, in response to King Xerxes of Persia's demand that the Greek army lay down their arms before the battle of Thermopylae.

Νν

n


Νίψον ἀνομήματα μὴ μόναν ὄψιν

Nipson anomēmata mē monan opsin
"Wash the sins not only the face"
A palindrome inscription on fountains of Asclepieia, later inscribed in Hagia Sophia

Look up Palindrome in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In ancient Greece, an asclepieion was a healing temple, sacred to the god Asclepius. ... Hagia Sophia The patriarchal basilica Hagia Sophia (Greek: ; Holy Wisdom), now known as the Ayasofya Museum, was the culmination of early Christian architecture. ...

Ξξ

x


Οο

(h)o


Οὐ φροντὶς Ἱπποκλείδῃ

Ou phrontis Hippokleidēi.
"Hippocleides doesn't care." From a story in Herodotus (6.129), in which Hippocleides loses the chance to marry Cleisthenes' daughter after getting drunk and dancing on his head. Herodotus says the phrase was a common expression in his own day.

Οὖτις ἐμοὶ γ' ὄνομα This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Hippocleides, the son of Teisander, was an Athenian nobleman, who served as Eponymous Archon for the year 566 BC-565 BC. During his term as archon he set up the statue of Athena Promachos in Athens for the Panathenaia festival. ... Cleisthenes (also Clisthenes or Kleisthenes) was the tyrant of Sicyon, who aided in the war against Cirra that destroyed that city in 595 BC. He organized a competition with his daughter Agarista as a prize; the two main competitors for her were the Alcmaeonid Megacles, and Hippocleides. ...

Outis emoi g' onoma.
"My name is Nobody". Odysseus to Polyphemus when asked what his name was. (Homer, Odyssey).

Head of Odysseus from a Greek 2nd century BC marble group representing Odysseus blinding Polyphemus, found at the villa of Tiberius at Sperlonga Odysseus or Ulysses (Greek Odysseus; Latin: Ulixes or, more commonly, Ulysses), pronounced , was the Greek king of Ithaca and the main hero in Homers epic poem... Odysseus and his men blinding the cyclops Polyphemus (detail of a proto-attic amphora, c. ... Homer (Greek: ) is the name given to the supposed unitary author of the early Greek poems the Iliad and the Odyssey. ... Beginning of the Odyssey The Odyssey (Greek Οδύσσεια (Odússeia) ) is one of the two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to the Ionian poet Homer. ...

Ππ

p


Παπαί, Μαρδόνιε, κοίους ἐπ' ἄνδρας ἤγαγες μαχησομένους ἡμέας, οἳ οὐ περὶ χρημάτων τὸν ἀγῶνα ποιεῦνται ἀλλὰ περὶ ἀρετῆς.

Papai, Mardonie, koious ep' andras ēgages machēsomenous hēmeas hoi ou peri chrēmatōn ton agōna poieuntai alla peri aretēs
"Good heavens! Mardonius, what kind of men are these against whom you have brought us to fight? men who do not compete for money, but for honour. — Spontaneous response of Tritantaechmes, a Persian general while Xerxes was interrogating some locals at Thermopylae. Xerxes asked why there were so few Greek fighters at Thermopylae. The answer was "All the others are participating in the Olympic Games". And when asked "what is the prize for the winner?", "An olive-wreath" came the answer.

Πέμπε δέ μιν Λυκίην δέ, πόρεν δ' ὅ γε σήματα λυγρὰ γράψας ἐν πίνακι πτυκτῷ θυμοφθόρα πολλά Mardonius was a Persian commander during the Persian Wars with Greece in the 5th century BC. He was the son of Gobryas and the son-in-law of Darius I of Persia, whose daughter Artozostra he had married. ... Xerxes the Great (Old Persian: 𐎧𐏁𐎹𐎠𐎼𐏁𐎠[2]) was a king of Persia (reigned 485 BC–465 BC) of the Achaemenid dynasty. ... Combatants Greek city-states Achaemenid Persia Commanders Leonidas Xerxes the Great Strength 300 Spartans 700 Thespians[1] 6,000 other Greek allies1 60,000 to 2. ... Ruins of the training grounds at Olympia The Ancient Olympic Games, originally referred to as simply the Olympic Games (Greek: ; Olympiakoi Agones) were a series of athletic competitions held between various city-states of Ancient Greece. ...

pempe de min Lukiēn de, poren d' ho ge sēmata lugra grapsas en pinaki ptuktōi thumophthora polla
"so he sent him to Lycia with lying letters written on a folded tablet, containing much ill against the bearer." Homer, Iliad - This passage shows that Homer actually knew the verb γράφειν (write).

Πίστις, ἐλπίς, ἀγάπη Homer (Greek: ) is the name given to the supposed unitary author of the early Greek poems the Iliad and the Odyssey. ... title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... Writing is the process of inscribing characters on a medium, with the intention of forming words and other larger language constructs. ...

Pistis, elpis, agapē
"Faith, hope, (and) love." (1 Corinthians, 13, 13.)

The First Epistle to the Corinthians is a book of the Bible in the New Testament. ...

Ρρ

r(h)


Ῥοδοδάκτυλος Ἠώς

Rhododaktulos Ēōs
"Rosy-fingered dawn." Occurs frequently in the Homeric poems.

Homer (Greek: ) is the name given to the supposed unitary author of the early Greek poems the Iliad and the Odyssey. ...

Σσ

s


Σπεῦδε βραδέως

Speude bradeōs.
"Hasten slowly" (cf. Latin festina lente), "less haste, more speed".

Σὺν Ἀθηνᾷ καὶ χεῖρα κίνει Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ...

Sun Athena kai cheira kinei.
"With Athena, and move your hands", or "Goddess Athena supports you, but you yourself must act too."

For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... Statue of Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture For the 1934 film, see, see The Goddess (1934 film). ...

Ττ

t


Τὰ πάντα ῥεῖ καὶ οὐδὲν μένει.

Ta panta rhei kai ouden menei.
"Everything flows, nothing stands still." Heraclitus

Τὴν δέ μεγάλην ἤπειρον, ὑφ' ἧς ἡ μεγάλη περιέχεται κύκλῳ θάλαττα, τῶν μὲν ἂλλων ἔλαττον ἀπέχει, τῆς δ' Ὠγυγίας περὶ πεντακισχιλίους σταδίους. Heraclitus of Ephesus (Ancient Greek - Herákleitos ho Ephésios (Herakleitos the Ephesian)) (about 535 - 475 BC), known as The Obscure (Ancient Greek - ho Skoteinós), was a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher, a native of Ephesus on the coast of Asia Minor. ...

Tēn de megalēn ēpeiron huph' hēs hē megalē periechetai kuklō thalatta, tōn men allōn elatton apechei, tēs d' Ōgugias peri pentakischilious stadious.
"The great continent which is surrounded on all sides by the great sea, they say, lies less distant from the others, but about five thousand stadia from Ogygia." Plutarch on the great continent west of the Atlantic Ocean

Τί δύσκολον; Τὸ ἐαυτὸν γνῶναι. Mestrius Plutarchus (Greek: Πλούταρχος; 46 - 127), better known in English as Plutarch, was a Greek historian, biographer, essayist, and Middle Platonist. ...

Ti duskolon? To eautōn gnōnai.
"What is hard? To know yourself." Thales

Τί εὔκολον; Τὸ ἄλλῳ ὑποτίθεσθαι. Thales of Miletos (, ca. ...

Ti eukolon? To allo hupotithestai.
"What is easy? To advise others." Thales

Τί κοινότατον; Ἐλπίς. Καὶ γὰρ οἳς ἄλλο μηδέν, αὔτη παρέστη. Thales of Miletos (, ca. ...

Ti koinotaton? Elpis. Kai gar hois allo mēden, autē parestē.
"What is quite common? Hope. When all is gone, there is still hope." Thales

Τί τάχιστον; Νούς. Διὰ παντὸς γὰρ τρέχει. Thales of Miletos (, ca. ...

Ti tachiston? Nous. Dia pantos gar trechei.
"What is the fastest? Nous (mind). It travels through all media." Thales

Τὸ γὰρ ἡδύ, ἐὰν πολύ, οὐ τι γὲ ἡδύ. The noosphere can be seen as the sphere of human thought being derived from the Greek νους (nous) meaning mind in the style of atmosphere and biosphere. In the original theory of Vernadsky, the noosphere is the third in a succession of phases of development of the Earth, after the geosphere... Thales of Miletos (, ca. ...

To gar hēdu, ean polu, ou ti ge hēdu.
"A sweet thing tasted too often is no longer sweet."

Τὸ δὶς ἐξαμαρτεῖν οὐκ ἀνδρὸς σοφοῦ.

To dis examartein ouk andros sophou.
"To commit the same sin twice is not a sign of a wise man."

Τὸ πεπρωμένον φυγεῖν ἀδύνατον.

To peprōmenon phugein adunaton.
"It's impossible to escape from what is destined."

Υυ

(h)u, (h)y


Ὕστερον πρότερον

Husteron proteron
"The latter one first".

The hysteron proteron (latter before) is a rhetorical device in which the first key word of the idea refers to something that happens temporally later than the second key word. ...

Φφ

ph

Φοβοῦ τοὺς Δαναοὺς καὶ δῶρα φέροντας
Φοβοῦ τοὺς Δαναοὺς καὶ δῶρα φέροντας

Φοβοῦ τοὺς Δαναοὺς καὶ δῶρα φέροντας Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 644 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The seafront at Çanakkale, Turkey, with the ahÅŸap at (wooden horse) from the 2004 film Troy (with myself to give the scale). ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 644 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The seafront at Çanakkale, Turkey, with the ahÅŸap at (wooden horse) from the 2004 film Troy (with myself to give the scale). ...

Phobou tous Danaous kai dōra pherontas.
"Beware of the Danaans (Greeks), even bearing gifts." Well known as a verse from the Aeneid written by Virgil, reading (Quidquid id est) timeo Danaos et dona ferentes.

Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos): is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BCE (between 29 and 19 BCE) that tells the legendary story... Publius Vergilius Maro (October 15, 70 BC – September 21, 19 BC), later called Virgilius, and known in English as Virgil or Vergil, was a classical Roman poet, the author of epics in three modes: the Bucolics [commonly but less correctly called the Eclogues], the Georgics and the substantially completed Aeneid...

Χχ

kh, ch


Χαλεπὰ τὰ καλά

Chalepa ta kala.
"The good/beautiful/fine/honorable things are hard [to attain]." [cf Plato, Republic 4, 435c.]

PLATO was one of the first generalized Computer assisted instruction systems, originally built by the University of Illinois (U of I) and later taken over by Control Data Corporation (CDC), who provided the machines it ran on. ... Plato. ...

Ψψ

ps


Ωω

(h)ō


Ὦ ξεῖν', ἀγγέλλειν Λακεδαιμονίοις ὅτι τῇδε κείμεθα τοῖς κείνων ῥήμασι πειθόμενοι.

Ō xein', angellein Lakedaimoniois hoti tēde keimetha tois keinōn rhēmasi peithomenoi..
"Oh stranger, tell the Spartans that here we lie, obedient to their laws." (Epigram by Simonides at Thermopylae).

Bold textil8jjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjpooSimonides of Ceos (ca. ... Combatants Greek city-states Achaemenid Persia Commanders Leonidas Xerxes the Great Strength 300 Spartans 700 Thespians[1] 6,000 other Greek allies1 60,000 to 2. ...

See also

The Greek language has contributed to the English vocabulary in three ways: directly as an immediate donor, indirectly through other intermediate language(s), as an original donor (mainly through Latin and French), and with modern coinages or new Greek. ... Greek ( IPA: or simply IPA: — Hellenic) has a documented history of 3,500 years, the longest of any single language in the Indo-European language family. ... This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... This page lists direct English translations of common Latin phrases, such as veni vidi vici and et cetera. ...

External links


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